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17 мая, 15:00

How Blockchain Could Help Emerging Markets Leap Ahead

Much has been made of the potential for blockchain technologies to open up new vistas for business and society. But is there a way for this revolutionary technology to empower the rich and poor alike? We argue that, like previous revolutionary ideas, blockchain has the potential to help developing nations leapfrog more-developed economies. Leapfrogging — using the lack of existing infrastructure as an opportunity to adopt the most advanced methods — has been a highly effective strategy for developing nations over the last few decades. The most visible example of leapfrogging today is in nations like Kenya and South Africa, which have rolled out near-universal telephone access using 3G networks instead of laying down copper cables, and provided internet access by smartphone rather than with desktop PCs. But it’s not just physical infrastructure that can be leapfrogged. One of the 20th century’s most celebrated examples of leapfrogging happened in Japan, when the country recovered from the ravages of World War II by embracing sophisticated new manufacturing techniques. Quality control revolutionized Japanese manufacturing in the 1960s and 1970s, even though the concept could not find a foothold in American manufacturing (although it was originally developed by an American, W. Edwards Deming). Quality control became a cornerstone of industry in Japan, reshaping the country’s national brand around companies known for manufacturing excellence, such as Toyota, Canon, and Nikon. European and American companies had to play catch-up for decades. How Blockchain WorksHere are five basic principles underlying the technology. 1. Distributed Database Each party on a blockchain has access to the entire database and its complete history. No single party controls the data or the information. Every party can verify the records of its transaction partners directly, without an intermediary. 2. Peer-to-Peer Transmission Communication occurs directly between peers instead of through a central node. Each node stores and forwards information to all other nodes. 3. Transparency with Pseudonymity Every transaction and its associated value are visible to anyone with access to the system. Each node, or user, on a blockchain has a unique 30-plus-character alphanumeric address that identifies it. Users can choose to remain anonymous or provide proof of their identity to others. Transactions occur between blockchain addresses. 4. Irreversibility of Records Once a transaction is entered in the database and the accounts are updated, the records cannot be altered, because they’re linked to every transaction record that came before them (hence the term “chain”). Various computational algorithms and approaches are deployed to ensure that the recording on the database is permanent, chronologically ordered, and available to all others on the network. 5. Computational Logic The digital nature of the ledger means that blockchain transactions can be tied to computational logic and in essence programmed. So users can set up algorithms and rules that automatically trigger transactions between nodes. One of today’s most celebrated examples of leapfrogging is the M-Pesa mobile payment system in Kenya and Tanzania, which lets people bank in their national currency using only their phones, leapfrogging traditional banking practices and creating a mobile banking revolution. This in turn boosted development by allowing relatively poor farmers to reliably send and receive payments at affordable rates, fostering economic growth by lowering transaction costs. Research funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has found that mobile money services have lifted 194,000 Kenyans out of poverty, with a particularly large impact in female-headed households. Simply copying the banking systems of the West, which have been built up over centuries, would not have been as easy or as effective for the people of Kenya and Tanzania. An added benefit is that mobile money services such as M-Pesa are more advanced and sophisticated than those found in many developed economies. It simply made more sense to leapfrog the financial infrastructure of the developed world, rather than support outdated legacy systems. Where are the opportunities for developing economies to leapfrog now? India’s Aadhaar biometric ID card system is a great example. It secures transactions by “anchoring” people’s identities, thus facilitating trade. The system assigns a unique 12-digit number to all Indian residents, which is stored in a central database along with biometrics such as fingerprints and iris scans. If someone wants to perform a transaction, such as opening a bank account, they present the card and have their fingerprint or iris scanned. This helps to prove their identity, cutting down on fraud and creating market efficiencies. The system currently serves a billion people. This is by far the largest and most comprehensive adoption of biometrics technology by any government in the world; transactional security is a priority in India. Aadhaar can be used to sign up for new mobile phone service, a process that still requires paper ID in many countries and is frequently subject to fraud. Transactional security extends beyond biometrics, which only secure the last link in a financial transaction; blockchain could secure the entire transactional process. For developing economies, this security is vital for ordinary people who want to trade. Even better, blockchains can spur local high-tech innovation. The natural decentralization of blockchain means that distance to infrastructure like data centers doesn’t matter. Developing nations