• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди1629
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы1240
      • Показать ещё
      Издания182
      • Показать ещё
      Компании211
      • Показать ещё
      Разное459
      • Показать ещё
      Формат88
      Международные организации119
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели10
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы2
28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 17:45

Зидан призвал не голосовать за Марин Ле Пен на выборах президента

Второй тур выборов во Франции состоится 7 мая

28 апреля, 07:42

Германия без паранджи: Бундестаг одобрил запрет одежды, скрывающей лицо и тело

Нижняя палата парламента Германии - Бундестаг поддержал законопроект, запрещающий паранджу для гражданских служащих.

27 апреля, 21:40

Эксперт объяснил призыв Саркози голосовать против Ле Пен

Старший научный сотрудник Института всеобщей истории РАН Евгений Осипов в разговоре с Nation News прокомментировал сообщения о том, что Николя Саркози призвал голосовать против лидера «Национального фронта» Марин Ле Пен во втором туре президентских выборов во Франции. Читать далее

26 апреля, 18:28

Олланд выступил против Ле Пен

Президент Франции Франсуа Олланд призвал правительство сделать все возможное, чтобы лидер «Национального фронта» Марин Ле Пен не получила хороший результат во втором туре президентской гонки. Послание главы государства на заседании совета министров зачитал представитель кабмина Стефан Ле Фоль. Голосовать за Эммануэля Макрона также призвал экс-президент Николя Саркози.

26 апреля, 18:15

Emmanuel Clinton Versus Marine LeTrump

Authored by Pepe Escobar via The Asia Times, Here’s the body count in the latest geopolitical earthquake afflicting the West: The Socialist Party in France is dead. The traditional Right is comatose. What used to be the Extreme Left is alive, and still kicking. Yet what’s supposed to be the shock of the new is not exactly a shock. The more things veer towards change (we can believe in), the more they stay the same. Enter the new normal: the recycled “system” – as in Emmanuel Macron — versus “the people” — as in the National Front’s Marine Le Pen, battling for the French presidency on May 7. Although that was the expected outcome, it’s still significant. Le Pen, re-christened “Marine”, reached the second round of voting despite a mediocre campaign. She essentially reassembled — but did not expand — her voting base. I have argued on Asia Times that Macron is nothing but an artificial product, a meticulously packaged hologram designed to sell an illusion. Only the terminally naïve may believe Macron incarnates change when he’s the candidate of the EU, NATO, the financial markets, the Clinton-Obama machine, the French establishment, assorted business oligarchs and the top six French media groups. As for the stupidity of the Blairite Left, it’s now in a class by itself. Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the domesticated hard-left of Insubordinate France, managed to equal the Catholic Right François Fillon in the final stretch. Yet the vapid PS candidate, Benoit Hamon, stole Mélenchon’s shot at hitting the second round. As for Marine, she lost almost four points in the final tally. With one extra week of campaigning Fillon, despite Penelopegate, could have been equal with Marine. Marine has only one extremely long shot on May 7. She will be frantically touring “deep France” to turn the second round into a debate on French identity and a clash of nationalists, patriots and sovereignists against pro-EU globalists and urban “liquid modernity” practitioners. So what do they want? Frontists are ready to rip Emmanuel Clinton’s neoliberal program to pieces, which will play very well in rural France and may even yield a few disgruntled Mélenchon votes. Unlike Fillon and Hamon, he has not gone public calling his supporters to vote Macron. Disgruntled Fillon voters may also be inclined to switch to Marine — considering Fillon was viscerally opposed to someone he described as “Emmanuel Hollande.” A quick look at the promises is in order. In a nutshell; Marine proffers a social model that “favors the French people;” Macron offers vague, “profound reforms.” Macron’s plan to save 60 billion euros of public funds implies firing 120,000 functionaries; that is a certified recipe to a “see you in the barricades” scenario. Marine only says she wants to reduce the public deficit — aiming at reducing state medical aid, the French contribution to the EU, and fiscal fraud. Neither wants to raise the minimum wage and VAT. Both want to reduce the tax burden on companies and both want to fight the “Uberization” of work, favoring French companies (Marine) and European companies (Macron). Marine’s absolute priority is to reduce social aid to foreigners and restitute “buying power” especially to pensioners and low-income workers. She’s vague about unemployment. Macron’s “profound reforms” are centered on unemployment insurance and pensions. He’s keen on a universal unemployment protection managed by the state. Everyone would be covered, including in the case of being fired. Marine and Macron coincide on one point; better reimbursement of costly health benefits. Europe is at the heart of the Marine vs Macron fight; that’s Frexit against a “new European project.” Everyone in Brussels “voted” Macron  as he proposes a budget for the eurozone, a dedicated Parliament, and a dedicated Minister of Finance. In short; Brussels on steroids. Marine’s Frexit should be decided via a referendum — a direct consequence of the frontist obsession with immigration. Marine wants to reduce legal admission of immigrants to 10,000 people a year (it’s currently 200,000), tax employment of foreign workers, and suppress social aid. In contrast, pro-immigration Macron aims at what he calls an open France, “faithful to its values.” On foreign policy, it’s all about Russia. Marine wants a “strategic realignment” with Moscow especially to fight Salafi-jihadi terror. Macron — reflecting a French establishment as Russophobic as in the US — is against it, although he concedes that Europe must come to terms with Russia even as he defends the current sanctions. About that Wall of Cash If the coming, epic clash could be defined by just one issue that would be the unlimited power of the Wall of Cash. Macron subscribes to the view that public debt and expenses on public service are the only factors responsible for French debt, so one must have “political courage” to promote reforms. Sociologist Benjamin Lemoine is one of the few who’s publicly debating what’s really behind it — the interest of financiers to preserve the value of the debt they hold and their aversion to any negotiation. Because they control the narrative, they are able to equate “political risk” —  be it Marine or Mélenchon — with the risk to their own privileged positions. The real issue at stake in France — and across most of the West — revolves around the conflicting interests of financial masters and citizens attached to public service and social justice. The coming clash between Emmanuel Clinton and Marine LeTrump won’t even begin to scratch the surface.

