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Peabody Energy
07 декабря, 23:16

Are the Dark Days of Coal ETF Really Over?

Coal is an interesting area to watch after this election.

07 декабря, 20:20

Trump picks oil ally Pruitt to head EPA

Pruitt has professed skepticism about climate change science, and his selection marks a major turning point for EPA.

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17 ноября, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Sunrun, Vivint Solar, Ballard Power Systems and Hannon Armstrong Sustainable Infrastructure Capital

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Sunrun, Vivint Solar, Ballard Power Systems and Hannon Armstrong Sustainable Infrastructure Capital

16 ноября, 20:05

Hoekstra, potential CIA pick, has long foreign, domestic lobbying resume

Former Rep. Peter Hoekstra, a potential Donald Trump pick to run the Central Intelligence Agency, previously lobbied on behalf of the Kurdish regional government, a Belarusian potash company and a Libyan organization, as well as many major U.S.-based companies.Vice President-elect Mike Pence took control of the Trump transition effort from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie last Friday amid reports that he is purging the team of lobbyists to square with the campaign’s theme of “draining the swamp” in Washington.During the campaign, Trump said he would issue a “lifetime ban against senior executive branch officials lobbying on behalf of a foreign government.” Still, he backtracked on his opposition to lobbyists in a “60 Minutes” interviews earlier this week.Hoekstra, who chaired the House Intelligence Committee from 2004 to 2007, has been floated repeatedly over the past week as a potential CIA chief. But his lobbying record is extensive; he worked as a lobbyist for Greenberg Traurig and Dickstein Shapiro after leaving Congress in 2011, and then struck out on his own this year.The Michigan Republican, who served 18 years in the House and unsuccessfully pursued both the Michigan governorship and a Senate seat, currently heads Hoekstra Global Strategies, whose clients include Oregon-based manufacturer Columbia Helicopters and Michigan-based oil production outfit Core Energy, according to lobbying disclosure reports. In 2016, his company reported $68,500 in income from the two companies. In his work before that, at Greenberg Traurig and Dickstein Shapiro, Hoekstra lobbied on behalf of mutliple domestic corporations, including coal giant Peabody Energy and tobacco company Lorillard Inc., as the latter went through a $27.4 billion merger with Reynolds American. And like Rudy Giuliani, whose bid to become Trump’s Secretary of State has prompted scrutiny of his foreign lobbying work, Hoekstra has done plenty of work for foreign clients. Hoekstra declined to comment on media speculation about a potential nomination - or how his lobbying history might affect his chances of getting a job in the Trump administration. “Any characterization of what’s going on and who they’re bringing on, that’s for the transition team to talk about and not for me,” Hoekstra, who is in Washington today, told POLITICO in a brief phone interview.“I’ve talked to the folks at the campaign,” he said. “They’re going through a very complicated process. I’ve been impressed with what they’re doing.”Hoekstra served as Trump’s Michigan co-chair and advisor on national security issues during the 2016 campaign. He also said that he participated in several briefings with Trump on Middle East issues and the threat from ISIS before the election. “He learns very quickly and he behaves exactly the way I would see a CEO behave,” Hoekstra said of Trump.After leaving Congress in early 2013 he joined Dickstein Shapiro, and then moved in August 2014 to Greenberg Traurig, which also employed Giuliani. It’s there that Hoekstra’s foreign lobbying took off. Hoekstra worked on raising the Kurdish Regional Government’s profile on the Hill, meeting often with his former colleagues and their staffs. The Kurdish Regional Government is the semi-autonomous governing body of the predominately Kurdish northern part of Iraq. Their armed forces, known as the Peshmerga, have been instrumental in the retaking of Mosul and the larger fight against ISIS. He argued in the pages of the National Review that the United States must provide the Kurdish security forces - known as the Peshmerga - with weapons to defeat ISIS. “The United States needs to immediately provide it with more than light arms and artillery to tip the scales in their favor and overcome the firepower of the Islamists,” he wrote.From April 2014 to October 2015, the firm received just over $260,000 in payments from the Kurdish Regional Government, according to Justice Department records. (Hoekstra left Greenberg Traurig in August 2015.)The Libya Institute for Advanced Studies, an organization that’s partnered with the State Department to do educational workshops in the war-torn country, also enlisted Hoekstra’s services at Greenberg Traurig’s services in 2015. His goal was to “strengthen a dialogue with Members of Congress, Administration Officials and other key leaders in the United States to communicate the foundation and its leadership's interests and policies for LIAS and issues related to the security and development of Libya,” according to Justice Department records. Just after he left Greenberg, Hoekstra published a book titled “Architects of Disaster: The Destruction of Libya about the Obama administration actions in Libya.”The work was roundly dismissed by White House officials. But the Heritage Foundation’s James Carafano, who is working on the Trump foreign policy transition, called it “A graphic autopsy of what went wrong in Libya and why.” Former GOP Nominee Mitt Romney said the book “cuts to the core in identifying how a radical Islamist agenda left to its own devices cannot reconcile with Western ideals of tolerance and acceptance.” Hoekstra also helped lobby on behalf of a Belarusian fertilizer company worried about the prospect of U.S. sanctions during his time with Greenberg Traurig. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, a Trump supporter as well, told POLITICO earlier this year that he thought Hoekstra helped organize a meeting with half a dozen company officials when the California representative traveled to the country on a government-sponsored trip. “We developed a very close and trusting relationship when he was in Congress and I always respected him,” Rohrabacher said. “So when he recommended the meeting I, of course, took him up on the offer.”

