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21 января, 02:09

Weekend Roundup: Inauguration Into The Unknown

This week a whole nation was inaugurated into the unknown. We don’t know what Donald Trump will do once in the White House. But we do know how he got there. Everyone of good faith must hope that the new president will succeed in his promised aim of lifting up the left behind, which the political establishment he ousted could not do. Yet, anyone with the slightest sense of history must also worry how his path to power will define what he does with it. The debasement of the democratic discourse introduced during Trump’s election campaign and since has already inflicted damage that cannot be easily undone. The level of xenophobic demonization of the world outside and enemies within, like his impulsive invective unleashed against even marginal critics, has been unprecedented for any presidential candidate in memory. Perhaps most dangerously, his effort to delegitimize any media, and even denigrate official intelligence agencies, that won’t play along with his fast and loose use of facts or distortion of reality aims to make all information suspect. In this Orwellian universe, truth then becomes only what the self-anointed tribune of the people, speaking on their behalf, declares it is. Fortunately, the Trump electoral mandate fell far short of a majority in a country that has a more diverse and pluralistic civil society than other times and places (such as 20th century Europe) where demagogues have risen to power. Robust cultural resistance will be part and parcel of the Trump years. Whole swaths of the nation, even entire states like California, will stand up and push back. Several polls already show that there is more popular opposition than support for Trump as he enters office. Outside the U.S., concerns abound over what the new president will do next. Angst is probably the greatest south of the border, in Mexico. In grappling with Trump, Sergio Muñoz Bata advises Mexico to look back to its proud history of standing up to the “colossus of the north.” James Zogby predicts that if Trump follows through on his promise to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, it “would ignite a spark that would set the region aflame.” Writing from Australia, Helen Clark says the possibility of an American retreat from Asia and rising tensions in the South China Sea are putting the region on edge. Nick Robins-Early interviews an independent Russian journalist who says Russian media coverage of Trump is so sympathetic, “it’s getting bizarre.” Peter Wittig, German ambassador to the U.S., asserts that we need a robust transatlantic alliance more than ever to counter terrorism, deal with Russia and create growth and jobs.  Within the U.S., Juan Escalante, an undocumented immigrant, lays out his emergency plan in case the Trump administration tries to deport his family. A Pakistani Muslim immigrant whose visa is up for renewal this summer, Mahira Tiwana tells us that despite feeling “other” in Trump’s America, she is not ready to give up on the “American dream” yet. Sina Toossi worries that Iranian-Americans will lose the voice they gained under Obama and that the Iran nuclear deal will be dismantled, worsening U.S. relations with Iran. Richard Eskow addresses Americans who voted for Trump because they felt left behind, saying Trump will let them down and that then, the working class should create a “grand alliance,” as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. advocated. Filmmaker Ethan Coen pens a Dr. Seuss-style poem about Trump, saying, “He’ll change some people used to say / Calm down after Election Day / But Putin and the KKK knew / Trumpet always be that way.” Jon Deutsch suggests the plus side of a Trump presidency could be the disruption of a political system that is long overdue for reform. Ivan Eland argues the U.S. intelligence community ― comprised of 17 huge agencies that don’t communicate effectively ― needs a shake-up, and Trump― who criticized intelligence officials after the release of reports about Russians hacking the election ― may make it happen. Howard Fineman reflects on Obama’s legacy, maintaining that his presidency worked “moderately well in domestic affairs, less well in the world ... is likely to be regarded more as transitional than transformative ... and ... feels oddly more like the end of an era than the beginning of the one he promised.” As Obama and his world order said goodbye, this week also saw China’s President Xi Jinping looking to fill a global power gap. Xi became the first Chinese president to attend the World Economic Forum in Davos, and he gave a speech with strong messages on globalization and climate change. Jane Cai and Frank Tang responded to his presence at the summit, writing, “With choking smog, a weakening currency and a widening wealth gap at home and a fragmented global capitalist system abroad, President Xi Jinping is determined to take advantage of an elite forum to assure the world that China is doing fine and is ready to help pull the world together.” From Beijing, Akshay Shah and Carole Bernard paint another picture, sharing charts they made using new data that show warning signs that China could be headed for a financial crisis. In a WorldPost feature, Danielle Mackey reports from San Salvador that a U.S. program meant to help Central American refugees is leaving most in danger. Saskia Sassen contends global firms and local elites who take land from farmers are partly to blame for skyrocketing violence in Central America. Edward Alden explains why, if Trump wants good jobs and investment, he needs to shape rules for foreign investment competition to avoid a race to the bottom in wage, consumer and environmental standards. From Helsinki, Heikki Hiilamo explores the potential of Finland’s new program testing out basic income for unemployed citizens. “As the world begins to see the impacts of globalized society with the elections of new leaders ― including Mr. Trump ―” he writes, “the answer to the fears of declining economies may just be a basic income system.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how cellular reprogramming boosted the lifespan of mice by 30 percent. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 января, 02:09

Weekend Roundup: Inauguration Into The Unknown

This week a whole nation was inaugurated into the unknown. We don’t know what Donald Trump will do once in the White House. But we do know how he got there. Everyone of good faith must hope that the new president will succeed in his promised aim of lifting up the left behind, which the political establishment he ousted could not do. Yet, anyone with the slightest sense of history must also worry how his path to power will define what he does with it. The debasement of the democratic discourse introduced during Trump’s election campaign and since has already inflicted damage that cannot be easily undone. The level of xenophobic demonization of the world outside and enemies within, like his impulsive invective unleashed against even marginal critics, has been unprecedented for any presidential candidate in memory. Perhaps most dangerously, his effort to delegitimize any media, and even denigrate official intelligence agencies, that won’t play along with his fast and loose use of facts or distortion of reality aims to make all information suspect. In this Orwellian universe, truth then becomes only what the self-anointed tribune of the people, speaking on their behalf, declares it is. Fortunately, the Trump electoral mandate fell far short of a majority in a country that has a more diverse and pluralistic civil society than other times and places (such as 20th century Europe) where demagogues have risen to power. Robust cultural resistance will be part and parcel of the Trump years. Whole swaths of the nation, even entire states like California, will stand up and push back. Several polls already show that there is more popular opposition than support for Trump as he enters office. Outside the U.S., concerns abound over what the new president will do next. Angst is probably the greatest south of the border, in Mexico. In grappling with Trump, Sergio Muñoz Bata advises Mexico to look back to its proud history of standing up to the “colossus of the north.” James Zogby predicts that if Trump follows through on his promise to move the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, it “would ignite a spark that would set the region aflame.” Writing from Australia, Helen Clark says the possibility of an American retreat from Asia and rising tensions in the South China Sea are putting the region on edge. Nick Robins-Early interviews an independent Russian journalist who says Russian media coverage of Trump is so sympathetic, “it’s getting bizarre.” Peter Wittig, German ambassador to the U.S., asserts that we need a robust transatlantic alliance more than ever to counter terrorism, deal with Russia and create growth and jobs.  Within the U.S., Juan Escalante, an undocumented immigrant, lays out his emergency plan in case the Trump administration tries to deport his family. A Pakistani Muslim immigrant whose visa is up for renewal this summer, Mahira Tiwana tells us that despite feeling “other” in Trump’s America, she is not ready to give up on the “American dream” yet. Sina Toossi worries that Iranian-Americans will lose the voice they gained under Obama and that the Iran nuclear deal will be dismantled, worsening U.S. relations with Iran. Richard Eskow addresses Americans who voted for Trump because they felt left behind, saying Trump will let them down and that then, the working class should create a “grand alliance,” as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. advocated. Filmmaker Ethan Coen pens a Dr. Seuss-style poem about Trump, saying, “He’ll change some people used to say / Calm down after Election Day / But Putin and the KKK knew / Trumpet always be that way.” Jon Deutsch suggests the plus side of a Trump presidency could be the disruption of a political system that is long overdue for reform. Ivan Eland argues the U.S. intelligence community ― comprised of 17 huge agencies that don’t communicate effectively ― needs a shake-up, and Trump― who criticized intelligence officials after the release of reports about Russians hacking the election ― may make it happen. Howard Fineman reflects on Obama’s legacy, maintaining that his presidency worked “moderately well in domestic affairs, less well in the world ... is likely to be regarded more as transitional than transformative ... and ... feels oddly more like the end of an era than the beginning of the one he promised.” As Obama and his world order said goodbye, this week also saw China’s President Xi Jinping looking to fill a global power gap. Xi became the first Chinese president to attend the World Economic Forum in Davos, and he gave a speech with strong messages on globalization and climate change. Jane Cai and Frank Tang responded to his presence at the summit, writing, “With choking smog, a weakening currency and a widening wealth gap at home and a fragmented global capitalist system abroad, President Xi Jinping is determined to take advantage of an elite forum to assure the world that China is doing fine and is ready to help pull the world together.” From Beijing, Akshay Shah and Carole Bernard paint another picture, sharing charts they made using new data that show warning signs that China could be headed for a financial crisis. In a WorldPost feature, Danielle Mackey reports from San Salvador that a U.S. program meant to help Central American refugees is leaving most in danger. Saskia Sassen contends global firms and local elites who take land from farmers are partly to blame for skyrocketing violence in Central America. Edward Alden explains why, if Trump wants good jobs and investment, he needs to shape rules for foreign investment competition to avoid a race to the bottom in wage, consumer and environmental standards. From Helsinki, Heikki Hiilamo explores the potential of Finland’s new program testing out basic income for unemployed citizens. “As the world begins to see the impacts of globalized society with the elections of new leaders ― including Mr. Trump ―” he writes, “the answer to the fears of declining economies may just be a basic income system.” Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at how cellular reprogramming boosted the lifespan of mice by 30 percent. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 января, 22:38

["hard Brexit"] Жесткий Брексит и уход с единого рынка - историческое событие, форма "нецивилизованного" развода

