• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди318
      • Показать ещё
      Компании503
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы359
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели148
      • Показать ещё
      Разное360
      • Показать ещё
      Формат35
      Издания31
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации45
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы2
16 июля, 18:58

Goldman Is Troubled By The Fed's Growing Warnings About High Asset Prices

With both the S&P, and global stock markets, closing last week at new all time highs, it is safe to say that any and all warnings about "froth", and perhaps a bubble in the market, as Deutsche Bank characterized it last week have been ignored. And yet, as Goldman's economist team writes over the weekend, the recent rise in warnings about "risk levels" and asset prices by Fed officials is concerning: "Fed officials have expressed greater concern about asset prices and financial stability risk recently, a change from their more relaxed view last fall. In particular, the minutes to the June FOMC meeting highlighted concern about high equity valuations and low volatility and drew a connection between potential overheating in the real economy and financial markets." To underscore this point, here is a recap of recent Fed warnings about asset prices, which have increased significantly since the presidential election: Janet Yellen, July 12, 2017 So in looking at asset prices and valuations, we try not to opine on whether they are correct or not correct. But as you asked what the potential spillovers or impacts on financial stability could be of asset price revaluations — my assessment of that is that as assets prices have moved up, we have not seen a substantial increase in borrowing based on those asset price movements. We have a financial system and banking system that is well capitalized and strong and I believe it is resilient. FOMC Minutes, July 5, 2017 ...in the assessment of a few participants equity prices were high when judged against standard valuation measures...  Some participants suggested that increased risk tolerance among investors might be contributing to elevated asset prices more broadly; a few participants expressed concern that subdued market volatility, coupled with a low equity premium, could lead to a buildup of risks to financial stability... Several participants expressed concern that a substantial and sustained unemployment undershooting might make the economy more likely to experience financial instability or could lead to a sharp rise in inflation that would require a rapid policy tightening that, in turn, could raise the risk of an economic downturn. Janet Yellen, June 27, 2017 Asset valuations are somewhat rich if you use some traditional metrics like price earnings ratios, but I wouldn't try to comment on appropriate valuations, and those ratios out to depend on long-term interest rates. John Williams, June 27, 2017 The stock market seems to be running pretty much on fumes... so something that clearly is a risk to the U S economy, some correction there, is something that we have to be prepared for and to respond to if it does happen. The U S economy still is doing — I think on fundamentals — is doing quite well. So I'm not worried about some kind of late- '90s, dot-corn bubble economy where a lot of the underpinnings were driven by the stock market. Bill Dudley, June 23, 2017 Monetary policymakers need to take the evolution of financial conditions into consideration... For example. when financial conditions tighten sharply, this may mean that monetary policy may need to be tightened by less or even loosened. On the other hand, when financial conditions ease - as has been the case recently - this can provide additional impetus for the decision to continue to remove monetary policy accommodation. Stanley Fischer, June 20, 2017 House prices are now high and rising in several countries, perhaps as a result of extended periods of low interest rates. Janet Yellen, June 14, 2017 We're not targeting financial conditions. We're trying to set a path of the federal funds rate, but taking account of those factors and others that don't show up in a financial conditions index. Robert Kaplan, June 30, 2017 That's not to say these imbalances won't build and I am concerned that they may but if you ask me today I think right now it's manageable, but I do think if there were some correction also in the markets. that could actually be a healthy thing. Neel Kashkari, May 17, 2017 Monetary policy should be used only as a last resort to address asset prices, because the costs to the economy of such a policy response are potentially so large. Eric Rosengren, May 8, 2017 While I am certainly not expecting such a scenario to occur, central bankers are charged with thinking about adverse risks to the economy. So current valuations in real estate are one such risk that I will continue to watch carefully. Jerome Powell, January 7, 2017 With inflation under control. overheating has shown up in the form of financial excess. The current extended period of very low nominal rates calls for a high degree of vigilance against the buildup of risks to the stability of the financial system. Perhaps their concern is due to the following Citi chart which we have discussed on numerous occasions, and which shows the "incredible" correlation between global central bank balance sheet size and market returns in recent years. Or perhaps the Fed is not worried about stock prices at all, and while the recent commentary about asset valuations is notable, what the Fed is really concerned about is the recent pick up in the unemployment rate, something which as Bank of America noted last week, "there are no episodes in which unemployment rose a bit and remained stable at its natural employment rate. Rather, a recession has always followed." Whatever the reason for this unexpected shift in rhetoric, here are some additional summary observations from Goldman, which while pointing out that such comments by Fed members are quite unorthodox, "Fed officials do appear more concerned about financial stability risks, and this could strengthen the case somewhat for tightening in the future." Traditionally, Fed officials have thought it wisest to respond to financial variables through their forecasted impact on inflation and employment. They have taken a more skeptical view of using the funds rate to lean against stretched valuations, though they have not closed that door entirely. We find that the Fed has largely followed these principles in practice, responding primarily not to valuation levels but rather to something like our FCI growth impulse, an estimate of the impact of recent changes in financial conditions on the growth outlook. Currently, the FCI growth impulse points to a healthy boost over the coming year, strengthening the case for further tightening. Leaving financial instability concerns out of the reaction function does not mean the policy stance has no role in reducing these risks. Our cross-country model of asset price busts shows that bust risk is substantially higher when the output gap is more positive, supporting the concern noted in the June minutes. This suggests that if the Fed is successful in containing overheating in the real economy, it can breathe at least a little easier about bubble risk. To what degree might the FOMC view financial stability risk as an independent argument for higher rates? Research by Fed economists suggests that because credit growth has been only moderate, the optimal response of the funds rate to financial instability risk is very small. But this could cut both ways: the economy’s reduced dependence on debt relative to the last two cycles also implies less risk that moderate tightening will lead to a crash. At this point, the FOMC does not need additional reasons for gradual further tightening, which a traditional reaction function based on the dual mandate suggests is already warranted. But Fed officials do appear more concerned about financial stability risks, and this could strengthen the case somewhat for tightening in the future. The quandary would be promptly resolved, of course, if in the ongoing increasingly nebulous relationship between the Fed's policy intentions and record high stock prices, which as Kevin Muir summarized simply as "stocks dare the Fed", and are "about to make Dudley, Fischer and Yellen extremely nervous", the Fed were to defy markets and unexpectedly hike rates once again, responding to the "dare", and making it clear that the Fed is indeed focused first and foremost to threats to financial stability resulting from market "froth" and "bubbles"... which incidentally it itself has created.