can build their own technology hubs, and any code created there would be as secure as services created anywhere else in the world. Everywhere is the same to blockchain, which could support home-grown technology industries in many developing countries. Blockchains can also address the most pressing needs of developing-world governments: the modernization and digitization of government functions. The current world leader in blockchain adoption is Dubai, and there is much in Dubai’s approach that could be adopted by developing world nations. The Dubai Blockchain Strategy (disclosure: Vinay is the designer) envisions moving all government documents — more than 100 million documents per year — onto a blockchain by 2020, creating a new platform for innovation and huge cost savings. The approach Dubai is taking to blockchain adoption, with the central government providing services on the blockchain as a way to spur innovation, could be an example for developing countries looking to kick their economic growth into a higher gear by establishing standards of integrity in fundamental systems of trade — particularly where exports require strong evidence about the origins of goods, like coffee or timber. The Internet of Agreements is our technology vision for trade facilitation, building on core concepts in the blockchain space. We believe that any agreement or transaction can be supported by technology, and our vision is simple: global trade, local regulation, and computers handle the red tape. Global trade, with local regulation facilitated by technology, works because technology makes the transaction costs manageable. We don’t necessarily need huge unifying platform agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership or even the European Economic Area to reduce the paperwork associated with trade and borders — if we have the right technologies. Blockchains default to being open data, which would allow governments and companies to rapidly learn from, test, and evolve new, more efficient best practices for conducting and facilitating trade. In such a future, the transaction costs of economic activity are drastically reduced in much the same way that the internet reduced the transaction costs of publishing and communication, resulting in the explosion of ideas we associate with it today. The usefulness of blockchain has similar promise. Just getting the costs of regulation and compliance down would open world markets and create wealth, but that doesn’t have to mean changing local regulations. Blockchain has already drawn the attention of the economist Hernando de Soto, who has worked for decades on improving access to the formal economy for the world’s poor. He has commented that the reason poor people don’t have more access to the formal economy is twofold: (1) the record-keeping systems in their developing world countries are unreliable and (2) they won’t give up information about themselves and their transactions because they don’t trust the people they’d be giving it to (i.e., their own governments). “They don’t want to be vulnerable to something that can be used against them,” says de Soto. “And that’s what’s interesting about the tamper-proof blockchain — if you can get the right message about it out there, [people will see] that it’s worthwhile recording yourself.” Because it was explicitly designed to function in an environment where participants cannot necessarily trust each other, blockchain technology is extremely secure. Records held on a blockchain database are immune to being tampered with by third parties, and can thus be authoritative. Smart contracts can provide automatic and predictable execution, again removing the ability for third parties to subvert agreed-upon processes. The benefits for a developing economy are clear: There’s less potential for fraud and corruption, trade becomes more efficient and less costly, government becomes more effective, and local technology hubs can form to build out the infrastructure and export the knowledge gained. If M-Pesa and similar services could lift tens of thousands of people out of poverty, imagine what a full-scale transformation built on blockchain might do. It could create hyperefficient government with provably trustworthy infrastructure; new markets and opportunities for citizens to access the formal economy on equal terms; efficiencies of operations that lower prices and improve the quality of goods for all consumers; and a kickstart to high-tech innovation around the world. All the goods flowing in and out of developing world countries could be tagged. For example, safe medication, protected from fraud, could flow in, while properly harvested wood and safely manufactured goods flow out. Educational records, business histories, health care information, and credit ratings could all be made usable the world over, helping those who want to trade or travel to prove their credentials. Anybody who has ever paid too much for a college transcript or tried to clear a shadow on their credit score can see how systems like this would be helpful in our daily lives. Nations that already have somewhat efficient systems might lack the incentive to adopt blockchain technologies at this time, but the rest of the world may well see an opportunity to innovate on internet time. If they do, the many ways they might leapfrog developed nations are limited only by the imagination of billions of people whose first real access to governance and trade infrastructure will look entirely 21st-century. Those are big dreams, and we should not be surprised if some of the world’s next leading megabrands and global platforms are born far away from the traditional centers of technology development. The future is global, and so is blockchain innovation.