В ожидаемом выступлении Тереза Мэй подтвердила решение о "жестком" Брексите, то есть уходе с единого рынка. Жак Сапир считает это проявлением слабости Брюсселя, который оказался не в силах надавить на Лондон. Тереза Мэй представила план осуществления Брексита, то есть "развода" Великобритании с Европейским Союзом. В конечном итоге она выбрала так называемое "жесткое" решение, "hard Brexit", которое подразумевает уход с единого рынка. Развод значит развод Это решение вполне можно понять, если вспомнить, чем стал единый рынок: чудовищно сложное образование со все более жестким регламентом, а также инструмент, который не дает странам Европейского Союза отстаивать собственные интересы. Передача полномочий, которую так расписывают Европейская комиссия и прочие союзные институты (их, как стоит напомнить, никто не выбирал), ведет к утверждению правил за пределами того, что может понадобиться отдельно взятой стране. Единый рынок превращается в каток, который стремится убрать различия между экономиками, хотя те по своей сути не могут быть одинаковыми. Более того, единый рынок лишь еще больше усилил расхождения между экономиками ЕС, что я уже не раз называл "евродивергенцией". С этим еще можно было бы смириться, если бы эти правила вели к формированию последовательной и активной политики для сохранения экономики стран Европейского Союза в условиях международной конкуренции. В то же время стоит отметить, что в этой сфере ЕС на самом деле ведет себя как консервный нож. Европейская комиссия проводит переговоры о различных договоренностях о свободной торговле не с точки зрения государств-членов, а с собственных идеологических позиций о том, что свободная торговля - решение всех наших проблем. Мы уже видели тому пример в случае комплексного торгово-экономического соглашения США и Канады (CETA) и трансатлантической зоны TAFTA. Как бы то ни было, в своих действиях Еврокомиссия и прочие институты руководствуются не только идеологией. Нужно во всеуслышание сказать о том, что ЕС постепенно превратился в инструмент Германии в ущерб всем остальным странам. Все началось с евро, который дал Германии два главных преимущества. Прежде всего, это защита от девальвации валют ее главных европейских конкурентов. Далее, стоимость новой валюты, в которой оперировала Германия, была ниже уровня, на котором она должна была бы находиться по логике вещей. Два этих преимущества во многом объясняют огромное положительное сальдо внешней торговли Германии. Тем не менее это сначала благоприятное, а затем и доминирующее положение Германии проявляется и во внешних переговорах ЕС, который явно в первую очередь заботится именно о ее интересах. Стоит напомнить, что такое доминирующее положение Германии и служащий ее интересам федерализм стали одними из ключевых аргументов в пользу Брексита. Кроме того, становятся понятнее два значимых момента в выступлении Терезы Мэй 17 июля: стремление положить конец верховенству европейского права (оно как раз служит инструментом подобного федерализма) и вернуть контроль над границами. Тереза Мэй, Дональд Трамп и устранение Франции Позиция Терезы Мэй лишь подкрепляется недавними заявления избранного президента США Дональда Трампа. В интервью Times и Bild он не скрывал пессимизма в отношение будущего Европейского Союза. Показателен и тот факт, что ни одну французскую газету на интервью не пригласили. Трамп говорил напрямую с британцами и немцами, потому что на самом деле сегодня имеют значение только они. К сожалению, нужно признать, что Франция окончательно лишилась влияния и осталась на периферии европейских дел. Французской общественности преподносили ЕС как средство приумножения аудитории и влияния страны, однако на самом деле тот лишь подрывает позиции Франции, что можно рассматривать как подготовительный этап к ее развалу. Нельзя не заметить, что при Николя Саркози и Франсуа Олланде Франции становится все труднее заставить прислушаться к себе в международной политике. Важным моментом тут стало подписание Договора о стабильности, координации и управлении, который обговаривался Ангелой Меркель и Николя Саркози, но был ратифицирован уже при Франсуа Олланде. С этой точки зрения наблюдается полная, но катастрофическая преемственность. Так называемая "европейская" политика двух президентов и их партий (республиканцы и социалисты) завела нас в полный тупик. В этой связи следует подвести итоги такого устранения Франции. Проводимая ЕС политика теперь уже совершенно неприемлема с точки зрения демократических принципов. Поэтому нужно посмотреть, что сейчас разыгрывается между Европейским Союзом и Терезой Мэй. То, что она назвала Великобританию и Францию двумя ядерными державами, обеспечивающими с помощью сдерживания мир в Европе (а не просто в Евросоюзе), является для нас стимулом к тому, чтобы вновь взять дела в свои руки. Брексит создал прецедент Процесс Брексита технически стартовал с выступления Терезы Мэй 17 января. Он займет определенное время, однако следует сразу уточнить его ритм. У Терезы Мэй явно есть два весомых козыря. Первый - это девальвация фунта стерлингов. Сейчас много говорят об "обвале" курса, но на самом деле, если рассмотреть ситуацию за последние десять лет, он лишь возвращается к "нормальному" уровню по отношению к конкурентоспособности страны. Кроме того, эта девальвация объясняет пересмотр в сторону повышения прогнозов роста на 2017 год. По всей видимости, мы очень и очень далеко от катастрофы, которую сулили все противники Брексита и обожатели Европы. МВФ увеличил сниженный осенью 2015 года прогноз с 1,1% до 1,5%. Это подтверждает, что Брексит играет на руку Великобритании. Есть у Терезы Мэй и другой козырь. Она может пригрозить ЕС превращением Великобритании в налоговую гавань. В таком случае сильнее всего пострадали бы две страны: Ирландия и Люксембург, родина Жана-Клода Юнкера (Jean-Claude Juncker). Таким образом, существуют все основания полагать, что она доведет дело до конца, и что развод Великобритании и ЕС не затянется. Важный момент здесь в том, что все это создает прецедент. До недавнего времени возможность выхода страны из Евросоюза была чисто формальной. Разумеется, теоретически она существовала с учетом статьи 50 Лиссабонского договора. Но политические условия ее реализации оставались крайне туманными. Именно поэтому речь Терезы Мэй так важна. Демонстрация реализации этой стратегии и контроля над ней позволяет Терезе Мэй показать слабость и бессилие ЕС. Тот же теперь представляется не просто губительным и опасным для стран-членов (за исключением Германии), но и неспособным предотвратить выход из него. Одной из главных целей ЕС было показать, как дорого может обойтись развод. Как бы то ни было, он не смог поднять ставки и оттолкнуть от выхода одно из крупнейших государств. Тем самым Евросоюз расписался в своем самом главном и, быть может, окончательном провале.(http://inosmi.ru/politic/...)

18 января, 22:38

["hard Brexit"] Жесткий Брексит и уход с единого рынка - историческое событие, форма "нецивилизованного" развода

В ожидаемом выступлении Тереза Мэй подтвердила решение о "жестком" Брексите, то есть уходе с единого рынка. Жак Сапир считает это проявлением слабости Брюсселя, который оказался не в силах надавить на Лондон. Тереза Мэй представила план осуществления Брексита, то есть "развода" Великобритании с Европейским Союзом. В конечном итоге она выбрала так называемое "жесткое" решение, "hard Brexit", которое подразумевает уход с единого рынка. Развод значит развод Это решение вполне можно понять, если вспомнить, чем стал единый рынок: чудовищно сложное образование со все более жестким регламентом, а также инструмент, который не дает странам Европейского Союза отстаивать собственные интересы. Передача полномочий, которую так расписывают Европейская комиссия и прочие союзные институты (их, как стоит напомнить, никто не выбирал), ведет к утверждению правил за пределами того, что может понадобиться отдельно взятой стране. Единый рынок превращается в каток, который стремится убрать различия между экономиками, хотя те по своей сути не могут быть одинаковыми. Более того, единый рынок лишь еще больше усилил расхождения между экономиками ЕС, что я уже не раз называл "евродивергенцией". С этим еще можно было бы смириться, если бы эти правила вели к формированию последовательной и активной политики для сохранения экономики стран Европейского Союза в условиях международной конкуренции. В то же время стоит отметить, что в этой сфере ЕС на самом деле ведет себя как консервный нож. Европейская комиссия проводит переговоры о различных договоренностях о свободной торговле не с точки зрения государств-членов, а с собственных идеологических позиций о том, что свободная торговля - решение всех наших проблем. Мы уже видели тому пример в случае комплексного торгово-экономического соглашения США и Канады (CETA) и трансатлантической зоны TAFTA. Как бы то ни было, в своих действиях Еврокомиссия и прочие институты руководствуются не только идеологией. Нужно во всеуслышание сказать о том, что ЕС постепенно превратился в инструмент Германии в ущерб всем остальным странам. Все началось с евро, который дал Германии два главных преимущества. Прежде всего, это защита от девальвации валют ее главных европейских конкурентов. Далее, стоимость новой валюты, в которой оперировала Германия, была ниже уровня, на котором она должна была бы находиться по логике вещей. Два этих преимущества во многом объясняют огромное положительное сальдо внешней торговли Германии. Тем не менее это сначала благоприятное, а затем и доминирующее положение Германии проявляется и во внешних переговорах ЕС, который явно в первую очередь заботится именно о ее интересах. Стоит напомнить, что такое доминирующее положение Германии и служащий ее интересам федерализм стали одними из ключевых аргументов в пользу Брексита. Кроме того, становятся понятнее два значимых момента в выступлении Терезы Мэй 17 июля: стремление положить конец верховенству европейского права (оно как раз служит инструментом подобного федерализма) и вернуть контроль над границами. Тереза Мэй, Дональд Трамп и устранение Франции Позиция Терезы Мэй лишь подкрепляется недавними заявления избранного президента США Дональда Трампа. В интервью Times и Bild он не скрывал пессимизма в отношение будущего Европейского Союза. Показателен и тот факт, что ни одну французскую газету на интервью не пригласили. Трамп говорил напрямую с британцами и немцами, потому что на самом деле сегодня имеют значение только они. К сожалению, нужно признать, что Франция окончательно лишилась влияния и осталась на периферии европейских дел. Французской общественности преподносили ЕС как средство приумножения аудитории и влияния страны, однако на самом деле тот лишь подрывает позиции Франции, что можно рассматривать как подготовительный этап к ее развалу. Нельзя не заметить, что при Николя Саркози и Франсуа Олланде Франции становится все труднее заставить прислушаться к себе в международной политике. Важным моментом тут стало подписание Договора о стабильности, координации и управлении, который обговаривался Ангелой Меркель и Николя Саркози, но был ратифицирован уже при Франсуа Олланде. С этой точки зрения наблюдается полная, но катастрофическая преемственность. Так называемая "европейская" политика двух президентов и их партий (республиканцы и социалисты) завела нас в полный тупик. В этой связи следует подвести итоги такого устранения Франции. Проводимая ЕС политика теперь уже совершенно неприемлема с точки зрения демократических принципов. Поэтому нужно посмотреть, что сейчас разыгрывается между Европейским Союзом и Терезой Мэй. То, что она назвала Великобританию и Францию двумя ядерными державами, обеспечивающими с помощью сдерживания мир в Европе (а не просто в Евросоюзе), является для нас стимулом к тому, чтобы вновь взять дела в свои руки. Брексит создал прецедент Процесс Брексита технически стартовал с выступления Терезы Мэй 17 января. Он займет определенное время, однако следует сразу уточнить его ритм. У Терезы Мэй явно есть два весомых козыря. Первый - это девальвация фунта стерлингов. Сейчас много говорят об "обвале" курса, но на самом деле, если рассмотреть ситуацию за последние десять лет, он лишь возвращается к "нормальному" уровню по отношению к конкурентоспособности страны. Кроме того, эта девальвация объясняет пересмотр в сторону повышения прогнозов роста на 2017 год. По всей видимости, мы очень и очень далеко от катастрофы, которую сулили все противники Брексита и обожатели Европы. МВФ увеличил сниженный осенью 2015 года прогноз с 1,1% до 1,5%. Это подтверждает, что Брексит играет на руку Великобритании. Есть у Терезы Мэй и другой козырь. Она может пригрозить ЕС превращением Великобритании в налоговую гавань. В таком случае сильнее всего пострадали бы две страны: Ирландия и Люксембург, родина Жана-Клода Юнкера (Jean-Claude Juncker). Таким образом, существуют все основания полагать, что она доведет дело до конца, и что развод Великобритании и ЕС не затянется. Важный момент здесь в том, что все это создает прецедент. До недавнего времени возможность выхода страны из Евросоюза была чисто формальной. Разумеется, теоретически она существовала с учетом статьи 50 Лиссабонского договора. Но политические условия ее реализации оставались крайне туманными. Именно поэтому речь Терезы Мэй так важна. Демонстрация реализации этой стратегии и контроля над ней позволяет Терезе Мэй показать слабость и бессилие ЕС. Тот же теперь представляется не просто губительным и опасным для стран-членов (за исключением Германии), но и неспособным предотвратить выход из него. Одной из главных целей ЕС было показать, как дорого может обойтись развод. Как бы то ни было, он не смог поднять ставки и оттолкнуть от выхода одно из крупнейших государств. Тем самым Евросоюз расписался в своем самом главном и, быть может, окончательном провале.(http://inosmi.ru/politic/...)