12 июля, 14:12

Will Low Inflation Delay Fed Rate Hikes?

Fed funds futures are currently pricing in a low probability that the Federal Reserve will squeeze monetary policy at any one of the next three FOMC meeting (Jul. 26, Sep. 20, Nov. 1). The Sep. meeting has recently been identified by some analysts as the most likely date for another rate hike. But the futures […]

11 июля, 15:14

Уильямс: ФРС сократит ставку еще раз в 2017 году

Москва, 11 июля - "Вести.Экономика". Один из главных сотрудников американского центробанка заявил, что он все еще ожидает одного повышения процентной ставки Федеральной резервной системой (ФРС) США и сокращения баланса активов регулятора в ближайшие месяцы, пишет Reuters.

11 июля, 14:27

Уильямс: ФРС сократит ставку еще раз в 2017 году

Один из главных сотрудников американского центробанка заявил, что он все еще ожидает одного повышения процентной ставки Федеральной резервной системой (ФРС) США и сокращения баланса активов регулятора в ближайшие месяцы, пишет Reuters.

11 июля, 14:27

Уильямс: ФРС сократит ставку еще раз в 2017 году

Один из главных сотрудников американского центробанка заявил, что он все еще ожидает одного повышения процентной ставки Федеральной резервной системой (ФРС) США и сокращения баланса активов регулятора в ближайшие месяцы, пишет Reuters.

11 июля, 13:35

 Сегодня в США ожидается спокойный день

Во вторник, 11 июля, в Соединенных Штатах Америки ожидается спокойный день, важной макроэкономической статистики опубликовано не будет. Из второстепенной статистики стоит отметить индекс сопоставимых продаж крупнейших розничных сетей (Красная книга), а также оптовые продажи за май. Кроме того, сегодня состоится выступления представителей ФРС, а именно Нила Кашкари и Лайел Брейнард. Сегодня до открытия рынка будут опубликованы финансовые результаты Pepsico. К 13:20 МСК фьючерсы на индекс S&P 500 торгуются с повышением на 0,12%.

11 июля, 09:30

 Сегодня в США ожидается спокойный день

Во вторник, 11 июля, в Соединенных Штатах Америки ожидается спокойный день, важной макроэкономической статистики опубликовано не будет. Из второстепенной статистики стоит отметить индекс сопоставимых продаж крупнейших розничных сетей (Красная книга), а также оптовые продажи за май. Кроме того, сегодня состоится выступления представителей ФРС, а именно Нила Кашкари и Лайел Брейнард. Сегодня до открытия рынка будут опубликованы финансовые результаты Pepsico. К 13:20 МСК фьючерсы на индекс S&P 500 торгуются с повышением на 0,12%.

11 июля, 00:30

Статистика. Что сегодня ожидать?

Во вторник, 11 июля, важной макроэкономической статистики, которая может оказать влияние на валютный рынок, не публикуется. Между тем, в течение дня состоятся выступления членов Комитета по денежной политике Банка Англии Бродбента и Халдейна, а также представителей ФРС Нила Кашкари и Лайел Брейнард.

10 июля, 23:34

Статистика. Что сегодня ожидать?

Во вторник, 11 июля, важной макроэкономической статистики, которая может оказать влияние на валютный рынок, не публикуется. Между тем, в течение дня состоятся выступления членов Комитета по денежной политике Банка Англии Бродбента и Халдейна, а также представителей ФРС Нила Кашкари и Лайел Брейнард.

10 июля, 18:01

Основные события завтрашнего дня

На вторник запланировано умеренное количество важных событий. В 03:05 GMT состоится выступление члена Комитета по открытым рынкам Д. Уильямса. В 10:00 GMT с речью выступит члена Комитета по денежно-кредитной политике Банка Англии Энди Халдейн. В 11:00 GMT с речью выступит член Комитета по денежной политике Банка Англии Бен Броадбент На 12:00 GMT запланировано выступление представителя ЕЦБ Бенуа Кере. В 12:15 GMT Канада отчитается по числу закладок новых фундаментов за июнь. Индикатор отражает число строительных объектов, которые появляются каждый месяц. Началом строительства считается закладка фундамента под будущие объекты. Показатель является опережающим индикатором экономической активности в строительном секторе экономики. В 14:00 GMT США заявит об уровне вакансий и текучести рабочей силы за май. В 16:30 GMT с речью выступит член Комитета по открытым рынкам ФРС Лайель Брайнард. На 17:20 GMT запланировано выступление члена Комитета по открытым рынкам ФРС Нила .Кашкари. Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam

10 июля, 15:40

Key Events In The Coming Week: All Eyes On Yellen, CPI And Retail Sales

In the usual post-payrolls economic data lull, the focus this week will be on North America, with Chair Yellen's semi-annual testimony on Wednesday alongside the the BoC, as well as a Friday data deluge in the US including CPI & retail sales. A 25bp hike this week from the Bank of Canada is expected, although the central bank may choose to wait until October. Additionally, there are monetary policy meetings in Korea, Malaysia, Chile, Peru & Israel. All eyes on the US: Fed Chair Yellen delivers her semi-annual testimony to Congress this week. According to DB, it will be fascinating to see whether Mrs Yellen chooses this week's semi-annual testimony to Congress on Wednesday and the Senate on Thursday to reinforce the recent more hawkish global central bank speak or whether she tries to pull things back a little. DB expect her to reinforce the message from the June 14 post-FOMC press conference and continue to guide the market towards an announcement of the beginning of balance sheet normalisation at the September 20 meeting as well as a rate hike by year-end, potentially resulting in futher bond selling.  BofA will be looking at how Chair Yellen describes her concern about financial stability risks, at how she talks about progress towards the dual mandate and for any details about balance sheet policy. She will also likely be asked questions about fiscal policy and financial market regulation, Our US Economic Weekly describes our expectations in more detail. US inflation data will also draw attention, as will retail sales, both released on Friday. Many expect another soft core CPI print of 0.1% m/m in June. Canada: Time to hike: The Bank of Canada will also be a key event this week. The recent avalanche of hawkish messages from the BoC, as well as from central bankers of advanced economies around the world, indicate that a hike is highly likely. A hike this week is our baseline, though the bank may also choose to wait until October. We have raised our CAD profile, but remain a little skeptical given valuation and recent moves in oil. The week ahead in Emerging Markets: There are monetary policy meetings in Korea, Malaysia, Chile, Peru and Israel. We expect BCRP to cut the reference rate 25bp. We also have several China macro releases. A snapshot look at the global week ahead Key Events: – Monday: Chinese Inflation Data, all in line with expectations (Jun) Wednesday: Fed Chair Yellen testifies to the US House Financial Services Committee, Bank of Canada Monetary Policy Decision, UK Labour Market Data (May/Jun) Thursday: Chinese Trade Balance (Jun) Friday: US CPI (Jun), US Retail Sales (Jun) DB with a more detailed look at the week ahead: We’re kicking off the week today in Germany where first out the gate we’ll get the latest trade data. Following that this morning we are due to receive the latest Bank of France business sentiment reading and Sentix investor confidence reading for the Euro area. It’s a typically quiet post-payrolls day for data in the US with the June labour market conditions index and May consumer credit reading the only data due. Tuesday looks equally quiet with no releases of note in Europe and just the NFIB small business optimism, JOLTS job openings and wholesale inventories data due in the US. Turning to Wednesday, the early data is due out of Japan where PPI will be released. In the UK we are due to receive the May and June employment data while Euro area industrial production for May will also be released. In the US the Fed’s Beige Book release is all that is due. On Thursday we’re kicking off in China with the June trade data. In Europe the final June CPI reports in Germany and France will be due. The BoE will also release its latest credit conditions and bank liabilities survey. In the US on Thursday we’ll get June PPI, initial jobless claims and the June monthly budget statement. We end the week in Asia on Friday with May industrial production data. In Europe we’ll get the May trade balance for the Euro area before we finish the week in the US with June CPI, retail sales, industrial production, manufacturing, July University of Michigan consumer sentiment and May business inventories. A focus on North America courtesy of RanSquawk North America: The major US economic releases will come on Friday. Headline CPI data for June is expected to moderate to 1.7% Y/Y from 1.9%, while the core metric is expected to tick up to 1.8% Y/Y from 1.7%. Commerzbank believe that “the Fed has a problem. Oil and food prices often mask the underlying inflation trend, the Fed watches the core rates, which are adjusted for these volatile components. Since the end of the recession in mid-2009, the core rate of the private consumption expenditure deflator rarely rose above 2%. Even core consumer price inflation, which usually comes in somewhat higher, was below target for most of the time. In recent months, however, even the slight uptrend came to a standstill, led by a price war by cellular phone providers.” Commerz suggest that “against this backdrop, it does not come as a surprise that the Federal Reserve is no longer referring to inflation to justify the normalisation of its monetary stance, but to the labour market and – recently – above all to the risks that a sustained expansionary course would have on financial market stability.” US Retail Sales data also hits on Friday. The headline is expected to rise by 0.1% M/M, following last month’s 0.3% fall, while the ex-autos measure is expected to rise by 0.2% M/M following last month’s 0.3% fall. May’s release represented the weakest outcome for retail sales since January 2016, as gasoline and auto sales both subtracted from total sales growth in the month, but even core sales were weak. Westpac believe that “the weak underlying trend is not expected to reverse in the near future. Rather, growth is set to persist at or near current levels.”After the minutes from the latest FOMC meeting held no surprises, focus will fall on Fedspeak, with particular onus on any language surrounding balance sheet reduction. The focal point will be the questions following Fed Chair Yellen’s appearance before the US House Financial Services Committee, after the text release held no notable headlines. On the voter front we will hear from Brainard, Kaplan and Evans during the week, while non-voters George and Williams will also make public addresses. The focal point in the Canadian docket comes on Wednesday, as the Bank of Canada issues its latest monetary policy decision and quarterly Monetary Policy Report  The majority of analysts are looking for the for the BoC to stand pat, and leave its key rate unchanged at 0.5%, although the swaps market prices in a circa 87% chance of a 25bps hike. Rhetoric from BoC governor Poloz and Senior Deputy Governor Wilkins has swung to the hawkish side in recent weeks. Wilkins was the first to shift her stance, noting that the “the Bank will assess whether all of the considerable policy stimulus presently in place is still required.” Poloz followed this up by suggesting “the rate cuts in the wake of the drop in oil prices in mid-2014 had largely done their job,” while he has backed this up with further hawkish rhetoric in subsequent speeches. On the domestic data front GDP growth has averaged 3.5% per quarter over the past three quarters, with Poloz noting that he expects inflation to be “well into an uptrend” as the output gap closes in the first half of 2018. The domestic labour market experienced its best quarter since 2010 during Q2 it is also worth noting that BoC’s Summer 2017 Business Outlook Survey (BOS) showed that businesses were very confident about future sales growth, employment, and investment. In particular, a record 66% of firms plan to increase employment over the next 12 months. Scotiabank now expects the Bank of Canada “to start raising interest rates in the second half of this year (two increases in 2017) and to raise interest rates once more in 2018.” It is also worth noting that US earnings season gets underway with the likes of JPMorgan Chase (JPM), Citigroup (C), Wells Fargo (WFC), PepsiCo (PEP) and Delta Airlines (DAL) all reporting their quarterly results. Other releases of note during the week: Tuesday US Wholesale Inventories (May) Thursday US PPI (Jun) Friday US Industrial & Manufacturing Production (Jun) US University Of Michigan Sentiment (Jul, P) * * * Finally, here is Goldman