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Выбор редакции
24 мая, 22:49

Will Amazon's Bookstores Thrive in New York City?

E-commerce giant Amazon.com (AMZN) is set to open its first bookstore in New York City tomorrow, bringing the total number of physical bookstore locations for the company to seven.

24 мая, 17:28

Top Ranked Income Stocks to Buy for May 24th

Top Ranked Income Stocks to Buy for May 24th

24 мая, 02:30

Trump Threatened To Let Obamacare 'Implode.' That's One Promise He's Keeping.

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); President Donald Trump has been telling us all along that he believes his best course politically is to do what he can to ensure that Obamacare breaks. What you may not have noticed is that he’s actually been executing that plan. The Affordable Care Act has had its share of problems, some them serious ― like health insurance premiums that middle-class families can’t afford, and swaths of the country with little to no competition among insurers. Since the beginning of the year, the actions of Trump and his team have exacerbated those problems. And unless they start doing something different, much of what some consumers don’t like about Obamacare is going to be even worse next year. Premiums will be higher than they would have been. Fewer insurance companies will sell policies to people who buy their coverage directly or through an exchange like HealthCare.gov (as opposed to people who get health benefits at work or from a government program like Medicare or Medicaid). “We could see less progress in covering the uninsured, or possibly even some areas of the country could see increases in the uninsured rate with people being priced out,” said Cynthia Cox, an associate director at the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. And this is only tangentially related to the push from Trump and the Republican-led Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act and “replace” it with a new bill that would cover millions fewer Americans, weaken protections for people with pre-existing conditions and severely cut back on aid for low-income households. When Trump became president, he took stewardship of the federal government and all the programs it runs. When it came to the Affordable Care Act ― a law the GOP has vowed to kill for over seven years ― Trump faced a choice: Manage it as best as he could while Congress debated what would come after it, or deliberately mismanage it. He has chosen the latter. This all fits a pattern dating back to the ACA’s enactment in 2010. Republicans in 19 states have refused to expand Medicaid, leaving millions uninsured. GOP-led states put roadblocks in front of insurance enrollment counselors tasked with assisting people shopping for coverage. The Republican Congress cut funding for insurance companies that greatly contributed to their financial difficulties with the exchanges, and to the closure of many nonprofit “co-op” insurers created under the law. And Republicans have led or championed a slew of legal challenges to the law, including two cases that went to the Supreme Court and a cost-sharing lawsuit still causing uncertainty. Rather than take steps to mitigate premium increases and insurers exiting the exchanges, Trump and the GOP have cheered them along. Rather than reassure insurance companies that the federal government will honor its agreements with them, Trump is going out of his way to make them believe it won’t. Rather than consider the millions of people who rely on this coverage, Trump declares Obamacare “dead” and washes his hands of it. Governors, state insurance regulators, insurance companies, health care providers and the business community are pleading with the Trump administration (and Congress) to provide some clarity about what’s going to happen next year. They aren’t getting it. State insurance commissioners and companies are saying they don’t even know who to talk to, and can’t get straight answers from anyone in the administration. Health insurance companies have already started hitting deadlines with state governments to state their intentions for next year about whether they’ll participate in these markets and how much they’ll charge. More deadlines are looming in the coming weeks with state and federal regulators. Unless Trump changes course, it’s looking more and more likely that everyone will assume the worst, and either abandon the health insurance exchanges or jack up prices even more to protect themselves. Trump told us he was going to do this Trump warned everyone about this. At a January news conference nine days before his inauguration, Trump articulated his thinking on this very clearly. Standing by and doing nothing to make the health insurance exchanges function better would help him politically, in his view, because Democrats ― many of whom were actually concerned about the welfare of people covered under the Affordable Care Act ― would flock to him and agree to his plan to repeal the law. “The easiest thing would be to let it implode in ’17,” Trump said at the time. “They would come, begging to us please, we have to do something about Obamacare.” When the House failed at its first attempt to pass a health care reform bill in March, Trump talked about this some more. “I’ve been saying for the last year and a half that the best thing we can do politically speaking is let Obamacare explode,” he said. Statements like these are echoed by GOP lawmakers, and by the two officials chiefly in charge of Affordable Care Act programs ― Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma. It therefore seems clear that the political leaders of the health care bureaucracy aren’t spending a lot of time worrying about the Obamacare marketplaces or the people currently using them to get covered. The damage done Actions, of course, speak louder than words, and the Trump administration’s actions have caused real harm to this part of the health insurance system. The reckoning will come in autumn, when consumers set out to shop for next year’s policies. On his first day as president, Trump issued an executive order instructing the agencies responsible for the Affordable Care Act to relax regulations and enforcement of its rules. The IRS responded by announcing it wouldn’t reject tax returns that left the part about health coverage ― a key enforcement mechanism for the law’s individual mandate ― blank. That was merely a continuation of the agency’s previous policy, which the IRS had planned to change this year. But it signaled to insurers, tax preparers and consumers that Trump wouldn’t enforce the mandate, which functions as a way to nudge healthy people into the insurance pool lest they pay a fine for being uninsured. “Most of our CEOs and plans, based on communication from the IRS, are doubtful about enforcement,” said Ceci Connolly, CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans, a trade group representing insurers including Kaiser Permanente and Geisinger Health Plan. Also in January, the administration canceled advertising intended to promote the end of the sign-up period