17 января, 12:58

Когда состоятся президентские выборы во Франции?

​Президентские выборы во Франции 2017 года будут проводиться в два тура.

17 января, 11:26

Может ли Мари Ле Пен выиграть выборы во Франции?

Здравый смысл подсказывает, что в президентской гонке во Франции лидер партии "Национальный фронт" Марин Ле Пен пройдет во второй тур, а затем с треском проиграет своему противнику, кем бы он ни был.

17 января, 11:26

Может ли Марин Ле Пен выиграть выборы во Франции?

Здравый смысл подсказывает, что в президентской гонке во Франции лидер партии "Национальный фронт" Марин Ле Пен пройдет во второй тур, а затем с треском проиграет своему противнику, кем бы он ни был.

16 января, 12:00

Can Marine Le Pen Pull Off French Election Stunner? Germany Loses No Matter Who Wins

Submitted by Mike Shedlock via MishTalk.com, Conventional wisdom suggests National Front candidate Marine le Pen will make it to the second round in French elections, then lose in a landslide to whoever her opponent happens to be. I believe le Pen’s odds of winning it outright are far better than most think. Current Polls Chart from Wikipedia, with image clips added. Top Five candidates Marine le Pen: National Front – Eurosceptic, Anti-Immigration – 25% François Fillon: Republicans – Center Right – 24% Emmanuel Macron: En Marche! – Socialist – 17% Manuel Valls: Socialist – 11% Jean-Luc Mélenchon: Left Front – Socialist – 13% In France, the winners of each party square off in around one of national elections. If no one gets 50% of the vote, the top two square off in round two. With about 25% or so solid votes, le Pen is likely to make it to the second round. The others battle to see who comes up against le Pen. Eurointelligence Reports January 13: Yesterday night the seven candidates for the left primaries had their first debate. It was sometimes painful to watch and it is not clear how much the audience took home from the long catalogue of measures the candidates were quizzed about. All tried to differentiate themselves from François Hollande, and lashed out against the common enemy François Fillon. All were eager to show how presidential they are and how well they represent the real socialist heart. Though it did not look like they succeeded. One blogger wrote that there was one irreconcilable division, that is between the candidates and their audience.   François Fillon, meanwhile, has his own rebellion to deal with. Laurent Wauquiez, Christian Estrosi, and other ex-Sarkozists, insist on making their own mark and call for changes to Fillon’s programme. When Fillon made his big appearance in Nice, Estrosi told everyone in front of the presidential candidate that he is not a “Filloniste”. Laurent Wauquiez, who was fired by Fillon, is leading this mini-revolt. He recently called for a de-taxation of supplementary working hours, one of Sarkozy’s key measures, which is absolutely not in the Fillon’s programme, writes Marianne. Brice Hortefeux, another Sarkozy ally, said they want to enrich the programme. Fillon, however, remains firm and will not give in to those demands. His campaign chief dismissed those efforts as coming from bad losers or small players. The risk is that he may alienate the Sarkozy wing, though.   January 12: For Macron, no politics goes without narrative and no narrative without ideal. So, what is his ideal? Some friends call him a real libertarian, others a real democrat, who has yet to find a socially empathetic narrative. In 2015 he outlined his three dreams – equality, Europe and industry. When it comes to Europe, he may well compare with Jacques Delors, who like him was not loved by the Socialist party and made his way. But this comparison only holds on Europe. Macron’s economic ideal is inspired by new-Keynesian thinking, and the idea that social improvement is achieved by eliminating unjust rents that keep up barriers in society.   January 11: Emmanuel Macron is the most pro-European among the presidential candidates, though will he really be ready to confront the Germans and change the course of the eurozone? We have our doubts, but he is the only candidate with at least an explicit eurozone agenda. In his speech at Humboldt University in Berlin yesterday he promised that, if elected, he would propose a common eurozone budget for investment and financial assistance in case of shocks. At the EU council in December 2017 he would propose democratic conventions in all EU countries for 6-10 months.   We note that his Berlin speech did not make headlines in the French press. They were more interested in comparing Macron with the Socialist candidates or to François Fillon, or in the question whether Macron exaggerated his arguments. There is a clear national bias in reporting, as we have observed so many times in the past.   The Front National took the chance to pick up on the point that Macron gave his speech in English rather than French. Pauvre France, tweeted Marine Le Pen. Florian Philippot writes it only shows Macron’s disrespect for the French language, and that he does not believe in France.   The latest Ifop poll for Paris Match shows Marine Le Pen (26%) advancing to the pole position for the first round, overtaking Francois Fillon (24%). Macron comes third (17%), far ahead of the Manuel Valls (10.5%). Le Pen is still expected to lose in the second round against Fillon (64% to 36%) or Macron (65% to 35%). We agree with François Heisbourg, who tweeted that this is a wildly unpredictable election. Wildly Unpredictable I agree with Eurointelligence this is a wildly unpredictable election. Already we have seen “wild” results with former president Nicolas Sarkozy unexpectedly getting clobbered in the first round of the primary by Francois Fillon. Germany a Loser No Matter Who Wins? Le Pen: Eurosceptic – Seeks better relations with Russia Macron: Pro Europe but seeks a common eurozone budget for investment and financial assistance in case of shocks. Mélenchon: A socialist who will not be in favor of reforms France desperately needs Valls: After the 2016 Nice attack, he was booed for saying that “France will have to live with terrorism.” Fillon: Fillon aims to reduce the public sector and cut 500,000 civil-service jobs.  He wants the state healthcare program (securité sociale) to work better with fewer payments. Fillon is in favor of increasing the retirement age to 65. He seeks better relations with Russia. Of the five, Germany could work best with Fillon. But his pro-Russia stance poses at least a minor problem. Fillon vs. Le Pen Can Le Pen Win? I think the current odds are wildly off, just as there were in the US with Trump. Le Pen is eurosceptic, but she will not seek to gut civil-service. Her message that France throws money at the EU will resonate with some. She regularly denounces France’s bandwagoning towards the USA. Her anti-immigration message will appeal to anyone who blames immigration for loss of jobs. Since Bottoming in November, Le Pen has steadily picked up voter approval vs. Fillon. What happened? Fillon had to disclose more and more of his policies in his  primary vs. Sarkozy. Many of Le Pen’s ideas are socialistic at heart. The socialists will not want an increased work week, hundreds of thousands of civil service jobs cut, etc. In round one of the French presidential election there will be lots of mud thrown, some of it at le Pen, but most of it will go to Macron, Mélenchon, Valls, and Fillon, all wanting the second spot. It is by no means certain le Pen makes it to the second round, but that outcome is highly likely. And if le Pen comes out better than expected, especially if there is a big mud-fight among the others, her chances in round 2 are far better than most believe.

15 января, 21:01

Битва за Африку: за что Запад убил Каддафи?