26 апреля, 17:36

Саркози призвал голосовать против Ле Пен

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози объявил, что во втором туре выборов главы государства он поддержит кандидата движения «Вперед!» Эммануэля Макрона.

26 апреля, 17:17

Саркози сделал свой выбор между Ле Пен и Макроном

Николя Саркози рассказал, за кого будет голосовать во втором туре президентских выборов во Франции.

26 апреля, 17:17

Саркози сделал свой выбор между Ле Пен и Макроном

Николя Саркози рассказал, за кого будет голосовать во втором туре президентских выборов во Франции.

26 апреля, 16:59

Республиканцы намерены объединяться с Макроном после парламентских выборов

Франсуа Баруэн нацелен на премьерство после парламентских выборов.

26 апреля, 15:53

Саркози призвал избирателей голосовать против Марин Ле Пен

Экс-президент назвал выход Марин Ле Пен во второй тур выборов «политическим землетрясением»

26 апреля, 15:46

Саркози заявил о намерении голосовать за Макрона во втором туре выборов

Экс-президент Франции Николя Саркози проголосует во втором туре выборов главы государства за кандидата Эммануэля Макрона. Об этом он сообщил в своем Facebook. Саркози отметил, что в случае победы лидера правой партии «Национальный фронт» Марин Ле Пен Францию ожидают «очень серьезные последствия». «Поэтому я буду голосовать во втором туре президентских выборов за Эммануэля Макрона. Это не является поддержкой его программы, это выбор ответственности», — отметил он. Ранее Саркози призывал сограждан голосовать за Франсуа Фийона.

26 апреля, 14:55

Саркози заявил о поддержке Макрона на президентских выборах Франции

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози написал в своем Facebook, что впервые за всю историю президентских выборов во Франции во второй тур не прошел кандидат от правых республиканцев и центристов

Выбор редакции
26 апреля, 14:47

Саркози заявил о поддержке Макрона во втором туре президентских выборов

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози заявил, что проголосует за кандидата от движения "Вперед" Эммануэля Макрона во втором туре выборов главы государства.

