• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании61
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы21
      • Показать ещё
      Разное14
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели2
      Формат3
      Издания3
      Сферы1
      Международные организации4
      Люди1
30 ноября, 16:54

Closing The Loop Amidst the Cobblestones of Malmo

We're gathered in the historic city of Malmo, Sweden this week with six innovators and some of the world's leading experts on sustainability to harness the power of collective solutions. "It's amazing to be here in Malmö with this years innovators," says Sofus Midtgaard the Nordic lead on LAUNCH. Midtgaard says creating real impact means "changing business as usual, scaling innovative solutions and preparing the system to adopt them." Toke Sabroe of LAUNCH helping May Al-Karooni, CEO of Globechain prepare her presentation. To help these innovators succeed and scale, LAUNCH partners IKEA Group, Nike Inc., Novozymes, Kvadrat, as well as leading scientists, investors, and Nordic government representatives will team up with the innovators tomorrow for interactive ideation and mentorship sessions. "It is this coming together of unusual partners from across industry and government where the power of LAUNCH lies to truly change the world," says Jeff Hamaoui of LAUNCH. "Innovation pushes us to think about the future we want and what could be, rather than the future that is coming to us," Hamaoui adds. The 6 LAUNCH Nordic innovators share how their ideas can disrupt the system: BioCellection: a biotech solution that uses bacteria to upcycle plastic. Cofounders Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao are based in the US: BioCellection's mission is to turn plastic pollution into value and to make this technology globally accessible. We are building a platform technology that will convert mixed plastic waste that is currently going to landfills, incinerators, and oceans into new materials and chemicals that can be used in the value chain of a variety of industries, ranging from construction, textiles, to biotechnology. We are upcycling a currently uncaptured material and closing the plastic economy by bridging previously disparate industries and rethinking the question 'plastics to X?' Globechain: a platform to connect businesses, charities and people to reuse unwanted items. Founder and CEO May Al-Karooni is based in the UK: Globechain is a reuse platform that connects businesses to charities and smes to give and take unwanted items within a supply chain network creating a social impact waste audit for its members. To date, it has helped divert over 1,000,000 kilos from landfill, contributed to over 800,000 in savings/revenue to charitable causes and indirectly helped increase employment and up skilling by around 37%. Infinited Fibre Company: a closed loop solution for the textile industry. Founder Petri Alava is based in Finland: We have sustainable chemical technology to produce new natural and affordable textile fibers equal to cotton from textile and cardboard waste normally ending up to landfills. The fashion industry is excited about this unique technology and many major brands are committed to working with us and helping scale us to markets. The potential impact, if we get this to large markets and people all over the world, could be annually savings of 6.5 billion litres of oil and 65 billion litres of fresh water. Kabadiwalla Connect: a system to help cities manage recyclable waste, by leveraging the informal waste ecosystem. Founder Siddhartha Hande is based in India: Urban India's waste management system is in crisis. Every year our cities generate over 68 million tons of waste and currently over 90% is sent to open landfills. Eventually, our company hopes to help divert 70% of this waste by engaging the informal sector -- helping avoid the emissions of 30 million tons of CO2 and resulting in the savings of at least 3.5 billion USD in expenditures for local municipalities every year. Shrilk: a biodegradable alternative to plastic that is inspired by the insect cuticle. Founder Javier Fernandez is based in Singapore: We believe the age of plastic is coming to its end and a new era based on the integration of biology in manufacturing is coming. Similar to how plastic transformed society and the way we consume and produce, biomaterials will do the same in bringing new methods of production addressing the current societal and sustainability needs. Queen of Raw: an online sustainable materials marketplace for suppliers and designers. CEO and Co-Founder Stephanie Benedetto is based in the US: Brands across industries struggle to find sustainable raw materials and factories around the world struggle to sell their excess stock that sits in a warehouse or eventually ends up in a landfill. Queen of Raw provides the bridge and by 2025 can save over 4 billion gallons of water and 2 million pounds of chemicals while keeping over 2 million tons of textiles out of landfills. BioCellection cofounders Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao honing their pitch ahead of the Nordic Forum December 1. "We are working to make our whole product range more sustainable, including playing an active role in the transition to a circular economy. We are looking forward to meeting this year's innovators with disruptive ideas and fresh mindsets who can help us on this journey. I'm looking forward to help and interact with this year's six selected innovators." Håkan Nordkvist, Head of Sustainability Innovation, IKEA Group You'll be able to meet all six innovators online today via Twitter at 10:30am EST. Using the hashtag #LAUNCHNordic, the innovators will share insights on their work and innovative ways to give products and materials a second life! Also joining them on Twitter will be NASA Astronaut Cady Coleman, a chemist and former United States Air Force officer, Coleman has been on three space missions and spent 180 days in space. She's eager to learn more about the innovations and says "a sustainable earth" will help inform our future journey to Mars. "While living up on our International Space Station for 6 months, I had a special vantage point," Coleman says. "We are all on a journey and whether we have our feet right here on earth, or we are traveling thru space, we have some problem solving to do. We need to be able to recycle our water, take care of our air, and grow food in places that it is not easy to do that. You can see that space exploration and sustainable earth have a lot in common," she adds. NASA Astronaut Cady Coleman It is especially poignant to have Coleman join on Twitter today on the eve of her retirement from NASA! After 33 years, Cady Coleman is beginning her next journey so be sure to join us on #LAUNCHNordic as we congratulate her on a remarkable career. "Being partners in LAUNCH Nordic has been highly inspirational for us. We are looking forward to helping this year's innovators, but we learn a lot from them as well. We look forward to share knowledge and hopefully find meaningful and relevant technologies and innovation suitable for co-investment." Anders Byriel, CEO, Kvadrat LAUNCH's Sofus Midtgaard and Jeff Hamaoui at High Court in Malmo, Sweden. Following the LAUNCH Nordic Forum, innovators will take part in an accelerator program to help them bring their innovations to scale. The LAUNCH Nordic Council participants include: Håkan Nordkvist, Head of Sustainability Innovation, IKEA Group; Anders Byriel, CEO, Kvadrat; Morten Elkjær, Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Mikkel Stenbæk, Deputy Head of Division, Danish EPA; Carin Daal, Head of Department, Region Skåne; and Mike van der Zanden, Sustainability Director, Supply Chain Innovation Europe, Nike. They will provide access to capital, credibility and capacity to help the six innovators take their innovations to scale. Malmo, Sweden where old red brick factories and historic canals take you back to the city's origins in the 16th century. The multimedia team of Bjarke Myrthu, Davar Ardalan, and Longfei Wang preparing for a live digital event at High Court in Malmo, Sweden. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 ноября, 17:56