with a detailed breakdown of what to expect in the US, alongside consensus expectations: The key economic releases this week are the CPI and retail sales reports on Friday. In addition, there are several scheduled speaking engagements by Fed officials this week, including Fed Chair Yellen’s Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress on Wednesday and Thursday. Monday, July 10 03:00 PM Consumer credit, May (consensus +$13.5bn, last +$8.2bn) 11:00 PM San Francisco Fed President Williams (FOMC non-voter) speaks: San Francisco Fed President Williams will give a speech titled "Speed Limits and Stall Speeds: Fostering Sustainable Growth in the United States" in Sydney, New South Wales. Audience Q&A is expected. Tuesday, July 11 06:00 AM NFIB small business optimism, June (consensus 104.4, last 104.5) 10:00 AM JOLTS job openings, May (last 6,044k) 10:00 AM Wholesale inventories, May final (consensus +0.3%, last +0.3%) 12:30 PM Fed Governor Brainard (FOMC voter) speaks: Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard will give the keynote address at a conference jointly sponsored by Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. The topic of the conference is “Normalizing Central Banks’ Balance Sheets: What is the New Normal?” Audience Q&A is expected. 01:20 PM Minneapolis Fed President Kashkari (FOMC voter) speaks: Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari will participate in a moderated Q&A discussion at the Minnesota Women's Economic Roundtable event. Audience Q&A is expected. Wednesday, July 12 08:30 AM Fed Chair Yellen’s opening statement for testimony released: Federal Reserve Chair Yellen’s prepared opening statement for her Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to Congress will be released ahead of her appearance before the House Financial Services Committee later in the morning. 10:00 AM Fed Chair Yellen appears before the House Financial Services Committee: Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen will appear before the House Financial Services Committee to deliver the Fed’s semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress and answer questions from lawmakers. We expect her testimony to be in line with the June FOMC statement and the post-meeting press conference. 02:00 PM Beige Book, July FOMC meeting period: The Fed’s Beige book is a summary of regional economic anecdotes from the 12 Federal Reserve districts. The June Beige Book noted that while activity continued to expand across most districts, a couple reported a slowdown in the pace of growth. Labor markets continued to tighten, while consumer spending softened. In the July Beige Book, we look for additional anecdotes related to the state of consumption, price inflation, and wage growth. 02:15 PM Kansas City Fed President George (FOMC non-voter) speaks: Kansas City Fed President Esther George will give a speech on the US economic outlook and the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet in Denver, Colorado. Audience Q&A is expected. Thursday, July 13 08:30 AM PPI final demand, June (GS flat, consensus flat, last flat); PPI ex-food and energy, June (GS +0.1%, consensus +0.2%, last +0.3%); PPI ex-food, energy, and trade, June (GS +0.2%, consensus +0.2%, last -0.1%): We expect PPI was flat for a second month in June, reflecting a modest rise in core producer prices offsetting a decline in energy prices. We estimate PPI ex-food and energy rose 0.1% and a somewhat firmer 0.2% increase after additionally excluding trade services. 08:30 AM Initial jobless claims, week ended July 15 (GS 255k, consensus 245k, last 248k); Continuing jobless claims, week ended July 8 (consensus 1,950k, last 1,956k): We estimate initial jobless claims rose 7k to 255k in the week ended July 15. Initial claims can be particularly volatile around this time of year due to annual summer auto-plan shutdowns, and we expect closures concentrated around the July Fourth holiday to produce a rise in claims this week. Continuing claims – the number of persons receiving benefits through standard programs – have started to rise, increasing in each of the last five weeks following a sharp decline in the first four months of the year. 10:00 AM Fed Chair Yellen appears before the Senate Banking Committee: Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen will appear before the Senate Banking Committee in the second day of testimony to deliver the Fed’s semi-annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress and answer questions from lawmakers. 11:30 AM Chicago Fed President Evans (FOMC voter) speaks: Chicago Fed President Charles Evans will give the keynote speech at the 9th Annual Rocky Mountain Economic Summit in Victor, Idaho. President Evans will discuss current US economic conditions and monetary policy. Audience and media Q&A is expected. 01:00 PM Fed Governor Brainard (FOMC voter) speaks: Federal Reserve Governor Lael Brainard will give a speech on monetary policy at the National Bureau of Economic Research’s Summer Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her remarks will be very similar to the speech given on July 11 at the conference hosted by Columbia University and the New York Fed. Audience Q&A is expected. 02:00 PM Monthly budget statement, June (consensus -$20.0bn, last -$88.4bn) Friday, July 14 08:30 AM CPI (mom), June (GS +0.03%, consensus +0.1%, last -0.1%); Core CPI (mom), June (GS +0.12%, consensus +0.2%, last +0.1%); CPI (yoy), June (GS +1.7%, consensus +1.7%, last +1.9%); Core CPI (yoy), June (GS +1.7%, consensus +1.7%, last +1.7%): We expect a 0.12% increase in June core CPI, which would leave the year-over-year rate unchanged at +1.7%. While we expect sequential improvement in the monthly pace of core inflation following three consecutive readings below 0.10%, several negative factors suggest scope for a somewhat soft report, including weakness in used car prices and airfares, as well as additional disinflation from cell phone plan discounts. On the positive side, we expect a rebound in apparel prices following three consecutive monthly declines. We estimate a 0.03% rise in headline CPI, reflecting rising food prices but a second monthly decline in energy prices. This would be consistent with the year-over-year rate slowing by two-tenths to 1.7%. 08:30 AM Retail sales, June (GS flat, consensus +0.1%, last -0.3%); Retail sales ex-auto, June (GS +0.2%, consensus +0.2%, last -0.3%); Retail sales ex-auto & gas, June (GS +0.4%, consensus +0.4%, last flat); Core retail sales, June (GS +0.4%, consensus +0.3%, last flat): We estimate core retail sales (ex-autos, gasoline, and building materials) rose 0.4% in June, reflecting firmer same-store sales results. We also estimate a 0.4% increase in the ex-auto ex-gas component. However, we estimate a 0.2% rise in the ex-auto component due to a second sharp monthly drop in gas prices. We expect the headline measure to be unchanged, reflecting a modest decline in auto sales. 09:15 AM Industrial production, June (GS +0.4%, consensus +0.3%, last flat); Manufacturing production, June (GS +0.4%, consensus +0.3%, last -0.4%); Capacity utilization, June (GS +76.9%, consensus +76.8%, last +76.6%): We estimate industrial production increased 0.4% in June, reflecting solid growth in auto and mining production. We estimate manufacturing production also rose 0.4%, reflecting broad cyclical improvement in several components, particularly in auto output. 09:30 AM Dallas Fed President Kaplan (FOMC voter) speaks: Dallas Fed President Robert Kaplan will take part in a moderated Q&A session at the Center for Economic Studies of the Private Sector’s conference on the Federal Reserve and monetary policy in Mexico City. Audience and media Q&A is expected. 10:00 AM Business inventories, May (consensus +0.3%, last -0.2%) 10:00 AM University of Michigan consumer sentiment, July preliminary (GS 94.4, consensus 95.0, last 95.1): We estimate the University of Michigan consumer sentiment index fell 0.7pt to 94.4 in the July preliminary reading, on top of the two point decline from its recent peak in May. Our forecast reflects continued a further pullback in higher frequency consumer surveys and choppy stock market performance over the last two weeks. Gas prices declined further over the last month, suggesting scope for a negative impact on the report’s measure of 5- to 10-year ahead inflation expectations, which at 2.5% in June was in the middle of its recent range. Source: DB, BofA, GS, RanSquawk