11 мая, 17:04

Nikon (NINOY) Posts Fiscal 2017 Loss, Revenues Remain Weak

Nikon (NINOY) reported fiscal 2017 net loss on the back of huge restructuring expenses.

08 мая, 17:45

What's in the Cards for Yelp (YELP) this Earnings Season?

Yelp Inc. (YELP) is set to report first-quarter 2017 results on May 9.

08 мая, 16:46

Will Voxeljet (VJET) Disappoint Yet Again in Q1 Earnings?

Voxeljet AG (VJET) is slated to report first-quarter 2017 results on May 11, after the closing bell.

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07 мая, 17:02

Анонс зеркального фотоаппарата Nikon D820 ожидается летом

Сетевые источники обнародовали предварительную информацию о новом зеркальном фотоаппарате Nikon, который, как ожидается, выйдет на коммерческий рынок под обозначением D820. Новинка должна прийти на смену полнокадровой модели Nikon D810, с подробным обзором которой можно ознакомиться в нашем материале. Свою предшественницу готовящаяся к выпуску камера превзойдёт по качеству изображений, формируемых при низких и высоких значениях светочувствительности.

05 мая, 16:36

Rostov’s most colorful church: From Prokudin-Gorsky to the present

At the beginning of the 20th century the Russian chemist and photographer Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky invented a complex process for vivid, detailed color photography (see box text below). Inspired to use this new method to record the diversity of the Russian Empire, he photographed numerous architectural monuments during the decade before the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II in 1917. Certainly among the most colorful structures Prokudin-Gorsky photographed is the Church of the Hodegetria Icon in Rostov Veliky, which he visited in 1911. My own photographs of this church were taken during several visits between 1987 and 2012. Located some 130 miles northeast of Moscow, Rostov Veliky (the Great) is one of the earliest historically attested towns in Russia, first mentioned under 862 in the chronicle "Tale of Bygone Years." Its main architectural ensemble is the majestic kremlin, which rises above the north shore of Lake Nero. Rostov kremlin. Northwest corner tower & Church of the Hodegetria Icon, south view. July 12, 2012. Summer 1911. / Photo: Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky The kremlin’s original designation was the Court of the Metropolitan, in recognition of its primary builder, Metropolitan Jonah of Rostov. After the Patriarch, Metropolitan is the highest ecclesiastical rank in the Russian Orthodox Church. Jonah Sysoevich (ca. 1607-90) was the son of a country priest named Sysoi. Tonsured at the Resurrection Monastery in Uglich, he rose through the monastic hierarchy, and in 1652 was appointed Metropolitan of Rostov by the newly elected Patriarch Nikon in Moscow. Rostov kremlin. Northwest corner tower&Church of the Hodegetria Icon, southeast view. Oct. 4, 1992. / Photo: William Brumfield Jonah had at his command villages with some 16,000 peasants, as well as the best craftsmen and artists of a large, prosperous diocese. Within 20 years — between 1670 and 1690 — Jonah's builders erected not only several large churches and residences for the Metropolitan's Court, but also the kremlin’s magnificent walls and towers. After Jonah’s death in 1690, his work at the kremlin was continued by the Metropolitan Josephat, whose buildings included a church dedicated to the Hodegetria Icon of the Mother of God. The Hodegetria Icon, which depicts Mary holding the Christ Child on her left arm and pointing to the infant with her right hand, is one of the most venerated objects in Russian Orthodoxy. A particularly notable example was held in the Dormition Cathedral in Smolensk. Rostov kremlin. Church of the Hodegetria Icon, south facade, window details. August 21, 1988. / Photo: William Brumfield Diamond accents Completed in 1693 at the northwest corner of the kremlin walls, the Rostov Church of the Hodegetria Icon underwent modifications in the 18th century. However, its basic form, featuring a single cupola and an open gallery on the upper floor, remained. The exuberantly painted diamond pattern on its exterior was apparently instigated by Afanasy Volkhovsky, bishop of Rostov from 1763-1776, who was known to be fond of “Moscow Baroque” ornamentalism.  