Columbia Acorn International A Fund (LAIAX) in Focus

Columbia Acorn International A (LAIAX) a Zacks Rank #2 (Buy) invests at least 75% of its net assets in foreign companies in developed markets (for example, Japan, Canada and the United Kingdom) and in emerging markets (for example, China, India and Brazil).

27 октября, 09:37

Фондовые рынки Европы снизились в среду на слабой отчетности

Европейские фондовые индексы завершили в минусе торги в среду на фоне разочаровывающей корпоративной отчетности, а также снижения цен на нефть.

26 октября, 19:51

European shares fall slightly led by Novozymes; Gucci owner soars

* IAG rises after British Airways pension deal (Adds details, updates prices)

Выбор редакции
26 октября, 10:27

Novozymes shares slide 11% as quarterly results disappoint

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

11 августа, 10:48

Европа: фондовые рынки умеренно отступили. США: рынок ушел в минус

В среду, 10 августа, фондовые индексы Старого Света завершили торговую сессию небольшим снижением. Европейские рынки акций за исключением британского не сумели финишировать на положительной территории на фоне возобновившегося снижения цен на нефть и ряда не самых удачных квартальных отчетностей, опубликованных в регионе. Цены на нефть вчера растеряли первоначальные выигрыши после публикации данных по запасам нефти от EIA, показавших увеличение запасов "черного золота" на 1,055 млн баррелей вместо ожидавшегося рынком сокращения.