Сенсационное интервью дал на днях двоюродный брат погибшего ливийского лидера Муаммара Каддафи. Кузен главы Джамахирии откровенно рассказал о планах своего убитого родственника и о том, почему Запад не мог допустить их воплощения в жизнь и пошёл даже на военную интервенцию, только чтобы сорвать замыслы одного из величайших африканских мечтателей. Ведь если бы Каддафи реализовал то, что запланировал, все процветание Запада прямо у нас на глазах могло начать превращаться в пшик.Мировая кладовая ресурсов могла выйти из-под контроля ЗападаНа фоне многих других африканских и ближневосточных автократов ливийский лидер Муаммар Каддафи мог смело считаться весьма умеренным и цивилизованными светским лидером. Сравнивать же его с теми, кто пришел ему на смену, всё равно что сравнивать профессора Оксфорда с бродяжничающим уголовником-наркоманом. Тем не менее Запад ради того, чтобы сбросить его, пошёл на противоречащую международному праву военную интервенцию, даже несмотря на то, что она вполне ожидаемо привела к чудовищному беспределу в Северной Африке и штурму границ Европы толпами мигрантов. Американцев эти последствия не так трогают (если не считать убийства их дипломатов в Бенгази), но европейцы ведь тоже влезли в эту авантюру. Зачем?Их мотивы и раскрыл на днях двоюродный брат Муаммара Каддафи Ахмед Каддафи ад-Дам:ЦитатаЗапад видел, как Каддафи руководил борьбой за освобождение всего африканского континента и изгнание из Африки колониальных стран. Он хотел добиться единства африканских стран, превратить континент в Соединённые Штаты Африки.Ахмед Каддафи ад-ДамПо словам родственника погибшего ливийского лидера, западные элиты беспокоила, в частности, инициатива Каддафи по созданию единой африканской валюты. Идеи Каддафи сначала по созданию, а затем по развитию Африканского союза заставили политиков и бизнесменов из Европы и Америки смотреть на главу Джамахирии, как на угрозу.Но чего же они боялись? В последнее время Каддафи ничем не угрожал Европе, а, напротив, сдерживал потоки рвущихся в неё мигрантов, хотя и требовал у европейцев денег на укрепление охраны границы. Так почему же европейцев или американцев должно волновать то, что происходит "за тридевять земель", на другом континенте?Дело в том, что в Африке, как и в некоторых других регионах "третьего мира", куётся финансовое благополучие "золотого миллиарда", западной цивилизации.ЦитатаОсвобождение, объединение и просвещение африканцев чревато тем, что они могут начать спрашивать по полной с западных корпораций, вывозящих за границу за бесценок их национальные богатства.Африка занимает первое место в мире по запасам золота, алмазов, платины, марганца, бокситов, хрома, ванадия, кобальта; второе - урана, меди, бериллия, сурьмы. Есть тут и огромные месторождения ртути, железа, титана, никеля, олова, вольфрама.В Конго находится 80% мировых залежей танталита, необходимого при производстве мобильных телефонов. До сих пор реально не оценены африканские залежи нефти и газа. Эксперты не исключают наличия у Южного Судана неразведанных запасов "черного золота", сопоставимых с теми, которыми располагает Саудовская Аравия.Кроме того, Африка является крупным поставщиком на рынки западных стран аграрной продукции по бросовым ценам.В своё время европейцы брали на Черном континенте все, что считали нужным без спросу. Африка почти полностью находилась в колониальном владении Великобритании, Франции, Германии, Бельгии, Португалии, Испании.Однако когда после завершения Второй мировой войны, во многом под советским влиянием, жители Чёрного континента заявили о своих правах и завоевали себе свободу, действовать пришлось тоньше. Вчерашние хозяева колоний превратились в военно-политических партнёров и инвесторов. Но суть осталась та же - беззастенчивый грабёж. А чтобы местные вдруг не надумали мешать белым господам их грабить, западные правительства и корпорации провоцируют в Африке гражданские и межгосударственные войны, кровавые перевороты.ЦитатаОдна только гражданская война в Конго унесла до 10 миллионов жизней, став самым кровопролитным конфликтом на планете после окончания Второй мировой войны. Пока местные жители воюют, оттуда вовсю нелегально вывозят танталит на Cobatt (США), H.C. Starck (Германия), Ningxia (Китай).Войны регулярно вспыхивают и в недавно созданном Южном Судане. Западным странам просто очень важно не дать Китаю провести нефтепровод к Индийскому океану. Пока жители Конго погибали от вражеских пуль и мачете и умирали от голода, диктатор страны Мобуту Сесе Секо, правивший при поддержке европейцев (в частности, французов и бельгийцев), аккумулировал на счетах в швейцарском банке около 5 миллиардов долларов.Монополию Запада в Африке пытаются нарушить Китай и ИндияФранцузские НКО также вовсю лоббируют интересы Парижа в бывших колониях. Там, где они работают, активно совершаются государственные перевороты.Когда же и это не помогает, в ход идут войска. Соглашения Франции c марионеточными режимами в сфере обороны позволили контролировать войска якобы суверенных стран и создавать французские военные базы в Кот-д’Ивуаре, Габоне, Чаде, Сенегале.После очередного применения военной силы французами в Африке группа политических деятелей Камеруна распространила в Интернете следующее заявление:Согласно воззванию политиков Кот-д’Ивуара:Цитата"В Кот-д’Ивуаре начинается новая колониальная война. В стране разыгрывается трагедия, задуманная Николя Саркози и так называемым мировым сообществом. Это настоящее уголовное преступление, осуществление давно задуманного плана новой колонизации Африки. Им опять нужны наша ценная древесина, наш кофе, наше какао, наш уран, наша нефть"Из примерно 17 тысяч французских военных, размещённых за границами Франции, почти 10 тысяч стоят в Африке.Партнёром и одновременно конкурентом Франции в Африке являются США. В 2008 году было создано отдельное Африканское командования американской армии. Французские и американские нефтяные компании соперничают за участки работы в Габоне, Конго и Анголе.Однако в последнее время американцам и французам на Чёрном континенте начало становиться тесновато. Своё присутствие в Африке усиливают прозорловые и активные китайцы: они дают африканцам огромные кредиты на выгодных условиях, которые потом тратятся на китайские же товары, инвестируют, создавая рабочие места для своих же соотечественников, выделяют огромные гранты на обучение африканской молодежи - как дома, так и на территории КНР.Конкуренцию же и Китаю, и западным странам одновременно составляет Индия. Политика Нью-Дели не так агрессивна и поэтому не столь сильно бросается в глаза, но это не делает её менее эффективной.По данным экспертов, Африка во многом с подачи внешних сил пережила только за последние полстолетия около двадцати гражданских войн - более 100 государственных переворотов, более десяти случаев геноцида и эпизодов массового террора. Ради того, чтобы кто-то в Европе утром хрустел круассаном и любовался на гладко подстриженный газон перед купленным в кредит домом, на Чёрном континенте убивают миллионы людей."Бремя белого человека" на Чёрном континентеВ своё время Африка существенно опережала по своему цивилизационному развитию варварскую Европу. Даже в Средние века там существовали огромные процветающие государства, с городами, которые по численности населения превосходили большую часть европейских столиц. Однако кровожадность европейских и ближневосточных завоевателей вкупе с активным поощрением работорговли сделали своё чёрное дело. Некогда могущественные государства стали бесправными колониями (а затем - неоколониями), критично отставшие в вопросах науки и техники от своей метрополии.Попытки африканцев сбросить гнёт и развиваться своими силами обычно заканчивались плачевно. Так, за попытку избавить Конго от неоколониальной зависимости по инициативе британских спецслужб был убит, расчленён и растворен в кислоте Патрис Лумумба.Однако по мере роста влияния Ливии в мире, росли и шансы на освобождение Африки. Каддафи был мощным лидером, а Ливия - богатой страной, способной позволить себе крупные проекты.ЦитатаРеализация идеи единого Африканского союза с единой валютой и во главе со светской Ливией могла привести к тому, что европейцам и американцам пришлось бы платить справедливую цену за всё то, что они вывозят из Африки, а это моментально сказалось бы на качестве жизни на Западе.На такое они пойти не могли. Каддафи был жестоко убит, а Африка отброшена в политическом плане на десятилетия назад.Западные лидеры не прочь превратить в Чёрный континент и Россию со всем постсоветским пространством, однако сделать это им не по зубам. Россияне же кровно заинтересованы в том, чтобы распределение благ в мире было максимально справедливым и по ценам, соответствующим реальности. Отсутствие возможности паразитировать на ком-то или на чем-то станет для Запада настоящей катастрофой.З.Ы. ТС'а: Кто ещё будет писать про то, что в западных странах нихрена нет ресурсов, а они вон как живут? Вот отсюда они и берутся, эти ресурсы.grosgros[link]

14 января, 20:37

Фийон утвержден кандидатом в президенты Франции

Официальным кандидатом партии «Республиканцы» на президентских выборах Франции стал бывший глава правительства страны Франсуа Фийон.

14 января, 19:42

​Франсуа Фийон стал официальным кандидатом на пост президента Франции

Экс-премьер Франции Франсуа Фийон в субботу был выбран официальным кандидатом на пост президента страны от партии «Республиканцы», передает агентство «RFI».

