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28 апреля, 20:46

Remarks by Vice President Pence at Swearing-In Ceremony for Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta

Vice President’s Ceremonial Office 11:55 A.M. EDT THE VICE PRESIDENT:  On behalf of the President of the United States, it is my honor to welcome you all today to the Office of the Vice President here at the White House complex for a very important moment in the life of this administration and in our national life, as I administer the oath of office to the 27th Secretary of Labor for the United States of America, Alexander Acosta.  (Applause.)   We’re fortunate to be joined today by his father, Rene, his wife, Jan, and their beautiful and charming daughters, Delia and Rosie.  Would you welcome them as well?  (Applause.)    I also want to thank all of our distinguished guests who have joined us for this important moment, especially Congresswoman Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, and all the Hispanic business and community leaders who are here with us today.  Thank you for being here on this historic day. This Saturday marks the end of President Trump’s first 100 days in office, and as this period draws to a close, it’s worth reflecting for just a moment on the optimism and the progress that is sweeping across America, thanks to the leadership of President Donald Trump.   For nearly 100 days, President Trump has been delivering on the promises that he made to the American people, one after another.  He picked a world-class Cabinet, which we’re adding to today, which is working around the clock to implement an agenda to make America great again.  In Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Trump kept his promise to nominate a Supreme Court justice in the mold of the late and great Justice Antonin Scalia.  President Trump has been putting America first -- rebuilding our military, restoring the arsenal of democracy, and he’s signing legislation to give our veterans the care that they deserve.  In fact, in now just short of 100 days, President Trump has signed 28 bills into law, 30 executive orders -- historic numbers that show that not only is President Trump a man of his word, President Trump is a man of action.  (Applause.)  And since day one, the President has taken decisive action to get our economy moving again and restore opportunity and prosperity for every American family.  President Trump, I always like to say, has a three-part agenda:  Jobs, jobs, and jobs.  And to kick-start jobs and growth, the President has been slashing through mountains of red tape.  He’s renewed focus even earlier today on American energy and American energy independence.  And just a few short days ago, the President put forward a plan for the biggest tax cut for individuals and businesses in American history.  (Applause.)   And the result?  More than 500,000 new jobs have been created so far this year.  Small-business confidence has skyrocketed to its highest level in decades, and for manufacturers, the highest level in two decades.  And company after company is announcing plans to invest in our country for the benefit of American workers, American jobs, and America’s future. The fact is that President Trump’s leadership has been making a difference every single day, and we’re just getting started.  And with our new Secretary of Labor, Alex Acosta, the President and I are confident that we will accomplish even more for working Americans and job creators all across this nation.  (Applause.)   Alex Acosta is the right man at the right time to lead the Department of Labor.  Born the son of two Cuban refugees, Alex showed his potential from his earliest days, earning both his undergraduate and law degrees from Harvard University.  He went on to clerk for Justice Samuel Alito on the Third Circuit Court of Appeals, and after a few years in private practice and as a professor at George Mason University School of Law, he entered into the noble path of public service.   In 2002, President George W. Bush appointed Alex to serve as a member of the National Labor Relations Board.  Only one year later, President Bush appointed him to be the Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice, and two years after that, he became the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida. Alex, I know you’ve tried to retire from public service more than once.  (Laughter.)  In 2009, you did it when you became dean of Florida International University College of Law.  But President Trump has now called you back -- called you back to public service, to bring you character, your intellect, and your ability to serve the country.  And we couldn’t be more grateful.   Your service, past, present, and future, is truly a testament to the American Dream and to your own character and your own abilities.  I want to thank you again.  Thank you for stepping up to serve our country and to serve working Americans at such a time as this.  Given your long and distinguished record, your integrity and your leadership, the President and I are absolutely confident that as -- with you as our new Secretary of Labor, we will continue to restore opportunity, prosperity and growth for working Americans now and for generations to come.  (Applause.)   And so, on behalf of President Trump, it is my great privilege to administer to you the oath of office.  Step aside and we’ll make it official.   (The oath is administered.)  (Applause.)  SECRETARY ACOSTA:  I want to thank President Trump, Vice President Pence, and the members of the Senate for the privilege of serving as Secretary of Labor.  I want to thank my wife, Jan.  Her unyielding support and her heartfelt love means the world to me.  It’s amazing to be loved, and I love her back more than words can really say.  And so, thank you.  (Applause.)   My daughters, Delia and Rosalia, are amazing.  They have followed this process in their own way.  When President Trump nominated me, I had to sit down and explain to them that we were, if confirmed, moving to Washington, and they wanted to know why.  And so I sort of took a pause and I tried to explain what being Secretary of Labor means in words that a four- and then six-year-old could understand.  And this is what I said.  I said, Daddy helps his students find good jobs, and so the President has asked Daddy to help people all over America find good jobs too.  (Applause.)  And then it struck me:  Explaining the responsibilities of the Secretary of Labor to a four- and a six-year-old really helped me encapsulate so many of the responsibilities of the Department of Labor.  Because, as the Vice President said, it is about finding and helping and supporting jobs and job growth.   My parents fled a Cuban dictatorship in search of freedom.  They met in high school.  They fell in love, and they married young.  Neither attended college.  What an amazing nation this is that the son of refugees who forwent an education to support a family could be standing here in this room, taking this oath, administered by the Vice President of the United States.  That is what America is about.  (Applause.)   My parents’ experience is part of who I am and frames my perspectives that I will bring to the important responsibilities of the Department of Labor.  We have a lot of work to do.  Too many Americans have seen jobs go overseas.  Too many Americans have seen jobs filled by foreign workers.  And too many Americans see that jobs are available, but that they don’t have the skills or the experience to fill those jobs.  The skills gap is real and needs to be addressed. Supporting Americans’ ability to find good jobs, safe jobs is a priority for President Trump, for Vice President Pence, and for me.  I am honored and I am profoundly humbled to be called in service of this important effort.  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)   END 12:08 P.M. EDT

28 апреля, 14:35

What's in the Cards for CONSOL Energy (CNX) in Q1 Earnings?