01 июня, 23:07

Business-Driven Sustainability Will Change the World

Fifteen years ago, Novozymes (a global cleantech company) signed onto the UN Global Compact--a pledge by businesses worldwide to adopt sustainable and socially responsible policies, and to report on their implementation. We joined because we believed a revolution would follow--turning corporations into social and environmental advocates and drivers of sustainable improvements. Today, that way of thinking and acting is becoming the way global leaders do business. With more than 80% of S&P 500 companies now issuing a corporate social responsibility (CSR) or sustainability report (according to the Governance & Accountability Institute), sustainability is becoming business mainstream. Companies are going beyond just reporting their financial, social and environmental results. They are now integrating sustainability practices into their operations. This transition to purpose-driven business brings solid results for companies like Novozymes. In fact, 2015 Morgan Stanley research found that, "...firms that consistently factor sustainability into their business strategy can fare better; with positive effects both on a firm's profitability and stock price performance..."-proof that by doing good a business can do well. With all the global challenges today, we need more companies to rethink tomorrow. How can they better drive their business using the new UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG's) as a guide? What impacts will this have on society and their bottom line? The answer is the sweet spot where people, planet and profit interconnect and deliver solutions for better lives in a growing world. In 2014, Novozymes used the draft SDG's as inspiration when developing its new long-term strategy and company purpose: Together we make biological solutions for better lives in a growing world. With technology innovation as the backbone of our business and sustainability at the heart of our culture, we search for ways that biology, nature's technology, can be leveraged to solve some of the world's biggest problems. In order to integrate the SDGs into our business we use them to assess our innovation pipeline and determine which new solutions have the most promise to bring positive impact to the world. Whether it's saving energy in the production of your favorite brew, reducing the use of chemicals to make your daughter's Justin Bieber concert T-shirt or bringing cleaner-burning biofuels to a service station near you, we're developing ways to implement more sustainable manufacturing of your favorite products. Many of these initiatives are highlighted at the Business for 2030 website which showcases business contributions to sustainable development through the prism of the SDGs. Among the 17 SDG goals, three in particular provide opportunities that biotechnology can help address: Eliminating billions of tons of CO2 Wherever we can modify a conventional process with a biological one it results in a significant positive impact to the environment. By using specific enzymes in your low temperature laundry detergent for example, we can reduce chemical consumption, energy, water and CO2 emissions, compared with conventional technologies. The documented environmental benefits of biological technologies are big. In 2015 alone, Novozymes' customers avoided 60 million tons of CO2 emissions by applying our products-- equivalent to taking 25 million cars off the road annually. Moreover, if all existing biotechnology were applied to industry today around the world, we could save 2.5 billion tons of CO2 emissions. But that is just the beginning. Our only limitation is the creativity of scientists and engineers to discover new ways where these solutions can make a real difference. Ensuring sustainable energy for all Novozymes is working with partners towards the shared goal of ensuring universal worldwide access to affordable, reliable and modern energy services. Through the World Bank and U.N.-led initiative Sustainable Energy For All (SE4ALL) High Impact Opportunity on Sustainable Bioenergy we aim to double sustainable bioenergy to 30 percent of the global energy mix by 2030. More than 50 developing countries are engaged with more than $50 billion mobilized from the private sector toward achieving these goals. Sustainable bioenergy holds vast opportunities to cut CO2 emissions, reduce dependency on oil, increase energy security, create green jobs, and enable emerging economies to address their growing energy needs. Supporting sustainable food production Feeding a growing world of nine billion people may prove to be the ultimate challenge. In order to meet this demand, farmers will need multiple technology tools in their toolbox. Novozymes' BioAgriculture technology harnesses naturally-occurring microbes in the soil to help farmers increase crop yields while reducing use of fertilizer and pesticides. Similarly, our animal feed microbes and enzymes help improve animal digestion and nutrition resulting in higher farm productivity, reduced antibiotic usage and lower environmental impact. We'll need to use more sustainable agriculture globally to continue to deliver the safe, affordable food many of us enjoy today. The world now has a plan for its development - the UN SDG´s - agreed upon by 193 countries in September 2015. This is a great gift to business because they can only be achieved through private sector solutions. The SDG's are a powerful, long-term signal providing direction and a great framework for business to release its powers of innovating and developing solutions for the world. In short, they are driving business to become an even stronger force for good. Learn more about Novozymes and how they are adopting the UN Sustainable Development Goals as a core driver of brand strategy, product and service innovation, and sustainability goal-setting going forward. Claus will be speaking to the Sustainable Brands community next week at SB'16 San Diego and at SB'16 Copenhagen this coming September 26-28. This post is part of a series produced by The Huffington Post and Sustainable Brands on the power of purpose in driving business success. The Huffington Post is a media partner for SB'16 San Diego, Sustainable Brands' flagship conference in San Diego June 6th-9th. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
18 февраля, 18:42