10 июля, 00:05

Tales From The FOMC Underground

Authored by EconomicPrism's MN Gordon, annotated by Acting-Man's Pater Tenebrarum, A Great Big Dud Many of today’s economic troubles are due to a fantastic guess.  That the wealth effect of inflated asset prices would stimulate demand in the economy. The premise, as we understand it, was that as stock portfolios bubbled up investors would feel better about their lot in life.  Some of them would feel so doggone good they’d go out and buy 72-inch flat screen televisions and brand-new electric cars with computerized dashboards on credit.   The Wilshire 5000 total market index vs. federal debt and real GDP (indexed, 1990=100) – mainly there is an ever wider gap between asset prices and the underlying economic output, and although federal debt has grown by leaps and bounds in the Bush-Obama era, it can’t hold a candle to asset price inflation either. If asset prices were an indication of how an economy is doing, we would have arrived in Utopia by now. Unfortunately that is not the case, as asset prices primarily reflect monetary inflation. Just consider the extreme example of Venezuela’s IBC General Index, which went from 40,000 to 120,000 points, while the economy contracted by 21% in real terms (officially, that is. If one were to apply private sector estimates of inflation, it would look a lot worse). It is certainly true that economic aggregates are benefiting from bubble conditions to some extent, but that is essentially phantom prosperity. If you burn all your furniture, your home will be warm – that this might be problematic only becomes glaringly obvious once all the furniture is gone, because then it will not only be cold, but there will be nothing left to sit on either. When the red line on this chart reverts to the mean (or the “other extreme”), there will be a lot of gnashing of teeth, as many of the mistakes made during the bubble era will be unmasked. [PT] – click to enlarge.   Before you know it, gross domestic product would go up – along with wages – and unemployment would go down.  A self-sustaining economic boom would follow. This fantastic guess, however, has proven to be a critical error in judgment.  Asset prices bubbled up, flat screen televisions and new cars were bought in record numbers, and the unemployment rate – according to the government’s statistics – went down. On the flip side, real GDP growth only marginally lurched upward, never eclipsing 3 percent during a calendar year, and the great big economic boom that was supposed to save the economy from itself turned out to be a great big dud. At the same time, the general aura of the Federal Reserve Chair, once held up on high by Bob Woodward, has slipped into irreparable decline.  No public relations exploit or press briefing can correct the damage.  No policy adjustment or balance sheet modification can return the Fed to its former glory. Quite frankly, the state of disrepute of present Fed Chair Janet Yellen appears to be that of a larcener, near comparable to a United States Congressman.  The transition from maestro to scoundrel in just over a decade has been a sight to behold.  ZIRP, QE, operation twist… you name it.  There’s been one absurdity after another.   Consider how much attention is paid to central bankers and their policies these days, as exemplified by how many cartoons about them are drawn about them. In times past no-one thought much about central banks, they were considered boring. That has certainly changed after the introduction of the pure fiat money system in the early 70s and the massive bubbles and busts their policies have triggered in the wake of this event. [PT] – click to enlarge.   Sanitized for Public Consumption No doubt, the Fed has brought their shame upon themselves.  They’ve made their bed.  But they don’t want to lay in it. Earlier this week the June FOMC meeting minutes were released.  According to the minutes, some FOMC members acknowledged that “equity prices were high when judged against standard valuation measures.”  Some are even “concerned that subdued market volatility, coupled with a low equity premium, could lead to a buildup of risks to financial stability.” Unfortunately, the minutes are prepared and provided for public consumption in a cleanly sanitized summary form.  Names are not tied to individual discussion points.  Moreover, name calling and vulgarities are omitted from the official record. Perhaps, good manners and erudite etiquette have been preserved in the hallowed halls of an FOMC meeting.  However, this is highly unlikely.  Because over the last decade or so, in nearly all social dealings, both professional and public, good old-fashioned human decency has devolved to barroom decorum.   We hope they haven’t removed the laugh track… (this is from an article we posted in 2014) [PT] – click to enlarge.   Thus we’ve taken it upon ourselves to round out a brief excerpt of the FOMC discussion, adding back the warts to better demonstrate the meeting’s dialogue.  What follows, in the best interest of reader edification, is a fictitious adaptation of true events that occurred at the June 14 FOMC meeting.  Enjoy!   The most recent laugh track chart we could find is from 2011 – and it is telling as well. The mood turned very somber in November of that year. We will have to hunt for a more recent update. Presumably the laugh track continues to mimic the trend in the stock market. [PT]   Tales from the FOMC Underground “What should we do?” began Yellen.  “A decade of easy monetary policies has turned financial markets into a Las Vegas casino while the economy’s lazed around like my smelly house cats. What the heck was Bernanke thinking?” “Hell, Janet,” remarked New York Fed President William Dudley.  “He wasn’t thinking.  He soiled his pantaloons and then he soiled them again.” “So now we must clean up his stinky pile while he promotes his revisionist courage to act shtick.  The reality is we must orchestrate a take-down of financial markets, and we must do it by year’s end.” “Well, gawd damn Bill!” barked St. Louis Fed President James Bullard.  “With the exception of Neel, the $700 billion dollar bailout boy, don’t you think we all know that?” “Hey, now!” interjected Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari.  “Don’t blame me.  I was just carrying out Hank Paulson’s will, right Bill?  Saving our boys’ bacon back at Goldman so they could continue doing god’s work.” “Besides Fish, it was you all who lined up behind Bernanke and tickled the poodle with his crazy QE experiment while I was busy chopping wood at Donner Pass and getting my fanny spanked in the California Governor’s race by retread Jerry Moonbeam Brown, of all people.” “Fair enough,” continued Bullard.  “The point is, taking down the stock market will cause an extreme upset to the economy’s applecart.  The mobs will come after us with torches and pitchforks.” “You see, the real trick is to do the dirty deed then disappear behind a fog of confusion.  That’s what Greenspan would do.  How can we pull that off?”   The maestro is still up to his old tricks… [PT]   After a moment of silent contemplation, and a licked finger held up to the cool political winds drafting across the country… “Eureka!  We can pin it on President Donald J. Trump!” exclaimed Chicago Fed President Charles Evans.  “Could our good fortune be any better?  Not since Herbert C. Hoover has there been a more perfect scapegoat for an economic depression of the Fed’s making.” “Hear, hear!” approved Yellen. “Damn the economy,” they bellowed in harmony… minus Kashkari.  “This one’s on Trump!”   Blaming ye olde Trump asteroid should be easy, since he has made the grievous mistake of taking credit for the run-up in the stock market on Twitter. Now he “owns” the bubble he previously denounced – at the very least he has become its co-owner. [PT]   “Bill, one last thing,” closed Yellen.  “After the meeting, remember to give the public that shake n’ bake you dreamed up about crashing unemployment.  We have to give off an air of being data dependent.” “That misdirection should twist them up until NFL football starts.  Shortly after that, our work will be done…” “…and by the New Year, Congress and Joe public will be begging us to rescue the economy from the Fed’s… I mean… Trump’s disastrous economic program.” *  *  * [Ed. note: in the original version of this article Richard Fisher was used in the section about the fictional meeting. We replaced him with James Bullard, as Fisher has retired from the Fed. Besides, we always thought Fisher was one of the more thoughtful Fed presidents; inter alia he was one of the handful of FOMC members who regularly dissented from Ben Bernanke’s mad-cap money printing schemes] 