CONSOL Energy Inc. (CNX) is expected to report first-quarter 2017 results before the market opens on May 2.

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26 апреля, 16:51

Speaker Ryan on the Antiquities Act Executive Order

WASHINGTON—House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) issued the following statement on President Trump’s executive action on the Antiquities Act: “The Antiquities Act is a century-old law that has been hijacked by executive overreach in recent years. While designating monuments is a noble goal, this law, like many others, has strayed far from its original purpose. Presidents have used the law to lock up thousands of acres of lands and water with the stroke of a pen, disregarding the needs and concerns of local communities. I commend the Trump administration for stopping this cycle of executive abuse and beginning a review of past designations.”

26 апреля, 16:42

Noble Energy (NBL) to Post Q1 Earnings: What's in Store?

Noble Energy (NBL) is scheduled to release first-quarter 2017 earnings on May 1.

26 апреля, 12:15

Top 10 terrible houses in fiction

Places you’d be desperate to avoid in real life provide a magnetic lure in books by authors from Dickens to Du Maurier and even Richard AdamsMy novel, The Clocks in This House All Tell Different Times, tells the tale of a girl who travels through a dark forest and arrives at a big house. The forest is bad but the house is arguably worse – a false sanctuary inhabited by decadent aristocrats; boozy and boisterous, on the brink of turning nasty. At some point when writing the story, I realised I was naively blundering into a long and noble tradition of books about terrible houses, much as I’ve naively blundered into many awkward, unfamiliar houses down the years. Maybe I love these places in fiction because I hate and fear them in real life. Continue reading...

26 апреля, 01:20

Trump Waves Pen, Piece Of Paper At Rural America

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― In the past three months, President Donald Trump has signed a number of executive orders that didn’t actually effect substantive changes, but which established task forces to study policy and, eventually, recommend possible courses of action. On Tuesday, he signed another one, this time about farms. Tuesday’s order, which Trump signed surrounded by farmers and ranchers, focuses on agriculture and rural development, which the Trump administration claims had been neglected by the Obama administration. “We continue a very relentless effort to make life better for Americans, and that includes the farmers and the people gathered around this table and including our ranchers and rural community folks,” Trump said at the White House. The president also complained about Canadian restrictions on dairy imports from the U.S. “This has been going on for a while. We are not going to put up with it,” he said, adding that the U.S. had slapped a tariff on Canadian lumber. The order Trump signed Tuesday is modest. It terminates a rural council that President Barack Obama created with an executive order in 2011, and replaces that council with a task force that will similarly be chaired by the secretary of agriculture and joined by officials from other agencies in the executive branch. “The executive order is ― well, it’s just pretty limp when you get right down to it,” David Swenson, an economist with Iowa State University, said in an interview. As with several other orders Trump has signed, Tuesday’s document doesn’t directly change administration policy. Rather, it asks agencies to come up with policy recommendations at a later time. The order gives the new task force 180 days to “identify legislative, regulatory, and policy changes to promote in rural America agriculture, economic development, job growth, infrastructure improvements, technological innovation, energy security, and quality of life.” Obama’s rural council had a similar job. Obama’s order told the council, among other things, “to coordinate development of policy recommendations to promote economic prosperity and quality of life in rural America.” A summary of Trump’s order said Obama’s rural council was “noble in purpose,” but too informal in practice. It also said, however, that the task force would consider whether the council structure was useful after all and should be brought back. “They’re gonna study it just like the last administration studied it,” Swenson said. The president’s order comes amid concerns from some farmers and agriculture experts that the Trump administration hasn’t been focused on farm policy and that Trump’s trade agenda could be bad for farmers, who sell a lot of crops for export. A Trump budget proposal earlier this year offered steep cuts for the Agriculture Department, which was the last executive branch agency to get a Cabinet secretary nomination, with Sonny Perdue getting sworn in earlier on Tuesday. Johnathan Hladik, policy director at the Center for Rural Affairs, a rural advocacy group, said certain aspects of the executive order — especially its mention of technological innovation in rural America — are promising. On the whole, however, Hladik feels the order will do little to alleviate his concerns with the massive cuts proposed for the USDA ― particularly when it comes to the zeroing-out of rural development initiatives like the agency’s microentrepreneur assistance program and value added producer grants in Trump’s budget proposal. “To me, it sounds like they’ve ignored rural America for their first 95 days and started to get some flak, so on days 95 and 96 they’re doing these token gestures to show they’re ignoring [rural America] no longer,” Hladik told HuffPost. The Farm Bureau, America’s largest agribusiness advocacy group, generally supports Trump and his efforts to undo regulations. But the liberal-leaning National Farmers Union was unenthusiastic Tuesday. Rob Larew, senior vice president of government relations and communications at the NFU, dismissed the order as a “redressing” of previous administrations’ efforts to address rural concerns. Larew’s group remains focused on how Perdue might push back against proposed cuts to his agency’s budget, and on farming-related policy decisions that have been made in the past weeks and months. “Everything from immigration efforts to health care have huge implications from the rural and agriculture perspective,” Larew told HuffPost. “So what will [Perdue] do? There are lots of challenges on the horizon, some of which were created by this administration, so he has a lot of things to take care of very quickly.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 апреля, 01:20

Trump Waves Pen, Piece Of Paper At Rural America

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― In the past three months, President Donald Trump has signed a number of executive orders that didn’t actually effect substantive changes, but which established task forces to study policy and, eventually, recommend possible courses of action. On Tuesday, he signed another one, this time about farms. Tuesday’s order, which Trump signed surrounded by farmers and ranchers, focuses on agriculture and rural development, which the Trump administration claims had been neglected by the Obama administration. “We continue a very relentless effort to make life better for Americans, and that includes the farmers and the people gathered around this table and including our ranchers and rural community folks,” Trump said at the White House. The president also complained about Canadian restrictions on dairy imports from the U.S. “This has been going on for a while. We are not going to put up with it,” he said, adding that the U.S. had slapped a tariff on Canadian lumber. The order Trump signed Tuesday is modest. It terminates a rural council that President Barack Obama created with an executive order in 2011, and replaces that council with a task force that will similarly be chaired by the secretary of agriculture and joined by officials from other agencies in the executive branch. “The executive order is ― well, it’s just pretty limp when you get right down to it,” David Swenson, an economist with Iowa State University, said in an interview. As with several other orders Trump has signed, Tuesday’s document doesn’t directly change administration policy. Rather, it asks agencies to come up with policy recommendations at a later time. The order gives the new task force 180 days to “identify legislative, regulatory, and policy changes to promote in rural America agriculture, economic development, job growth, infrastructure improvements, technological innovation, energy security, and quality of life.” Obama’s rural council had a similar job. Obama’s order told the council, among other things, “to coordinate development of policy recommendations to promote economic prosperity and quality of life in rural America.” A summary of Trump’s order said Obama’s rural council was “noble in purpose,” but too informal in practice. It also said, however, that the task force would consider whether the council structure was useful after all and should be brought back. “They’re gonna study it just like the last administration studied it,” Swenson said. The president’s order comes amid concerns from some farmers and agriculture experts that the Trump administration hasn’t been focused on farm policy and that Trump’s trade agenda could be bad for farmers, who sell a lot of crops for export. A Trump budget proposal earlier this year offered steep cuts for the Agriculture Department, which was the last executive branch agency to get a Cabinet secretary nomination, with Sonny Perdue getting sworn in earlier on Tuesday. Johnathan Hladik, policy director at the Center for Rural Affairs, a rural advocacy group, said certain aspects of the executive order — especially its mention of technological innovation in rural America — are promising. On the whole, however, Hladik feels the order will do little to alleviate his concerns with the massive cuts proposed for the USDA ― particularly when it comes to the zeroing-out of rural development initiatives like the agency’s microentrepreneur assistance program and value added producer grants in Trump’s budget proposal. “To me, it sounds like they’ve ignored rural America for their first 95 days and started to get some flak, so on days 95 and 96 they’re doing these token gestures to show they’re ignoring [rural America] no longer,” Hladik told HuffPost. The Farm Bureau, America’s largest agribusiness advocacy group, generally supports Trump and his efforts to undo regulations. But the liberal-leaning National Farmers Union was unenthusiastic Tuesday. Rob Larew, senior vice president of government relations and communications at the NFU, dismissed the order as a “redressing” of previous administrations’ efforts to address rural concerns. Larew’s group remains focused on how Perdue might push back against proposed cuts to his agency’s budget, and on farming-related policy decisions that have been made in the past weeks and months. “Everything from immigration efforts to health care have huge implications from the rural and agriculture perspective,” Larew told HuffPost. “So what will [Perdue] do? There are lots of challenges on the horizon, some of which were created by this administration, so he has a lot of things to take care of very quickly.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 апреля, 23:28

Remarks by President Trump in Farmers Roundtable and Executive Order Signing Promoting Agriculture and Rural Prosperity in America

Roosevelt Room 3:14 P.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT:  Busy day.  They had a very busy day -- had a good day.  We’re doing well, very well.  Things are turning around.  I know they’re turning around for you folks, so I just want to welcome you very much to the White House -- special place -- America’s farmers and ranchers.   I especially want to congratulate Secretary -- now I can say, Secretary Sonny Perdue, who was just sworn in as the Secretary of Agriculture -- (applause) -- sworn in by Justice Thomas.  And it was a beautiful ceremony, and we’re going to celebrate a little bit later, and that’s great.  We’re very happy.  And you had a good vote too. SECRETARY PERDUE:  Yes, sir. THE PRESIDENT:  You didn’t have one of those 51-49 votes.  (Laughter.)  He had a very big vote, so thank Justice Thomas too -- great man, great person.  We appreciate it. America’s noble farming tradition stretches back to its earliest days.  Farmers led the way across the Great Plains, and put down roots from coast to coast.  Today, America’s farmers feed not only our nation, but millions of people around the world, and we’re going to open that up much more for you folks because, as you know, it’s not totally open, to put it mildly.  We learned that yesterday, frankly, with Canada, where the dairy farmers up in Wisconsin, Upstate New York, different places -- a lot of border states in particular -- are not able to sell their dairy products into Canada.  And this has been going on for a while, and we’re not going to put up with it. And separately, we put a very big tax -- we will be putting a very big tariff on lumber -- timber -- coming into this country.  People don’t realize Canada has been very rough on the United States.  Everyone thinks of Canada as being wonderful, and so do I.  I love Canada.  But they’ve outsmarted our politicians for many years, and you people understand that.  So we did institute a very big tariff; we announced it yesterday.  And we’re going to take care of our dairy farmers in Wisconsin, and Upstate New York, and lots of other places.  So I think you people all probably agree with that, right?  Would you agree with that?  You better believe it. Our farmers deserve a government that serves their interest and empowers them to do the hard work that they love to do so much.  And that’s what today’s executive order is all about.  With this order, I’m directing Secretary Perdue to work with other members of my Cabinet to identify and eliminate unnecessary regulations that hurt our nation’s farmers and rural communities.   Now, Sonny, I’ve already signed a lot of regulations and terminations that really help the farmer a lot.  You know what I’m talking about.  But we have some left, and you’ll identify them.  But we’ve really gotten rid of some of the biggest ones.  And that was a big help, right?  I mean, they won’t tell you about it, but they’re big numbers, and it’s going to mean a lot to the farmers. This order also establishes the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity, to be led by Secretary Perdue.  I just want to tell you that it’s an honor to be with you because, among many other things, with this order, we continue a very relentless effort to make life better for hardworking Americans, and that includes the farmers and all of the people gathered around this table, including our ranchers, our rural community folks.  We’re having a very, very big impact.  It’s already started.  Sonny is going to now identify additional areas where we can get rid of unnecessary regulations, and you people are going to be so prosperous, and you’re going to hire so many more people than currently work for you, and that’s going to make me very happy, okay? So I want to thank you very much.  So do we have the executive order, please? So this is promoting agriculture and rural prosperity in America.  And, now, there’s a lot of words I won’t bother reading everything.  But agriculture and rural prosperity in America, that’s what we want.  And we don’t want to be taken advantage of by other countries -- and that’s stopping, and that’s stopping fast.  Okay, thank you. (The President signs the executive order.) Well, perhaps I should give this pen to Sonny Perdue.  What do you think?  (Laughter and applause.)   Thank you very much, everybody. Q    Mr. President, do you fear a trade war with Canada, sir? THE PRESIDENT:  No, not at all. Q    Why not? THE PRESIDENT:  They have a tremendous surplus with the United States.  Whenever they have a surplus, I have no fear.  By the way, virtually every country has a surplus with the United States.  We have massive trade deficits.  So when we’re the country with the deficits, we have no fear. Q    Will you sign a CR if it doesn’t include funding for the wall? THE PRESIDENT:  Say it? Q    Will you sign a CR to continue funding the government if it doesn’t include --  THE PRESIDENT:  The wall is going to get built, by the way.  Just in case anybody has any question:  The wall is going to get built, and the wall is going to stop drugs, and it’s going to stop a lot of people from coming in that shouldn’t be here, and it’s going to have a huge effect on human trafficking, which is a tremendous problem in this world -- a problem that nobody talks about -- but it’s a problem that’s probably worse than any time in the history of this world.  Human trafficking, what’s going on.   The wall is going to get built, and we’re setting record numbers in terms of stopping people from coming in, and stopping drugs from coming in.  You see the numbers down 73, 74 percent.  I will say, Secretary Kelly -- formerly General Kelly -- is doing an incredible job.  And I was just with him a little while ago, and he said we definitely, desperately need the wall.  And we’re going to have the wall built.  I mean, I don't know why people are talking.  I watch these shows, and the pundits in the morning -- they don’t know what they’re talking about.  The wall gets built -- 100 percent.  Thank you very much. Q    When will the wall get built? THE PRESIDENT:  Soon.  We’re already preparing.  We’re doing plans.  We’re doing specifications.  We’re doing a lot of work on the wall, and the wall gets built.  The wall is very, very important. Q    In your first term? THE PRESIDENT:  Well, it’s certainly going to -- yeah, yeah, sure. Q    In your first term? THE PRESIDENT:  We have plenty of time -- got a lot of time. Thank you. END  3:21 P.M. EDT 

25 апреля, 18:32

Delek продаст 10% месторождения Тамар

За 10% из 31,5% акций руководство Delek Group надеется выручить 1,2 млрд. долларов. В течение 4 лет компания продаст все акции на Тамар

24 апреля, 19:01

Minister’s bizarre dam plot ridiculed

AN Indian politician who attempted to cover a dam in polystyrene has been left red-faced after his bizarre water-saving scheme backfired. Tamil Nadu state minister Sellur K Raju waded into the dam with

24 апреля, 14:30

Helmerich & Payne (HP) Q2 Earnings: What's in the Cards?

Helmerich & Payne, Inc. (HP) is set to release fiscal second-quarter 2017 results before the opening bell on Apr 27.

24 апреля, 13:40

New Survey Shows Bernie Is Right: Young Americans Want To Reverse Runaway Inequality

A new survey conducted by the Runawayinequality.org Educational Network shows that younger Americans (ages 18-40) overwhelmingly support bold proposals to reverse inequality―- Sanders-type policies such as Medicare for all, free higher education, ending mass incarceration, wealth taxes on multi-millionaires, financial speculation taxes on Wall Street, public banks, immigrants rights, worker rights, a guaranteed job at a living wage, campaign finance reform, and a sustainable environment. Meanwhile, the Trump administration is accelerating inequality. The billionaire appointees, the Goldman Sachs economic advisors, the hollow healthcare and tax proposals all are designed to move more money into the hands of the few. Unfortunately, the mainstream Democrats are hardly better when in comes to runaway inequality. Over the last 37 years, America’s top 10 percent saw their incomes rise by 115 percent and the top 1 percent saw an incredible rise of 198 percent. Meanwhile, the bottom half of all American earners not only failed to see any gain at all, but their incomes actually declined by 1 percent from 1978 to 2015, according to research by Thomas Piketty. During the Obama years “the top 1 percent of families captured 52 percent of total real income growth per family from 2009 to 2015 while the bottom 99 percent of families got only 48 percent of total real income growth,” reports inequality expert, Emanuel Saez Most politicians and pundits throw their hands up in despair. They argue there is really nothing we can do about rising inequality because of the powerful impacts of global competition and automation. Those who are falling behind just don’t have the skills needed to prosper in the modern world. Life is unfair. Get used to it. But these fatalists are dead wrong. There is ample evidence to show that many other nations have far less inequality but also deploy the most advanced technologies, and are even more open to foreign competition. (See here.) Furthermore, the mainstream Democrats have convinced themselves, that despite the Sanders surge, most Americans do not support bold policies to reverse runaway inequality — too “socialistic.” Does a social democratic program appeal to most Americans? We decided to test the mainstream Democratic Party phobias by asking 200 randomly selected 18 to 40 year-olds to evaluate a strong platform aimed at reversing runaway inequality. (The response choices were “Strongly Agree”, “Neutral,” “Disagree,” “Strongly Disagree.” The results below combine the “Strongly Agree/Agree” categories, and the “Strongly Disagree/Disagree” categories. Given the sample size the margin of error is a 7 percent. The survey was conducted April 20-22 via SurveyMonkey.) The results clearly demonstrate that these younger people are more than willing to embrace bold proposals. (Please keep in mind that approximately 30 to 40 percent of these respondents were likely Trump voters.) Money and Politics: The right to fair and equal representation, free from voter suppression and the influence of big money. For our democracy to endure, we must overturn Citizens United, enact public campaign financing and enforce the Voting Rights Act. Agree: 65.8%, Disagree: 5.0% Medicare for All: The right to universal health care. Expand and improve Medicare (for All) to provide every American with access to quality, affordable healthcare. Agree: 75.6%, Disagree: 12.7% Environmental Protection: To prevent catastrophic damage to our planet’s life support systems, we must accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy; protect our water and air from pollution; and prevent companies from moving to countries with weaker health, safety and environmental standards. Agree: 84.5%, Disagree: 4.0% Job at a living wage: Everyone who is willing and able to work is entitled to a decent paying job in a safe and healthy workplace. If the private sector can’t provide such jobs, then the public sector should. Agree: 65.0%, Disagree: 20.5% Free Public Education: The right to free public education from pre-K through college or trade school. Pre-K for 2- to 5-year olds should be available free of charge for all families. And everyone who qualifies for entrance to higher education should be able to attend tuition free. Agree: 72.0%, Disagree: 13.0% Impartial criminal justice: Biased law enforcement in poor urban and rural communities must be ended, and we must stop using mass incarceration as a substitute for decent employment and educational opportunities. Agree: 75.1%, Disagree: 16.9% Pathway to citizenship: Every resident of the US should have a comprehensive pathway to citizenship, and be afforded the rights to due process and a fair hearing that the Constitution guarantees to all. Agree: 68.2%, Disagree: 10.4% Worker Rights: To protect and enhance worker rights and fairness on the job, the freedom to unionize, free from employer coercion, must be promoted. Agree: 58.6%, Disagree: 10.5% Public Banks: As an alternative to Wall Street’s predatory lending, every state should charter a public bank, modeled on the Bank of North Dakota, whose first and only goal is to serve its people. Also, like many other developed nations, the US should charter a national postal bank to provide fair and accessible financial services in all our communities. Agree: 59.0%, Disagree: 9.5% Taxing Wall Street: To move money to Main Street, a small sales tax should be imposed on stocks, bonds and derivatives. This also would discourage high frequency computer trades which make up the majority of all stock market activity. Agree: 49.0, Disagree: 10.7% End Stock Manipulation: CEOs and their Wall Street partners should not be permitted to enrich themselves by using corporate funds to buy back their own shares in order to artificially raise share prices. This was illegal before 1982 and should be again. Agree: 71.5%, Disagree: 6.5% Wealth Tax of 1% on those whose net worth is over $10 million: Those who have grown super-rich in our financialized economy must pay their fair share of taxes. A wealth tax, currently used by Spain, France, Switzerland and Norway, is an excellent way to recoup those losses. Agree: 72.1%, Disagree: 10.1% What will it take to wake up the Corporate Democrats? The Democratic Party is trying to move “economic issues” into their core message. That’s not good enough. As we see from our survey, younger Americans in particular are hungry for more than platitudes about economic opportunity, public-private partnerships, reduced tuition loans and other half measures. What the Democrats are offering can be co-opted by Trump’s faux populism. But a strong agenda to reverse runaway inequality cannot. Rather than embrace these proposals mainstream Democrats are likely to reject our survey because it doesn’t jive with the milquetoast questions posed by their high-priced pollsters, and because it challenges their cozy relationships with Wall Street and corporate elites. But we can’t afford to sit around and moan this sorry state of affairs. Millions are in motion and eager to get more involved. We need to break through the false narratives and continue to prove that Americans want a much fairer society. For starters, we could turn this agenda into a circulating petition, get 20 million or so to sign it, and then shove it in the face of every politician. Then maybe, just maybe, we’ll see growing support for real policies to reverse runaway inequality. If you’re interested in helping out, check out runawayinequality.org We need you. We need each other. (In honor of Trump’s first 100 days, we’re having a week-long e-book sale for Runaway Inequality: An Activist Guide to Economic Justice. ― $4.99 on Amazon, Barnes and Noble and Apple. All proceeds go to support these educational efforts.) This article originally appeared on Alternet.org Les Leopold, the director of the Labor Institute, is currently working with unions and community organizations to build the educational infrastructure of a new “reversing runaway inequality” movement. For more information, contact runawayinequality.org.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 апреля, 13:00

Francesca Segal: ‘I think there are multiple awkward ages’

The award-winning novelist on life’s transitional stages, and her father – the man who wrote Love StoryFrancesca Segal was born in 1980 in north-west London, where she lives today. Her debut novel, The Innocents, won the 2012 Costa first novel award and the Betty Trask award. Her new novel, The Awkward Age, tells a story about reconstituted families and the lengths to which parents will go to ensure their child’s happiness.The Awkward Age is about a fifty-something couple on their second relationship, cohabiting with their two teenage children. What appealed to you about this scenario?I thought it was rich with tension and comic possibilities. It’s what more than 50% of families in this country look like. And that noble lunacy of constructing two halves that were never designed to fit together – it’s beautiful, sad, touching and intriguing. Continue reading...

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22 апреля, 18:00

Обзор ЦАПа Fiio i1 для iOS — ride the lightning

Не успела ещё улечься пыль от интернет-баталий по поводу отсутствия 3,5-мм гнезда в iPhone, не успели ещё самые экзальтированные граждане из числа тех, кто iPhone никогда не купит, рассказать о том, как они не могут без этого жить, а мудрые производители уже столбят интересные ниши. Не остались в стороне и Fiio, выпустив свой первый официальный […]

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21 апреля, 16:02

West Ham United v Everton: match preview

Although they are nine points above the bottom three, West Ham cannot relax yet. Slaven Bilic’s options have been limited by Andy Carroll’s groin injury and suspensions to Sam Byram and Mark Noble, while another concern for the manager must be Romelu Lukaku’s record against his side. The Everton forward has scored in each of his past nine matches against the Hammers. Jacob SteinbergKick-off Saturday 3pm Continue reading...

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20 апреля, 17:12

Plains All American Commences Open Season for New Pipeline

Plains All American Pipeline, L.P (PAA) has started an open season to gauge the demand for its planned new crude oil pipeline extending from Permian Basin to Cushing, OK.

20 апреля, 07:35

Has America Really Become Less Tolerant Of Sexual Harassment?

The cheering of liberals, progressives, well-mannered, morally decent, and socially conscious people of every stripe over the ousting of Fox News megastar Bill O’Reilly has been raucous and widespread. The reality that this seemingly indestructible Goliath of right-wing cable news could be toppled by women attesting to his predatory and assaultive behaviors inspired many a Tweet, post, article, treatise on the topic of sexual harassment. The sheen of schadenfreude has been layered thick and gooey, and even the most noble of social commentators is likely feeling some measure of “he had it comin’!” (though apparently not the man in the White house, whose own pedigree of sexually assaultive behaviors compelled an “I don’t think Bill did anything wrong” defense of his buddy.) Perhaps it is that reality — that Trump wrangled his new job despite spewing some of the most sexually denigrating tripe about women — that’s caused many on both sides of the moral divide to presume O’Reilly was indestructible. Untouchable. And why wouldn’t we think that when one of the most repugnant, self-admitted sexual abusers has been allowed into the damn White House! On top of that, we’ve watched countless women of merit and substance attest to sexual assault and harassment involving these slippery titans only to see those same women dismissed, belittled, and disbelieved, the clear message being: “In a he-say/she-say scenario, the she-say will never trump the he.” We have a long history of that patriarchal response in America, so much so that rape and sexual harassment are grievously under-reported. But, certainly with rape, where the “majority of perpetrators will not go to jail,” and in harassment cases where famous, powerful men are generally believed over their victims, it’s only the strongest woman who will put herself through the double-jeopardy of first being victimized by an abuser, then by those who refuse to believe her. Given those odds, much will be made of the fact that O’Reilly was toppled by a bevy of strong women stepping forward despite cultural pushback, but the reality is likely less noble. According to a piece in The Atlantic, Why Was Bill O’Reilly Really Fired?, the rationale is a heady mix of, yes, a morality assessment (“The allegations are disturbing and, given the importance of women in every aspect of our business, we don’t feel this is a good environment in which to advertise our products right now.”), but also an economic one: 21st Century Fox’s pending takeover of Sky TV, the European pay-TV company, in a deal said to be worth $14 billion. “On May 16,” New York magazine reported, “the British media regulator Ofcom is set to judge whether the Murdochs are ‘fit and proper’ to own such a large media property.” And “removing O’Reilly could appease critics and help close the Sky deal.” You know what’s worth more than $446 million? [The Factor’s advertising revenues] $14 billion. “Morality via math,” as The Atlantic put it, but you know what? WE’LL TAKE IT. Whatever financial concerns powered what is ultimately the right move morally, the fact is: a rich, famous, powerful man was fired because he abused women. No matter how it’s parsed, spun, twisted, or minimized, that’s big. His very public and humiliating termination can’t help but send a powerful message, one desperately needed as a matter of course, but certainly needed after Trump’s election: that abuse of women will not be tolerated, even by those with wealth and power. But will that message get across? Will it sustain; make a dent? Does it mean culture-at-large is becoming less tolerant, less willing to look away, less forgiving of sexual violence and abuse? Will it have an impact in a society where men in the military illegally hack nude photos of both male and female compatriots to expose online; where teenage boys in Steubenville claimed to not know that digitally assaulting an unconscious girl is considered rape; where a privileged Stanford swimmer got only a wrist-slap for his horrific act of violence against an inebriated woman, and where rape in the military continues to be an egregious and pervasive problem? In every one of those scenarios, the caustic, violent, and predatory behaviors of largely young men are the common threads, men who have somehow become inured to the repugnance of their actions; men who have learned, assimilated, or been taught that abusing, harassing, or raping women is (unfathomably) excusable in certain circumstances: when a woman is drunk, passive, incapable of self-protecting behaviors. When a woman is serving in a system of powerful, gender-based patriarchy. When a woman is in private possession of images not meant for public consumption. When a woman is building a career and looking for honest sponsorship from men who can offer it. When a woman is... a woman. Somehow, legions of young men have grown up either not being taught and mentored in moral, ethical, respectful conduct toward women, or they’re picking up negative attitudes embodied by the men in their lives: fathers, family members, coaches, peers, bosses, older opinion leaders. Whatever the components, the resulting equation turns boys into men like Bill O’Reilly, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and yes, Donald Trump. And that needs to change. Desperately. In an example of art mirroring culture, the truth of how we adults raise our boys and girls to comport themselves on this issue came into high relief as I watched the new Netflix series, Thirteen Reasons Why. Adapted from a book by the same name, it tells the deeply painful story of a high school girl’s suicide brought on by a critical mass of bullying, sexual harassment, and, terrifyingly, two different rapes. As savvy as I am about modern culture, and having a son who was, not all that long ago, in high school, I was stunned by the depiction of both the gauntlet girls are forced to walk as they make their way through school, as well as the seemingly acceptable bullying by privileged males whose disproportionate power renders them untouchable, their value as athletes vaunted above their value as human beings of integrity. In that scenario, the girls become invisible victims, while the shiny exteriors of aggrandized boys blinds the adults from recognizing and intervening effectively. If this series, by any measure, accurately illustrates high school in America, we’ve got some serious work to do. It’s learned behavior, and we’ve got to preempt it: Men, women, mothers, fathers, teachers, mentors, and coaches: When it comes to the boys, we’ve got to teach, exemplify and demand respectful, courteous, ethical behaviors toward women. ALL women. Young, old, pretty, homely; lovely or hell on wheels. That goes for what we say, how we act, the way we treat their mothers (and, for us mothers, the way we treat ourselves); the way we respond to the other females in their lives, both young and old. We must banish any tendency to say things like: “boys will be boys,” “it’s just locker room talk,” or “she was asking for it” or “he’s just being a guy.” If you think any of the behaviors I’ve enumerated above are even remotely acceptable, you need to enlighten yourself. Maybe sit down and watch Thirteen Reasons Why and educate yourself about what those kinds of acts can lead to, both in terms of destroying lives and turning out boys who remain predators. When it comes to the girls in our care, we’ve not only got to treat them with the respect and courtesy they deserve, we’ve got to teach them how to demand it for themselves. How to enjoy feeling attractive, desirable, and appealing without becoming passive, overly-needy, and self-negating. For me as a woman, one of the most troubling aspects of Thirteen Reasons Why was watching the passivity and acquiescence of the young women involved, girls who were doing and allowing things they didn’t actually want, didn’t honestly believe in, but somehow didn’t have the wherewithal, the tools, the inner strength or sense of self to push back as needed. In their desire to feel wanted, be seen as popular, likable, as “not a problem,” they succumbed to pressures that left them vulnerable, often in dangerous situations in which they were ultimately victimized. So while we teach our boys to be good men, we’ve got to set our girls up to be strong and self-loving, armed with coping skills to withstand sexual bullying and peer pressure; offering perspective that allows them to see themselves as valuable and worthy without needing the approval of those who might abuse, negate, denigrate, or violate them. We’ve got to come at it from all sides; it’s that big a problem. I may be an optimist, but I hope O’Reilly’s firing is the start of, or maybe an expansion of, a new cultural meme on the topic of sexual assault and harassment. That he will be held as an example of what happens to callous boys who become men who abuse women. That the women who stood up to him will be seen as beacons of female power for those young girls finding their way through the politics of being women. That we are making an essential turn in the march toward gender equality and integrity, one that will ultimately lead to a society that could never excuse the repugnant behaviors of men like O’Reilly, Ailes, Cosby, and, sadly, the current man in the White House. We’ll know when we get there. For now, let’s celebrate; this event is a small but a worthy victory on the road to decency. Photo by A#U# @ Unsplash Follow Lorraine Devon Wilke on Facebook, Twitter and Amazon. Details and links to her blog, photography, books, and music can be found at www.LorraineDevonWilke.com. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 апреля, 07:35

