• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди1470
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы1245
      • Показать ещё
      Формат86
      Издания188
      • Показать ещё
      Разное471
      • Показать ещё
      Компании210
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации98
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели12
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы2
25 февраля, 01:21

Weekend Roundup: A Hard Look At The Long Past And The Near Future

Sorting out the present global turmoil understandably demands our attention. But fathoming the lessons of the long past and anticipating the near future is no less important in framing the consequential choices we make today. Warning to the reader: what follows will likely disturb the safe space of those with a Panglossian outlook. A decided pessimism prevails among today’s key thinkers who look at the times ahead through the prism of historical experience. This week, Stanford University classics historian Walter Scheidel outlines the theme of his new book, The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century. “For hundreds and perhaps thousands of years,” Scheidel writes, “peace, stability and development have rewarded those at the top of the food chain more than anybody else. Profits from business, connections and power multiplied in the hands of the few and passed between generations. But the inverse is also true: Every time the gap between rich and poor narrowed ― during the two world wars, for example ― there was massive violence, a shock to the established order.” “Yet,” he continues, “inequality” is “resilient” ― it “regularly advances once violent shock retreats.” Despite our idealistic hopes, Scheidel concludes, there is no reason to believe the future will be any different than the past: “Once genetic and cybernetic enhancements of the human body migrate from the domain of science fiction to real-life labs and clinics, the well-off will inevitably be in the best position to take advantage of these offerings, both for themselves and their offspring.” In an interview, Cambridge University astrophysicist Martin Rees ― famous for asking whether we are living through humankind’s “final century” ― tallies the promise and perils ahead. Above all, Rees is concerned about the uses and misuses of biotechnology in the coming decades. “We are already seeing that it’s becoming easier to modify the genome,” he says, “and we heard about experiments on the influenza virus to make it more virulent and transmissible. These techniques are developing very fast and have huge potential benefits but unfortunately also downsides. They are easily accessible and handled. It’s the kind of equipment that’s available at many university labs and many companies. And so the risk of error or terror in these areas is quite substantial, while regulation is very hard. It’s not like regulating nuclear activity, which requires huge special purpose facilities. Biohacking is almost a student-competitive sport.” Like Scheidel, Rees’ reading of history casts a dark shadow on the future. As he puts it, “what can be done, will be done.” And in the near term, Rees see the main challenge as intelligent robots replacing workers with living wages. “We will have to accept a big redistribution in the way the labor market is deployed,” he warns. “And in order to ensure we don’t develop even more inequality, there has to be a massive redistribution of wealth too. The money earned by robots can’t stay with a small elite ― Silicon Valley people, for instance.” Rees’ advice for the short and long-term future: “There is a great saying, ‘fortune favors the prepared mind.’” Back in the present, defenders of liberal democracy are preparing for the worst. Human Right Watch Executive Director Kenneth Roth writes with alarm that, “I’ve spent years defending human rights around the world, but I’ve never been this worried about the future of the United States.” Roth warns that, “Experience elsewhere teaches us that [autocratic governments] can arrive with extraordinary speed, signaled not by tanks surrounding the presidential palace but by the erosion of democratic norms.” Writing from Hong Kong, Chandran Nair has had enough of America “bullying” everyone else, especially now that President Donald Trump is the culprit in the pulpit. “In response,” Nair writes in a defiant call to action, “the world should now get tough with America, and let it know that the global majority will no longer be pushed around.”  Graham Fuller, a former vice chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council, sees some value in Trump’s penchant to candidly acknowledge what everyone knows to be true but won’t say. Though perhaps not quite as the president meant it when he recently said that he is open to a “one-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Fuller agrees that “the two-state solution in practice is essentially a fraud.” Drawing on his long experience in the Middle East, he writes, “honest observers know full well that the mantra of preserving ‘the peace process’ for the two-state solution is now little more than a cover by hard-line Zionists for full Israeli annexation of Palestinian lands.” The impacts of Trump’s America are also being felt in Africa. As China widens the scope of its activities there and the U.S. steps back from the world, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden find that many are scrutinizing whether Beijing is a partner or predator on the continent.  Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz talks with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the man most known for his role in a controversial plan to build an Islamic community center near ground zero in New York. He says Muslims in America should create an “American Islam” in order to assimilate with other like-minded people of faith to combat the extremist rhetoric in their respective religions. He also notes that his Cordoba House is, “training imams who are culturally integrated into the American life and can deal with the issues of it.”  Writing from Berlin, Yermi Brenner looks at how the marginalized Roma minority community in Germany continues to struggle against racism, invisibility and the threat of deportation over seven decades after a significant fraction of its population was murdered during the Holocaust. Reporting on the tensions between South Africans and Nigerian immigrants and shopkeepers in Johannesburg, Sipho Hlongwane reminds us that xenophobia is not limited to America or Europe these days. Finally, our Singularity series this week showcases a “one-cent lab-on-a-chip” that “can diagnose cancer and infections.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 февраля, 01:21

Weekend Roundup: A Hard Look At The Long Past And The Near Future

Sorting out the present global turmoil understandably demands our attention. But fathoming the lessons of the long past and anticipating the near future is no less important in framing the consequential choices we make today. Warning to the reader: what follows will likely disturb the safe space of those with a Panglossian outlook. A decided pessimism prevails among today’s key thinkers who look at the times ahead through the prism of historical experience. This week, Stanford University classics historian Walter Scheidel outlines the theme of his new book, The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century. “For hundreds and perhaps thousands of years,” Scheidel writes, “peace, stability and development have rewarded those at the top of the food chain more than anybody else. Profits from business, connections and power multiplied in the hands of the few and passed between generations. But the inverse is also true: Every time the gap between rich and poor narrowed ― during the two world wars, for example ― there was massive violence, a shock to the established order.” “Yet,” he continues, “inequality” is “resilient” ― it “regularly advances once violent shock retreats.” Despite our idealistic hopes, Scheidel concludes, there is no reason to believe the future will be any different than the past: “Once genetic and cybernetic enhancements of the human body migrate from the domain of science fiction to real-life labs and clinics, the well-off will inevitably be in the best position to take advantage of these offerings, both for themselves and their offspring.” In an interview, Cambridge University astrophysicist Martin Rees ― famous for asking whether we are living through humankind’s “final century” ― tallies the promise and perils ahead. Above all, Rees is concerned about the uses and misuses of biotechnology in the coming decades. “We are already seeing that it’s becoming easier to modify the genome,” he says, “and we heard about experiments on the influenza virus to make it more virulent and transmissible. These techniques are developing very fast and have huge potential benefits but unfortunately also downsides. They are easily accessible and handled. It’s the kind of equipment that’s available at many university labs and many companies. And so the risk of error or terror in these areas is quite substantial, while regulation is very hard. It’s not like regulating nuclear activity, which requires huge special purpose facilities. Biohacking is almost a student-competitive sport.” Like Scheidel, Rees’ reading of history casts a dark shadow on the future. As he puts it, “what can be done, will be done.” And in the near term, Rees see the main challenge as intelligent robots replacing workers with living wages. “We will have to accept a big redistribution in the way the labor market is deployed,” he warns. “And in order to ensure we don’t develop even more inequality, there has to be a massive redistribution of wealth too. The money earned by robots can’t stay with a small elite ― Silicon Valley people, for instance.” Rees’ advice for the short and long-term future: “There is a great saying, ‘fortune favors the prepared mind.’” Back in the present, defenders of liberal democracy are preparing for the worst. Human Right Watch Executive Director Kenneth Roth writes with alarm that, “I’ve spent years defending human rights around the world, but I’ve never been this worried about the future of the United States.” Roth warns that, “Experience elsewhere teaches us that [autocratic governments] can arrive with extraordinary speed, signaled not by tanks surrounding the presidential palace but by the erosion of democratic norms.” Writing from Hong Kong, Chandran Nair has had enough of America “bullying” everyone else, especially now that President Donald Trump is the culprit in the pulpit. “In response,” Nair writes in a defiant call to action, “the world should now get tough with America, and let it know that the global majority will no longer be pushed around.”  Graham Fuller, a former vice chairman of the CIA’s National Intelligence Council, sees some value in Trump’s penchant to candidly acknowledge what everyone knows to be true but won’t say. Though perhaps not quite as the president meant it when he recently said that he is open to a “one-state solution” to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Fuller agrees that “the two-state solution in practice is essentially a fraud.” Drawing on his long experience in the Middle East, he writes, “honest observers know full well that the mantra of preserving ‘the peace process’ for the two-state solution is now little more than a cover by hard-line Zionists for full Israeli annexation of Palestinian lands.” The impacts of Trump’s America are also being felt in Africa. As China widens the scope of its activities there and the U.S. steps back from the world, Eric Olander and Cobus van Staden find that many are scrutinizing whether Beijing is a partner or predator on the continent.  Turkish journalist Ilgin Yorulmaz talks with Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, the man most known for his role in a controversial plan to build an Islamic community center near ground zero in New York. He says Muslims in America should create an “American Islam” in order to assimilate with other like-minded people of faith to combat the extremist rhetoric in their respective religions. He also notes that his Cordoba House is, “training imams who are culturally integrated into the American life and can deal with the issues of it.”  Writing from Berlin, Yermi Brenner looks at how the marginalized Roma minority community in Germany continues to struggle against racism, invisibility and the threat of deportation over seven decades after a significant fraction of its population was murdered during the Holocaust. Reporting on the tensions between South Africans and Nigerian immigrants and shopkeepers in Johannesburg, Sipho Hlongwane reminds us that xenophobia is not limited to America or Europe these days. Finally, our Singularity series this week showcases a “one-cent lab-on-a-chip” that “can diagnose cancer and infections.” WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
24 февраля, 22:36

French Prosecutor To Open Official Probe Into Francois Fillon's Embezzlement Allegations

As recently as one week ago, French conservative politician Francois Fillon, who until recently was the favorite to win the upcoming presidential election until centrist Emmanuel Macron stormed ahead of him in popularity, said he would end his presidential campaign if an official probe was launched against him over a long-running graft scandal. Then, one week ago, he backtracked on the promise to quit the race if he is placed under formal investigation over his wife’s employment. Last Friday Fillon said he would stay in the presidential race come what may, despite an ongoing investigation into whether his wife, Penelopé Fillon, did real work in exchange for receiving  €830,000 of taxpayer money as his parliamentary assistant. “My decision is clear: I am a candidate and I will continue until victory,” he said in an interview with French newspaper Le Figaro “The closer we get to the date of the election, the more scandalous it would be to deny the Right and the Centre of a candidate,” Mr Fillon added.  Or, alternatively, the more scandalous if a formal probe is opened just weeks before the election. Which, incidentally, is precisely what happened on Friday evening when according to the Le Parisien newspaper, France's financial prosecutor has asked an investigative magistrate to open a probe into allegations that presidential candidate Francois Fillon's wife was paid large sums of money for work she may not have done. According to Reuters, the report from Le Parisien followed an earlier media report on the website of French TV station M6 that the prosecutor was likely to publish a statement on the matter later on Friday. The prosecutor had said earlier this month it was continuing its probe into the affair, which has seen Fillon lose ground in opinion polls. Fillon, the candidate of The Republicans' right-wing party, has denied any wrongdoing. It is unclear if now that a formal probe is in play, he will quit, and if so how that would impact the other two frontrunners, Le Pen and Macron.

24 февраля, 17:08

Marine Le Pen: Madame Présidente?

The far-right candidate leads in French polls, but her challenges may prove insurmountable.

24 февраля, 15:43

'Teflon' Le Pen unshaken as corruption plagues French election

Where scandals have wounded François Fillon, accusations slide off Front National candidate without denting her voteOn a busy shopping street in the Paris constituency of the scandal-hit French presidential candidate François Fillon, the word corruption was creeping into the smalltalk.“All French politicians are corrupt,” said a 52-year-old pharmacist, sighing. “Some scandals come to light, others stay hidden, but 100% of politicians are up to no good – everywhere, not only in France.” Continue reading...

23 февраля, 13:08

Макрон заручился поддержкой рейтингового политика-центриста

Таким образом, кандидат в президенты Франции может получить дополнительных 3% поддержки.

Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 15:27

Саркози занялся развитием сети отелей

Бывший президент Франции Николя Саркози вошел в состав совета директоров отельного оператора AccorHotels. Он возглавит новый комитет международной стратегии в AccorHotels. Задача этого отделения — развитие сети отелей оператора за рубежом и продвижение французского туризма.

Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 01:02

После неудачи на праймериз Николя Саркози вошел в совет директоров Accor Hotels

Экс-президент будет исполнять эти обязанности до 2018 года

Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 00:52

Николя Саркози займется гостиничным бизнесом

Потерпевший неудачу на прошедших во Франции праймериз экс-президент страны Николя Саркози займется частным бизнесом, заняв пост одного из директоров французского гостиничного оператора "Аккор Хотелс".

Выбор редакции
21 февраля, 21:53

Nicolas Sarkozy joins AccorHotels board

Former French president turns to business after primary defeat

21 февраля, 20:12

Selling Of French Bonds Accelerates As Le Pen Extends Lead, Macron Tumbles In Latest Poll

Another day, another headache for owners of French bonds. In the latest French presidential poll, conducted by Elabe for TV broadcaster BFMTV, Marine Le Pen extended her lead by another 2-3 points, while support for her primary centrist challenger Emmanuel Macron, tumbled by 5 points in the last week. The poll, released today, showed that Le Pen's lead rose by either 1.5 points to 27% or by 2 points to 28%, depending whether centrist candidate Francois Bayrou would take part in the election... ... or withdraw. The most surprising result, however, is the plunge in Macron's odds, who lost five points in the first round voting intentions compared to the same poll conducted two weeks ago. Macron, who is the former French economy minister and who is running on a pro-EU platform, fell to third place behind right-wing candidate Francois Fillon, whom he eclipsed earlier in the month after a major embezzlement scandal erupted in which Fillon was accused of using public funds to pay for his family's wages. Fillon gained 3 points in both variations of the poll. But more concerning for her opponents, was the notable gains Le Pen made in the second round, where while still trailing behind both Fillon and Macron, she has seen a 4 points gain in the past week, shrinking the difference between Macron in the runoff round to 59-41. Until several weeks ago, she was firmly in the 20% range. Meanwhile, as we have observed virtually every single day in the past three weeks, the better Le Pen does the polls, the higher French yields rise, and the greater the spread to German bunds.... ... over fears that a Le Pen victory would be the last nail in the coffin for the Eurozone. Le Pen's FN party has warned it would take France out of the Eurozone, return to the French franc, and would redenominate billions in French debt, a step which leading economists and rating agencies last week declared would to "massive sovereign default" and global financial chaos.

19 февраля, 22:15

Французы ставят на Ле Пен и Макрона

Всего каких-то два месяца остается до президентских выборов во Франции. По опросам, в первом туре побеждает Марин Ле Пен с 26% голосов. Второй тур пока за Эммануэлем Макроном. Хотя и Франсуа Фийон тоже подтягивается.

19 февраля, 22:15

Французы ставят на Ле Пен и Макрона

Всего каких-то два месяца остается до президентских выборов во Франции. По опросам, в первом туре побеждает Марин Ле Пен с 26% голосов. Второй тур пока за Эммануэлем Макроном. Хотя и Франсуа Фийон тоже подтягивается.

18 февраля, 00:59

Weekend Roundup: Europe May Break The Brexit-Trump Momentum This Year

After Brexit and the victory of U.S. President Donald Trump, the widespread expectation is that continental Europe will follow suit and bring populists into power in upcoming elections there this year. Yet one repercussion of the early days of the Trump presidency is that Europeans can now see clearly the kind of ugly incivility, volatility and chaos that will result if they go down that path. The memory of Europeans also remains closer to the devastation their continent experienced in the 20th century as a result of ultra-nationalism. You can’t step into the now meticulously reconstructed Frauenkirche in Dresden – only completed in 2005 ― without recalling the World War II destruction of that magnificent city. Despite distaste for the Brussels bureaucracy and messy politics of the European Union, what former French President François Mitterrand once said still resonates with most Europeans: “Nationalism means war.”   Pierpaolo Barbieri writes this week that elections or governing realignments in 2017 are likely to see a “reverse domino” effect of centrists rolling back the populist tide in the Netherlands, France, Germany and Italy. “Europe’s 2017 may well be tempestuous,” says Barbieri, “but it will not be tragic. Indeed, the continent’s multiple electoral tests are likely to yield more, rather than less, pro-European governments than we have today.” While Barbieri may be right about the future of the Western European core, in the east, Poland has already gone down the populist road. Christian Borys and Oskar Górzyński report from Warsaw that what we are seeing now in the U.S. feels like déjà vu in Poland. “Like the Americans who found solace in Trump’s campaign speeches targeting ‘the forgotten ones,’” they write, “many Poles felt that they, too, had been passed over in the country’s prosperity run.” But once vaulted into power by the left behind, the conservative Catholic, right-wing Law and Justice Party headed by Jaroslaw Kaczyński moved quickly in an illiberal direction, challenging the media and politicizing the courts. The authors quote one Polish analyst as saying, “Kaczyński believes he can dismantle the constitution because he’s been given a mandate to do so.” Writing from Berlin, Tobias Bunde is not so sure that even the European core will hew to the center. He is concerned that fake news and Russian influence meddling threaten to tip the scales in his country if not frontally challenged. “German society is not immune to illiberal forces,” he worries. “On the contrary, the fact that Berlin played a central role in rebuking Russian aggression in Ukraine makes it a target for propaganda and disinformation campaigns, especially from those who reject sanctions and strive to protect Russia’s ‘sphere of influence’ in Eastern Europe.” Bunde argues that, while populists should be engaged and not shut out, “we also cannot tolerate half-truths or false information, nor can we accept foreign propaganda. In the end, there is nothing more critical than our liberal democracy itself. And it cannot survive without a fact-based, open debate.”  Apple chief Tim Cook echoed this concern in a recent interview with The Daily Telegraph. The explosion of misinformation is a “big problem in a lot of the world” and is “killing people’s minds in a way,” he warned. “Unfortunately,” he said, referring to fake news, “some of the people that are winning are the people that spend their time trying to get the most clicks, not tell the most truth.” At a recent Berggruen Institute conference, eBay co-founder Pierre Omidyar expressed the same concern in starker terms: “Virality is undermining democracy.”  Writing from Rome, Roberto Sommella reviews the laundry list of valid criticisms of the EU and the single currency. But he concludes that it is time to decisively reaffirm that the benefits are greater than the downsides. For the youth who will inhabit the future, all of Europe has become their common home, he says. And a common currency has made Europe as a whole a central player in global trade. Further, even as other Europeans dislike Germany’s dominant role, Sommella argues, “They forget that, without the ties that link it to the European Union, Germany would act just the same, free as a panzer in the plains – would this be an advantage to [the] Italians, [the] French and even the Brits?” Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau arrived in Europe this week for events marking the ratification of the new Canada-EU free trade pact. Ulf Gartzke and Mark Entwistle posit that one consequence of President Trump’s bashing of both open trade and European integration is that it is making Canada Europe’s key trans-Atlantic link. If the North American Free Trade Agreement is renegotiated as Trump has promised, that, in their view, will make the EU-Canada relationship even more critical. “Many European companies have made big bets on Mexico as a low-cost manufacturing location with easy access to the U.S.,” they write. “The fact that Trump has threatened to impose a new border adjustment tax on imports from Mexico or to even leave NAFTA constitutes a major geo-economic risk for these firms, including German global players like Volkswagen or BMW.” If the U.S. continues down that path, they predict, Canada will likely become the “platform from which European companies can gain access to the U.S. market.” Back in America, the suspicion is growing that the disruption and turmoil unleashed on multiple fronts by the new administration in recent weeks is an intentional effort guided by White House counselor Steve Bannon to wreak havoc. Flemming Rose, the Danish editor who became a target of worldwide Islamist ire for publishing cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad, recounts a conversation last year in which Bannon outlined his apocalyptic views. Rose notes that, first of all, he disagrees with the Trump strategist’s notion that the West is at war with all Muslims. Most worrisome for Rose, though, is, “Bannon’s conviction that the way to a better world sometimes necessitates blowing up what is” and his “apparent belief that violence and war can have a cleansing effect.”  In a similar vein, Akhilesh Pillalamarri interprets Bannon’s worldview in light of his reputed reading of the Hindu scripture, the Bhagavad Gita. Pillalamarri writes that Bannon “seems to have a worldview in accordance with some of the teachings of the Gita that see the world as a cosmic battlefield, possibly imagining himself as warrior of dharma [righteousness or duty], adapted around his idea that the defense of capitalism and Christianity should be militarized and seen in the context of a great clash of civilizations and ideas.”  Lauren Markham reports from the Santa Rosa region of Guatemala on how drought and a fungus called coffee rust are destroying the livelihoods of farmers there and forcing them to migrate. This, she reports, is a prominent example of how climate change can “collude and collide” with gang violence, inequality and a lack of opportunities to drive migration. What is happening in Guatemala, Markham warns, is a harbinger of what could come throughout the world. Our Singularity series this week reports on how robots created 100,000 jobs at Amazon. By driving down shipping costs and passing on those savings to customers in cheaper prices, demand has increased. To fulfill the new demand, new workers were hired. Looking at another side of robots, Future of Life Institute’s Ariel Conn talks with leading scientists about how smart AI can really get. WHO WE ARE   EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at The Huffington Post, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 февраля, 12:41

ЦРУ шпионило за кандидатами в президенты Франции // По данным WikiLeaks, разведку США интересовали предвыборные планы и отношения внутри партий

В преддверии президентских выборов 2012 года во Франции Центральное разведывательное управление (ЦРУ) США в течение семи месяцев шпионило за всеми основными кандидатами и их партиями. Об этом стало известно из новой порции опубликованных WikiLeaks документов. Разведку интересовали планы избирательных кампаний политиков, их взгляды на экономику и отношения с США. Авторы сайта подчеркивают, что репутация союзника США не спасла Никола Саркози от слежки со стороны ЦРУ.

17 февраля, 08:15

Сайт WikiLeaks сообщил о слежке ЦРУ за Олландом, Саркози и Ле Пен

Центральное разведывательное управление США внедряло своих агентов в основные французские партии перед выборами 2012 года

17 февраля, 03:55

Wikileaks сообщила о слежке ЦРУ за партиями Франции перед выборами в 2012 году

По данным WikiLeaks, Центральное разведывательное управление (ЦРУ) США за семь месяцев до выборов 2012 года во Франции поручило своим агентам внедриться в основные политические партии страны. ЦРУ допустило, что партия «Союз за народное движение» тогдашнего президента Никола Саркози не сумеет удержать власть. Разведка поставила своими целями выяснить стратегии партии и определить личные взгляды самого господина Саркози.Как отмечает WikiLeaks, даже тот факт, что Никола Саркози считался проамериканским политиком, не защитил его от шпионажа со стороны США. Помимо него объектами слежки были Социалистическая партия Франсуа Олланда, «Национальный фронт» Мари Ле Пен, а также кандидаты Доминик Стросс Кан и Мартин Обри. ЦРУ хотело узнать обстановку внутри партий, установить их финансирование, а также проверить партии на наличие связей с бизнес-элитами.Кроме того, разведка была заинтересована…

16 февраля, 14:13

Французская прокуратура не видит оснований закрывать дело против Фийона

Дальнейшие действия прокуратуры пока не известны.

Выбор редакции
15 февраля, 14:13

Фийон встретится с Саркози для обсуждения своего участия на выборах

При этом часть Республиканцев выступает за смену кандидата в президенты от партии на Саркози.

14 февраля, 14:44

Французские фермеры могут привести Марин Ле Пен к победе на выборах

Упадок сельского хозяйства французы связывают с политикой ЕС

15 сентября 2016, 07:56

Monsanto в Европе и революция в России

Bayer наконец-то купил Monsanto! Казалось бы, в первую очередь это проблема для европейских фермеров. Чего волноваться нам? (14.09.2016)«Expert Online» Немецкий концерн Bayer объявил о заключении сделки с американским производителем генно-модифицированных семян и гербицидов Monsanto по цене $128 за акцию. Советы директоров обеих компаний единогласно одобрили слияние. ...Выручка объединенной структуры по итогам 2015 года могла бы достигнуть 23 млрд евро. После объединения компании будут совокупно контролировать около 30% мирового урожая. Акции Bayer на фоне информации о сделки прибыли 2,2%, Monsanto подорожали на 0,2%. (конец цитаты) Но с того дня, как 30% рынка сельхозпродукции окажутся под контролем двух фирм, в недалеком прошлом участвовавших в человеконенавистнических проектах: первая входила в концерн IG Farben (владел 42,5 % акций компании, которая производила Циклон Б), а вторая производила «Агента «оранж» для британской и американской армий, который распылялся с самолетов для уничтожения растительности на территории повстанцев. Неудивительно, что корпорации-носители такого прошлого теперь объединились в своей борьбе с населением планеты.

14 декабря 2015, 17:54

Марин Ле Пен в последний раз предупреждает

Во втором туре региональных выборов во Франции партия «Национальный фронт» набрала рекордные 6 миллионов 820 тысяч голосов избирателей. Однако «Национальный фронт», получивший в первом туре большинство в шести регионах (из 13), не смог победить ни в одном из них во втором. Для ус...

28 июля 2015, 15:18

Казнь Сейфа Аль-Ислама и трагическая судьба других детей Каддафи

Ливийский суд вынес смертный приговор сыну Муаммара Каддафи. 43-летний Сейф аль-Ислам приговорен к расстрелу за преступления против мирных граждан. В ходе гражданской войны в Ливии погибли два сына Каддафи. Его вдова, два других сына и дочь бежали в Оман.

23 марта 2015, 09:46

Саркози и Ле Пен обошли социалистов на региональных выборах во Франции

Елизавета Антонова Правоцентристский блок Николя Саркози и «Национальный фронт» набрали 32,5 и 25,35% соответственно и обошли социалистов по итогам первого тура выборов в советы департаментов во Франции Французский политик Николя Саркози Фото: REUTERS 2015 Возглавляемый Николя Саркози блок во главе с партией «Союз в поддержку народного движения» лидирует по итогам первого тура выборов в советы департаментов во Франции, сообщает сайт телеканала France 24. Голосование прошло во Франции в воскресенье, 22 марта. Блок бывшего президента Франции, по последним данным, получил 32,5% голосов. Второе место заняла ультраправая партия «Национальный фронт» под руководством Марин Ле Пен с 25,35%. Комментируя результаты выборов, Ле Пен призвала правительство Франции, возглавляемое социалистом Манюэлем Вальсом, подать в отставку. Правящая Социалистическая партия заняла третье место с 22% голосов. Таким образом, партии удалось избежать полного разгрома, отмечает издание. Второй тур выборов пройдет 29 марта. Обозреватели France 24 отмечают, что для Ле Пен результаты оказались не самыми впечатляющими. Ее «Национальному фронту» прочили первое место на выборах и не менее 30% голосов. Проигрыш правоцентристам, как отмечает телеканал, подрывает надежды Ле Пен стать серьезным претендетом на победу на президентских выборах 2017 года. Непопулярность нынешнего правительства социалистов связана прежде всего с его неспособностью выполнить предвыборные экономические обещания, в том числе снизить уровень безработицы, которая сейчас достигает 10%. Ультраправые победили в первом туре в 43 из 98 департаментов страны. Второй тур состоится в следующее воскресенье, 29 марта. Саркози уже исключил, что его блок объединится с партией Ле Пен. По словам бывшего президента, «Национальный фронт» «не решит проблемы Франции, а только усугубит их».

22 сентября 2014, 01:34

Саркози решил вернуться в большую политику, чтобы "спасти" Францию

Николя Саркози сообщил, что у него нет иного выбора, кроме как вернуться в большую политику, так как Франция зашла в тупик. Экс-президент выдвинет свою кандидатуру на пост председателя главной оппозиционной партии Франции - "Союза за народное движение".

01 июля 2014, 18:54

Le скандал: Николя Саркози под стражей

Новость номер один во Франции. Николя Саркози . под стражей. Бывшего президента задержали для дачи показаний, подозревают в коррупции. Впервые в истории современной Франции задержан бывший глава государства. В отношении лидера страны (хоть и с приставкой экс) . беспрецедентный шаг.

11 ноября 2012, 23:35

Василий Смирнов/ Контрразведка готовит «Дело Мистралей»?

Материал для уголовного дела по «Оборонсервису», послужившего поводом для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова с должности министра обороны, собирала военная контрразведка ФСБ России. У теперь уже бывшего главы Минобороны «были трения с ФСБ», подтверждают сегодня «Ведомости». По некоторым сведениям, нынешнее уголовное дело представляет собой лишь «надводную часть айсберга». Намного более интересными могут оказаться материалы, собранные контрразведкой в ходе ревизии международных контактов бывшего министра.  Напомним, что Анатолий Сердюков являлся последовательным сторонником закупок зарубежных вооружений и военной техники, за что постоянно критиковался в России. Практически каждый контракт такого рода сопровождался скандалами и намеками на наличие в нем коррупционной составляющей. Самым громким, долгоиграющим и дорогостоящим для России был скандал вокруг закупки у Франции абсолютно ненужных нам, по мнению экспертов, вертолетоносцев «Мистраль». Контракт стоимостью в несколько миллиардов евро был пролоббирован лично тогдашним президентом Франции Николя Саркози и одобрен лично тогдашним президентом России Дмитрием Медведевым.   По мнению редактора авторитетного журнала Moscow Defense Brief Константина Макиенко, масштабные межгосударственные проекты по закупке вооружений часто сопровождаются «комиссионными». Со сделки минимальной стоимостью в 1,2 млрд. евро даже 1% составит 12 млн. евро. Макиенко также напоминает, что изначально цена контракта с французами предполагалась на уровне 980 млн. евро. А для французских ВМС такие корабли строятся и вовсе за 400 млн. евро, то есть в три раза дешевле той суммы, за которую «Мистраль» в конечном счете продали России. Но «произошло вмешательство политического руководства России, в лице бывшего президента Медведева, которое обязало Министерство обороны заключить этот контракт в двухнедельный срок... Таким образом... российский налогоплательщик потерял 220 млн. евро», - отмечал в связи с этим эксперт. Если прямые потери для российской казны, по оценкам экспертов, могли составить 220 млн. евро, то какими могли быть «комиссионные», и кому они могли предназначаться - вполне себе предмет для пристального изучения контрразведчиками. Стоит отметить, что практика «особого мотивирования» сделок на самом высоком государственном уровне российским бизнесменам и покровительствующим им чиновникам как минимум хорошо знакома. Ведь совсем недавно президент Белоруссии Александр Лукашенко внезапно признался, что один из считающихся близких к Дмитрию Медведеву коммерсантов предлагал ему «откат» в 5 млрд. долларов за льготные условия приватизации ряда белорусских предприятий. По некоторым сведениям, российские контрразведчики уже давно собирали материал о злоупотреблениях и вероятных коррупционных схемах, сопровождавших подписание контракта по «Мистралям». Но дать ход этому делу не представлялось возможным, поскольку это нанесло бы серьезный репутационной удар не только по Анатолию Сердюкову, но и по Дмитрию Медведеву, сменившему пост президента РФ на кресло премьер-министра. Однако, бесконечно замалчивать эту ситуацию также не представлялось возможным. Тем более, что встречное расследование внезапно начали и французские спецслужбы, проводящие в настоящее время пристальную ревизию деятельности бывшего президента Франции Николя Саркози. Более того: французская сторона на неформальном уровне уже якобы изъявила желание придать огласке некую документальную информацию о том, почему именно руководство Минобороны РФ при деятельном непротивлении Дмитрия Медведева в ходе сделки по «Мистралям» не только не помешало нанесению экономического ущерба Российской Федерации, но и непосредственно способствовало этому.  Символично, что свой последний зарубежный визит в статусе министра обороны Анатолий Сердюков совершил именно во Францию. На минувшей неделе, когда в России уже вовсю разгорался скандал вокруг «Оборонсервиса», Сердюков в Париже расхваливал французскую экипировку, бронетехнику и боеприпасы. Там же министром как ни в чем не бывало обсуждалась скандальная закупка у французов пятидесяти «генеральских вертолетов» Eurocopter, о которой в сентябре подробно писала газета «Московский Комсомолец». Нельзя исключать, что одной из истинных целей этой «прощальной» поездки Сердюкова в Париж была попытка заблокировать или хотя бы отсрочить развитие скандала по «Мистралям». Одной лишь контрразведке теперь может быть известно, какие условия этого и с кем именно могли обсуждаться. Как бы то ни было, но дело «Оборонсервиса» как формальный повод для отставки Анатолия Сердюкова представляется довольно удачным. В отличие от ожидаемого в ближайшее время скандала вокруг «Мистралей», оно не наносит прямого непосредственного удара по репутации Дмитрия Медведева. К тому же, после отставки Сердюкова его можно сделать «крайним» по любым вновь открывшимся обстоятельствам, - т.е. вероятные разоблачения французов лично для премьера теперь будут уже не так страшны. Пока, впрочем, глава правительства не спешит окончательно «сдавать» своего многолетнего соратника и подопечного. Окружение Дмитрия Медведева уже распространило информацию о том, что Анатолий Сердюков подал прошение об отставке сам (а не был уволен), и что его деятельность на посту министра в целом оценивается премьером позитивно. «Сердюков был эффективным министром обороны, это проявилось в ходе преобразований, которые он проводил в вооруженных силах», сказал Медведев, комментируя отставку министра.