CEO Admits That Environmentalism Does Cost Him Profits

No one scrutinizes and nitpicks bold decisions quite like family. Except, maybe, Wall Street. Publicly traded companies are often constrained by the financial sector’s appetite for quick profits, no matter the cost to the environment or the long-term sustainability of the firm. That culture of short-term thinking poses a challenge to companies trying to wean themselves off fossil fuels or rid their supply line of a toxic chemical or pay their workers fairly. Ethics aren’t cheap or, in the minds of some cash-craven shareholders, worth it. For S.C. Johnson & Son, the home chemicals giant behind Windex and Drano, it’s good to be “a family company.” “Wall Street rewards that short-termism and in my mind, they’re just taking advantage of that short-termism,” Herbert Fisk Johnson III, the company’s chairman and chief executive, told The Huffington Post last week in a rare interview. “We are in a very fortunate situation to not have to worry about those things, and we’re very fortunate that we have a family that is principled and has been very principled.” S.C. Johnson has been privately held since its current boss’s great-great-grandfather, Samuel Curtis Johnson Sr., founded the firm in Racine, Wisconsin, in 1886. With $9.6 billion in revenue each year, the maker of such products as Ziploc bags and Saran wrap ranks 35th on Forbes’ list of America’s largest private companies. It’s a comfortable place to be in, particularly for a firm that isn’t beholden to shareholders looking for earnings gains each quarter. But it’s that freedom that allows S.C. Johnson to make decisions that keep the company in line with its values, even if it hurts its bottom line. Last week, the company became the first major player in the household chemicals industry to list 100 percent of the ingredients used to create fragrance in one of its lines of scented products, the Glade Fresh Citrus Blossoms collection of wax melts and air fresheners. The move, lauded by environmentalists, served to highlight the lack of transparency around the “natural ingredients” and “essential oils” used in scented products that actually contain hundreds of chemicals. It seems, on the face of it, like a major coup for the company’s marketing team at a time when shoppers are demanding greater clarity about the products they buy. But the decision put S.C. Johnson at odds with both fragrance producers, who say listing all chemicals jeopardizes their proprietary formulas, and California regulators, who require a warning label on products that don’t use vague, catchall phrases like “essential oils.” Warning labels, as the cigarette industry can attest to, aren’t good for sales. “If you put a product with a big warning label on it,” Johnson said, “it’s not going to sell.” But, as Johnson wrote in an article for the April 2015 issue of the Harvard Business Review, S.C. Johnson “has a long history of taking action to address the environmental or health effects of the chemicals in our products.” Take, for example, Saran Wrap. When S.C. Johnson acquired the food storage product in 1998 from Dow Chemical, the plastic wrap trounced other rivals because it was microwavable, it blocked out odors and its sticky consistency clung easily to surfaces. Around that time, regulators and environmentalists began raising concerns over toxic chemicals released when burning polyvinylidene chloride, the chlorine-based ingredient responsible for Saran Wrap’s favored traits. “We set out to figure out an alternative for Saran that didn’t contain chlorine, but that’s just as good,” Johnson said. “Bottom line is, we couldn’t find anything that’s just as good. Nothing had those clinging properties.” But the company couldn’t ignore facts, so they changed the formula anyway. “We went out there with an inferior product, and we’ve been steadily losing business,” Johnson said. “Still, chlorine-based plastic wraps like that are still used in the marketplace today, and we can’t compete against those.” Another example came in the late 1970s, under the leadership of Johnson’s father, Samuel. The company banned chlorofluorocarbons -- chemicals, used as an aerosol propellant, that erode the Earth’s ozone layer -- three years before they were banned in the United States. Suppliers, and even some employees, were not happy. During a speech, a chief executive of a chemical company interrupted S.C. Johnson’s then-CEO and insisted that the company’s move would “ruin the industry.” “You look back on that decision today, in light of the strong laws that came in, and that was a very prescient decision,” Johnson said. To be sure, remaining private means a company doesn't have to report as much about itself to the public, making it less transparent and accountable. But even being public has flaws -- the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission took heat last month for failing to enforce stricter environmental standards reporting at public companies.  Keeping a company off public stock exchanges isn’t the only way to insulate the firm from the frenzied whims of Wall Street. In Denmark, nonprofit foundations own majority or controlling stakes in many of the country’s biggest companies. Their backing makes it easier for management to stave off pressure from shareholders to sacrifice the company’s values in pursuit of quick financial gains. The NoVo Foundation owns pharmaceutical giant Novo Nordisk and its biotech sister firm, Novozymes. About 51 percent of brewing behemoth Carlsberg is owned by an eponymous foundation that uses its profits to fund scientific research. Shipping goliath Maersk is controlled by the A.P. Møller and Chastine McKinney Møller Foundation, which holds more than 50 percent of voting rights at the company. But the foundation ownership model remains rare in the United States. Before 1969, it was more common, according to a 2013 study. But the Tax Reform Act of 1969 virtually eliminated such ownership by restricting how much of a for-profit business a private foundation can own, according to the Foundation Center. The legal change came of longstanding fears over the power of private foundations set up by industrialists like John D. Rockefeller or Andrew Carnegie to preserve dynastic wealth.  So, for now, keeping the business in the family might be the best way to keep it kosher. “Right before he passed away, my great-grandfather made a speech before the company and said, ‘Goodwill of people is the only enduring thing in any business. It’s the sole substance. The rest is shadow,’” Johnson recalled. “It’s so true, and that has been the principle we’ve had since our inception.” Also on HuffPost: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 февраля, 22:15