26 апреля, 14:43

Саркози объявил о поддержке Макрона во втором туре выборов во Франции

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози объявил, что во втором туре выборов главы государства он поддержит кандидата движения «Вперед!» Эммануэля Макрона. Саркози сообщил, что огорчен результатами первого тура выборов, по итогом которого борьбу за пост президента продолжают Макрон и Марин Ле Пен.

26 апреля, 14:40

Саркози решил голосовать за Макрона во втором туре выборов президента Франции

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози заявил, что проголосует во втором туре выборов главы государства за кандидата Эммануэля Макрона. Об этом он написал в своем фейсбуке. По его мнению, в случае победы второго кандидата - лидера правой ...

25 апреля, 12:05

Призрак Кремля в Париже: нужен ли российским хакерам сайт Макрона

По словам сотрудников Trend Micro, с декабря 2016 года сайт Макрона пытались взломать 160 раз.

24 апреля, 23:02

Emmanuel Macron Is Good News For Europe, And A Lesson For The U.S.

Never say cat before you have it in the bag ― the run-off still has to be won ― but we can sigh in relief after Emmanuel Macron beat Marine Le Pen 24.01% to 21.3% in the first round of the French Presidential elections. After weeks of hearing about a prospective overwhelming victory for Marine Le Pen, her getting in the run-off is less brutally shocking than her father’s in 2002. At the time, French people were caught by surprise by Le Pen’s success and the outcry led to a massive victory for Jacques Chirac. The widespread expectancy that Le Pen would get into the run-off and it subsequent normalization, is in fact the most dangerous variable for run-off ― together with the fact that the vote will take place on a long weekend, and that the extreme left’s leader Jean-Luc Melanchon did not see fit to call his voters to support Macron, in a suicidal move that seems to characterize progressive parties nowadays. Emmanuel Macron is a Justin Trudeau-style candidate. Just like Canada’s Prime Minister, Macron is young, handsome and generally perceived as a new face in politics. His pedigree, in fact, tells otherwise: his education and curriculum is typical of French Grand Comis, people who studied at the “Grands Ecoles” (something similar to the Ivy League in the U.S., with the difference that they are cost-free and based on real merit): Charles De Gaulle, Georges Pompidou, Valerie Giscard d’Estaing, Francois Mitterrand, Jacques Chirac, Nicolas Sarkozy, Francois Holland, they all attended (Sarkozy without in fact graduating) at least one of the Grands Ecoles. Macron attended la crème de la crème among them: he went to Sc. Po. and ENA (Ecole Nationale d’Administration) to then get on a career path common among Enarques: first, Inspector at the General Inspectorate for Finances; then onto the private sector as an investment banker at Rothschild; to finally entering politics directly at the highest level, as Minister of Economy and Digital Affairs in the second Valls Government (2014-2016). As such, Macron reassures the European elites more than anybody else, as the sudden spike in the stock market showed. As Minister for Economic, Macron got the chance to walk the European corridors that matter helped by his flawless English ― also a novelty among French politicians. He is also profoundly pro-European; during the electoral campaign, he affirmed ― among other things ― that participation in the ERASMUS program (an exchange program for higher education students financed by the European Commission) should be made compulsory for all students. In an environment that suggested otherwise, he took the risk of clearly affirming his pro-European stance: indeed, Europe will be at the center of the last two weeks of the campaign in France. Democrats at the national level can learn from Europe: it's time to stop blaming a supposed populist wave, WikiLeaks, the CIA or the Russians... Differently from what many predicted in the United States, the three elections held after Brexit proved how London’s breakaway reinforced the feeling of belonging to the European Union, among European citizens, rather than the contrary. Populism is not winning in Europe, or at least in Western Europe: after Austria and Holland, also France defeated national populism. (Admittedly, the story differs in parts of Eastern Europe, starting with Hungary, where Prime Minister Victor Orban’s actions may lead to a suspension from the EU, according to art. 7 of the Treaty - and it would be well time…). In Germany, the forthcoming October elections will probably lead to a coalition ― excluding any kind of populism ― and the same result is highly probable in Spring 2018 in Italy, where a pure proportional electoral system is likely to be the solution for the new electoral law. That is, electoral systems matter, too. And this is here where the bad news begins for the other side of the Atlantic: as we know, Hillary Clinton won the popular vote, but lost the election, due to how constituencies are designed. Each state has different rules for redistricting, making the whole process very complicated, but one thing is certain: if the Democrats are to change things, they need to stop thinking that demographics are enough to eventually secure the victory.  The 2016 mantra “we have blacks and latinos” in fact proved wrong on so many different levels ― and they need to actively groom a new generation of politicians, starting with the local level. The local level is also where access to vote is determined: while in Europe voting rights are mostly automatic, in the U.S. there are in fact a million ways to prevent people from voting. Equally, Democrats at the national level can learn from Europe: it’s time to stop blaming a supposed populist wave, WikiLeaks, the CIA or the Russians; time to face the hard reality that for how skilled, knowledgeable and amazing, Hillary was simply the wrong candidate for the times. Her candidacy was at odds with the electors’ quest for new faces ― that is candidates perceived as being outside the usual circles ― yet not necessarily people without political experience. For instance, Justin Trudeau, Emmanuel Macron, Alexander Van Der Bellen are all people of experience, yet perceived as not part of the old political elite. This repulsion for “politics as usual” helps for instance in understanding how it is possible, as a new Washington Examiner’s poll shows, that though President Trump is the least popular president in modern times, with 42 percent approval and 53 percent disapproval, he’d still beat Hillary Rodham Clinton if the election were held today and in the popular vote, not just Electoral College: asked how they would vote if the election were held today, 43 percent of the respondents said they would support Trump and 40 percent said Clinton. There are grassroots independent manifestations everywhere from the march for women to the march for Science ― people who react and show their disapproval. Yet, the Democratic Party seems unable to use this positive energy to bring change. The same energy that Macron was able to channel into a vote in France. Contrary to what many claimed on this side of the ocean, the French elections are once more proof that Brexit did not lead Europe into disaster. Somehow Nigel Farage seems to have damaged Washington more than Brussels… May Paris be a learning lesson for the U.S. Democrats before it is too late. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58fb9e41e4b00fa7de14cf2e,58fd37bbe4b00fa7de1537a4,58f4bef5e4b0da2ff861c205,58cae4d0e4b00705db4d7aad -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 апреля, 20:41