Выбор редакции
10 июля, 00:00

New Bailouts Prove 'Too Big to Fail' Is Alive and Well

Neel Kashkari, Wall St. JournalRegulators keep insisting bondholders will take losses, but then they’re reluctant to impose them.

05 июля, 22:31

В ФРС поспорили об инфляции и сокращении баланса

На прошедшем в середине июня заседании руководства Федеральной резервной системы между чиновниками обострилась дискуссия по поводу ряда ключевых вопросов, касающихся дальнейшего развития монетарной политики.

05 июля, 22:31

В ФРС поспорили об инфляции и сокращении баланса

На прошедшем в середине июня заседании руководства Федеральной резервной системы между чиновниками обострилась дискуссия по поводу ряда ключевых вопросов, касающихся дальнейшего развития монетарной политики.

30 июня, 06:11

Почему Федрезерв вновь потерпит провал, - Джеймс Рикардс

Джон Мейнард Кейнс написал однажды: “Практичные люди, считающие себя совершенно не подверженными никакому интеллектуальному влиянию, обычно оказываются рабами какого-нибудь умершего экономиста.”Более верных слов и придумать сложно, однако, если вы захотите освежить цитату Кейнса применительно к сегодняшним условиям, вам следует начать ее с “практичных женщин,” чтобы учесть в этом высказывании Председателя Федрезерва Джанет Йеллен. “Умершим экономистом” в таком случае будет значиться изобретатель Кривой Филлипса Уильям Филлипс, отошедший в мир иной в 1975 году.Если описать в простых терминах, то Кривая Филлипса – это модель, основанная на одном уравнении, которая описывает обратное отношение между инфляцией и уровнем безработицы. Если безработица уменьшается, то инфляция растет, и наоборот. Это уравнение было впервые явлено миру в академическом журнале в 1958 году, и оно рассматривалось как полезный инструмент в монетарной политике в 1960-х и начале 1970-х годов.Но к середине 1970-х Кривая Филлипса перестала работать. В США наблюдалась большая безработица и высокая инфляция в одно и то же время. Иногда такую ситуацию называют “стагфляцией.” Милтон Фридман высказал идею, что Кривая Филлипса может работать только на непродолжительных промежутках времени, потому что в долгосрочной перспективе инфляция всегда определяется монетарным предложением.Экономисты начали видоизменять оригинальное уравнение, добавляя в него различные факторы, которые имели не эмпирическую природу, а были сами результатами других моделей. В результате вместо уравнения получилась путаница моделей, основанных на моделях, которые не имели ни малейшего отношения к действительности. К началу 1980-х Кривая Филлипса никем не воспринималась всерьез, даже академиками, и она оказалась похороненной раз и навсегда. RIP.Но подобно зомби из сериала “Ходячие мертвецы” Кривая Филлипса вновь вернулась!И человек, который сделал главную работу по оживлению этого мертвеца, оказался никем иным, как Джанет Йеллен, которая является либеральным экономистом, специализирующимся на экономике труда, и которая по совпадению занимает теперь пост Председателя Федрезерва.Уровень безработицы в США сейчас равен 4,3%, и это самое низкое значение с начала 2000 годов. Йеллен полагает, что в таких условиях должна возникнуть инфляция, так как недостаточное предложение на рынке труда приведет к росту зарплат, в результате чего экономика приблизится к пределам реального роста. Йеллен также согласна с Фридманом в том, что монетарная политика работает с временным лагом.Если вы верите в то, что вскоре случится инфляция, и в то, что монетарная политика работает с лагом, то вам следует повышать процентные ставки прямо сейчас, чтобы сохранить контроль над ростом цен. Именно это Йеллен и ее коллеги делают в настоящее время.Однако давайте вернемся в реальный мир, в котором все указывает не на приближение инфляции, а на приближение дефляции. Нефтяные цены падают, среднесрочные процентные ставки снижаются, участие в рабочей силе сокращается, демография располагает к сбережениям, а не к тратам, а логистика и цепочки поставок таких гигантов, как Wal-Mart и Amazon, душат рост цен, где бы он не возникал.Даже традиционные сектора, в которых ранее наблюдалась высокая инфляция, такие как высшее образование и здравоохранение, и те охлаждаются в последнее время.Йеллен и небольшая группа руководителей Феда, включая Билла Дадли и Стэна Фишера, продолжают всем видом показывать, что намерены и дальше повышать ставки в этом году. Оппозиция, выступающая за то, чтобы в этом году ставки остались на текущем уровне, растет, и в рядах этой оппозиции числятся Нил Кашкари, Лейл Брейнард и Чарльз Эванс.Их интеллектуальная схватка вскоре достигнет своего апогея.Во-первых, облигации растут в цене, потому что рынки ожидают рецессию или замедление экономики в результате неоправданного ужесточения политики Федрезервом. И тут я вспоминаю Билла Гросса…Практически каждый инвестор слышал о Билле Гроссе. В течение нескольких десятилетий он возглавлял фонд PIMCO, являющийся самым большим облигационным фондом. Он специализировался на долге американского казначейства…Фонд PIMCO всегда был “тяжеловесом” на облигационном рынке. В 1980-х и в 1990-х годах я работал в качестве главного кредитного специалиста в одном из крупнейших первичных дилеров, которые напрямую заключают сделки с торговым деском Федерального Резерва, осуществляющим операции на открытом рынке.Фонд PIMCO имел выделенные линии и выделенную команду специалистов в нашей фирме. Когда этот фонд продавал или покупал облигации, рынок приходил в движение. Каждый первичный дилер хотел получить заявку от этого фонда.Гросс стал известен благодаря своему умению показывать доходность, значительно превышающую рост облигационных индексов. Его успех заключался в правильно выбранном тайминге. Если вы продаете бонды накануне роста процентных ставок, и покупаете их, когда Федрезерв готовится понизить ставки, то вы можете получить не только купон и полный возврат затраченных вами средств в момент погашения этих облигаций, но и большие прибыли от изменения цен этих долговых инструментов.Теперь Гросс выступает с одним из самых своих серьезных предупреждений. Он говорит, что уровень рыночного риска теперь выше, чем когда-либо с момента, предваряющего панику 2008 года. Гросс говорит, что все может повториться вновь, и скоро.Никто не умеет читать рынок лучше, чем Билл Гросс. А значит, когда он выступает с предупреждением, инвесторам стоит обратить на это внимание.Рынок акций дает противоположный сигнал. Акции растут, потому что рынки интерпретируют повышение ставок Федрезервом как сигнал о том, что экономика набирает силу.Оба эти рынка не могут быть правы одновременно. Либо акциям, либо облигациям предстоит упасть в недалеком будущем.Золото наблюдает и ждет, то снижаясь, испугавшись дефляции, то устремляясь вверх, решив, что Федрезерв будет вынужден развернуть свой курс, как только экономика заметно замедлится.Мои модели показывают, что облигации, Билл Гросс и золото правильно оценивают ситуацию, а акции ждет обвал.Коррекция на рынке акций не случится прямо сейчас, потому что Федрезерв все еще находится в режиме заговаривания ставок вверх и полагает, что дизинфляция – это временное явление.Но даже Джанет Йеллен не может игнорировать реальность слишком долго. Прогнозы ФРБ Атланты по росту ВВП во втором квартале снизились с майских 4,3% до 3,4% по состоянию на 2 июня и до 2,9% по состоянию на 15 июня.Сегодня этот банк выпустил свой последний прогноз по росту ВВП, который остался неизменным с 15 июня, то есть, по мнению ФРБ Атланты, экономика Америки вырастет во втором квартале на 2,9% из расчета за год.Но есть нечто, что замедляет рост экономики, и это нечто – повышение ставок Федрезервом.К августу даже сам Федрезерв получит послание. Но может так статься, что к тому моменту время исправлять ситуацию будет упущено. Если рост экономики США во втором квартале составит 2,5%, то в совокупности со значением этого показателя за первый квартал на уровне 1,2% прирост ВВП Америки во первом полугодии будет равен 1,85% из расчета за год.И это даже меньше роста ВВП в 2%, который считается слабым в текущем цикле восстановления, стартовавшего в июне 2009 года. В таких условиях инфляция не рождается.Необдуманная политика Феда не должна никого удивлять.Федеральный Резерв делал почти все неправильно по крайней мере в последние 20 лет, а то и дольше. Федрезерв организовал бэйл-аут Long-Term Capital Management в 1998 году, хотя по делу этому фонду следовало бы дать обанкротиться, чтобы Уолл Стрит услышал предупреждение.Вместо этого мы увидели, что пузыри стали еще больше, в результате чего случился катастрофический коллапс 2008 года. Гринспен удерживал низкие ставки слишком долго с 2002 по 2006 год, и все это привело к надуванию пузыря в секторе недвижимости и последующему его коллапсу.Бернанке проводил “эксперимент” (как он сам выражался) с количественным смягчением с 2008 по 2013 год, и этот эксперимент не привел к ожидаемому росту экономики, но он надул новые пузыри в акциях и в облигациях развивающихся рынков.И теперь Йеллен повышает ставки в условиях слабеющей экономики, и ее действия, вероятно, приведут к рецессии, как это произошло в 1937 году, когда Федрезерв также решил поднять ставки на фоне низких темпов экономического роста.Почему Федрезерв совершил это череду ошибок?Ответ заключается в том, что он использует устаревшие и дефективные модели, такие как Кривая Филлипса, и так называемую политику “эффекта богатства.” Ничего из этого не ново; я говорю об этом годами в моих книгах, интервью и выступлениях.Новизна заключается в том, что теперь даже мейнстрим-медиа начинают замечать, что что-то идет не так. Руководители Федрезерва были представлены как шарлатаны, как профессора из Страны Оз.Последняя ошибка Федрезерва приведет к тому, что еще до сентября его политика смягчится в форме сигналов рынкам о том, что повышений ставок до конца года не предвидится.Пришла пора покупать казначейские ноты и золото, а также выходить из акций в кэш. Возможно, Федрезерв последним узнает о наступлении дефляции, но, когда он узнает об этом, его реакция может оказаться немедленной, и в этом случае рынки могут пережить потрясение.Именно это и происходит, когда зомби вырываются на свободу.Опубликовано 26.06.2017 г.Источник: Why the Fed Will Fail Once Again