Denmark Has Figured Out One Way To Foil Corporate Greed

NEW YORK -- Denmark is not the socialist utopia celebrated by Sen. Bernie Sanders during the first Democratic presidential debate in October. Just ask Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, who responded two weeks later to say his country is "far from a socialist planned economy. Denmark is a market economy." But at least when it comes to the ownership of its biggest companies, Denmark has an unusual way of doing business. Many of the country's corporate titans are controlled by nonprofit foundations and charities, which either own majority stakes or dominate shareholder voting through more powerful classes of shares. Their backing makes it much easier for management to stave off pressure from other shareholders to pursue quick financial gains -- at the expense, perhaps, of employees' well-being, the environment or even the company's own long-term competitiveness. "The fact is that many Danish companies have an ownership structure that allows us not to be forced by the short-termism of the markets, per se, and to think long term," Novozymes CEO Peder Holk Nielsen said in an interview at The Huffington Post's Manhattan headquarters on Tuesday. "I think that is a great grooming ground for sustainability." Novozymes -- a Copenhagen-based biotech firm that last month released a new probiotic microbe product that may help poultry farmers wean their birds off potentially dangerous antibiotic regimens -- is controlled by a charitable foundation. Similarly, about 51 percent of brewing giant Carlsberg is owned by an eponymous foundation that uses its profits to fund scientific research. Maersk, the Danish shipping goliath, is controlled by the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Moller Foundation, which holds more than 50 percent of voting rights at the company. The Lundbeck Foundation, which owns 70 percent of its namesake pharmaceutical company, shells out about $74.4 million in grants each year to fund medical research and education programs. Businesses around the world rely on profit as a chief metric of success, and stock markets -- where companies go to sell shares and raise money -- encourage this focus. But recently, several noted business leaders have called for an end to the obsession with quarterly earnings, which can divert companies from investing in things that take more than a few months to pay off, such as renewable energy.  "Guys like myself are shielded from the sheer short-term focus of the stock market," Nielsen said. "Yet we have 75 percent of our ownership in free-float, so we're actually exposed to the stock market." The charitable foundation controls 69 percent of Novozymes' shareholder votes, but actually owns only 25 percent of its stock. That hybrid model insulates the company from pressure to deliver quick and easy profits, while keeping it grounded in the reality of the market. It also protects the company from proxy fights or hostile takeovers by a competitor.  "You're not going to be knocked over by a bad quarter," Nielsen said. "But you also take a bad quarter seriously because the stock market will tell you it's not right."  Looking beyond quarterly earnings doesn't seem to hurt shareholders. Foundation-owned companies on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange were at least as good at delivering risk-adjusted stock returns as their competitors with traditional ownership structures, according to a study published in the European Journal of Law and Economics in 2004.  To be sure, the foundation-ownership model is not a particularly democratic one. It places control over a public company in the hands of a small board of directors at the nonprofit, rather than with the larger group of investors who own stock in the firm.  In many cases, foundation ownership was the wish of company founders who wanted to preserve the businesses they built for posterity, according to Steen Thomsen, a professor at Copenhagen Business School's Center for Corporate Governance who co-authored the 2004 study.  "The typical story is of a founder who regards the company as his contribution to world peace, has not done anything else in his life and can't bear to part with it or see it torn apart by siblings who can't agree," Thomsen told the Financial Times in 2011. Moreover, a business model that suits a nation smaller than Maryland, with just 5.6 million people, might not work as well in a much larger country. "It has a weird effect on politics in such a small country -- the CEOs' families do have an outsized influence on politics," said Guan Yang, an expert in Danish finance who grew up in Copenhagen and teaches at New York University. "A lot more than, if you take an American example like the Koch brothers, they're pretty small compared to the size of the U.S. economy." Foundation ownership of businesses is rare in the United States. Before 1969, it was more common, according to a follow-up study led by Thomsen in 2013. But the Tax Reform Act of 1969 virtually eliminated such ownership by restricting how much of a for-profit business a private foundation can own, according to the Foundation Center. The legal change came of longstanding fears over the power of private foundations set up by industrialists like John D. Rockefeller or Andrew Carnegie to preserve dynastic wealth.  But as the gap between those born rich and born poor in the U.S. continues to widen, reining in the wealthy may be a moot point. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 февраля, 22:15