on the health insurance exchanges, for which President Barack Obama’s administration had already paid. When the final enrollment numbers came in, they were lower than for 2016, an outcome partially attributable to lost sign-ups during the final days, which had proved busier during the first three annual enrollment campaigns. Most damaging has been Trump’s cavalier attitude toward paying health insurance companies that serve the lowest-income exchange customers money they’re owed. Anthem, a big Blue Cross Blue Shield insurer with a major presence on the exchanges, has said it plans to keep selling policies on these marketplaces ― unless these payments go away, which could make the company reconsider. “We remain pretty confused as to what the administration’s position on cost-sharing reductions is, exactly,” Connolly said. “The messages have been so radically different from day to day and hour to hour that it’s nearly impossible for any responsible business to make plans for the future based on the commentary.” Because of a lawsuit that House Republicans brought in 2014 and won in lower court last year against the Obama administration, Trump has the power to unilaterally make or refuse to make these payments, which totaled $7 billion in 2016. Under the Affordable Care Act, insurers must reduce out-of-pocket costs like deductibles and copayments for poor enrollees, and the federal government is supposed to reimburse them for the expense. Almost 60 percent of exchange customers, or about 7 million people, qualified for these cost-sharing reductions this year. So far, Trump has kept the money flowing ― but he keeps threatening not to. And even though Trump and House Republicans requested a delay in the lawsuit proceedings from a federal appeals court Monday instead of agreeing to halt the payments, all this uncertainty is making health insurance companies very nervous. There’s a good chance that will lead them to price next year’s coverage under the assumption they won’t get paid for the cost-sharing reductions. “Health plans in the rest of the nation are sitting on edge of their seats waiting to see what the federal government is going to do,” said Peter Lee, the executive director of Covered California, the Golden State’s health insurance exchange. “A decision [to stop paying] CSRs is an early indicator that the federal government is maybe ready to walk away from the individual markets.” Amid all this, the administration has taken a few positive steps with respect to the exchanges, such as issuing an insurer-friendly regulation that, among other things, make it harder for consumers to cancel insurance policies right after receiving costly treatments. But those efforts haven’t balanced out the administration’s other actions, and have even contributed to the confusion about how Trump and his team will run these programs. Obamacare versus Trumpcare Whatever Trump’s actions and statements, the health insurance exchanges struggled before he took office. Rate increases for 2017 were substantial. Analyses from the Kaiser Family Foundation, Standard & Poor’s, the Congressional Budget Office and others have concluded the financial performance of these marketplaces and the insurers that use them are improving this year, in part because insurers have priced their policies more in line with their customers’ medical costs. On Tuesday, for example, Health Care Service Corp., which runs Blue Cross and Blue Shield plans in five states, announced it had reversed its losses on the exchange markets and earned a profit during the first quarter of this year. The messages have been so radically different from day to day and hour to hour that it’s nearly impossible for any responsible business to make plans for the future based on the commentary. Ceci Connolly, CEO, Alliance of Community Health Plans “There’s a bit of irony here in that the individual market was starting to stabilize,” Connolly said, even though it remains “far from perfect.” Insurers in some regions are still losing money and fleeing the markets, and more premium increases would have arrived next year, regardless. The question is, how much of this is attributable to Obamacare’s lingering problems and how much is because of the way Trump has overseen it (or failed to)? “We don’t know what the premium increases would’ve been in Earth 2,” Cox said. “But it seems fair to say that some portion of these premium increases and some portion of the insurers’ decision to leave is because of the uncertainty they’re facing for next year.” Accurately quantifying what share of rate hikes is because of the law itself, and what share is because of Trump, would be hard, if not outright impossible. But one at least one insurance company tried. CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield asked Maryland regulators for a huge average premium increase next year ― 52 percent ― and said 15 percentage points of that is related to fear that Trump won’t make the cost-sharing reduction payments. In other words, what was going to be bad will probably be worse as a direct result of the administration’s posture. Most premiums won’t go up as high as CareFirst is requesting ― and it’s a good bet Maryland will squeeze the company to accept less. But considering just the cost-sharing reduction payments issue, the Kaiser Family Foundation projects that would force insurers to raise premiums by an average of 19 percent above and beyond what they would’ve done next year if Trump stops reimbursing them. And, ironically, ending the payments would increase total federal spending, because the higher insurance prices would entitle qualified consumers to larger tax credits to defray their monthly premiums, the foundation also found. Not too late There’s still time, although not much, for Trump or even Congress to intervene and reassure health insurance companies and consumers that the federal government will resume active stewardship of the exchanges. “It can still be salvaged,” said Christina Pearson, a senior vice president at the consulting firm Avalere Health. Making clear that the cost-sharing reduction payments will be made through the end of next year, and that the IRS will enforce the individual mandate, would go a long way toward making 2018 better for insurance companies and their customers. But if Trump doesn’t change his mind about all this, it will lead to to a health insurance market that simply doesn’t work as well as it could. And that will be a result of the administration caring more about highlighting the market’s failures than trying to make it as good as possible for the millions of people who use it. The consequences, Cox said, are straightforward: “We could see less progress in covering the uninsured, or possibly even some areas of the country could see increases in the uninsured rate with people being priced out.” Jonathan Cohn contributed reporting. Politics hurt too much? Sign up for HuffPost Hill, a humorous evening roundup featuring scoops from HuffPost’s reporting team and juicy miscellanea from around the web. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 мая, 13:30