Франция делает выбор: впервые в истории Пятой республики главные партии - за бортом

Через две недели Франция будет решать, с кем и куда ей идти. И, если верить прессе и аналитикам, далеко она не уйдет. Курс останется прежним. Креатуру Олланда и стоящих за ним глобалистов - Эммануэля Макрона - уже объявляют уверенным победителем этой кампании.

15 сентября 2016, 07:56

Monsanto в Европе и революция в России

Bayer наконец-то купил Monsanto! Казалось бы, в первую очередь это проблема для европейских фермеров. Чего волноваться нам? (14.09.2016)«Expert Online» Немецкий концерн Bayer объявил о заключении сделки с американским производителем генно-модифицированных семян и гербицидов Monsanto по цене $128 за акцию. Советы директоров обеих компаний единогласно одобрили слияние. ...Выручка объединенной структуры по итогам 2015 года могла бы достигнуть 23 млрд евро. После объединения компании будут совокупно контролировать около 30% мирового урожая. Акции Bayer на фоне информации о сделки прибыли 2,2%, Monsanto подорожали на 0,2%. (конец цитаты) Но с того дня, как 30% рынка сельхозпродукции окажутся под контролем двух фирм, в недалеком прошлом участвовавших в человеконенавистнических проектах: первая входила в концерн IG Farben (владел 42,5 % акций компании, которая производила Циклон Б), а вторая производила «Агента «оранж» для британской и американской армий, который распылялся с самолетов для уничтожения растительности на территории повстанцев. Неудивительно, что корпорации-носители такого прошлого теперь объединились в своей борьбе с населением планеты.

14 декабря 2015, 17:54

Марин Ле Пен в последний раз предупреждает

Во втором туре региональных выборов во Франции партия «Национальный фронт» набрала рекордные 6 миллионов 820 тысяч голосов избирателей. Однако «Национальный фронт», получивший в первом туре большинство в шести регионах (из 13), не смог победить ни в одном из них во втором. Для ус...