29 июня, 03:14

The Fed Is Trying to Avoid a Greenspan-Style Bubble

Samuel Rines Politics, Keeping rates too low for too long could lead to disaster. In his dissent against the Federal Reserve’s latest decision to raise rates, Minneapolis Fed President Neel Kashkari warned that the Fed was at risk of making a 1970’s style mistake—only in reverse. Whereas the Fed of forty years ago was too slow to raise rates in response to high inflation, Kashkari’s idea is that, with both inflation expectations and realized inflation now declining, today’s Fed should rethink (i.e. lower) the trajectory of its policy tightening. This is a sort of “anti-Volcker” moment for the Fed dissenters. For the past several years, the Fed has serially missed its 2 percent inflation target, and (the argument goes) the Fed needs to be truly committed to its target, or it will lose credibility. Already, the Fed has to explain the deviation. Chair Janet Yellen’s statement expressed confidence in the eventuality of hitting 2 percent before stating that the Fed would look through the current weak inflation figures. While somewhat unexpected in its directness, Yellen’s statement is less than shocking. This Fed frequently sees oil as having only a transitory impact on inflation and takes care to avoid placing too much credence in subsequent readings. The culprit this time around happened to be wireless phone plans, but the pivot to unlimited data plans is realistically a one-time happening. In other words, choosing to call sharp, one-time movements in prices transitory is far from abnormal. Read full article

28 июня, 16:37

US economic growth still in the 2ish% channel

In the aftermath of the shale oil bust that sent the US economy to stall speed in 2015, growth has rebounded, but only to a sort of 2%ish level. Continued low inflation insures further low nominal GDP growth aka secular stagnation. But so far, this stagnation has not made the economy more susceptible to recession. Some brief thoughts below Here’s […] Related posts: The Fed’s financial stability concerns, auto subprime edition Is the new rout in oil getting worrying? The oil price cliff dive will end the prospect of double-barrelled tightening

28 июня, 09:30

Анонс основных событий и данных макростатистики на вторник, 27 июня

Москва, 28 июня. /МФД-ИнфоЦентр, MFD.RU/00:30 мск: Выступление президента ФРБ Миннеаполиса Нила Кашкари; 09:00 мск: Цены на импорт в Германии за май; 09:00 мск: Индикатор потребления в Швейцарии от UBS за май; 09:00 мск: Индекс цен на дома в Великобритании за июнь; 11:00 мск: Денежная масса М3 в евр...

28 июня, 06:37

Евро продолжает расти

Евро продолжает расти в ходе азиатской сессии, и достигнув нового 10-месячного максимума против доллара США. Рост евро начался после выступления главы ЕЦБ Драги во вторник, в ходе которого он намекнул на возможное завершение программы покупок облигаций ЕЦБ. Драги сообщил, что стимулирование будет постепенно сокращаться по мере дальнейшего улучшения ситуации в экономике еврозоны. Аналитики считают, что в сентябре или октябре этого года ЕЦБ объявит, что начнет сворачивать программу покупки облигаций уже в начале следующего года. Кроме того, Драги заявил, что ЕЦБ может проигнорировать временную слабость инфляции. "Хотя определенные факторы оказывают влияние на инфляцию, в данный момент они в основном являются временными, и ЦБ может их не учитывать", - сообщил Драги, и добавил, что необходимо продолжать аккомодационную политику, чтобы динамика инфляции стала устойчивой и самоподдерживающейся. Участники рынка продолжают оценивать высказывания главы ФРС Йеллен и других представителей центробанка США в надежде получить подсказки относительно перспектив дальнейшего ужесточения денежно-кредитной политики в этом году. Вчера в своей речи Йеллен так и не затронула тему денежно-кредитной политики. А вот президент ФРБ Филадельфии Харкер заявил, что поддерживает дальнейшее повышение ставок, и добавил, что недавнее замедление инфляции, скорее всего, является временным. Президент Федерального резервного банка Миннеаполиса Нил Кашкари, выступая на мероприятии в мэрии Мичигана заявил, что не стоит спешить с повышением ставок ФРС прямо сейчас и что он пока не видит убедительных аргументов в пользу повышения ставок. Согласно котировкам фьючерсов на ставку ФРС, отслеживаемым CME Group, инвесторы оценивают вероятность очередного повышения ставок ФРС в этом году в 54,4% против 50,0% в пятницу и 46,8% неделей ранее (20 июня). Австралийский доллар значительно вырос на фоне повсеместного ослабления американской валюты, а также на фоне роста цен на железную руду. В отсутствие важных экономических данных из Австралии на этой неделе, на курс австралийской валюты в основном будут влиять внешние факторы. Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam

10 ноября 2015, 20:59

Бывший банкир Goldman Sachs и PIMCO вошел в ФРС США

Новым президентом Федерального резервного банка Миннеаполиса стал бывший топ-менеджер инвестбанка Goldman Sachs и фонда облигаций PIMCO Нил Кашкари.