Pick The Plum Of Online Learning

One way to tap into the educational software business is to invest in the industry's dominant player, U.K.-based Pearson.

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23 мая, 10:40

Football transfer rumours: Everton to land £25m Gylfi Sigurdsson?

Today’s rumours struggle to find the wordsDavid Moyes is to play a part in sourcing his successor at Sunderland. It’s the sort of plan that worked so well a few years ago at Manchester United, isn’t it. Names on his list include Ryan Giggs, Nigel Pearson, David Wagner, Alan Pardew, Garry Monk, Aitor Karanka, Slavisa Jokanovic and Paul Lambert. Perhaps Moyes should also consider Sir Alex Ferguson for a job that’s guaranteed to be a world of pain for whoever stupidly agrees to take it, just to see how he likes it.Meanwhile sprinting out of the Stadium of Light door, as though chasing a ball lumped straight down the middle because his team-mates have no other ideas left: Jermain Defoe. He’s making a break for it, in double-quick time, in the hope of getting as far away from the mess as possible. Bournemouth, 343 miles south, fits the bill perfectly. Continue reading...

22 мая, 13:45

Who’s Marking Those Common Core High-Stakes Tests?

You were stressed; your children were stressed; and the teachers in their school were stressed. But the ELA and Math tests are over and we don’t have to worry about the results until August. What we should be worrying about is who is marking them. Will graders be careful, thoughtful, and competent? Carelessly graded exams are worthless, and only serve to punish children, teachers, and schools. So who grades the tests? Pearson advertises for test graders on the website Indeed.com. The advertisement below is from Pearson’s Austin, Texas scoring center. They want college graduates (or equivalency?), any degree, and they are willing to pay $13 an hour, almost as much as a customer associate earns at Walmart, but significantly less than our test grader would make at Costco or Home Depot. Their “highly qualified” graders, unable to find or hold jobs in low paying service industries will be expected to “put aside personal biases,” evaluate “student responses to subject-related open-ended questions,” and “apply scoring guide according to customer requirements.” Similar positions are also available at Pearson’s Charlotte, North Carolina and Hadley, Massachusetts grading centers. Questar Assessment, which designs and grades tests for New York State has similar ads with similar qualifications for seasonal test scorers, but their ad does not list the hourly wage. However, according to the website Glassdoor, salaries range between $12 and $15 an hour an hour. In Florida, teacher and school administration candidates are protesting arbitrary certification tests that seem designed to produce high failure rates. According to a report by WPTV in West Palm Beach, since 2015 failure rates have significantly increased on the Florida Teacher Certification and Educational Leadership exams while Pearson profits from each failure. Up until 2009, the Florida Department of Education subsidized the tests, but no more. Candidates paid $25 to take each part of the multi-part tests and did not pay to retake a section that they failed. Pearson now charges test-takers up to $200 per section and an additional $20 to retake a section, an increase of 800 percent. Test-takers can appeal failing scores and pay $75 for a reevaluation. In January and February there were 871 appeals but only 15 scores were changed from fail to pass, less than 2 percent. Julie McCue, a veteran teacher with 21 years of classroom experience, a Master’s degree, and high evaluations from supervisors, is suing the Florida Department. Ms. McCue has failed the essay portion of the leadership exam four times with the exact same score and each of her grade appeals were rejected by Pearson. McCue believes the real failure is Pearson’s for hiring low paid unqualified test scorers. Follow Alan Singer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReecesPieces8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 мая, 16:14

Top Ranked Value Stocks to Buy for May 19th

Top Ranked Value Stocks to Buy for May 19th

11 мая, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Unilever, Associated British Foods, RELX, Pearson and BT Group