28 июля 2015, 15:18

Казнь Сейфа Аль-Ислама и трагическая судьба других детей Каддафи

Ливийский суд вынес смертный приговор сыну Муаммара Каддафи. 43-летний Сейф аль-Ислам приговорен к расстрелу за преступления против мирных граждан. В ходе гражданской войны в Ливии погибли два сына Каддафи. Его вдова, два других сына и дочь бежали в Оман.

23 марта 2015, 09:46

Саркози и Ле Пен обошли социалистов на региональных выборах во Франции

Елизавета Антонова Правоцентристский блок Николя Саркози и «Национальный фронт» набрали 32,5 и 25,35% соответственно и обошли социалистов по итогам первого тура выборов в советы департаментов во Франции Французский политик Николя Саркози Фото: REUTERS 2015 Возглавляемый Николя Саркози блок во главе с партией «Союз в поддержку народного движения» лидирует по итогам первого тура выборов в советы департаментов во Франции, сообщает сайт телеканала France 24. Голосование прошло во Франции в воскресенье, 22 марта. Блок бывшего президента Франции, по последним данным, получил 32,5% голосов. Второе место заняла ультраправая партия «Национальный фронт» под руководством Марин Ле Пен с 25,35%. Комментируя результаты выборов, Ле Пен призвала правительство Франции, возглавляемое социалистом Манюэлем Вальсом, подать в отставку. Правящая Социалистическая партия заняла третье место с 22% голосов. Таким образом, партии удалось избежать полного разгрома, отмечает издание. Второй тур выборов пройдет 29 марта. Обозреватели France 24 отмечают, что для Ле Пен результаты оказались не самыми впечатляющими. Ее «Национальному фронту» прочили первое место на выборах и не менее 30% голосов. Проигрыш правоцентристам, как отмечает телеканал, подрывает надежды Ле Пен стать серьезным претендетом на победу на президентских выборах 2017 года. Непопулярность нынешнего правительства социалистов связана прежде всего с его неспособностью выполнить предвыборные экономические обещания, в том числе снизить уровень безработицы, которая сейчас достигает 10%. Ультраправые победили в первом туре в 43 из 98 департаментов страны. Второй тур состоится в следующее воскресенье, 29 марта. Саркози уже исключил, что его блок объединится с партией Ле Пен. По словам бывшего президента, «Национальный фронт» «не решит проблемы Франции, а только усугубит их».

22 сентября 2014, 01:34

Саркози решил вернуться в большую политику, чтобы "спасти" Францию

Николя Саркози сообщил, что у него нет иного выбора, кроме как вернуться в большую политику, так как Франция зашла в тупик. Экс-президент выдвинет свою кандидатуру на пост председателя главной оппозиционной партии Франции - "Союза за народное движение".

01 июля 2014, 18:54

Le скандал: Николя Саркози под стражей

Новость номер один во Франции. Николя Саркози . под стражей. Бывшего президента задержали для дачи показаний, подозревают в коррупции. Впервые в истории современной Франции задержан бывший глава государства. В отношении лидера страны (хоть и с приставкой экс) . беспрецедентный шаг.

11 ноября 2012, 23:35

Василий Смирнов/ Контрразведка готовит «Дело Мистралей»?

Материал для уголовного дела по «Оборонсервису», послужившего поводом для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова с должности министра обороны, собирала военная контрразведка ФСБ России. У теперь уже бывшего главы Минобороны «были трения с ФСБ», подтверждают сегодня «Ведомости». По некоторым сведениям, нынешнее уголовное дело представляет собой лишь «надводную часть айсберга». Намного более интересными могут оказаться материалы, собранные контрразведкой в ходе ревизии международных контактов бывшего министра.  Напомним, что Анатолий Сердюков являлся последовательным сторонником закупок зарубежных вооружений и военной техники, за что постоянно критиковался в России. Практически каждый контракт такого рода сопровождался скандалами и намеками на наличие в нем коррупционной составляющей. Самым громким, долгоиграющим и дорогостоящим для России был скандал вокруг закупки у Франции абсолютно ненужных нам, по мнению экспертов, вертолетоносцев «Мистраль». Контракт стоимостью в несколько миллиардов евро был пролоббирован лично тогдашним президентом Франции Николя Саркози и одобрен лично тогдашним президентом России Дмитрием Медведевым.   По мнению редактора авторитетного журнала Moscow Defense Brief Константина Макиенко, масштабные межгосударственные проекты по закупке вооружений часто сопровождаются «комиссионными». Со сделки минимальной стоимостью в 1,2 млрд. евро даже 1% составит 12 млн. евро. Макиенко также напоминает, что изначально цена контракта с французами предполагалась на уровне 980 млн. евро. А для французских ВМС такие корабли строятся и вовсе за 400 млн. евро, то есть в три раза дешевле той суммы, за которую «Мистраль» в конечном счете продали России. Но «произошло вмешательство политического руководства России, в лице бывшего президента Медведева, которое обязало Министерство обороны заключить этот контракт в двухнедельный срок... Таким образом... российский налогоплательщик потерял 220 млн. евро», - отмечал в связи с этим эксперт. Если прямые потери для российской казны, по оценкам экспертов, могли составить 220 млн. евро, то какими могли быть «комиссионные», и кому они могли предназначаться - вполне себе предмет для пристального изучения контрразведчиками. Стоит отметить, что практика «особого мотивирования» сделок на самом высоком государственном уровне российским бизнесменам и покровительствующим им чиновникам как минимум хорошо знакома. Ведь совсем недавно президент Белоруссии Александр Лукашенко внезапно признался, что один из считающихся близких к Дмитрию Медведеву коммерсантов предлагал ему «откат» в 5 млрд. долларов за льготные условия приватизации ряда белорусских предприятий. По некоторым сведениям, российские контрразведчики уже давно собирали материал о злоупотреблениях и вероятных коррупционных схемах, сопровождавших подписание контракта по «Мистралям». Но дать ход этому делу не представлялось возможным, поскольку это нанесло бы серьезный репутационной удар не только по Анатолию Сердюкову, но и по Дмитрию Медведеву, сменившему пост президента РФ на кресло премьер-министра. Однако, бесконечно замалчивать эту ситуацию также не представлялось возможным. Тем более, что встречное расследование внезапно начали и французские спецслужбы, проводящие в настоящее время пристальную ревизию деятельности бывшего президента Франции Николя Саркози. Более того: французская сторона на неформальном уровне уже якобы изъявила желание придать огласке некую документальную информацию о том, почему именно руководство Минобороны РФ при деятельном непротивлении Дмитрия Медведева в ходе сделки по «Мистралям» не только не помешало нанесению экономического ущерба Российской Федерации, но и непосредственно способствовало этому.  Символично, что свой последний зарубежный визит в статусе министра обороны Анатолий Сердюков совершил именно во Францию. На минувшей неделе, когда в России уже вовсю разгорался скандал вокруг «Оборонсервиса», Сердюков в Париже расхваливал французскую экипировку, бронетехнику и боеприпасы. Там же министром как ни в чем не бывало обсуждалась скандальная закупка у французов пятидесяти «генеральских вертолетов» Eurocopter, о которой в сентябре подробно писала газета «Московский Комсомолец». Нельзя исключать, что одной из истинных целей этой «прощальной» поездки Сердюкова в Париж была попытка заблокировать или хотя бы отсрочить развитие скандала по «Мистралям». Одной лишь контрразведке теперь может быть известно, какие условия этого и с кем именно могли обсуждаться. Как бы то ни было, но дело «Оборонсервиса» как формальный повод для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова представляется довольно удачным. В отличие от ожидаемого в ближайшее время скандала вокруг «Мистралей», оно не наносит прямого непосредственного удара по репутации Дмитрия Медведева. К тому же, после отставки Сердюкова его можно сделать «крайним» по любым вновь открывшимся обстоятельствам, - т.е. вероятные разоблачения французов лично для премьера теперь будут уже не так страшны. Пока, впрочем, глава правительства не спешит окончательно «сдавать» своего многолетнего соратника и подопечного. Окружение Дмитрия Медведева уже распространило информацию о том, что Анатолий Сердюков подал прошение об отставке сам (а не был уволен), и что его деятельность на посту министра в целом оценивается премьером позитивно. «Сердюков был эффективным министром обороны, это проявилось в ходе преобразований, которые он проводил в вооруженных силах», сказал Медведев, комментируя отставку министра.