16 ноября, 17:33

4 Green Stocks to Buy Despite a Trump Presidency

Evidence on the ground tells a different tale and picking stocks from the sector may still be a smart investment option.

15 ноября, 00:05

Can Trump Derail The EV Revolution?

The day after the November 8th U.S. presidential election, the stock prices for electric car maker Tesla plunged 5 percent. Solar and wind stocks also fell, while the share prices for coal and oil companies surged. Peabody Energy, for example, the world’s largest private sector coal producer, saw its stock skyrocket by more than 40 percent on speculation that the Trump administration could breathe new life into the dying sector. The energy industry, in other words, could be substantially altered by a change in government policy, with clean…

09 ноября, 21:31

Oil Stocks Soar After Donald Trump Victory, But Coal Is The Real Winner

Shares of U.S. oil and gas companies spiked Wednesday after Donald Trump won the presidency, but the biggest winner seems to be the ailing coal industry. Oil giants BP, Chevron and Exxon Mobil made modest gains of less than 1 percent. But stock in bankrupt Peabody Energy, the world’s largest privately owned coal company, skyrocketed over 47 percent. ConocoPhillips, a Houston-based oil giant specialized extracting gas from coal seams, climbed nearly 3 percent.  Trump vowed in May to revitalize a coal industry that had all but collapsed amid a series of ill-timed bets on Chinese demand and competition from cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Like Peabody, Arch Coal, Alpha Natural Resources and Patriot Coal have filed for bankruptcy in recent months. The president-elect, who has denounced scientific evidence of climate change as a “hoax,” said he plans to scrap President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, his signature effort to combat global warming. The plan, stalled since February by court challenges, would have empowered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to force utility companies to slash emissions. In an ironic twist, hope for a resurgence of the world’s dirtiest fossil fuels comes as world leaders are gathered in Marrakech, Morocco, for the 22nd Conference of the Parties. Last year, the climate conference yielded the historic Paris accord, in which 180 countries agreed to curb greenhouse gas emissions in an attempt to avoid the worst effects from global warming. The treaty, which Trump threatened during his campaign to unravel, went into effect last Friday.  The solar industry suffered a major rout on Wednesday. SolarCity, the Elon Musk-led solar installer looking to merge with Tesla later this month, plunged nearly 6 percent. First Solar Inc. fell about 3 percent. SunPower Corporation plummeted almost 15 percent.  Trump has repeatedly slammed energy produced from renewable sources as too expensive and complained that wind turbines kill eagles. In fact, the price of clean energy has fallen drastically over the last eight years, and the renewable energy industries are producing more jobs than oil or gas.  “Let me tell you: the miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, which was so great to me last week and Ohio and all over, they’re going to start to work again, believe me,” Trump said at a rally earlier this year. “You’re going to be proud again to be miners.” Part of Trump’s appeal to struggling coal miners in Appalachian states stemmed from his accusation that Obama had waged a so-called war on coal. But the industry has been contracting for decades, including under Republican presidents. In 1985, coal employed 177,000 people. By the end of 2008, that number had fallen to just 86,000. Now it’s just about 56,000. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 ноября, 21:31