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Unilever, Associated British Foods, RELX, Pearson and BT Group

10 мая, 21:49

Britain's Economy Recovers from Q1 Hiccups: 5 Stocks to Buy

Gains in manufacturing, services and construction signal all round economic improvements

Выбор редакции
10 мая, 09:30

Fighting fit: the sheltered housing schemes adapting to new challenges | Saba Salman

Cuts to supported accommodation can lead to a sense of community and tackle isolation if residents pull together and have a say in new servicesBefore she retired, Rene Woods, 84, worked as a warden at Pearsons Retreat, the sheltered housing complex for older people on the Sussex coast where she now lives. The on-site support she delivered as a housing officer – visiting residents daily and running social groups – is radically different from the peripatetic nature of services and drop-in activities she receives now as a resident.Government figures suggest there are 462,565 sheltered or extra-care homes for older people for rent in Great Britain. These sheltered housing schemes offer low-level support, such as help with budgeting or being linked to a call centre in the event of an emergency, and self-contained accommodation for people aged 55 or older on low incomes. Benefits for residents include greater independence than a care home and less reliance on health and social care services. Continue reading...

08 мая, 13:39

Preemptive Move Fails, Pearson Shareholders Turn On CEO

On Friday, a large majority of Pearson shareholders, in a non-binding vote, rejected a report granting a large raise and bonuses to corporate CEO John Fallon. This was the largest vote of no confidence in corporate leadership, a 61% no vote, in Great Britain since 2009. Fallon’s salary, bonus, incentives, and other benefits, went up by 20% last year to almost $2 million, despite record corporate loses and steep declines in the value of Pearson stock. In a preemptive effort to manipulate stock prices on the London Exchange prior to the shareholders meeting, Fallon announced Pearson planned to sell off its North American textbook business and other school “products’ like envision Math and iLit. Unfortunately for America’s children, Pearson plans to continue to invest in online “virtual schools,” and high-stakes testing. Fallon also declared that he used his entire 2016 £343,000 “bonus,” almost half a million U.S. dollars, to purchase additional Pearson stock. These moves boosted Pearson stock value on the London Exchange by more than 10%, but they were not enough to forestall the shareholders’ revolt. According to an analysis by Leila Abboud of Bloomberg, for the last four years Pearson has been “stuck in a cycle of falling revenue, profit warnings, cost-cutting programs, and asset sales.” Pearson's problems are the result of major corporate miscalculations. The U.S. higher education market is currently responsible for 25% of Pearson’s sales and 45% of its profits, but “students are increasingly rejecting expensive textbooks and turning to rental programs run by Amazon as well as cheaper online materials.” Fallon keeps promising that the company will return to profitability through “cost-cutting,” but the benefits “tend to be eaten up by declines in revenue as the business weakens.” In addition, Third World markets, where Parson invested heavily under Fallon’s leadership, have produced virtually zero profit. While Fallon was trying to fend off angry shareholders inside the IET Conference Center in London, outside, teacher union opponents of Pearson’s global policies and their allies staged a protest rally where they released helium-filled balloons with images of Fallon’s face. Representatives from the National Union of Teachers (UK), the American Federation of Teachers (US), the South African Democratic Teachers Union, the Kenya National Union of Teachers, the Danish Union of Teachers, New Zealand Educational Institute and Uganda National Teachers’ Union, and Global Justice Now demanded that Pearson appoint new leadership to end its push for privatized schools in Africa and Asia, and build a sustainable business model that views public education as a fundamental human right, not a leverage point for profits. Follow Alan Singer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReecesPieces8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