Denmark Has Figured Out One Way To Foil Corporate Greed

NEW YORK -- Denmark is not the socialist utopia celebrated by Sen. Bernie Sanders during the first Democratic presidential debate in October. Just ask Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, who responded two weeks later to say his country is "far from a socialist planned economy. Denmark is a market economy." But at least when it comes to the ownership of its biggest companies, Denmark has an unusual way of doing business. Many of the country's corporate titans are controlled by nonprofit foundations and charities, which either own majority stakes or dominate shareholder voting through more powerful classes of shares. Their backing makes it much easier for management to stave off pressure from other shareholders to pursue quick financial gains -- at the expense, perhaps, of employees' well-being, the environment or even the company's own long-term competitiveness. "The fact is that many Danish companies have an ownership structure that allows us not to be forced by the short-termism of the markets, per se, and to think long term," Novozymes CEO Peder Holk Nielsen said in an interview at The Huffington Post's Manhattan headquarters on Tuesday. "I think that is a great grooming ground for sustainability." Novozymes -- a Copenhagen-based biotech firm that last month released a new probiotic microbe product that may help poultry farmers wean their birds off potentially dangerous antibiotic regimens -- is controlled by a charitable foundation. Similarly, about 51 percent of brewing giant Carlsberg is owned by an eponymous foundation that uses its profits to fund scientific research. Maersk, the Danish shipping goliath, is controlled by the A.P. Møller and Chastine Mc-Kinney Moller Foundation, which holds more than 50 percent of voting rights at the company. The Lundbeck Foundation, which owns 70 percent of its namesake pharmaceutical company, shells out about $74.4 million in grants each year to fund medical research and education programs. Businesses around the world rely on profit as a chief metric of success, and stock markets -- where companies go to sell shares and raise money -- encourage this focus. But recently, several noted business leaders have called for an end to the obsession with quarterly earnings, which can divert companies from investing in things that take more than a few months to pay off, such as renewable energy.  "Guys like myself are shielded from the sheer short-term focus of the stock market," Nielsen said. "Yet we have 75 percent of our ownership in free-float, so we're actually exposed to the stock market." The charitable foundation controls 69 percent of Novozymes' shareholder votes, but actually owns only 25 percent of its stock. That hybrid model insulates the company from pressure to deliver quick and easy profits, while keeping it grounded in the reality of the market. It also protects the company from proxy fights or hostile takeovers by a competitor.  "You're not going to be knocked over by a bad quarter," Nielsen said. "But you also take a bad quarter seriously because the stock market will tell you it's not right."  Looking beyond quarterly earnings doesn't seem to hurt shareholders. Foundation-owned companies on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange were at least as good at delivering risk-adjusted stock returns as their competitors with traditional ownership structures, according to a study published in the European Journal of Law and Economics in 2004.  To be sure, the foundation-ownership model is not a particularly democratic one. It places control over a public company in the hands of a small board of directors at the nonprofit, rather than with the larger group of investors who own stock in the firm.  In many cases, foundation ownership was the wish of company founders who wanted to preserve the businesses they built for posterity, according to Steen Thomsen, a professor at Copenhagen Business School's Center for Corporate Governance who co-authored the 2004 study.  "The typical story is of a founder who regards the company as his contribution to world peace, has not done anything else in his life and can't bear to part with it or see it torn apart by siblings who can't agree," Thomsen told the Financial Times in 2011. Moreover, a business model that suits a nation smaller than Maryland, with just 5.6 million people, might not work as well in a much larger country. "It has a weird effect on politics in such a small country -- the CEOs' families do have an outsized influence on politics," said Guan Yang, an expert in Danish finance who grew up in Copenhagen and teaches at New York University. "A lot more than, if you take an American example like the Koch brothers, they're pretty small compared to the size of the U.S. economy." Foundation ownership of businesses is rare in the United States. Before 1969, it was more common, according to a follow-up study led by Thomsen in 2013. But the Tax Reform Act of 1969 virtually eliminated such ownership by restricting how much of a for-profit business a private foundation can own, according to the Foundation Center. The legal change came of longstanding fears over the power of private foundations set up by industrialists like John D. Rockefeller or Andrew Carnegie to preserve dynastic wealth.  But as the gap between those born rich and born poor in the U.S. continues to widen, reining in the wealthy may be a moot point. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
19 января, 19:14

Производитель энзимов Novozymes отчитался об увеличении квартальной прибыли

Крупнейший в мире производитель энзимов Novozymes отчитался об увеличении квартальной прибыли. Так, чистая прибыль в четвертом квартале увеличилась с 603 млн датских крон годом ранее до 693 млн крон ($100,9 млн). Аналитики, в свою очередь, в среднем прогнозировали данный показатель на уровне 702 млн крон. Выручка за рассматриваемый период выросла с 3,18 млрд крон до 3,45 млрд крон.

Выбор редакции
19 января, 13:00

Производитель энзимов Novozymes отчитался об увеличении квартальной прибыли

Крупнейший в мире производитель энзимов Novozymes отчитался об увеличении квартальной прибыли. Так, чистая прибыль в четвертом квартале увеличилась с 603 млн датских крон годом ранее до 693 млн крон ($100,9 млн). Аналитики, в свою очередь, в среднем прогнозировали данный показатель на уровне 702 млн крон. Выручка за рассматриваемый период выросла с 3,18 млрд крон до 3,45 млрд крон.

24 сентября 2015, 20:11

The Case for Business Action on Climate Change

As members of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and on behalf of the 93 companies included in this letter, we recognize that regardless of faith, we can all appreciate the call to climate action contained in Pope Francis' encyclical, "On Care for Our Common Home." It is a universal message -- one that speaks to the challenges climate change is having on society and the environment and the role of individuals, civil society and institutions to address them. For years, the body of science behind climate change has grown clearer and more focused. The planet is warming with severe consequences that threaten business growth and a healthy economy. We believe that we have reached a tipping point on climate change and that there is an unstoppable shift to a global economy that is significantly less harmful to the environment. As the world transitions to this new economy, it will be important to provide economic progress and a higher quality of life for all people in all regions of the world. The private sector will play a key role in this transition and can help build prosperity and secure a better world for what will soon be nine billion people. Increasingly, business leaders are working collaboratively with competitors and with nongovernmental organizations to set goals to significantly reduce natural-resource use, invest in clean energy, improve global health and feed more people. A common thread that cuts across all of these efforts is finding new and innovative ways to use technology to achieve these social and environmental commitments. No company is perfect. But, all companies are made up of people who want to leave a higher quality of life and a better world for generations to come. As leaders of these companies, we are committed to using our innovation, scale and entrepreneurial spirit to seek ways to address both the environmental and societal challenges created by climate change. Ahead of the Paris climate negotiations this December, we will help do our part to facilitate the transition to a low-carbon economy. WBCSD Signatories: Arcadis AzkoNobel Brisa Auto Estradas CH2M CLP Hong Kong Ltd Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited DuPont EDP -- Energias de Portugal Fibria International Flavors & Fragrances Kellogg Company Monsanto Nestle SA Novozymes NRG P&G Poyry Oyj Plc Siemens SONAE Titan Cement Company Unilever To view the remainder of the signatories, please click here. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

14 сентября 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks lower at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 down 1.08%

Denmark stocks were lower after the close on Monday, as losses in the Personal&Household Goods, Consumer Goods and Healthcare sectors led shares lower. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 declined 1.08%. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were TDC A/S (COP:TDC), which rose 1.65% or 0.62 points to trade at 38.10 at the close. Meanwhile, Tryg A/S (COP:TRYG) added 0.31% or 0.4 points to end at 131.5 and Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb) was up 0.27% or 0.8 points to 294.7 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were Nordea Bank AB (COP:NDA), which fell 2.69% or 2.15 points to trade at 77.75 at the close. Novo Nordisk B (COP:NOVOb) declined 1.50% or 5.6 points to end at 367.3 and Pandora A/S (COP:PNDORA) was down 1.42% or 11.0 points to 763.0. Falling stocks outnumbered advancing ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 110 to 41 and 7 ended unchanged. Crude oil for October delivery was down 1.70% or 0.76 to $43.87 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in November fell 3.04% or 1.49 to hit $47.55 a barrel, while the December Gold contract rose 0.44% or 4.90 to trade at $1108.20 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was up 0.31% to 6.5996, while EUR/DKK rose 0.02% to 7.4611. The US Dollar Index was up 0.06% at 95.44.

08 сентября 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks higher at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 up 1.40%

Denmark stocks were higher after the close on Tuesday, as gains in the Oil&Gas, Healthcare and Financials sectors led shares higher. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 rose 1.40%. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb), which rose 3.33% or 9.5 points to trade at 295.0 at the close. Meanwhile, FLSmidth&Co. (COP:FLS) added 2.40% or 5.7 points to end at 243.2 and Vestas Wind Systems (COP:VWS) was up 2.08% or 7.2 points to 353.8 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were A.P. Moller – Maersk A (COP:MAERSKa), which fell 0.65% or 70 points to trade at 10620 at the close. A.P. Moller – Maersk B (COP:MAERSKb) declined 0.64% or 70 points to end at 10900 and ISS A/S (COP:ISS) was up 0.22% or 0.50 points to 229.40. Rising stocks outnumbered declining ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 100 to 57 and 2 ended unchanged. Shares in A.P. Moller – Maersk A (COP:MAERSKa) fell to 52-week lows; falling 0.65% or 70 to 10620. Shares in A.P. Moller – Maersk B (COP:MAERSKb) fell to 52-week lows; down 0.64% or 70 to 10900. Crude oil for October delivery was down 0.37% or 0.17 to $45.88 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in October rose 3.87% or 1.84 to hit $49.48 a barrel, while the December Gold contract rose 0.27% or 3.00 to trade at $1124.40 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was down 0.08% to 6.6748, while EUR/DKK fell 0.00% to 7.4616. The US Dollar Index was down 0.13% at 96.02.

Выбор редакции
26 августа 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks lower at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 down 0.89%

Denmark stocks were lower after the close on Wednesday, as losses in the Real Estate, Consumer Goods and Healthcare sectors led shares lower. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 declined 0.89%. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were ISS A/S (COP:ISS), which rose 2.30% or 4.90 points to trade at 218.10 at the close. Meanwhile, Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb) added 0.71% or 2.0 points to end at 283.8 and William Demant Holding (COP:WDH) was up 0.09% or 0.5 points to 540.5 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were FLSmidth&Co. (COP:FLS), which fell 4.39% or 10.9 points to trade at 237.3 at the close. Coloplast A/S (COP:COLOb) declined 1.90% or 8.5 points to end at 439.5 and DSV (COP:DSV) was down 1.76% or 4.2 points to 234.0. Falling stocks outnumbered advancing ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 90 to 69 and 4 ended unchanged. Shares in FLSmidth&Co. (COP:FLS) fell to 5-year lows; falling 4.39% or 10.9 to 237.3. Crude oil for October delivery was down 0.94% or 0.37 to $38.94 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in October fell 0.34% or 0.14 to hit $43.06 a barrel, while the December Gold contract fell 1.34% or 15.20 to trade at $1123.10 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was up 1.09% to 6.5503, while EUR/DKK fell 0.01% to 7.4644. The US Dollar Index was up 0.95% at 94.81.