Rostov kremlin. Church of the Hodegetria Icon & Church of the Resurrection, southwest view. Aug. 7, 1987. / Photo: William Brumfield The diamond pattern was originally imported to Muscovy by Italian architects at the turn of the 16th century. The earliest example is the “Faceted” or “Rusticated Palace,” completed with diamond rustication in the Moscow Kremlin in the 1490s. Although the diamond pattern had an enduring appeal in Russia, local builders rarely applied it in carved stone. It proved much easier to paint the facets on brick walls as a colorful trompe l'oeil. The surge of ornamentalism at the end of the 17th century saw a revival of this technique throughout Muscovy, from Kostroma to Sergiev Posad. The Rostov church is a late example. Later history With the death of Josephat in 1701, little else of note was built in the Rostov kremlin. Skilled masons throughout Russia were drafted into the construction of St. Petersburg, founded in 1703. With the transfer of the regional metropolitanate from Rostov to Yaroslavl in 1787, the Rostov kremlin began to decay.  Rostov kremlin. Church of the Hodegetria Icon, south facade, upper level&gallery. Aug. 21, 1988. / Photo: William Brumfield Fortunately, in the late 19th century Rostov merchants gathered funds to maintain the kremlin ensemble. In 1883, the White Chamber, built as a banquet hall for the Metropolitan of Rostov, opened as a museum of church antiquities that was the predecessor of the current distinguished Rostov Kremlin Museum. Thus, through local pride, Metropolitan Jonah’s visionary project was preserved for Prokudin-Gorsky and subsequent generations. A comparison of my photographs of the Hodegetria Church with those of Prokudin-Gorsky shows few changes over the decades. A notable difference just beneath the roof is the disappearance of a row of iconic wall paintings, with a large image of the Virgin of the Sign (Znamenie) in the middle. It is not clear when they were originally created, but such exterior paintings were usually effaced during the Soviet period. Rostov kremlin. Northwest corner tower & Church of the Hodegetria Icon, view from Metropolitan's Chambers. Aug. 7, 1987. / Photo: William Brumfield In the early 20th century the Russian photographer Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky invented a complex process for color photography. Between 1903 and 1916 he traveled through the Russian Empire and took over 2,000 photographs with the new process, which involved three exposures on a glass plate. In August 1918 he left Russia with a large part of his collection of glass negatives and ultimately resettled in France. After his death in Paris in 1944, his heirs sold his collection to the Library of Congress. In the early 21st century the Library digitized the Prokudin-Gorsky Collection and made it freely available to the global public. A number of Russian websites now have versions of the collection. In 1986 the architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield organized the first exhibit of Prokudin-Gorsky photographs at the Library of Congress. Over a period of work in Russia beginning in 1970, Brumfield has photographed most of the sites visited by Prokudin-Gorsky. This series of articles will juxtapose Prokudin-Gorsky’s views of architectural monuments with photographs taken by Brumfield decades later.  Read more: The Kremlin of Rostov the Great: Last Masterpiece of medieval Russia

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02 мая, 12:42

ASML и Carl Zeiss подали встречный иск против Nikon

ASML, третий по величине производитель полупроводникового оборудования в мире, заявил в минувшую пятницу, что подал встречный иск против Nikon после того, как несколькими днями ранее японская компания начала против него широкомасштабную патентную битву. REUTERS/Thomas Peter

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01 мая, 17:28

What's in the Cards for Zillow Group (ZG) in Q1 Earnings?

Zillow Group, Inc. (ZG) is set to report first-quarter 2017 results on May 4.

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25 апреля, 10:55

Nikon подала в суд на ASML и Carl Zeiss за нарушение патентов

В декабре 2016 года компания Nikon объявила о начале реструктуризации бизнеса. Как и многие другие японские производители электроники, Nikon вошла в чёрную полосу убытков. В частности, продажи цифровых камер компании страдают под давлением смартфонов. Между тем значительную часть выручки компании Nikon приносило производство промышленного литографического оборудования для выпуска полупроводников. Но всё это осталось в 90-х годах прошлого века. Увы, пионер рынка оборудования для производства чипов уступил пальму первенства конкурентам, а именно — нидерландской компании ASML. Первый коммерческий сканер ASML для EUV-литографии (NXE:3300B)

25 апреля, 00:55

Nikon sues ASML, Zeiss for using chip-making knowhow

Nikon Corp said Monday it has taken legal action in the Netherlands, Germany and Japan over the use of semiconductor lithography technology in products made by Dutch and German companies.…

24 апреля, 12:50

Japan’s Nikon sues ASML, Zeiss over chip-making technology

Nikon Corp. said Monday it has taken legal action in the Netherlands, Germany and Japan over the use of semiconductor lithography technology in products made by Dutch and German companies.

21 апреля, 17:16

The Kremlin of Rostov the Great: Last Masterpiece of medieval Russia

Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection (right), north wall, Dormition Cathedral. Oct. 4, 1992. / Photo: William Brumfield At the beginning of the 20th century, the Russian chemist and photographer Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky invented a complex process for vivid, detailed color photography. Inspired to use this new method to record the diversity of the Russian Empire, he photographed numerous historic sites during the decade before the abdication of Tsar Nicholas II in 1917. In 1911, Prokudin-Gorsky visited Rostov Veliky, or Rostov the Great, located some 130 miles northeast of Moscow. Rostov is one of the earliest historically attested towns in Russia. It was first mentioned under 862 in the ancient chronicle "Tale of Bygone Years."  Prokudin-Gorsky traveled to Rostov not only to photograph its monumental architecture, but also its Museum of Antiquities, whose august patron was Nicholas II. My own photographs were taken during several visits from 1988 through 2013. Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection (right), north wall, Dormition Cathedral. View north from Metropolitan's chambers. Summer 1911. / Photo: Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky Rostov's main architectural ensemble is its majestic kremlin, which rises above the north shore of Lake Nero. Although most of the ensemble was not built until the 17th century, this citadel conveys an unforgettable sense of Rostov's importance for medieval Russia. A valuable patron The ensemble’s original designation was the Court of the Metropolitan, in recognition of its founder, Metropolitan Jonah of Rostov. After Patriarch, Metropolitan is the highest ecclesiastical rank in the Russian Orthodox Church. An ambitious, dynamic church leader, Jonah Sysoevich (ca. 1607-90) was the son of a country priest named Sysoi. Tonsured at the Resurrection Monastery in Uglich, he rose through the regional monastic hierarchy and in 1652 was appointed Metropolitan of Rostov by the newly elected Patriarch Nikon in Moscow. Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection (right), north wall, Dormition Cathedral. Southwest view. August 21, 1988. / Photo: William Brumfield Jonah had at his command land holdings and villages with some 16,000 peasants, as well as the best craftsmen and artists of a large, prosperous diocese. Within 20 years — between 1670 and 1690 — Jonah's builders erected not only several large churches and other buildings for the Metropolitan's Court and residence, but also magnificent walls with towers and gate churches. Among Prokudin-Gorsky’s several photographs of the kremlin is a view north from the Metropolitan’s Chambers. On the right is the superb Church of the Resurrection, located over the north Holy Gate, which served as the main entrance to the kremlin from Cathedral Square. Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection. South view. Oct. 4, 1992. / Photo: William Brumfield Architectural treasures Built in 1670, the Resurrection Church was one of the earliest churches within the ensemble. Its extended base supports an enclosed gallery on the south and west. The main structure is crowned by five soaring cupolas topped with ornamental iron crosses. Its interior, also photographed by Prokudin-Gorsky, is covered with frescoes and will be the subject of a subsequent article. On the wall to the left of the church is a small bell pavilion. The Rostov kremlin walls, supported by massive arches, resemble the late 17th-century walls of the St. Cyril-Belozersk Monastery in Kirillov, which was intended to serve as a mighty fortress guarding the Russian North. The Rostov kremlin, however, was never intended for military purposes, and its walls are solely for the imposing effect desired by Jonah. Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection. Southwest view. Aug. 21, 1988. / Photo: William Brumfield Visible beyond the walls on the left is the upper part of the Dormition Cathedral, first built of stone in the mid-12th century and rebuilt twice thereafter. Its final form, erected in 1508-1512, was modeled on the Dormition Cathedral in the Moscow kremlin, thus symbolizing the spiritual unity of the Muscovite realm. As with many other major Russian churches, the Dormition Cathedral’s original curved roofline was later replaced with a simpler sloped roof visible in Prokudin-Gorsky’s photograph. My photographs show the post-war restoration to the earlier roofline that followed the contours of the semicircular gables (zakomary). My more recent views also show changes in the color of the Resurrection Church walls. Rostov kremlin. Church of Resurrection. Southwest view. July 12, 2012. / Photo: William Brumfield Otherwise, a comparison of our photographs shows few changes over the decades. This stability is in no small measure due to the remarkable success of an early Russian preservation effort. With the transfer of the metropolitanate from Rostov to Yaroslavl in 1787 the Rostov kremlin rapidly fell into decay. Many of its buildings were used as warehouses, and there were thoughts of demolishing structures for their brick. Fortunately, in the late 19th century Rostov merchants gathered funds to maintain the ensemble. In 1883 the White Chamber, built as a banquet hall for the Metropolitan of Rostov, opened as a museum of church antiquities, predecessor of the current distinguished Rostov Kremlin Museum. Thus through local pride Metropolitan Jonah’s visionary project was preserved for Prokudin-Gorsky and many subsequent generations. Cathedral of the Dormition. Southwest view. June 28, 1995. / Photo: William Brumfield In the early 20th century the Russian photographer Sergei Prokudin-Gorsky invented a complex process for color photography. Between 1903 and 1916 he traveled through the Russian Empire and took over 2,000 photographs with the new process, which involved three exposures on a glass plate. In August 1918 he left Russia with a large part of his collection of glass negatives and ultimately resettled in France. After his death in Paris in 1944, his heirs sold his collection to the Library of Congress. In the early 21st century the Library digitized the Prokudin-Gorsky Collection and made it freely available to the global public. A number of Russian websites now have versions of the collection. In 1986 the architectural historian and photographer William Brumfield organized the first exhibit of Prokudin-Gorsky photographs at the Library of Congress. Over a period of work in Russia beginning in 1970, Brumfield has photographed most of the sites visited by Prokudin-Gorsky. This series of articles will juxtapose Prokudin-Gorsky’s views of architectural monuments with photographs taken by Brumfield decades later.  Read more: The Massive Walls of Solovki: From Prokudin-Gorsky to the present

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16 апреля, 00:01

Новая статья: Главные события прошедшей недели, 10–16 апреля 2017 года

В этом выпуске: LeEco отказалась покупать американскую компанию Vizio; «зеркалка» Nikon D7500 умеет снимать 4К-видео; HTC One X10 анонсирован только для российского рынка; E Ink Holdings и Sony создают совместное предприятие; E Ink Holdings и Sony создают совместное предприятие; Qualcomm подала встречный иск к Apple; Ricoh отрицает уход с рынка потребительских фотокамер

14 апреля, 09:00

Сотрудников ищут Skyeng, Redmadrobot, Mail.Ru Group и Streetbee

Редакция vc.ru продолжает публиковать резюме специалистов, желающих работать в стартапах и ИТ-компаниях (выходят по понедельникам), а также вакансии компаний, которые ищут сотрудников (выходят по четвергам).

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13 апреля, 14:51

3DNews Daily: автомобильные «глаза» Sony, анонс Nikon D7500, кража PIN-кода по датчикам движения

В этом выпуске: автомобильные «глаза» Sony, анонс Nikon D7500, кража PIN-кода по датчикам движения

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12 апреля, 16:37

Ricoh планирует выйти из бизнеса по производству фотокамер

Вслед за компаниями Canon, Nikon, Samsung и другими известными брендами о судьбе бизнеса по выпуску цифровых фотокамер задумалась компания Ricoh. И не от хорошей жизни, хотя всего 6 лет назад — в 2011 году — Ricoh имела виды на старший сегмент цифровых зеркальных аппаратов со сменными объективами. Тогда компания приобрела бизнес японской компании Hoya и права на бренд Pentax, но финансового благополучия ей это не принесло. Убытки стали неотъемлемой частью регулярной отчётности Ricoh. Серия юбилейных камер Pentax K-3 II

12 апреля, 16:35

Is Nikon a Great Stock for Value Investors?

Let's put Nikon Corporation (NINOY) stock into this equation and find out if it is a good choice for value-oriented investors right now

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12 апреля, 09:00

Nikon D7500: новая зеркальная фотокамера с поддержкой 4K-видео

Компания Nikon сегодня официально представила цифровой зеркальный фотоаппарат среднего уровня D7500, продажи которого начнутся предстоящим летом. Утверждается, что новинка обеспечивает такое же качество изображения, что и D500 — флагманская зеркальная фотокамера Nikon формата DX. Анонсированное устройство оборудовано 20,9-мегапиксельной КМОП-матрицей (23,5 × 15,7 мм) и высокопроизводительным процессором обработки изображений EXPEED 5. Диапазон чувствительности равен 100–51200 единиц ISO с возможностью расширения до эквивалента 1 640 000 единиц ISO. Выдержка — от 1/8000 до 30 с.

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11 апреля, 13:47

Фотография Nikon D7500 попала в Сеть

Для тех, кто присматривается к покупке новой зеркальной камеры, Nikon готовит очередное предложение, которое может быть представлено публике в скором времени. На ресурсе Nokishita было опубликовано изображение, на котором якобы запечатлён фотоаппарат Nikon D7500 — выход на рынок этой модели должен состояться в июне 2017 года, а анонс — в ближайшие недели. Ранее сообщались ожидаемые характеристики этой камеры, которая якобы получит 20-Мп сенсор, применявшийся уже в старшей модели Nikon D500. Ожидается, что показатели чувствительности будут варьироваться от ISO 100 до ISO 51200, будет присутствовать система автофокусировки по 51 точке, скоростной режим фотографий до 8 кадров/с и возможность съёмки видео в разрешении 4K. Заодно фотокамера будет оснащаться поворотным экраном для более удобной съёмки с нестандартных углов и поддерживать службы Nikon SnapBridge.

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10 апреля, 17:55

В музее Nikon открылась выставка прототипов камер прошлых лет

Музей, который функционирует на территории головного офиса Nikon в Токио, проводит в эти дни очередную выставку, приуроченную к 100-летнему юбилею компании. Новая экспозиция называется «Прототипы камер — воспоминания разработчиков» (Prototype Cameras — Developers' Memories) и будет открыта для посетителей до 1 июля 2017 года. В рамках данного мероприятия Nikon демонстрирует порядка сорока прототипов фототехники, созданных в период с 40-х по 80-е годы прошлого века. В числе экспонатов можно увидеть прообраз популярной плёночной зеркалки Nikon F3, созданный в 1975 году, за пять лет до её выхода на рынок, и одну из первых версий Nikon F, датируемую 1957 годом (производство Nikon F началось в 1959 году). Все представленные образцы интересны тем, что на них разработчики испытывали инновационные технологии, функции и дизайн, которые впоследствии были внедрены в серийную продукцию.