07 мая, 16:59

Мне сверху видно все: в потолке канадского аэропорта живет маленький енот

Маленький енот обустроил себе уютный домик прямо в потолке терминала внутренних рейсов аэропорта в Канаде.

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05 мая, 20:52

Barclays slips after call to bridge ‘capital gap’

UK stocks advance as Pearson leads blue-chip gainers

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05 мая, 19:38

Pearson: two-thirds of shareholders reject pay package

Two-thirds of investors in the loss-making education publisher vote against John Fallon's pay rise.

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05 мая, 17:26

Pearson: avoiding the blitz

Ebitda has declined markedly in spite of vigorous belt-tightening

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05 мая, 16:46

Pearson shareholders reject chief executive's £1.5m pay package

Investors’ revolt against deal for John Fallon comes after educational publisher reports largest annual loss in its historyMore than six out of 10 Pearson shareholders have voted against the £1.5m pay package awarded to the embattled chief executive, John Fallon, after the educational publisher reported the largest annual loss in its history. Fallon received a 20% pay rise last year, including a bonus of £343,000, despite the company recording a record loss of £2.6bn. Continue reading...

Выбор редакции
05 мая, 13:30

Основные фондовые индексы Европы преимущественно снижаются

Европейские рынки преимущественно снижаются, так как падение цен на нефть негативно повлияло на настроения инвесторов. Общеевропейский индекс Stoxx 600 упал на 0,3 процента в начале торгов в пятницу, причем большинство секторов торгуются на отрицательной территории. Тем не менее, акции образовательной группы Pearson выросли на 13,5 процента на фоне новых планов по реструктуризации, включая возможную продажу ее подразделения в США. Нефтегазовый сектор оказался в числе самых слабых в пятницу, так как падение цен на нефть повлияло на большинство компаний и снизило сектор на 0,84 процента. Цены на сырую нефть упали до самого низкого уровня за шесть месяцев в пятницу. Цены на эталон Brent впервые со времени соглашения ОПЕК упали ниже 45 долларов за баррель, и несколько стран, не входящих в ОПЕК, согласились сократить добычу в попытке повысить цены. Между тем, акции телекоммуникационных компаний также снизились, под влиянием убытков Telefonica и Inmarsat. Последний был замечен в нижней части индекса Stoxx 600 после того, как акционеры проголосовали против политики оплаты компании, представленной в обзоре по вознаграждениям в четверг. Акции IHG Group немного снизились после того, как компания сообщила о 2,7-процентном ежеквартальном росте глобального дохода, и о том, что ее руководитель Ричард Соломонс уйдет в отставку в конце июля. Его заменит Кит Барр, нынешний главный коммерческий директор IHG. На другом конце индекс Stoxx 600 акции секторов розничной торговли и путешествия и досуга торговались с незначительным повышением. Бумаги Marks and Spencer поднялись на 3,5 процента после объявления бывшего босса Asda Арчи Нормана своим новым председателем и бывшего генерального директора Halfords Джила Макдональда новым главой подразделения одежды. Между тем, евро торгуется около шестимесячного максимума в пятницу, поскольку последнее развитие событий во французской политике ставит Макрона ближе к ключам к Елисейскому дворцу в последний день агитации. Прокуроры в Париже начали расследование в связи с выборами в четверг после того, как Макрон подал жалобы на онлайн-слухи, которые утверждали, что у него есть секретный банковский счет в Карибском бассейне. На текущий момент FTSE 7251.75 3.65 0.05% DAX 12597.54 -50.24 -0.40% CAC 5365.07 -7.35 -0.14% Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam