• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Страны / Регионы39
      • Показать ещё
      Компании8
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации2
      Показатели1
      Люди3
      Разное8
      • Показать ещё
      Издания1
      Формат1
Остров Питкэрн
Выбор редакции
15 ноября, 21:18

Sulfur and lead isotopic evidence of relic Archean sediments in the Pitcairn mantle plume [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The isotopic diversity of oceanic island basalts (OIB) is usually attributed to the influence, in their sources, of ancient material recycled into the mantle, although the nature, age, and quantities of this material remain controversial. The unradiogenic Pb isotope signature of the enriched mantle I (EM I) source of basalts...

01 сентября, 08:00

Obama: No Nation, Not Even One As Powerful As The U.S., Is Immune From Climate Change

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); HONOLULU ― Days after creating the largest marine protected area on the planet, President Barack Obama on Wednesday traveled to Hawaii to address those attending the world’s largest conservation event, highlighting his administration’s expansion of the nearby monument and the need to swiftly combat climate change. “No nation, not even one as powerful as the United States, is immune from a changing climate,” Obama told a small, private audience at Honolulu’s East-West Center that included the Pacific Island Conference of Leaders and delegates of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s World Conservation Congress.   The president’s appearance in Hawaii spotlights IUCN’s World Conservation Congress, which begins Thursday in Honolulu ― the first time the U.S. has hosted the gathering in IUCN’s 68-year history. The congress, held every four years, is the world’s largest environment and nature conservation event, often referred to as the Olympics of conservation. Obama said conservation has been a cornerstone of his presidency. “I have to say that Teddy Roosevelt gets credit for starting the National Park System, but when you include a big chunk of the Pacific Ocean, we have now actually done more acreage,” he said of his administration. Obama’s speech called attention to his move last week to quadruple the area included in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument surrounding the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The White House said the expansion “provides critical protections for more than 7,000 marine species,” many found nowhere else on earth. Established in 2006 by President George W. Bush, Papahānaumokuākea (pronounced Pa-pa-hah-now-mo-koo-ah-keh-ah ) was already larger than all of the country’s national parks combined. Now 582,578 square miles, it is nearly four times the size of California and dwarfs the United Kingdom’s 322,000-square-mile Pitcairn Islands Marine Reserve, which formerly held the title of world’s largest fully protected marine area.  The expansion extends the monument’s protections, including a ban on commercial fishing, from 50 miles to 200 miles around the remote island chain. Obama’s expansion of the monument and his trip to Hawaii could not come at a more opportune time.  In a May 2014 letter to former IUCN Director General Julia Marton-Lefèvre, Obama expressed strong support for Hawaii’s bid to host the event.  “Hawaii is one of the most culturally and ecologically rich areas in the United States, with a wealth of unique natural resources and a distinctive traditional culture that draws from the United States and the Asia-Pacific region,” the president wrote. “The diversity and vulnerability of Hawaii’s natural resources, as well as their importance to the islands’ economy, make Hawaii a perfect location to discuss these challenges.” Obama on Thursday is expected to travel to Midway Atoll, a small, circular-shaped atoll within Papahānaumokuākea, where he will make a statement on the marine monument expansion. “This is a hallowed site, and it deserves to be treated that way,” Obama said of the monument. “And from now on, it will be preserved for future generations.” Watch Obama’s speech above. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

01 сентября, 08:00

Obama: No Nation, Not Even One As Powerful As The U.S., Is Immune From Climate Change

HONOLULU ― Days after creating the largest marine protected area on the planet, President Barack Obama on Wednesday traveled to Hawaii to address those attending the world’s largest conservation event, highlighting his administration’s expansion of the nearby monument and the need to swiftly combat climate change. “No nation, not even one as powerful as the United States, is immune from a changing climate,” Obama told a small, private audience at Honolulu’s East-West Center that included the Pacific Island Conference of Leaders and delegates of the International Union for Conservation of Nature’s World Conservation Congress.   The president’s appearance in Hawaii spotlights IUCN’s World Conservation Congress, which begins Thursday in Honolulu ― the first time the U.S. has hosted the gathering in IUCN’s 68-year history. The congress, held every four years, is the world’s largest environment and nature conservation event, often referred to as the Olympics of conservation. Obama said conservation has been a cornerstone of his presidency. “I have to say that Teddy Roosevelt gets credit for starting the National Park System, but when you include a big chunk of the Pacific Ocean, we have now actually done more acreage,” he said of his administration. Obama’s speech called attention to his move last week to quadruple the area included in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument surrounding the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The White House said the expansion “provides critical protections for more than 7,000 marine species,” many found nowhere else on earth. Established in 2006 by President George W. Bush, Papahānaumokuākea (pronounced Pa-pa-hah-now-mo-koo-ah-keh-ah ) was already larger than all of the country’s national parks combined. Now 582,578 square miles, it is nearly four times the size of California and dwarfs the United Kingdom’s 322,000-square-mile Pitcairn Islands Marine Reserve, which formerly held the title of world’s largest fully protected marine area.  The expansion extends the monument’s protections, including a ban on commercial fishing, from 50 miles to 200 miles around the remote island chain. Obama’s expansion of the monument and his trip to Hawaii could not come at a more opportune time.  In a May 2014 letter to former IUCN Director General Julia Marton-Lefèvre, Obama expressed strong support for Hawaii’s bid to host the event.  “Hawaii is one of the most culturally and ecologically rich areas in the United States, with a wealth of unique natural resources and a distinctive traditional culture that draws from the United States and the Asia-Pacific region,” the president wrote. “The diversity and vulnerability of Hawaii’s natural resources, as well as their importance to the islands’ economy, make Hawaii a perfect location to discuss these challenges.” Obama on Thursday is expected to travel to Midway Atoll, a small, circular-shaped atoll within Papahānaumokuākea, where he will make a statement on the marine monument expansion. “This is a hallowed site, and it deserves to be treated that way,” Obama said of the monument. “And from now on, it will be preserved for future generations.” Watch Obama’s full speech below. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 августа, 07:33

Obama To Quadruple Hawaii Monument, Creating World’s Largest Protected Marine Area

President Barack Obama, who’s already protected more public acres than any U.S. president, will add to his legacy of conservation by quadrupling the marine monument surrounding the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, the White House announced. The designation, expected to take effect Friday, will expand Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument from 139,797 square miles to 582,578 square miles, making it the largest marine protected area on the planet. The White House said the move “provides critical protections for more than 7,000 marine species,” including federally protected monk seals, whales and sea turtles, as well as black coral ― the longest-living marine species in the world. The expansion also is expected to make the area more resilient to climate change-related threats, including rising sea levels, warming ocean temperatures and acidification. Sen. Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii), who introduced the proposal in June, called Obama’s move “one of the most important actions an American president has ever taken for the health of the oceans.” “Expanding Papahānaumokuākea will replenish stocks of ‘ahi, promote biodiversity, fight climate change, and give a greater voice to Native Hawaiians in managing this resource,” Schatz said Friday in a statement. “This declaration sets us on a strong path forward for our irreplaceable environment and the generations to come.” Established in 2006 by President George W. Bush, Papahānaumokuākea was already larger than all of the country’s national parks combined.   The expansion will extend the monument’s protections, including a ban on commercial fishing, from 50 miles to 200 miles around the remote island chain. The area covered by the expanded monument will be nearly four times the size of California, and nearly as big as Alaska.  Matt Rand, director of Pew’s Global Ocean Legacy project, which worked with Native Hawaiians, scientists, community leaders and others in pushing for the expansion, called Friday’s announcement a “big deal for the planet.”  “We’re just seeing significant environmental degradation globally, and this is a huge step in changing our course,” Rand told The Huffington Post. “I hope not only does it protect this ecosystem, but I hope it inspires the world.” Papahanaumokuakea will dwarf the United Kingdom’s Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific Ocean, and the Chagos Marine Reserve in the Indian Ocean, which are 322,000 square miles and 247,000 square miles, respectively. Earlier this year, communities in a remote archipelago south of Tahiti proposed establishing a 385,000-square-mile ocean sanctuary.   Along with Obama’s latest conservation decision, the White House announced the president will travel to Hawaii next week, where on Wednesday he will address leaders from the Pacific Island Conference of Leaders and the International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress. On Thursday he plans to travel to Midway Atoll, located within the Papahānaumokuākea.  The World Conservation Congress kicks off in Honolulu next month. The congress, held every four years, is the world’s largest environmental and nature conservation event. #BREAKING: U.S. creates world’s largest protected area in Hawaii https://t.co/UYKNyA5ehL #MahaloObama pic.twitter.com/oekgfF7IuJ— pew environment (@pewenvironment) August 26, 2016 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
24 августа, 10:20

В руки ученых попали волосы моряков с мятежного судна «Баунти»

Исследователи намерены провести тесты ДНК, чтобы проверить, действительно ли попавшие к ним образцы волос принадлежали морякам, которые в XVIII веке подняли мятеж на британском судне «Баунти». Один из самых знаменитых бунтов в истории английского флота произошел в 1789 году. Капитан «Баунти» Уильям Блай и 18 членов экипажа, сохранившие ему верность, были посажены в лодку и проделали долгий путь по Тихому океану, пока спустя 42 дня не оказались на острове Тимор. Мятежники направились на «Баунти» к острову Таити, а оттуда, захватив нескольких полинезийцев, поплыли на восток, в поисках острова, где могли бы поселиться. Они обнаружили необитаемый остров Питкэрн. Потомки моряков с «Баунти» и полинезийских женщин живут там до сих пор. Десять коротких косичек, которые, как утверждается, принадлежали семи мятежникам и трем полинезийским женщинам, более века хранились в жестяной коробке из-под табака. Одна из них, возможно, принадлежала помощнику капитана Флетчеру Кристиану, который был одним из руководителей бунта. Частный коллекционер несколько лет приобрел эти волосы на аукционе Sotheby’s, а недавно его вдова передали их в Центр изучения островов Питкэрн, находящийся в Калифорнии. Теперь образцы этих волос доставлены в Королевский колледж в Лондоне для извлечения и анализа митохондриальной ДНК.

20 апреля, 00:19

Run Your Money Like It's The Red Violin

Stradivarius made some 900 violins, over 600 still exist. Red varnish was employed in his “golden period,” from 1704 to 1720. This coating still holds fast on many instruments played on today. Professionals like the charming soloist Elizabeth Pitcairn, who now owns this red violin, was gifted it by her [...]

06 апреля, 02:02

Tiny Island Chain Wants To Create The World's Largest Ocean Sanctuary

In an effort to protect fisheries and preserve one of the planet's healthiest marine ecosystems, communities in a remote archipelago south of Tahiti are working to establish the largest fully protected marine reserve on the planet. The proposal, which municipalities in the Austral Islands presented to the French Polynesian government on Monday, would ban fishing in more than 385,000 square miles of ocean surrounding the island chain and establish sustainable coastal fishing areas around each of its five inhabited islands. The Pew Charitable Trusts, which helped the communities draft their proposal, said in an announcement on Tuesday that islanders hope the reserve will "help maintain healthy fish stocks to feed their families and support local fishermen while maintaining Polynesian customs that date back hundreds of years." The reserve, if approved, would be roughly the size of California, Nevada and Arizona combined. Jérôme Petit, director of Pew's Global Ocean Legacy campaign in French Polynesia, told The Huffington Post that the 6,000-plus residents of Rimatara, Rurutu, Tubuai, Raivavae and Rapa are concerned about the environmental damage affecting the world's fisheries. "They say, 'We fish now in one day what we could fish 20 years ago in one hour,'" Petit said. The reserve would extend roughly 200 nautical miles around each island, with the exception of the islands' northern coasts. Sustainable coastal fishing areas extending 20 miles from each island would allow local anglers to fish from boats that are less than 25 feet long, according to the proposal. Petit told HuffPost that the "whole community is really on board" with the idea. The only opposition, he said, came from large fishing operations in Tahiti, which rarely fish in the area but voiced concerns that the reserve would prevent them from doing so in the future.  According to the proposal, fish from Austral waters account for less than 2 percent of French Polynesia’s overall catch, so the reserve wouldn't have much of an impact on commercial fishing operations. "We are pretty confident it will go through," Petit said by email. "The only question is when. But since there is such as strong public support, the government will probably move forward rather quickly." The sanctuary's proposed name, Rāhui Nui Nō Tuhaa Pae, or "the big rāhui of the Austral Islands," is a reference to the traditional Polynesian practice of rāhui, which involves conserving a resource by restricting access to it. “In the 1980s, we witnessed overfishing along our coastlines as modern fishing techniques and freezers arrived to our island,” Tuanainai Narii, the mayor of Rapa, said in a statement. “We brought our fish stocks back to healthy levels by reinstating a coastal rāhui." Now, Narii added, the island communities have seen the threat facing the world's oceans and "recognize that more must be done to conserve pelagic fish stocks." Global populations of scombridae, the family of fish that includes tuna and mackerel, declined 74 percent between 1970 and 2010. According to Pew, the Austral Islands are a "hot spot of marine biodiversity." Of the 455 species of mollusks found there, 98 are endemic. The islands are also home to numerous species of sharks, rays, corals and fish. By designating the marine reserve, French Polynesia would fulfill a commitment it made in 2013 to protect at least 20 percent of its surrounding waters by 2020.  The overseas collectivity of France is already home to the largest marine mammal and shark sanctuaries in the world. This latest proposal simply confirms the islands are serious about leading the way in ocean conservation, Petit said in a release. “A marine reserve of this magnitude would add to the growing movement by Pacific island governments to protect their waters to improve the health of the ocean," he said.  Last year, New Zealand established Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary, the world’s third-largest fully protected marine area. Currently, the world's largest sanctuary is the United Kingdom’s Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific Ocean, which measures 322,000 square miles. The Austral Islands' reserve would be 63,000 square miles larger.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 апреля, 02:02

Tiny Island Chain Wants To Create The World's Largest Ocean Sanctuary

In an effort to protect fisheries and preserve one of the planet's healthiest marine ecosystems, communities in a remote archipelago south of Tahiti are working to establish the largest fully protected marine reserve on the planet. The proposal, which municipalities in the Austral Islands presented to the French Polynesian government on Monday, would ban fishing in more than 385,000 square miles of ocean surrounding the island chain and establish sustainable coastal fishing areas around each of its five inhabited islands. The Pew Charitable Trusts, which helped the communities draft their proposal, said in an announcement on Tuesday that islanders hope the reserve will "help maintain healthy fish stocks to feed their families and support local fishermen while maintaining Polynesian customs that date back hundreds of years." The reserve, if approved, would be roughly the size of California, Nevada and Arizona combined. Jérôme Petit, director of Pew's Global Ocean Legacy campaign in French Polynesia, told The Huffington Post that the 6,000-plus residents of Rimatara, Rurutu, Tubuai, Raivavae and Rapa are concerned about the environmental damage affecting the world's fisheries. "They say, 'We fish now in one day what we could fish 20 years ago in one hour,'" Petit said. The reserve would extend roughly 200 nautical miles around each island, with the exception of the islands' northern coasts. Sustainable coastal fishing areas extending 20 miles from each island would allow local anglers to fish from boats that are less than 25 feet long, according to the proposal. Petit told HuffPost that the "whole community is really on board" with the idea. The only opposition, he said, came from large fishing operations in Tahiti, which rarely fish in the area but voiced concerns that the reserve would prevent them from doing so in the future.  According to the proposal, fish from Austral waters account for less than 2 percent of French Polynesia’s overall catch, so the reserve wouldn't have much of an impact on commercial fishing operations. "We are pretty confident it will go through," Petit said by email. "The only question is when. But since there is such as strong public support, the government will probably move forward rather quickly." The sanctuary's proposed name, Rāhui Nui Nō Tuhaa Pae, or "the big rāhui of the Austral Islands," is a reference to the traditional Polynesian practice of rāhui, which involves conserving a resource by restricting access to it. “In the 1980s, we witnessed overfishing along our coastlines as modern fishing techniques and freezers arrived to our island,” Tuanainai Narii, the mayor of Rapa, said in a statement. “We brought our fish stocks back to healthy levels by reinstating a coastal rāhui." Now, Narii added, the island communities have seen the threat facing the world's oceans and "recognize that more must be done to conserve pelagic fish stocks." Global populations of scombridae, the family of fish that includes tuna and mackerel, declined 74 percent between 1970 and 2010. According to Pew, the Austral Islands are a "hot spot of marine biodiversity." Of the 455 species of mollusks found there, 98 are endemic. The islands are also home to numerous species of sharks, rays, corals and fish. By designating the marine reserve, French Polynesia would fulfill a commitment it made in 2013 to protect at least 20 percent of its surrounding waters by 2020.  The overseas collectivity of France is already home to the largest marine mammal and shark sanctuaries in the world. This latest proposal simply confirms the islands are serious about leading the way in ocean conservation, Petit said in a release. “A marine reserve of this magnitude would add to the growing movement by Pacific island governments to protect their waters to improve the health of the ocean," he said.  Last year, New Zealand established Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary, the world’s third-largest fully protected marine area. Currently, the world's largest sanctuary is the United Kingdom’s Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific Ocean, which measures 322,000 square miles. The Austral Islands' reserve would be 63,000 square miles larger.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 апреля, 06:30

Қазақстандықтарға Тынық мұхитындағы аралға көшу ұсынысы жасалды

Nur.kz оқырманы Арсен Туған Facebook парақшасында тұрғындарымызға Тынық мұхитындағы Питкэрн аралына көшу ұсынысын жасаған сайттың жазбасын жария етті. Питкэрн аралдарының бірінде азаматтық алу үшін www.immigration.gov.pn сайтына кіріп, өтініш қалдыру керек. Кейін арал билігінің бірнеше талабын орындасаң жеткілікті. Facebook жазбасында келесі ақпарат келтірілген: "Өмірінің соңына дейін мұхит жағалауында балық аулап өмір сүргісі келетіндер үшін қызық ұсыныс жасалды. Тынық мұхитының оңтүстік бөлігінде кішігірім арал-мемлекет бар - Питкэрн аралы (Pitcairn Island) деп аталады. Бұл аралда (Британияның мұхит сыртындағы иелігі саналады) 53 адам ғана тұрады - олардың 43-і - 1789 жылы "Баунти" кемесінде көтеріліс жасаған британдық теңізшілер мен олардың полинезиялық жұбайларының ұрпағы, ал қалған 10 адам - шетелдіктер. Олар аралына жаңа адамдар тарту керек деген тоқтамға келген. Бұл аралға көшуге ниет білдірген әзірге бір-ақ адам табылды. Себебі, ол жерге ұшақтар ұшпайды. Ал кемемен екі күн жүзуің керек. Оның өзінде кеме ол жерге жылына төрт-ақ рет барады. Келген адамға тегін жер телімін жалға береді. Бастапқыда екі жылға ғана, ал кейін өміріңнің соңына дейін тегін тұра аласың. Иммиграцияға ұсыныс үшін 500 жаңазеландиялық доллар қажет. Сонымен қатар аралда екі жыл бойы өмір сүруге мүмкіндік беретін 30 мың жаңазеландиялық ақшаң болуы керек. 2 жылдан кейін жергілікті кеңес сені өз азаматы ретінде қабылдау шешімін шығарады, әрине егер сен шу шығарғыш, қылмыскер адам болмасаң. Ұсынысты мына сілтеме арқылы жіберуге болады - http://www.immigration.gov.pn/immigrate/index.html. P. S. Ол жерде зауыт та, фабрика да жоқ - тіршілік ету үшін тек балық аулау қажет", - деп жазады Арсен Туған. Аралда өз почтасы, мемлекеттік офис, аптасына үш күн жұмыс істейтін дүкен, Жаңа Зеландиядан тартылған телефон байланысы және Wi-Fi-мен жабдықталған үйлер бар.

05 апреля, 03:59

Казахстанцам предложили переселиться на остров в Тихом океане

Читатель Nur.kz Арсен Туган опубликовал пост в Фейсбуке со ссылкой на сайт, где предложено эмигрировать на острова Питкэрн в Тихом океане. На официальном сайте www.immigration.gov.pn людям предложено принять участие в прошении на получение гражданства островов Питкэрн, которые граничат на западе с Французской Полинезией. Для этого необходимо подать заявку и выполнить необходимые условия, прописанные правительством островов. Вот что сообщается в посту пользователя Фейсбука (пунктуация и орфография сохранены - от ред.). "Интересное предложение для тех, кто хочет оставшуюся жизнь прожить на берегу океана, ловя рыбу, варя уху, прислушиваясь к шуму океанского прибоя и размышляя о смысле жизни. :)) Короче, есть такое крохотное островное государство в южной части Тихого океана - называется Остров Питкэрн (Pitcairn Island). На этом острове (он считается Британским заокеанским владением) живет аж 53 человека - 43 человека это потомки взбунтовавшихся в 1789 году британских моряков с корабля "Баунти" и их полинезийских жен, и 10 иностранцев. Ну, они и решили, что надо как-бы добавить свежую кровь и пригласить новых людей. Правда, пока только один человек изьявил желание переселиться на этот остров - самолеты туда не летают, а на корабле туда плыть два дня, и то корабль туда заходит всего четыре раза в год. Зато новоприбывшему дают в бесплатную аренду участок земли - сначала на два года, а после двух лет - в постоянную бесплатную аренду. Заявка на иммиграцию стоит 500 новозеландских долларов, и еще нужно показать наличие средств в размере 30 тысяч новозеландских для безбедного существования на острове в течении первых 2 лет. После 2 лет местный совет утверждает тебя на постоянное жительство - ну если ты человек не скандальный и не криминальный, а спокойный и положительный. :)) Подавать заявку надо здесь - http://www.immigration.gov.pn/immigrate/index.html. P. S. Ни заводов, ни фабрик там нет - то есть выживать наверное надо только рыболовством. :))", - пишет Арсен Туган. Вполне возможно кто-то из казахстанцев решится на этот переезд, ведь многие из нас мечтают обрести дом и участок на райском острове в теплом океане. Кроме того, на острове есть почта, государственный офис и магазин, которые работают три дня в неделю. Есть телефонная связь, проложенная из Новой Зеландии, и дома оборудованы Wi-Fi.

Выбор редакции
11 марта, 21:02

Pitcairn in 'last chance saloon' after child abuse images case

Conviction of former mayor brings back bad memories a decade after high-profile child sexual assault and rape trials“It’s in the last chance saloon,” says one seasoned observer of Pitcairn Island, the tiny community founded by the Bounty mutineers in the middle of the vast Pacific Ocean. “There are still dark undercurrents. It’s still Pitcairn, still the same old place.”This week, as a former island mayor was found guilty of downloading scores of hardcore child abuse images and films featuring children as young as six, there was a bleak sense of déjà vu on the island. Coming a decade after the high-profile trials of 10 fellow islanders on child sexual assault and rape charges, Michael Warren’s conviction and 20-month jail sentence brought back some very bad memories. Continue reading...

07 февраля, 08:11

Germany Exports to Pitcairn Islands

Exports to Pitcairn Islands in Germany decreased to 1 EUR THO in August from 2 EUR THO in July of 2016. Exports to Pitcairn Islands in Germany averaged 43.78 EUR THO from 2000 until 2016, reaching an all time high of 383 EUR THO in March of 2003 and a record low of 0 EUR THO in July of 2001. Exports to Pitcairn Islands in Germany is reported by the Federal Statistical Office, Germany. This page includes a chart with historical data for Germany Exports to Pitcairn Islands.

26 ноября 2015, 02:37

What Made Dozens Of People Hide In The Laotian Forest For Years?

Every week, The WorldPost asks an expert to shed light on a topic driving headlines around the world. Today, we speak with Corinne Purtill on her new book, "Ghosts in the Forest."  In 2004, American journalist Corinne Purtill met with a group of people who had been living alone in the forests of southern Laos for years, seeking refuge from a brutal war. What they didn't know until they left their community in the woods was that the violent rule of Cambodia's Khmer Rouge had actually ended a quarter-century earlier. Years after meeting and reporting on the group, Purtill decided to return to Cambodia and reconnect with the men and women who had rejoined society after so long in isolation. What she found through extensive interviews with them -- especially Ly Kamoun, who goes by "Moun" -- was a far more complex story than they first told in 2004.  The WorldPost spoke with Purtill about her experience reporting on the lives of these 34 hideaways, which she has chronicled in her book Ghosts in the Forest. What compelled you to dig further into this story after the initial reports? I had come across the story when I was a reporter at the Cambodia Daily. My colleague there was one of the very first people to break this after he found it through one of his sources in the province. Going up there initially to meet the group when they first came out of the forest, to talk with them about the bare bones of the experience, it was just such a fascinating and compelling story. All the questions it raised of survival, of isolation and of what compels you to keep going in those circumstances. It just stayed with me. I went back to the U.S. and was working at a newspaper in Arizona when a friend asked me a few years later what became of them and if I knew anything more. There was so many questions I still had, and I thought it was worth exploring further.  In the book, you touch on some of the different factors that led them to stay in isolation. Why do you think they stayed for so long?  I think fear played such a huge role in it. The circumstances that they lived through and the circumstances of Cambodia at the time they went into the forest were really terrifying. Moun and the other men that were in the group he was with had been conscripted by the Khmer Rouge as young children, 14 or 15 years old. The Khmer Rouge years in Cambodia were deadly and chaotic. It was a really terrifying time. When the Vietnamese invaded, even though it did end the rule of this horrifying regime, it was also very frightening for people. No one was really sure what would happen, especially people still under the control of the Khmer Rouge like Moun. To be so cut off from what was going on in the broader politics of the world, it was a very frightening time for them. He was told that if the Vietnamese find you, they'll kill you, they'll eat your liver, they'll kill your children. The Khmer Rouge would also kill them if they escaped -- there was no sense of trust. When you consider those circumstances, it makes more sense why someone might say that they're willing to risk it on their own, because the unknown is a safer bet than the terror of what is known. There was also really no way to get information. To be so cut off from what was going on in the broader politics of the world, it was a very frightening time for them. Are there any parallels with other "hideaways" like Japanese soldier Hiroo Onoda? I get into that a bit towards the end of the book. Jared Diamond, the anthropologist, looked into this for an article in Nature. He looked at different examples of people and groups who for different reasons have found themselves in isolation -- Japanese soldiers in the Philippines after WWII, as well as mutineers on Pitcairn Island. What he found was that those who are successful at living a long time and not falling apart are people with a similar background. Moun and the other families he was with were all from an indigenous community in Cambodia's northeast. Also, people who come from a collective culture and who want to put the survival of the group beyond their own individuality are successful. The highland communities that Moun came from are these types of communities. Also, a shared sense of purpose is important for survival -- if you all agree that you're working towards the same thing rather than being out for yourself. They had this shared sense of purpose, and they were able to survive quite successfully for a long amount of time. There's a lot of interesting reveals as the fuller picture of what happened in the forest unfolds. What was the most surprising for you when reporting this story? When I went into it, I was coming as a Westerner and probably unfairly imposing some of my own biases on it. I was really interested in the mechanics of survival in terms of how they found food, built shelter and actually lived in such an isolated environment for such a long time. I remember talking to a Khmer colleague in Phnom Penh who said that was actually kind of a stupid question, though, because they know how to do those things. They were from a very rural environment already, and the part of Cambodia they were from in the 1970s was a very agrarian, foraging-based existence. Living that way wasn't the challenge for them. What they found harder, and what was interesting, was how difficult it was to live without a broader community. There's really nothing romantic about it. The way we in the West sometimes look at striking out on your own, they saw as a very lonely, sad existence. They struggled with trying to stave off that loneliness and still function without the broader context of community. That's what I found most surprising and interesting.  What have you learned from the experience of reporting this, and what are you hoping people take away from reading the book?  I think that it left me with a stronger sense of the necessity of community as part of what humans need to really thrive. It gave me a better sense of what a community does for your sort of spiritual health, that it's not a fringe benefit but it's part of what's built into our DNA, of what we need to thrive in the world. Any individual placed in these extraordinary circumstances would have to make choices they never thought they'd make. What I would hope people take away from it is to hopefully understand that a bit more, but then also have more empathy for the decisions that people are forced to make in really extreme situations. I hope that people take away that any individual placed in these extraordinary circumstances would have to make choices they never thought they'd make and do things they never thought that they would do if it meant that your survival and your family's survival were on the line. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. More from The WorldPost's Weekly Interview Series: - Have We Got ISIS All Wrong?- What Is The State Of Political Islam Today?- Was The Libyan Intervention A Mistake?- What Palestinian Membership In The ICC Really Means- Naming The Dead: One Group's Struggle To Record Deaths From U.S. Drone Strikes In Pakistan    -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 сентября 2015, 07:14

New Zealand Will Create A Massive Ocean Sanctuary

The world's third-largest fully protected marine area was announced on Monday during the United Nations General Assembly in New York. Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary northeast of New Zealand, at 239,383 square miles, will be twice the size of New Zealand's landmass and 35 times larger than all of the country's existing marine reserves combined. Prime Minister John Key announced the creation of the sanctuary, saying it will preserve important habitats for seabirds, whales, dolphins, endangered sea turtles and thousands of other species. "As well as being home to a wide range of marine species, the Kermadec region is one of the most geographically and geologically diverse areas in the world," Key said. The Kermadecs, located about 620 miles northeast of New Zealand’s North Island, serve as an important migratory pathway for marine mammals making seasonal journeys between tropical and cooler waters, according to The Pew Charitable Trusts. The area is home to more than 50 underwater volcanoes -- part of the longest underwater volcanic arc on the planet -- and the world's second-deepest ocean trench, with a depth of 6.2 miles. “We are just beginning to understand the abundance of life there, but we know that creating this marine sanctuary will safeguard rare habitats and species critical for healthy ecosystems throughout the South Pacific,” Bronwen Golder, who manages Pew’s Global Ocean Legacy campaign, said in a release. Matt Rand, Global Ocean Legacy’s director, added that New Zealand was preserving "one of the few relatively unspoiled areas of ocean on Earth," and that the impacts would be felt far beyond the region. The new sanctuary expands the Kermadec Islands Marine Reserve -- established in 1990 extending 12 nautical miles from each of the area's six islands -- to include a major portion of New Zealand’s exclusive economic zone. Fishing and mining will no longer be permitted in the area. Charles Hufflett, who pioneered New Zealand's tuna industry in the early 1980s, slammed the sanctuary as short-sighted and said the government made the decision without industry consultation. "How come that New Zealanders wake up at 5 o'clock in the morning to find that this has been announced?" Hufflett told stuff.co.nz. "It's incredible." The sanctuary still requires legislation, but it is expected to be in place by Oct. 1, 2016. According to Pew, Kermadec will be the third-largest fully protected marine area in the world, after the United Kingdom’s Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific Ocean and the Chagos Marine Reserve in the Indian Ocean. Take a tour of the Kermadec region below:   Also on HuffPost:  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
29 июля 2015, 10:36

AMD Radeon R9 370X — новое имя для Radeon R9 270X

Судя по последним известиям, AMD готовит пополнение линейки графических карт Radeon 300, которая была анонсирована в июне этого года. Пополнением станет Radeon 370X — пока не известно, будет ли эта модель отнесена к семейству R7 или R9. Эта карта займёт нишу между Radeon R9 370 и Radeon R9 380. Как и менее мощная модель, она будет использовать графическое ядро Pitcairn/Trinidad, но в конфигурации XT, а не Pro. Этот чип производится с использованием 28-нанометрового техпроцесса и при площади кристалла 212 квадратных миллиметров включает в себя 2,8 миллиарда транзисторов. Как сообщает Expreview, новинка получит 1280 поточных процессоров, 80 текстурных блоков и 32 модуля растровых операций (RBE). Если верить имеющимся скриншотам GPU-Z, графический процессор Radeon R9 370X будет функционировать на частоте 1180 МГц без турборежима. Но опубликованные скриншоты верны для версии с заводским разгоном, так что обычный вариант Radeon R9 370X может получить частоты 1000/1050 МГц, как это было и у Radeon R9 270X. Частота памяти составит 1400 (5600) МГц, что даст пиковую пропускную способность на уровне 179,2 Гбайт/с. Ожидается появление моделей как с двумя, так и с четырьмя гигабайтами видеопамяти. Эталонный вариант AMD с теплопакетом 150 ватт потребует подключения двух шестиконтактных разъёмов питания PCIe.

Выбор редакции
29 июля 2015, 00:00

Новая статья: Обзор и тестирование видеокарты ASUS STRIX R7 370 4 Гбайт: островов у нас хватит!

Знакомимся с оригинальной версией старой-новой видеокарты среднего класса на графическом процессоре AMD Pitcairn/Curacao/Trinidad. Простое переименование — или действительно что-то новое?

29 июня 2015, 16:31

What If the Oceans Were National Parks?

Ocean conservationists want to bring the same approach to the ocean that the century-old National Park Service brought to the land.

Выбор редакции
22 июня 2015, 10:35

Pitcairn Island, population 48, passes law to allow same-sex marriage

Tiny Pacific island has no gay couples but follows countries which have approved legislationPitcairn Island, a tiny speck in the Pacific that is home to just 48 people, has passed a law allowing same-sex marriage, but has no gay couples wanting to wed.First settled in 1790, Pitcairn is a British Overseas Territory that has some legal autonomy and is often considered the world’s smallest country by population. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
09 июня 2015, 19:13

Замечены изображения AMD Radeon R7 370

Китайский ресурс Chiphell опубликовал изображения новой графической карты AMD Radeon R7 370. Как уже известно, под этим номером компания выпустит два варианта, с 2 и 4 Гбайт видеопамяти на борту, стоимостью $135 и $175 соответственно. Основой новинки станет ядро Pitcairn, более известное сейчас под именем Curacao. Почему именно Curacao? Ответом на этот вопрос служит наличие разъёма CrossFireX, в то время как все более новые решения AMD его не используют и общаются друг с другом в режиме CrossFire, используя протокол XDMA. Сама карта довольно компактна и имеет один шестиконтактный разъём питания, а значит, уровень её энергопотребления не должен превышать 150 ватт.

18 марта 2015, 18:56

Pitcairn Islands to get world's largest single marine reserve

UK government gives go ahead in the 2015 budget to a vast marine protected area in the Pacific that’s home to more than 80 species of fish, coral and algaeThe UK is to establish the world’s largest continuous marine reserve in waters around the Pitcairn Islands in the Pacific, the government has said.While not mentioned in chancellor George Osborne’s speech, the budget published on Wednesday confirms that the government will go ahead with designating the ocean around Pitcairn – famous partly as the island where the mutineers of the Bounty settled – as a marine protected area (MPA). Continue reading...