14 января, 01:04

Weekend Roundup: Davos Elites Look To China’s Global Role As America Steps Back

A new rift in world affairs appears to be opening up: a division between pro-globalization Asia, with China in the lead, and the transatlantic nations that have turned against globalization. “President Xi’s appearance at the World Economic Forum in Davos next week,” I write in a blog post this week, “comes at both an auspicious and inauspicious moment. It is an auspicious moment because President-elect Donald Trump has all but announced America’s withdrawal from the world it has largely made over recent decades — and from which Asia has most benefited.” Since Europe has become inwardly absorbed with anxieties over terror attacks, immigration and failed integration, I continue, “that leaves China as the one major power with a global outlook. Ready or not, China has become the de facto world leader seeking to maintain an open global economy and battle climate change. In effect, President Xi has become the ‘core leader’ of globalization.” “The inauspicious aspect is the reverse,” I go on to say. “The general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party is speaking to the converted from the pulpit in the foremost church of the global elite that gathers annually in Davos. Aligning with the global business elites in such a high profile manner places China even more squarely in the negative sights of the populist wave sweeping the Western democracies. It affirms in their minds that China is the main enemy of the working and middle class in the West.” China’s increasing show of force in the South China Sea this week in response to what it sees as provocations by the incoming U.S. administration also does it little favor in Western eyes.  Alexis Crow makes the counter-case that globalization continues to be beneficial to the West, saying trade is closely correlated with economic growth. “Increased wages in Southeast Asia boost demand for goods from new economy sectors in the West,” she writes. She also notes, as a case in point, how Chinese investment is creating thousands of jobs in Ohio. Writing from Vladivostok, Artyom Lukin wonders how heightening conflict with China, as Trump tilts toward a closer embrace of Moscow, will play out. “Given Trump’s obvious hostility to China and his friendliness to Russia,” he writes, “Moscow may move into the apex spot of the triangle, having better relations with Beijing and Washington than they have with each other.” As Lukin sees it, Russian President Vladimir Putin may well seek to, “position himself as a sort of mediator between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping.” Based on his experiences with Putin, Alexey Kovalev offers some advice as a Russian journalist to his American colleagues who this week faced their first press conference with Donald Trump. “Facts don’t matter. You can’t hurt this man with facts or reason. He’ll always outmaneuver you. He’ll always wriggle out of whatever carefully crafted verbal trap you lay for him. Whatever he says, you won’t be able to challenge him.” He welcomes his American colleagues to “the era of bullshit.” Fearing this is only the beginning of what’s to come in the battle between Trump and the press, Howard Fineman writes, “It’s not a video game. It’s Washington in the Trump era, and we’ve just seen an unsettling preview.” Many Africans are also wondering how a Trump presidency that is hostile to China will unfold for them. As Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden report, while America’s role in the world is growing uncertain, China is becoming more predictably favorable. As the year opened, China outlawed its domestic ivory trade and Foreign Minister Wang Yi is making a visit to Africa his first overseas trip of the year. China has also committed $60 billion in financing for African projects. Writing from Singapore, Parag Khanna takes another tack entirely, suggesting that an America caught up in the turmoil of a populist backlash might learn a thing or two not only from other successful states like Germany, but from China as well. America, Khanna observes, “is caught in a hapless cycle of flip-flopping parties and policies while overall national welfare stagnates. Populism has prevailed over pragmatism.” He further remarks that, even in the West, there is grudging admiration for, “China’s ability to get things done without perpetual factionalism holding up national priorities, such as infrastructure.” The populist drift in both the U.S. and Europe deeply concerns the Human Rights Watch organization, Nick Visser reports. “They scapegoat refugees, immigrant communities, and minorities. Truth is a frequent casualty,” he cites the watchdog’s director, Kenneth Roth, as saying. Nick Robins-Early looks at the trend of populism in Europe, noting that this year will be a test for the far-right, specifically in France, Germany and The Netherlands. Writing from New Delhi, Swati Chaturvedi fears the consequences of the anti-Muslim and anti-woman hate speech that seems part and parcel of a Hindu brand of populism taking hold in India today. “Trolls,” she says, “are the goons of the online world. ... lies and violent words can have deadly consequences in the real world.”  In an interview, former Iranian President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr sees opportunity for the regime in a Trump presidency where others see only trouble. “Khamenei’s supporters believe not only that Trump will maintain the Vienna nuclear agreement,” he says, “but also that his policies in Syria and the Middle East will maintain the interests of the regime.” Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, also has a positive spin on the negativity surrounding President-elect Trump. He thinks Americans are more than capable of rising to disruptive challenges of new technologies behind so much political anxiety today. Wheeler argues that the slogan “‘Make America Great Again’ became a surrogate for ‘Make me secure again amidst all this change.’ Great swaths of the electorate sought stability in a world where everything seemed to be changing.” Wheeler reminds his fellow Americans that they’ve been here before: “Like today,” he says, “the technology revolution of the 19th century produced a longing for stability. But instead of retreating, Americans pushed forward to build a new security around new concepts. Universal education, employee rights, governmental offsets to abusive market power and other initiatives targeted the new problems. The result was the good old days many now long for.” Writing from Geneva, Richard Baldwin sees a double blow to the labor market – in both rich and poor countries ― of both offshoring and robots. “Rapid advances in computing power and communication technology,” he contends, “will make it economical for many more people to work remotely across borders.” As medical costs rise in the rich countries, for example, Baldwin expects to see more and more “telesurgery” where the patient and doctor are divided by hundreds of miles. In this world so afflicted by hatred and violence, Turkish novelist Kaya Genc also sees a way to unite amidst division, finding beauty and peace in the quotidian event of a winter snowfall. “Snow saved Istanbul,” he writes this week from his beloved hometown on the shores of the Bosphorous. “As flakes fell from the sky, the city was relieved of its status as the new destination of international terror. … There was a hint of something chilling in the air, and I felt relieved that it was not man-made.”  Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at a new breakthrough: a nanoscale archive of 1,000 languages that you can now wear around your neck.  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

14 января, 01:04

Weekend Roundup: Davos Elites Look To China’s Global Role As America Steps Back

A new rift in world affairs appears to be opening up: a division between pro-globalization Asia, with China in the lead, and the transatlantic nations that have turned against globalization. “President Xi’s appearance at the World Economic Forum in Davos next week,” I write in a blog post this week, “comes at both an auspicious and inauspicious moment. It is an auspicious moment because President-elect Donald Trump has all but announced America’s withdrawal from the world it has largely made over recent decades — and from which Asia has most benefited.” Since Europe has become inwardly absorbed with anxieties over terror attacks, immigration and failed integration, I continue, “that leaves China as the one major power with a global outlook. Ready or not, China has become the de facto world leader seeking to maintain an open global economy and battle climate change. In effect, President Xi has become the ‘core leader’ of globalization.” “The inauspicious aspect is the reverse,” I go on to say. “The general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party is speaking to the converted from the pulpit in the foremost church of the global elite that gathers annually in Davos. Aligning with the global business elites in such a high profile manner places China even more squarely in the negative sights of the populist wave sweeping the Western democracies. It affirms in their minds that China is the main enemy of the working and middle class in the West.” China’s increasing show of force in the South China Sea this week in response to what it sees as provocations by the incoming U.S. administration also does it little favor in Western eyes.  Alexis Crow makes the counter-case that globalization continues to be beneficial to the West, saying trade is closely correlated with economic growth. “Increased wages in Southeast Asia boost demand for goods from new economy sectors in the West,” she writes. She also notes, as a case in point, how Chinese investment is creating thousands of jobs in Ohio. Writing from Vladivostok, Artyom Lukin wonders how heightening conflict with China, as Trump tilts toward a closer embrace of Moscow, will play out. “Given Trump’s obvious hostility to China and his friendliness to Russia,” he writes, “Moscow may move into the apex spot of the triangle, having better relations with Beijing and Washington than they have with each other.” As Lukin sees it, Russian President Vladimir Putin may well seek to, “position himself as a sort of mediator between Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping.” Based on his experiences with Putin, Alexey Kovalev offers some advice as a Russian journalist to his American colleagues who this week faced their first press conference with Donald Trump. “Facts don’t matter. You can’t hurt this man with facts or reason. He’ll always outmaneuver you. He’ll always wriggle out of whatever carefully crafted verbal trap you lay for him. Whatever he says, you won’t be able to challenge him.” He welcomes his American colleagues to “the era of bullshit.” Fearing this is only the beginning of what’s to come in the battle between Trump and the press, Howard Fineman writes, “It’s not a video game. It’s Washington in the Trump era, and we’ve just seen an unsettling preview.” Many Africans are also wondering how a Trump presidency that is hostile to China will unfold for them. As Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden report, while America’s role in the world is growing uncertain, China is becoming more predictably favorable. As the year opened, China outlawed its domestic ivory trade and Foreign Minister Wang Yi is making a visit to Africa his first overseas trip of the year. China has also committed $60 billion in financing for African projects. Writing from Singapore, Parag Khanna takes another tack entirely, suggesting that an America caught up in the turmoil of a populist backlash might learn a thing or two not only from other successful states like Germany, but from China as well. America, Khanna observes, “is caught in a hapless cycle of flip-flopping parties and policies while overall national welfare stagnates. Populism has prevailed over pragmatism.” He further remarks that, even in the West, there is grudging admiration for, “China’s ability to get things done without perpetual factionalism holding up national priorities, such as infrastructure.” The populist drift in both the U.S. and Europe deeply concerns the Human Rights Watch organization, Nick Visser reports. “They scapegoat refugees, immigrant communities, and minorities. Truth is a frequent casualty,” he cites the watchdog’s director, Kenneth Roth, as saying. Nick Robins-Early looks at the trend of populism in Europe, noting that this year will be a test for the far-right, specifically in France, Germany and The Netherlands. Writing from New Delhi, Swati Chaturvedi fears the consequences of the anti-Muslim and anti-woman hate speech that seems part and parcel of a Hindu brand of populism taking hold in India today. “Trolls,” she says, “are the goons of the online world. ... lies and violent words can have deadly consequences in the real world.”  In an interview, former Iranian President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr sees opportunity for the regime in a Trump presidency where others see only trouble. “Khamenei’s supporters believe not only that Trump will maintain the Vienna nuclear agreement,” he says, “but also that his policies in Syria and the Middle East will maintain the interests of the regime.” Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, also has a positive spin on the negativity surrounding President-elect Trump. He thinks Americans are more than capable of rising to disruptive challenges of new technologies behind so much political anxiety today. Wheeler argues that the slogan “‘Make America Great Again’ became a surrogate for ‘Make me secure again amidst all this change.’ Great swaths of the electorate sought stability in a world where everything seemed to be changing.” Wheeler reminds his fellow Americans that they’ve been here before: “Like today,” he says, “the technology revolution of the 19th century produced a longing for stability. But instead of retreating, Americans pushed forward to build a new security around new concepts. Universal education, employee rights, governmental offsets to abusive market power and other initiatives targeted the new problems. The result was the good old days many now long for.” Writing from Geneva, Richard Baldwin sees a double blow to the labor market – in both rich and poor countries ― of both offshoring and robots. “Rapid advances in computing power and communication technology,” he contends, “will make it economical for many more people to work remotely across borders.” As medical costs rise in the rich countries, for example, Baldwin expects to see more and more “telesurgery” where the patient and doctor are divided by hundreds of miles. In this world so afflicted by hatred and violence, Turkish novelist Kaya Genc also sees a way to unite amidst division, finding beauty and peace in the quotidian event of a winter snowfall. “Snow saved Istanbul,” he writes this week from his beloved hometown on the shores of the Bosphorous. “As flakes fell from the sky, the city was relieved of its status as the new destination of international terror. … There was a hint of something chilling in the air, and I felt relieved that it was not man-made.”  Finally, our Singularity series this week looks at a new breakthrough: a nanoscale archive of 1,000 languages that you can now wear around your neck.  WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor.   EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 января, 15:00