Выбор редакции
24 августа 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks lower at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 down 4.83%

Denmark stocks were lower after the close on Monday, as losses in the Chemicals, Software&Computer Services and Technology sectors led shares lower. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 fell 4.83% to hit a new 3-months low. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were FLSmidth&Co. (COP:FLS), which fell 0.40% or 1.1 points to trade at 275.6 at the close. Meanwhile, William Demant Holding (COP:WDH) fell 1.20% or 6.5 points to end at 536.0 and Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb) was down 1.89% or 5.3 points to 274.8 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were A.P. Moller – Maersk A (COP:MAERSKa), which fell 6.65% or 760 points to trade at 10670 at the close. A.P. Moller – Maersk B (COP:MAERSKb) declined 6.47% or 760 points to end at 10990 and Danske Bank A/S (COP:DANSKE) was down 5.88% or 12.0 points to 192.2. Falling stocks outnumbered advancing ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 155 to 6 and 1 ended unchanged. Shares in A.P. Moller – Maersk A (COP:MAERSKa) fell to 52-week lows; losing 6.65% or 760 to 10670. Shares in A.P. Moller – Maersk B (COP:MAERSKb) fell to 52-week lows; losing 6.47% or 760 to 10990. Crude oil for October delivery was down 3.19% or 1.29 to $39.16 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in October fell 3.66% or 1.67 to hit $43.80 a barrel, while the December Gold contract fell 0.28% or 3.20 to trade at $1156.40 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was down 1.52% to 6.4552, while EUR/DKK rose 0.01% to 7.4641. The US Dollar Index was down 1.30% at 93.61.

19 августа 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks lower at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 down 1.56%

Denmark stocks were lower after the close on Wednesday, as losses in the Consumer Goods, Industrials and Chemicals sectors led shares lower. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 lost 1.56%. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were GN Store Nord (COP:GN), which rose 2.10% or 2.6 points to trade at 126.4 at the close. Meanwhile, Jyske Bank A/S (COP:JYSK) added 0.31% or 1.2 points to end at 384.2 and Vestas Wind Systems (COP:VWS) was up 0.26% or 1.0 points to 386.5 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were Carlsberg A/S B (COP:CARLb), which fell 9.24% or 54.5 points to trade at 535.5 at the close. Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb) declined 3.09% or 9.4 points to end at 294.6 and FLSmidth&Co. (COP:FLS) was down 2.95% or 9.0 points to 296.0. Falling stocks outnumbered advancing ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 108 to 49 and 2 ended unchanged. Shares in Jyske Bank A/S (COP:JYSK) rose to 5-year highs; gaining 0.31% or 1.2 to 384.2. Crude oil for October delivery was down 4.08% or 1.76 to $41.36 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in October fell 3.23% or 1.57 to hit $47.23 a barrel, while the December Gold contract rose 1.13% or 12.60 to trade at $1129.50 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was down 0.35% to 6.7443, while EUR/DKK fell 0.01% to 7.4633. The US Dollar Index was down 0.13% at 96.86.

18 августа 2015, 19:35

Denmark stocks higher at close of trade; OMX Copenhagen 20 up 1.08%

Denmark stocks were higher after the close on Tuesday, as gains in the Oil&Gas, Healthcare and Consumer Goods sectors led shares higher. At the close in Copenhagen, the OMX Copenhagen 20 added 1.08%. The best performers of the session on the OMX Copenhagen 20 were Jyske Bank A/S (COP:JYSK), which rose 4.64% or 17.0 points to trade at 383.0 at the close. Meanwhile, William Demant Holding (COP:WDH) added 2.88% or 16.0 points to end at 572.0 and Vestas Wind Systems (COP:VWS) was up 2.09% or 7.9 points to 385.5 in late trade. The worst performers of the session were A.P. Moller – Maersk A (COP:MAERSKa), which fell 0.74% or 90 points to trade at 12140 at the close. Novozymes B (COP:NZYMb) declined 0.39% or 1.2 points to end at 304.0 and Pandora A/S (COP:PNDORA) was down 0.37% or 3.0 points to 799.0. Rising stocks outnumbered declining ones on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange by 83 to 69 and 5 ended unchanged. Shares in Jyske Bank A/S (COP:JYSK) rose to 5-year highs; rising 4.64% or 17.0 to 383.0. Crude oil for October delivery was up 0.71% or 0.30 to $42.71 a barrel. Elsewhere in commodities trading, Brent oil for delivery in October fell 0.34% or 0.17 to hit $48.58 a barrel, while the December Gold contract fell 0.26% or 2.90 to trade at $1115.50 a troy ounce. USD/DKK was up 0.47% to 6.7689, while EUR/DKK rose 0.00% to 7.4638. The US Dollar Index was up 0.21% at 97.04.