Oil Stocks Soar After Donald Trump Victory, But Coal Is The Real Winner

Shares of U.S. oil and gas companies spiked Wednesday after Donald Trump won the presidency, but the biggest winner seems to be the ailing coal industry. Oil giants BP, Chevron and Exxon Mobil made modest gains of less than 1 percent. But stock in bankrupt Peabody Energy, the world’s largest privately owned coal company, skyrocketed over 47 percent. ConocoPhillips, a Houston-based oil giant specialized extracting gas from coal seams, climbed nearly 3 percent.  Trump vowed in May to revitalize a coal industry that had all but collapsed amid a series of ill-timed bets on Chinese demand and competition from cheaper natural gas and renewable energy. Like Peabody, Arch Coal, Alpha Natural Resources and Patriot Coal have filed for bankruptcy in recent months. The president-elect, who has denounced scientific evidence of climate change as a “hoax,” said he plans to scrap President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, his signature effort to combat global warming. The plan, stalled since February by court challenges, would have empowered the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to force utility companies to slash emissions. In an ironic twist, hope for a resurgence of the world’s dirtiest fossil fuels comes as world leaders are gathered in Marrakech, Morocco, for the 22nd Conference of the Parties. Last year, the climate conference yielded the historic Paris accord, in which 180 countries agreed to curb greenhouse gas emissions in an attempt to avoid the worst effects from global warming. The treaty, which Trump threatened during his campaign to unravel, went into effect last Friday.  The solar industry suffered a major rout on Wednesday. SolarCity, the Elon Musk-led solar installer looking to merge with Tesla later this month, plunged nearly 6 percent. First Solar Inc. fell about 3 percent. SunPower Corporation plummeted almost 15 percent.  Trump has repeatedly slammed energy produced from renewable sources as too expensive and complained that wind turbines kill eagles. In fact, the price of clean energy has fallen drastically over the last eight years, and the renewable energy industries are producing more jobs than oil or gas.  “Let me tell you: the miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, which was so great to me last week and Ohio and all over, they’re going to start to work again, believe me,” Trump said at a rally earlier this year. “You’re going to be proud again to be miners.” Part of Trump’s appeal to struggling coal miners in Appalachian states stemmed from his accusation that Obama had waged a so-called war on coal. But the industry has been contracting for decades, including under Republican presidents. In 1985, coal employed 177,000 people. By the end of 2008, that number had fallen to just 86,000. Now it’s just about 56,000. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 ноября, 18:00

Трамп - президент США. Какие бумаги нужно покупать

Отдел информации и анализа мировых рынков компании "ФИНАМ" представил исследование, посвященное итогам президентских выборов в США. В рамках отчета эксперты проанализировали экономическую программу Дональда Трампа и определили круг американских ценных бумаг, которые обладают существенным потенциалом роста при новом главе Белого дома. Одним из ключевых предложений программы Дональда Трампа является возрождение промышленного и энергетического потенциала США, причем особое внимание он уделил угольной промышленности, пообещав смягчить регулирование отрасли и открыть ранее обанкротившиеся шахты. В связи с этим, по мнению аналитиков "ФИНАМ", неплохим спросом будут пользоваться акции угольных компаний, такие как Consol Energy, Arch Coal и Peabody Energy. Эксперты полагают, что наиболее перспективной будет компания Consol Energy, являющаяся одной из крупнейших в США.

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27 октября, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Dominion Resources, DTE Energy, Xcel Energy and American Electric Power

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: NextEra Energy, Dominion Resources, DTE Energy, Xcel Energy and American Electric Power

27 октября, 01:20

War on Coal Continues: Will It Survive?

War on Coal Continues: Will It Survive?

26 октября, 22:57

Exxon Mobil Could Be On The Brink Of 'Irreversible Decline'

Exxon Mobil Corp. may be facing “irreversible decline” as the oil giant fails to cope with low oil prices and mounting debt, a report released Wednesday found. The Texas-based company, scheduled to report its third-quarter earnings on Friday, has suffered a 45 percent drop in revenue over the past five years as it bet big on drilling in oil sands, the Arctic and deep-sea sites ― decisions that proved expensive, environmentally risky and politically controversial. Combined with a two-year plunge in oil prices, ballooning long-term debt to cover dividend payments to shareholders and an evaporating pool of cash, Exxon Mobil’s finances show “signs of significant deterioration,” according to new research from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a nonprofit based in Cleveland. “Investors right now are getting less cash from Exxon than they have historically, and are likely to get less cash in the future,” Tom Sanzillo, director of finance at the IEEFA, told The Huffington Post on Wednesday. “This is going to be a much smaller company in the future, and the oil industry is going to be much smaller in the future.” In April, Exxon Mobil was stripped of Standard & Poor’s top credit rating for the first time since the 1930s. The rating agency said it worried Exxon took on billions in debt to fund new drilling projects at a time when oil prices were high. Now, with the price of crude below $50 per barrel, that debt looks risky. Despite S&P specifically citing such payments in its downgrade, Exxon Mobil actually increased its dividend by 2 cents the next day. Usually, dividends go up as a company’s stock price thrives. But shares of Exxon have trailed the S&P 500 for 10 quarters in a row, the report noted, and that’s before factoring in the risks of climate change. Exxon Mobil is embroiled in a bevy of legal fights, notably with a handful of state attorneys general who are investigating the company for spending decades covering up the role of burning fossil fuels in global warming. The firm has repeatedly insisted such probes are politically motivated, and claimed that subpoenas seeking internal documents on climate change violate its constitutional rights. Unlike some of its rivals, Exxon has been slow to invest in renewable energy. CEO Rex Tillerson last year mocked the idea of investing in clean energy, likening it to losing “money on purpose.” Tillerson said last week that oil prices are unlikely to rebound anytime soon, thanks to large stockpiles of oil and resurgent shale output in the U.S. “If you’re an institutional investor and you’ve received very good returns from a company for many years and all of sudden you don’t get those returns, and all of a sudden the company is in controversy, you have to start asking questions of management,” said Sanzillo, who spent years working to manage New York City’s pension fund. Exxon flatly denied claims made in the report, suggesting that the nonpartisan IEEFA ― funded mostly by large philanthropic foundations ― is serving as a shill for “anti-oil activists.” “The report and its conclusions are inaccurate and were bought and paid for by the same anti-oil activists who have been running a campaign of disinformation against our company,” Alan Jeffers, a spokesman for Exxon, told HuffPost in an email. “ExxonMobil believes that its operations will exhibit strong performance over the long term as a result of disciplined investment, cost management, asset enhancement programs and application of advanced technology.” Exxon’s head-in-the-sand approach could spell doom for the company, much as it did for the financially ravaged coal industry. The value of the coal sector has decreased by two-thirds since 2010. In recent months, industry giants Peabody Energy, Arch Coal, Alpha Natural Resources and Patriot Coal have all filed for bankruptcy. Advocates for the industry, including Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, blame environmental regulations passed under President Barack Obama for suffocating the coal business. But much of the industry destroyed itself with expensive, debt-laden bets that China’s hunger for coal would never slow down. In reality, coal use fell by 3.7 percent in China last year. “Exxon is too big of an investment and too important of a company for institutional investors to simply shrug like they did with coal,” Sanzillo said. “I get that [Exxon] wants to wipe it all away. That’s what everyone does, and that’s what the coal industry did. Look where they wound up.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 октября, 22:57

Exxon Mobil Could Be On The Brink Of 'Irreversible Decline'

Exxon Mobil Corp. may be facing “irreversible decline” as the oil giant fails to cope with low oil prices and mounting debt, a report released Wednesday found. The Texas-based company, scheduled to report its third-quarter earnings on Friday, has suffered a 45 percent drop in revenue over the past five years as it bet big on drilling in oil sands, the Arctic and deep-sea sites ― decisions that proved expensive, environmentally risky and politically controversial. Combined with a two-year plunge in oil prices, ballooning long-term debt to cover dividend payments to shareholders and an evaporating pool of cash, Exxon Mobil’s finances show “signs of significant deterioration,” according to new research from the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a nonprofit based in Cleveland. “Investors right now are getting less cash from Exxon than they have historically, and are likely to get less cash in the future,” Tom Sanzillo, director of finance at the IEEFA, told The Huffington Post on Wednesday. “This is going to be a much smaller company in the future, and the oil industry is going to be much smaller in the future.” In April, Exxon Mobil was stripped of Standard & Poor’s top credit rating for the first time since the 1930s. The rating agency said it worried Exxon took on billions in debt to fund new drilling projects at a time when oil prices were high. Now, with the price of crude below $50 per barrel, that debt looks risky. Despite S&P specifically citing such payments in its downgrade, Exxon Mobil actually increased its dividend by 2 cents the next day. Usually, dividends go up as a company’s stock price thrives. But shares of Exxon have trailed the S&P 500 for 10 quarters in a row, the report noted, and that’s before factoring in the risks of climate change. Exxon Mobil is embroiled in a bevy of legal fights, notably with a handful of state attorneys general who are investigating the company for spending decades covering up the role of burning fossil fuels in global warming. The firm has repeatedly insisted such probes are politically motivated, and claimed that subpoenas seeking internal documents on climate change violate its constitutional rights. Unlike some of its rivals, Exxon has been slow to invest in renewable energy. CEO Rex Tillerson last year mocked the idea of investing in clean energy, likening it to losing “money on purpose.” Tillerson said last week that oil prices are unlikely to rebound anytime soon, thanks to large stockpiles of oil and resurgent shale output in the U.S. “If you’re an institutional investor and you’ve received very good returns from a company for many years and all of sudden you don’t get those returns, and all of a sudden the company is in controversy, you have to start asking questions of management,” said Sanzillo, who spent years working to manage New York City’s pension fund. Exxon flatly denied claims made in the report, suggesting that the nonpartisan IEEFA ― funded mostly by large philanthropic foundations ― is serving as a shill for “anti-oil activists.” “The report and its conclusions are inaccurate and were bought and paid for by the same anti-oil activists who have been running a campaign of disinformation against our company,” Alan Jeffers, a spokesman for Exxon, told HuffPost in an email. “ExxonMobil believes that its operations will exhibit strong performance over the long term as a result of disciplined investment, cost management, asset enhancement programs and application of advanced technology.” Exxon’s head-in-the-sand approach could spell doom for the company, much as it did for the financially ravaged coal industry. The value of the coal sector has decreased by two-thirds since 2010. In recent months, industry giants Peabody Energy, Arch Coal, Alpha Natural Resources and Patriot Coal have all filed for bankruptcy. Advocates for the industry, including Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, blame environmental regulations passed under President Barack Obama for suffocating the coal business. But much of the industry destroyed itself with expensive, debt-laden bets that China’s hunger for coal would never slow down. In reality, coal use fell by 3.7 percent in China last year. “Exxon is too big of an investment and too important of a company for institutional investors to simply shrug like they did with coal,” Sanzillo said. “I get that [Exxon] wants to wipe it all away. That’s what everyone does, and that’s what the coal industry did. Look where they wound up.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 октября, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Hallador Energy, CNX Coal Resources, Cloud Peak Energy, Suncoke Energy and Westmoreland Coal

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Hallador Energy, CNX Coal Resources, Cloud Peak Energy, Suncoke Energy and Westmoreland Coal

26 октября, 01:26

Coal Industry Stock Outlook - October 2016

Coal Industry Stock Outlook - October 2016

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