We Can’t Forget All The 'Scandals' Of The Obama White House

This piece is part of a series on Obama’s legacy that The Huffington Post will be publishing over the next week. Read other pieces in the series here. One of the lowest points of Barack Obama’s presidency came in late spring 2013, when the White House was involved in a trio of controversies that the media and partisan critics had deemed worthy of calling “scandals.” As you may recall, the Obama White House was in the thick of the ongoing michegas over its 2012 Benghazi talking points ― hashed out in the fog of the attack and believed by many to have been massaged for the sake of ensuring that Obama would prevail in that November’s election. The second controversy was the then-unfolding story that the IRS had targeted political groups for heightened scrutiny, singling out organizations with the words “patriot” or “tea party” in their names. And the third scandal was the one that only a few people cared about, because it happened to reporters: It had just come to light that the Department of Justice had secretly seized “two months of phone records for Associated Press reporters and editors without notifying the news organization.” It was a pretty bad time for the president, and somewhere in Alaska, former Gov. Sarah Palin (R) added to it with a searing Facebook post. As The Huffington Post’s Paige Lavender reported: “This scandalous hat trick is on your watch. It is not believable that you knew nothing about Obama administration actions in dealing with these scandals,” Palin wrote. [...] Palin said Obama’s “team is out of control,” specifically targeting Attorney General Eric Holder and calling for his resignation. Palin didn’t stop at the latest scandals to rock the Obama Administration. She also slammed Obama for not holding his own umbrella. Umbrellas? Oh, Sarah, that vault looked so good in the air but then you botched the landing. But this was typical. During the Obama years, it definitely has been possible to view some of the White House’s decisions as “scandalous.” At the risk of having many Very Serious Beltway People come at me with their “Well, actually, this is just an example of a difficult policy choice, Jason,” I’ll say that for my money, the whole drone “kill list” thing and the administration’s failure to properly secure the financial futures of distressed post-crash homeowners actually do rise to the “scandal” level. But for many others, Obama’s use of a teleprompter qualified.   Who knew that things as petty as a teleprompter or an umbrella could stoke such outrage? Who knew that partisan antagonists could be so creative? In that way, the Obama era was truly unique. The idiots who peddled all of the dumb, perplexing and made-up controversies that competed for everybody’s attention actually used real industry and innovation. It was a breathless time where clothing and condiments and the particularities of various office supplies could inspire endless fist-shaking and sputtering and hot-takes galore. What if all of this energy and effort had been put to some productive purpose? Alas, Obama’s hip-hop barbecue maybe didn’t create any jobs, but so many stupid things kept the media in business all the same. Here are some of the greatest hits. February 2008: Michelle Obama is proud of us, so let’s stone her in the town square. A stray remark at a campaign rally ― “People in this country are ready for change and hungry for a different kind of politics and … for the first time in my adult life I am proud of my country because it feels like hope is finally making a comeback” ― got Michelle Obama in dutch, because wasn’t America swell before hope made a comeback? Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and his wife were quick to counter that they’d always been proud of their country, presumably including that time their country did this to them. Can you imagine how exhausting it is to always be proud of something? I’d be much prouder of America if it didn’t need my validation all the damn time. June 2008: Black couple did alarming thing with their hands. Ha, you guys, let’s remember Fox News idiot E.D. Hill and her stricken reaction at the sight of Barack and Michelle dapping each other up. “A fist bump? A pound? A terrorist fist jab? The gesture everyone seems to interpret differently.” It was a good reminder that stupidity often requires intense mental exertion. March 2009: Michelle Obama has arms. They appeared in a photograph. This was bad for some reason. April 2009: Obama has a run-in with the greeting police. Being polite and culturally aware doesn’t often work out for presidents, as Obama found out after he got caught bowing his head in greetings with Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah bin Abdulaziz. The State Department’s protocols do mandate a “no bowing” policy! But it would seem that the importance of these protocols lies in preventing a partisan Rorschach test from exploding on the internet. It’s too bad that the energy detractors exerted over this wasn’t matched when it came time to question the U.S. role in Saudi Arabia’s military campaign in Yemen! April 2009: God save the queen (from Michelle Obama). The first lady got herself into a real spot when she “briefly put her hand on the back of Queen Elizabeth II” at a reception. The British press reacted with an aghast exhalation, citing royal etiquette. (Stateside, we mostly remembered that Americans are no longer subjects of the British monarch.) May 2009: Time for a condiment inquisition! So, the president, like all right-thinking people, loves a good burger. He also eschews ketchup, which is correct, because ketchup is garbage. But the fact that he likes to use Dijon-style mustard sent Fox News banshee Sean Hannity into a spasm of false class consciousness and complaint. “Hope you liked your fancy burger,” Hannity mewled, while playing his audience old Grey Poupon commercials. Hey, Sean, you understand that Grey Poupon is really cheap and all that other stuff is just effective marketing, right? July 2009: Panic at the G-8 Summit! So I’ve got to admit, at first blush, this looked pretty bad ― a chance photograph of Obama and his French counterpart, Nicolas Sarkozy, looked like Obama had paused to take a lingering look at a 17-year-old Brazilian woman’s backside while at the G-8 conference. In an amazing feat of journalism, however, reporters revealed that the original photo had a little bit of the old trompe l’oeil, and Obama was absolved of wrongdoing. That used to be the way the news worked, anyway. July 2009: Obama said a true thing about a stupid incident in Cambridge, Massachusetts. If the police ever arrest me for breaking into my own home, I’d say that those cops “acted stupidly” because that would quite literally be the truth. I’d say that if it happened to you, too. But when Obama said the same thing after Cambridge police arrested Harvard professor Skip Gates for allegedly breaking into his own home, everything went sideways for the president. Naturally, the fact that the topics of race and police resonated throughout made it more than possible for this matter to get overly politicized. It certainly demonstrated that there were massive (and unnecessary) political constraints on Obama in any discussion about race ― and in retrospect, this is a real pity. Also bad: This was the event that gave the world “beer summits.” January 2010: People have opinions about desks! A 2010 photograph of Obama talking to a room full of advisers with his feet propped on the Resolute Desk would make the complaint rounds for years to come, so much so that three years after the fact, The Washington Times somehow reported that the image was sending “shockwaves around the world,” which, LOL. Naturally, the outrage mainly stemmed from the fact that Obama wasn’t propping up his feet while simultaneously being Caucasian. July 2010: The curious matter of the “black power” ice cream. I’m pretty certain this scandal was entirely confined to the state of Maine, but the story here is that there is an ice cream joint in Bar Harbor with a logo that looks like “an upright black fist clenching a spoon,” and it never really mattered to anyone until the Obamas stopped in for some cones one summer. That’s when “several right-leaning bloggers have suggested that the decision by Obama, the nation’s first black president, to patronize a shop with what one site called ‘such a politically-sensitive logo’ has hidden, intentional meaning.” And that’s how the Dunning-Kruger effect works! May 2011: Common did some black stuff at the White House. Michelle Obama celebrated some American poets at the White House, among them Chicago rapper and actor Common. It takes real effort to mine Common’s work for anything even remotely “gangsta” (Common’s best-known song is a repudiation of hip-hop’s excesses), but The Daily Caller put in some time and surfaced a poem “written from the perspective of inner city black youths who feel that the police don’t protect them.” Soon, Fox News was following suit, referring to Common as a “vile rapper.” If you’re wondering if that was an abrupt change of heart on Common’s merits by Fox News, give yourself a prize. September 2011: Never forget that time Obama used a binder clip. This may have been the most amazing scandal of the Obama presidency. At a Rose Garden news conference urging Congress to pass the American Jobs Act, Obama brandished a copy of the bill, and the New York Post somehow fixated ... on this: President Obama’s plan to reverse the nation’s staggering jobless rate is held together with a paper clip! “Here it is,” Obama said, waving a copy of his jobs plan during a ceremony in the White House Rose Garden yesterday, an enormous paper clip binding the pages together. That’s right, a whole crazy thing about how a stack of paper was held together by a binder clip. The Post called it “chintzy,” and Steve Doocy of “Fox & Friends” deployed similar language. Such elitism! Everyone knows that the noble binder clip is the hardy working-class paper fastener. That used to mean something. Throughout 2012: A crazy row over a 2009 Oval Office decor decision consumes those with nothing better to talk about. It began with a Winston Churchill bust being removed from its Oval Office perch in favor of a Martin Luther King Jr. bust shortly after Obama took office. This outraged people who just learned of the move and combined a congenital need to be outraged with the failure to achieve the formal operational stage of cognitive development. The ensuing mystery and its attendant confusion was compounded by the fact that there are Churchill busts all over the White House. Finally it was explained, probably to no one’s satisfaction. I don’t know how I’ll explain to future generations how so many people became obsessed with a bust of Churchill. With any luck, there won’t be any “future generations.” May 2012: The political press learns something about memoirs. Oh, man, and then there was the time that a bunch of political reporters got a bit snooty about the fact that the “New York girlfriend” in Obama’s memoir Dreams From My Father, was never disclosed to be a “composite character” made up of many different people in the book itself. Except, guess what? This was, in fact, disclosed in all editions of the book. Really, political reporters should probably talk to the people who publish memoirs because then they’d learn that composite characters are a frequently used device that allows memoirists to keep their books from being tens of thousands of pages long, but I guess that would be too much effort. August 2013: The Obama’s don’t have any white dogs. Ha, well, OK. February 2014: Were Bey and Bam doing it? No, Obama and Beyonce were not having an affair, despite the momentarily confident assertion from French photographer Pascal Rostain that The Washington Post was planning on reporting the blockbuster account. Alas, such a report did not come to pass. Still, it was a fun one for the ‘shippers. August 2014: Hold up, is everyone really freaking out about a tan suit? Obama famously told author Michael Lewis that in an effort to “pare down decisions,” he restricted himself to wearing only gray or blue suits while in office. It’s no wonder: The one time he opted for something different ― a tan suit ― the world nearly exploded. Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.) actually got mad about this. It’s like we want the world to think we are a nation of garbage people. September 2014: The coffee cup salute. Very few people noticed or cared about this time Obama hopped off Marine One holding a cup of coffee in his hand, causing him to bungle the traditional salute to the Marines at the end of the steps. But apparently numerous people exist who meticulously watch for such breaches of protocol and start shrieking about it on social media whenever they catch one. It’s a good way to serve your country without putting anything personal at risk, I guess. May 2016: The house Obama will live in after he leaves office is near other things. Specifically, The Daily Caller objects to the fact that the president’s Kalorama home will be near the Islamic Center of Washington, D.C. Just wait till they find out that Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner will be doing the same! Finally, over the years many people have complained that Obama plays too much golf. We’re going to give his critics this one, because golf is bad. ~~~~~  Jason Linkins edits “Eat The Press” for The Huffington Post and co-hosts the HuffPost Politics podcast “So, That Happened.” Subscribe here, and listen to the latest episode below.    type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related coverage... + articlesList=586bfbfbe4b0d9a5945cc204,5866836ce4b0de3a08f808dd,584eea35e4b04c8e2bb0cee2 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 12:02

Франция попросила США разрешить занять место Британии в командных структурах НАТО

Осенью минувшего года Париж отправил в Вашингтон «для лоббирования американских должностных лиц» неофициальную делегацию, которая «подчеркнула, насколько полезными могут быть военные силы Франции»; в частности, предполагается, что представитель Франции может претендовать на пост заместителя главнокомандующего силами НАТО в Европе после выхода Великобритании из ЕС, сообщил военный источник. О планах Парижа занять место Британии в командных структурах НАТО сообщает аналитический центр Королевского института вооруженных сил (RUSI), передает РИА «Новости» со ссылкой на газету Times. В докладе RUSI говорится, что уже идет обсуждение возможности «передачи поста члену НАТО, который также является членом ЕС». Напомним, в 2009 году бывший тогда президентом Франции Николя Саркози объявил, что Франция возвращается в командные структуры НАТО. Франция покинула интегрированные структуры командования НАТО в 1966 году, когда у власти находился Шарль де Голль.

08 января, 12:44

Вице-канцлер Германии допустил распад ЕС

Германия больше не рассматривает распад Евросоюза как нереалистичную перспективу. Об этом заявил заместитель федерального канцлера Зигмар Габриэль, возглавляющий Социал-демократическую партию. По его мнению, это может произойти в связи с победой Марин Ле Пен на выборах президента Франции.

08 января, 12:44

Вице-канцлер Германии допустил распад ЕС

Германия больше не рассматривает распад Евросоюза как нереалистичную перспективу. Об этом заявил заместитель федерального канцлера Зигмар Габриэль, возглавляющий Социал-демократическую партию. По его мнению, это может произойти в связи с победой Марин Ле Пен на выборах президента Франции.

07 января, 03:11

Weekend Roundup: America’s Crisis Of Social Intelligence

If the recent U.S. presidential election campaign was about defining American reality, little has been decided. The ongoing inability to arrive at a shared worldview or even to agree on basic facts, abetted by a media that thrives on adversity to monetize attention, is deadly for the discourse in any democracy. This crisis of social intelligence in which the perception of reality is unmoored from objective observation is even more consequential than the highly damaging quarrel between the official U.S. intelligence agencies and President-elect Donald Trump over Russian influence meddling. But the two are linked. None of the intelligence professionals I know would ever consider themselves infallible. Yet they do strive mightily to establish the facts and resist partisan pressures to slant their findings. Professional intelligence analysis seeks to root out false signals, disinformation, unfounded rumor and subjective opinion. It is, in effect, the opposite of peer-driven social media which now has the most influence over American hearts and minds including, apparently, over the incoming commander-in-chief. While the joint report on the Russian hacks released last week by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security was scored by some as less than conclusive, former NATO commander James Stavridis and cybersecurity expert Dave Weinstein believe it was highly effective. “Publicly laying this level of detail out sets a dramatic precedent that could serve a significant blow to Russia’s current and future cyberoperations in the U.S. and elsewhere,” they write. “The technical details of the report constitute an intelligence windfall for ordinary network defenders who have been starving for rich real-time threat information from the federal government to protect their systems against sophisticated actors.” A further report released Friday by U.S. intelligence agencies concludes that Russia aimed “to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency” and that “Putin and the Russian government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.” Writing from Moscow, Maria Snegovaya reports that most commentators there have greeted President Barack Obama’s recently announced sanctions in response to Russian hacking with “mockery and derision.” Official Russia, she says, has offered the usual retort: deny then distort.  If identifying and shutting down hackers has become a key task of intelligence agencies in these cyber times, the new challenge for education is to provide young people with the tools of social intelligence so they can tell fact from fabrication on social media. Stanford professor Sam Wineburg lays out the steps educators need to take to help students discern what is fake news or not. “The tools we’ve invented are handling us,“ he says, “not the other way around.” Teacher Lynn Kelley tells her students they fall victim to fake news when they lack the critical distance to be aware of their own biases and assumptions or when they are unable to evaluate claims without the relevant historical knowledge. Natalie Jackson reports on a poll that says most Americans think tweets are not the way a president should communicate.  The scientific consensus on climate change is perhaps the most contested fact by the new powers to be in Washington. These stunning motion graphics compiled by James Warner illustrate the toll a warming climate took on the planet in 2016. Dominique Mosbergen reports that, indeed, 2016 was the hottest year on record.  Nicolas Berggruen and I suggest how the incoming U.S. administration can promote renewable energy while creating jobs and security for Americans by jointly investing with China and Mexico in the infrastructure of a “solar border” instead of a wall. Guy Standing argues that a universal basic income would be a bulwark against far-right populism because it provides a secure economic base in people’s lives. “The response to these darkening times,” he writes, “must be to devise and rally support for a new income distribution system.” In other global developments, yet another terror attack hit Istanbul on New Year’s Eve at a fashionable nightclub on the banks of the Bosphorus. Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz reports that, despite the aims of the terrorists, the responses to the attack are serving to unite a divided country. Mercy Corps’ Michael Bowers looks ahead to the humanitarian crises that should garner more attention in 2017 – in Yemen, South Sudan and Lake Chad. Ali Rodriguez reports that the economic situation has become so dire in Venezuela that even talented artists committed to the opposition can’t afford to stay and are fleeing. Former Iranian National Security Council member Seyed Hossein Mousavian sees the potential for hope in the incoming U.S. administration. “While it might sound counterintuitive,” he writes, “Republican control of Congress and the presidency presents an opportunity for successful U.S.- Iran diplomacy. The U.S. government is now able to act in unison, enabling for novel approaches towards the region that may have previously been politically impossible.” In his piece, Mousavian also lists what he believes President-elect Donald Trump should know about Iran. One point is that America’s military presence in the Middle East has created instability there. Interestingly, while chaos gripping much of the Mideast is leading to disengagement by world powers, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden explore why China is actually looking to invest more in the region. In recent years, China was also always the poster child for the worst pollution in the world that came along with rapid growth. Now that China is trying to clean up its act, and India has joined the club of rapid growth, it is facing its own challenges. Bhargav Krishna writes from New Delhi that, “India’s under-funded public health system is straining to cope with the increasing burden of pollution-driven illnesses.” Writing from Hong Kong Wang Xiangwei reports that President Xi Jinping, recently donned “a core leader,” denounced resistance to his reforms by local officials at a Politburo meeting this week after which his comments were splashed across national media. Former Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei argues that, despite Brexit and the Trump election, globalization is not doomed; it is just shifting East with China in a leading position. Taking a comprehensive strategic view of world events, Zbigniew Brzezinski proposes that the only effective response to the present crisis of global power is trilateral cooperation among the U.S., China and Russia. He warns that, “The U.S. should not act towards China as if it were already an enemy; significantly, it should not favor India as America’s principal ally in Asia. This would almost guarantee a closer connection between China and Russia. Nothing is more dangerous to the U.S. than such a close connection.” Our Singularity series this week looks at the technological developments to watch in 2017 – artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, decentralized peer-to-peer networks, biosynthetic labs and autonomous vehicles. Finally, our latest column by the Future of Life Institute reminds us that, in many ways, 2016 was a year of hope with advances in AI and health as well as new moves to reduce the global number of nuclear weapons. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

07 января, 03:11

Weekend Roundup: America’s Crisis Of Social Intelligence

If the recent U.S. presidential election campaign was about defining American reality, little has been decided. The ongoing inability to arrive at a shared worldview or even to agree on basic facts, abetted by a media that thrives on adversity to monetize attention, is deadly for the discourse in any democracy. This crisis of social intelligence in which the perception of reality is unmoored from objective observation is even more consequential than the highly damaging quarrel between the official U.S. intelligence agencies and President-elect Donald Trump over Russian influence meddling. But the two are linked. None of the intelligence professionals I know would ever consider themselves infallible. Yet they do strive mightily to establish the facts and resist partisan pressures to slant their findings. Professional intelligence analysis seeks to root out false signals, disinformation, unfounded rumor and subjective opinion. It is, in effect, the opposite of peer-driven social media which now has the most influence over American hearts and minds including, apparently, over the incoming commander-in-chief. While the joint report on the Russian hacks released last week by the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security was scored by some as less than conclusive, former NATO commander James Stavridis and cybersecurity expert Dave Weinstein believe it was highly effective. “Publicly laying this level of detail out sets a dramatic precedent that could serve a significant blow to Russia’s current and future cyberoperations in the U.S. and elsewhere,” they write. “The technical details of the report constitute an intelligence windfall for ordinary network defenders who have been starving for rich real-time threat information from the federal government to protect their systems against sophisticated actors.” A further report released Friday by U.S. intelligence agencies concludes that Russia aimed “to undermine public faith in the US democratic process, denigrate Secretary Clinton, and harm her electability and potential presidency” and that “Putin and the Russian government developed a clear preference for President-elect Trump.” Writing from Moscow, Maria Snegovaya reports that most commentators there have greeted President Barack Obama’s recently announced sanctions in response to Russian hacking with “mockery and derision.” Official Russia, she says, has offered the usual retort: deny then distort.  If identifying and shutting down hackers has become a key task of intelligence agencies in these cyber times, the new challenge for education is to provide young people with the tools of social intelligence so they can tell fact from fabrication on social media. Stanford professor Sam Wineburg lays out the steps educators need to take to help students discern what is fake news or not. “The tools we’ve invented are handling us,“ he says, “not the other way around.” Teacher Lynn Kelley tells her students they fall victim to fake news when they lack the critical distance to be aware of their own biases and assumptions or when they are unable to evaluate claims without the relevant historical knowledge. Natalie Jackson reports on a poll that says most American’s think tweets are not the way a president should communicate.  The scientific consensus on climate change is perhaps the most contested fact by the new powers to be in Washington. These stunning motion graphics compiled by James Warner illustrate the toll a warming climate took on the planet in 2016. Dominique Mosbergen reports that, indeed, 2016 was the hottest year on record.  Nicolas Berggruen and I suggest how the incoming U.S. administration can promote renewable energy while creating jobs and security for Americans by jointly investing with China and Mexico in the infrastructure of a “solar border” instead of a wall. Guy Standing argues that a universal basic income would be a bulwark against far-right populism because it provides a secure economic base in people’s lives. “The response to these darkening times,” he writes, “must be to devise and rally support for a new income distribution system.” In other global developments, yet another terror attack hit Istanbul on New Year’s Eve at a fashionable nightclub on the banks of the Bosphorus. Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz reports that, despite the aims of the terrorists, the responses to the attack are serving to unite a divided country. Mercy Corps’ Michael Bowers looks ahead to the humanitarian crises that should garner more attention in 2017 – in Yemen, South Sudan and Lake Chad. Ali Rodriguez reports that the economic situation has become so dire in Venezuela that even talented artists committed to the opposition can’t afford to stay and are fleeing. Former Iranian National Security Council member Seyed Hossein Mousavian sees the potential for hope in the incoming U.S. administration. “While it might sound counterintuitive,” he writes, “Republican control of Congress and the presidency presents an opportunity for successful U.S.- Iran diplomacy. The U.S. government is now able to act in unison, enabling for novel approaches towards the region that may have previously been politically impossible.” In his piece, Mousavian also lists what he believes President-elect Donald Trump should know about Iran. One point is that America’s military presence in the Middle East has created instability there. Interestingly, while chaos gripping much of the Mideast is leading to disengagement by world powers, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden explore why China is actually looking to invest more in the region. In recent years, China was also always the poster child for the worst pollution in the world that came along with rapid growth. Now that China is trying to clean up its act, and India has joined the club of rapid growth, it is facing its own challenges. Bhargav Krishna writes from New Delhi that, “India’s under-funded public health system is straining to cope with the increasing burden of pollution-driven illnesses.” Writing from Hong Kong Wang Xiangwei reports that President Xi Jinping, recently donned “a core leader,” denounced resistance to his reforms by local officials at a Politburo meeting this week after which his comments were splashed across national media. Former Chinese Vice Foreign Minister He Yafei argues that, despite Brexit and the Trump election, globalization is not doomed; it is just shifting East with China in a leading position. Taking a comprehensive strategic view of world events, Zbigniew Brzezinski proposes that the only effective response to the present crisis of global power is trilateral cooperation among the U.S., China and Russia. He warns that, “The U.S. should not act towards China as if it were already an enemy; significantly, it should not favor India as America’s principal ally in Asia. This would almost guarantee a closer connection between China and Russia. Nothing is more dangerous to the U.S. than such a close connection.” Our Singularity series this week looks at the technological developments to watch in 2017 – artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, decentralized peer-to-peer networks, biosynthetic labs and autonomous vehicles. Finally, our latest column by the Future of Life Institute reminds us that, in many ways, 2016 was a year of hope with advances in AI and health as well as new moves to reduce the global number of nuclear weapons. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera), Dileep Padgaonkar (Times of India) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khannaare Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 января, 08:59

Politico назвала людей, которые "испортят" европейцам жизнь в 2017 году

Британским таблоидам — таким, как The Sun, Daily Mail, Daily Express — досталось от автора за их влияние на общественное мнение Великобритании, в том числе в вопросе отделения страны от Евросоюза. По мнению Варадараяна, из-за них Brexit может пройти максимально болезненным и невыгодным для каждой из сторон путем.

15 сентября 2016, 07:56

Monsanto в Европе и революция в России

Bayer наконец-то купил Monsanto! Казалось бы, в первую очередь это проблема для европейских фермеров. Чего волноваться нам? (14.09.2016)«Expert Online» Немецкий концерн Bayer объявил о заключении сделки с американским производителем генно-модифицированных семян и гербицидов Monsanto по цене $128 за акцию. Советы директоров обеих компаний единогласно одобрили слияние. ...Выручка объединенной структуры по итогам 2015 года могла бы достигнуть 23 млрд евро. После объединения компании будут совокупно контролировать около 30% мирового урожая. Акции Bayer на фоне информации о сделки прибыли 2,2%, Monsanto подорожали на 0,2%. (конец цитаты) Но с того дня, как 30% рынка сельхозпродукции окажутся под контролем двух фирм, в недалеком прошлом участвовавших в человеконенавистнических проектах: первая входила в концерн IG Farben (владел 42,5 % акций компании, которая производила Циклон Б), а вторая производила «Агента «оранж» для британской и американской армий, который распылялся с самолетов для уничтожения растительности на территории повстанцев. Неудивительно, что корпорации-носители такого прошлого теперь объединились в своей борьбе с населением планеты.

22 сентября 2014, 01:34

Саркози решил вернуться в большую политику, чтобы "спасти" Францию

Николя Саркози сообщил, что у него нет иного выбора, кроме как вернуться в большую политику, так как Франция зашла в тупик. Экс-президент выдвинет свою кандидатуру на пост председателя главной оппозиционной партии Франции - "Союза за народное движение".

01 июля 2014, 18:54

Le скандал: Николя Саркози под стражей

Новость номер один во Франции. Николя Саркози . под стражей. Бывшего президента задержали для дачи показаний, подозревают в коррупции. Впервые в истории современной Франции задержан бывший глава государства. В отношении лидера страны (хоть и с приставкой экс) . беспрецедентный шаг.

11 ноября 2012, 23:35

Василий Смирнов/ Контрразведка готовит «Дело Мистралей»?

Материал для уголовного дела по «Оборонсервису», послужившего поводом для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова с должности министра обороны, собирала военная контрразведка ФСБ России. У теперь уже бывшего главы Минобороны «были трения с ФСБ», подтверждают сегодня «Ведомости». По некоторым сведениям, нынешнее уголовное дело представляет собой лишь «надводную часть айсберга». Намного более интересными могут оказаться материалы, собранные контрразведкой в ходе ревизии международных контактов бывшего министра.  Напомним, что Анатолий Сердюков являлся последовательным сторонником закупок зарубежных вооружений и военной техники, за что постоянно критиковался в России. Практически каждый контракт такого рода сопровождался скандалами и намеками на наличие в нем коррупционной составляющей. Самым громким, долгоиграющим и дорогостоящим для России был скандал вокруг закупки у Франции абсолютно ненужных нам, по мнению экспертов, вертолетоносцев «Мистраль». Контракт стоимостью в несколько миллиардов евро был пролоббирован лично тогдашним президентом Франции Николя Саркози и одобрен лично тогдашним президентом России Дмитрием Медведевым.   По мнению редактора авторитетного журнала Moscow Defense Brief Константина Макиенко, масштабные межгосударственные проекты по закупке вооружений часто сопровождаются «комиссионными». Со сделки минимальной стоимостью в 1,2 млрд. евро даже 1% составит 12 млн. евро. Макиенко также напоминает, что изначально цена контракта с французами предполагалась на уровне 980 млн. евро. А для французских ВМС такие корабли строятся и вовсе за 400 млн. евро, то есть в три раза дешевле той суммы, за которую «Мистраль» в конечном счете продали России. Но «произошло вмешательство политического руководства России, в лице бывшего президента Медведева, которое обязало Министерство обороны заключить этот контракт в двухнедельный срок... Таким образом... российский налогоплательщик потерял 220 млн. евро», - отмечал в связи с этим эксперт. Если прямые потери для российской казны, по оценкам экспертов, могли составить 220 млн. евро, то какими могли быть «комиссионные», и кому они могли предназначаться - вполне себе предмет для пристального изучения контрразведчиками. Стоит отметить, что практика «особого мотивирования» сделок на самом высоком государственном уровне российским бизнесменам и покровительствующим им чиновникам как минимум хорошо знакома. Ведь совсем недавно президент Белоруссии Александр Лукашенко внезапно признался, что один из считающихся близких к Дмитрию Медведеву коммерсантов предлагал ему «откат» в 5 млрд. долларов за льготные условия приватизации ряда белорусских предприятий. По некоторым сведениям, российские контрразведчики уже давно собирали материал о злоупотреблениях и вероятных коррупционных схемах, сопровождавших подписание контракта по «Мистралям». Но дать ход этому делу не представлялось возможным, поскольку это нанесло бы серьезный репутационной удар не только по Анатолию Сердюкову, но и по Дмитрию Медведеву, сменившему пост президента РФ на кресло премьер-министра. Однако, бесконечно замалчивать эту ситуацию также не представлялось возможным. Тем более, что встречное расследование внезапно начали и французские спецслужбы, проводящие в настоящее время пристальную ревизию деятельности бывшего президента Франции Николя Саркози. Более того: французская сторона на неформальном уровне уже якобы изъявила желание придать огласке некую документальную информацию о том, почему именно руководство Минобороны РФ при деятельном непротивлении Дмитрия Медведева в ходе сделки по «Мистралям» не только не помешало нанесению экономического ущерба Российской Федерации, но и непосредственно способствовало этому.  Символично, что свой последний зарубежный визит в статусе министра обороны Анатолий Сердюков совершил именно во Францию. На минувшей неделе, когда в России уже вовсю разгорался скандал вокруг «Оборонсервиса», Сердюков в Париже расхваливал французскую экипировку, бронетехнику и боеприпасы. Там же министром как ни в чем не бывало обсуждалась скандальная закупка у французов пятидесяти «генеральских вертолетов» Eurocopter, о которой в сентябре подробно писала газета «Московский Комсомолец». Нельзя исключать, что одной из истинных целей этой «прощальной» поездки Сердюкова в Париж была попытка заблокировать или хотя бы отсрочить развитие скандала по «Мистралям». Одной лишь контрразведке теперь может быть известно, какие условия этого и с кем именно могли обсуждаться. Как бы то ни было, но дело «Оборонсервиса» как формальный повод для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова представляется довольно удачным. В отличие от ожидаемого в ближайшее время скандала вокруг «Мистралей», оно не наносит прямого непосредственного удара по репутации Дмитрия Медведева. К тому же, после отставки Сердюкова его можно сделать «крайним» по любым вновь открывшимся обстоятельствам, - т.е. вероятные разоблачения французов лично для премьера теперь будут уже не так страшны. Пока, впрочем, глава правительства не спешит окончательно «сдавать» своего многолетнего соратника и подопечного. Окружение Дмитрия Медведева уже распространило информацию о том, что Анатолий Сердюков подал прошение об отставке сам (а не был уволен), и что его деятельность на посту министра в целом оценивается премьером позитивно. «Сердюков был эффективным министром обороны, это проявилось в ходе преобразований, которые он проводил в вооруженных силах», сказал Медведев, комментируя отставку министра.