Has America Really Become Less Tolerant Of Sexual Harassment?

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); The cheering of liberals, progressives, well-mannered, morally decent, and socially conscious people of every stripe over the ousting of Fox News megastar Bill O’Reilly has been raucous and widespread. The reality that this seemingly indestructible Goliath of right-wing cable news could be toppled by women attesting to his predatory and assaultive behaviors inspired many a Tweet, post, article, treatise on the topic of sexual harassment. The sheen of schadenfreude has been layered thick and gooey, and even the most noble of social commentators is likely feeling some measure of “he had it comin’!” (though apparently not the man in the White house, whose own pedigree of sexually assaultive behaviors compelled an “I don’t think Bill did anything wrong” defense of his buddy.) Perhaps it is that reality — that Trump wrangled his new job despite spewing some of the most sexually denigrating tripe about women — that’s caused many on both sides of the moral divide to presume O’Reilly was indestructible. Untouchable. And why wouldn’t we think that when one of the most repugnant, self-admitted sexual abusers has been allowed into the damn White House! On top of that, we’ve watched countless women of merit and substance attest to sexual assault and harassment involving these slippery titans only to see those same women dismissed, belittled, and disbelieved, the clear message being: “In a he-say/she-say scenario, the she-say will never trump the he.” We have a long history of that patriarchal response in America, so much so that rape and sexual harassment are grievously under-reported. But, certainly with rape, where the “majority of perpetrators will not go to jail,” and in harassment cases where famous, powerful men are generally believed over their victims, it’s only the strongest woman who will put herself through the double-jeopardy of first being victimized by an abuser, then by those who refuse to believe her. Given those odds, much will be made of the fact that O’Reilly was toppled by a bevy of strong women stepping forward despite cultural pushback, but the reality is likely less noble. According to a piece in The Atlantic, Why Was Bill O’Reilly Really Fired?, the rationale is a heady mix of, yes, a morality assessment (“The allegations are disturbing and, given the importance of women in every aspect of our business, we don’t feel this is a good environment in which to advertise our products right now.”), but also an economic one: 21st Century Fox’s pending takeover of Sky TV, the European pay-TV company, in a deal said to be worth $14 billion. “On May 16,” New York magazine reported, “the British media regulator Ofcom is set to judge whether the Murdochs are ‘fit and proper’ to own such a large media property.” And “removing O’Reilly could appease critics and help close the Sky deal.” You know what’s worth more than $446 million? [The Factor’s advertising revenues] $14 billion. “Morality via math,” as The Atlantic put it, but you know what? WE’LL TAKE IT. Whatever financial concerns powered what is ultimately the right move morally, the fact is: a rich, famous, powerful man was fired because he abused women. No matter how it’s parsed, spun, twisted, or minimized, that’s big. His very public and humiliating termination can’t help but send a powerful message, one desperately needed as a matter of course, but certainly needed after Trump’s election: that abuse of women will not be tolerated, even by those with wealth and power. But will that message get across? Will it sustain; make a dent? Does it mean culture-at-large is becoming less tolerant, less willing to look away, less forgiving of sexual violence and abuse? Will it have an impact in a society where men in the military illegally hack nude photos of both male and female compatriots to expose online; where teenage boys in Steubenville claimed to not know that digitally assaulting an unconscious girl is considered rape; where a privileged Stanford swimmer got only a wrist-slap for his horrific act of violence against an inebriated woman, and where rape in the military continues to be an egregious and pervasive problem? In every one of those scenarios, the caustic, violent, and predatory behaviors of largely young men are the common threads, men who have somehow become inured to the repugnance of their actions; men who have learned, assimilated, or been taught that abusing, harassing, or raping women is (unfathomably) excusable in certain circumstances: when a woman is drunk, passive, incapable of self-protecting behaviors. When a woman is serving in a system of powerful, gender-based patriarchy. When a woman is in private possession of images not meant for public consumption. When a woman is building a career and looking for honest sponsorship from men who can offer it. When a woman is... a woman. Somehow, legions of young men have grown up either not being taught and mentored in moral, ethical, respectful conduct toward women, or they’re picking up negative attitudes embodied by the men in their lives: fathers, family members, coaches, peers, bosses, older opinion leaders. Whatever the components, the resulting equation turns boys into men like Bill O’Reilly, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and yes, Donald Trump. And that needs to change. Desperately. In an example of art mirroring culture, the truth of how we adults raise our boys and girls to comport themselves on this issue came into high relief as I watched the new Netflix series, Thirteen Reasons Why. Adapted from a book by the same name, it tells the deeply painful story of a high school girl’s suicide brought on by a critical mass of bullying, sexual harassment, and, terrifyingly, two different rapes. As savvy as I am about modern culture, and having a son who was, not all that long ago, in high school, I was stunned by the depiction of both the gauntlet girls are forced to walk as they make their way through school, as well as the seemingly acceptable bullying by privileged males whose disproportionate power renders them untouchable, their value as athletes vaunted above their value as human beings of integrity. In that scenario, the girls become invisible victims, while the shiny exteriors of aggrandized boys blinds the adults from recognizing and intervening effectively. If this series, by any measure, accurately illustrates high school in America, we’ve got some serious work to do. It’s learned behavior, and we’ve got to preempt it: Men, women, mothers, fathers, teachers, mentors, and coaches: When it comes to the boys, we’ve got to teach, exemplify and demand respectful, courteous, ethical behaviors toward women. ALL women. Young, old, pretty, homely; lovely or hell on wheels. That goes for what we say, how we act, the way we treat their mothers (and, for us mothers, the way we treat ourselves); the way we respond to the other females in their lives, both young and old. We must banish any tendency to say things like: “boys will be boys,” “it’s just locker room talk,” or “she was asking for it” or “he’s just being a guy.” If you think any of the behaviors I’ve enumerated above are even remotely acceptable, you need to enlighten yourself. Maybe sit down and watch Thirteen Reasons Why and educate yourself about what those kinds of acts can lead to, both in terms of destroying lives and turning out boys who remain predators. When it comes to the girls in our care, we’ve not only got to treat them with the respect and courtesy they deserve, we’ve got to teach them how to demand it for themselves. How to enjoy feeling attractive, desirable, and appealing without becoming passive, overly-needy, and self-negating. For me as a woman, one of the most troubling aspects of Thirteen Reasons Why was watching the passivity and acquiescence of the young women involved, girls who were doing and allowing things they didn’t actually want, didn’t honestly believe in, but somehow didn’t have the wherewithal, the tools, the inner strength or sense of self to push back as needed. In their desire to feel wanted, be seen as popular, likable, as “not a problem,” they succumbed to pressures that left them vulnerable, often in dangerous situations in which they were ultimately victimized. So while we teach our boys to be good men, we’ve got to set our girls up to be strong and self-loving, armed with coping skills to withstand sexual bullying and peer pressure; offering perspective that allows them to see themselves as valuable and worthy without needing the approval of those who might abuse, negate, denigrate, or violate them. We’ve got to come at it from all sides; it’s that big a problem. I may be an optimist, but I hope O’Reilly’s firing is the start of, or maybe an expansion of, a new cultural meme on the topic of sexual assault and harassment. That he will be held as an example of what happens to callous boys who become men who abuse women. That the women who stood up to him will be seen as beacons of female power for those young girls finding their way through the politics of being women. That we are making an essential turn in the march toward gender equality and integrity, one that will ultimately lead to a society that could never excuse the repugnant behaviors of men like O’Reilly, Ailes, Cosby, and, sadly, the current man in the White House. We’ll know when we get there. For now, let’s celebrate; this event is a small but a worthy victory on the road to decency. Follow Lorraine Devon Wilke on Facebook, Twitter and Amazon. Details and links to her blog, photography, books, and music can be found at www.LorraineDevonWilke.com. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.