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Progress Energy
17 сентября 2016, 15:05

Five Years Later, Occupy Gets Its Moment

Given up for dead, the leftist movement born in Zuccotti Park had an unlikely big year—but it’s still not clear how its supporters can turn its energy into permanent wins.

08 сентября 2016, 19:05

Argentina Considering Energy Partnership With Britain Over Falklands

Argentine Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra stated that her country would be willing to engage in a joint fossil fuels exploration project with Britain near the disputed Falklands Islands. In remarks to what The Guardian published on Thursday, Argentina’s top diplomat under President Mauricio Macri said any energy ventures with Britain would be a “sensible thing to discuss and could make sense.” Doing so would be part of a change in rhetoric from the less diplomatic exchanges under Macri’s predecessor, Cristina Fernandez…

08 сентября 2016, 01:28

API: U.S. Crude Inventories See Biggest Draw Since 1999

U.S. crude inventories collapsed by 12 million barrels this week, marking the largest inventory draw since January 1999, according to analysis of this week’s American Petroleum Institute inventory report by ZeroHedge. Brent oil prices had hovered around $47.92 before the API figures became public Wednesday afternoon, which caused the price to spike above $48.54 a barrel within five minutes of the release. Also, barrel prices for West Texas Intermediate jumped to $46.14 from $45.48 after the weekly numbers were released. Tomorrow’s Energy…

07 сентября 2016, 18:59

Norway’s Giant Oil Fund Excludes Duke Energy on Environment Concerns

The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund, Norway’s US$870-billion oil fund, said that it excludes, effective Wednesday, Duke Energy Corp (NYSE:DUK) and three subsidiaries from its investment universe on the grounds that the companies have caused severe environmental damage. Central bank Norges Bank, which oversees the Government Pension Fund Global, said that along with Duke Energy Corp, its wholly-owned subsidiaries Duke Energy Carolinas LLC, Duke Energy Progress LLC, and Progress Energy Inc have all been excluded. The fund’s…

18 августа 2016, 00:18

King Coal Is Losing Its Lobbying Edge

WASHINGTON ― While the coal lobby is often blamed for a lot of Washington’s foot-dragging on addressing climate change, two major coal industry groups may be losing some of their clout. A new report from the environmental group Climate Investigations Center looks at recent losses in the membership of two major coal lobbies: the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) and the National Mining Association. ACCCE was once a significant player in Washington, allowing major coal companies to lobby under the banner of their self-proclaimed cleanliness. The group’s ads were everywhere when it seemed like Congress might pass legislation addressing climate change, and it spent nearly $40 million in 2008 alone. (It also got some bad press in 2009 when an ACCCE subcontractor was caught sending fake letters to House members opposing the climate bill.) The group’s controversial tactics and climate change position pushed some coalition members away. Major utilities Progress Energy and Duke Energy and the French manufacturer Alstom left at the end of 2009. But the coalition has soldiered on, dutifully blasting out statements against any and all executive action the Obama administration has taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. While the more recent departures have gone unnoticed, they’ve been pretty significant. The Midwestern power companies Ameren and DTE Energy both quietly left ACCCE, the report notes. And Arch Coal, which filed for bankruptcy in January, is also no longer listed as a member on ACCCE’s website, nor is Consol Energy. Consol spokesman Brian Aiello said the company’s affiliate, CNX Coal Resources, now handles all relationships with coal trade associations ― and while it is a member of the National Mining Association, it is not involved in ACCCE. Those companies were once some of the biggest funders of ACCCE. According to a Greenwire report from November 2009, Arch and Consol each gave the coalition $5 million in 2008. Duke gave $2 million, while DTE, Ameren and Progress gave $1 million each. The National Mining Association has also had some big departures. The carmaker Volvo made a public split last December, calling the group’s position on policies to address climate change “quite crazy.” And the report confirms that one of the world’s largest mining companies, Anglo American, has left ― which the company attributed to both budgeting issues and its decision to move away from mining coal. The bank Wells Fargo and insurance company Zurich have also left the association. Chevron confirmed it has been out of the mining association since 2014, which spokeswoman Melissa Ritchie said coincided with the closure of Chevron’s Questa Mine. The company “no longer has active coal or mineral mining operations,” she said. The Western utility PacifiCorp also confirmed to The Huffington Post that it is no longer active in the organization. To be sure, there are still some major companies involved in ACCCE ― Southern Company, Caterpillar and Peabody Energy among them. And the National Mining Association still has dozens of members. But spending was down at both organizations last year. Bloomberg reported earlier this year that ACCCE spent 51 percent less money on lobbying in 2015 than in 2014. But ACCCE’s lobbying and political spending was already pretty low in 2014, as the new report notes ― just $1.8 million, down from a high of $11.9 million in 2011. The National Mining Association spent $4.8 million on lobbying in 2015, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, down from nearly $5.9 million in 2014 ― though its lobbying spending has been relatively consistent in the longer term. Joe Smyth, a researcher with the Climate Investigations Center, said the shift likely reflects the fact that coal groups have maintained positions on climate policies that are out of step with other major businesses, and that the coal industry overall is on the downturn. “So the coal mining industry and its lobbying efforts are increasingly isolated ― that’s why these companies are leaving coal lobby groups like the National Mining Association and ACCCE,” Smyth said. Neither ACCCE nor the National Mining Association responded to a request for comment. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 июня 2016, 01:18

Bernie Sanders' Digital Team Launches Job Site For Out-Of-Work Progressives

For progressives feeling Berned out by the 2016 campaign, there's a new site to help them get back on their feet.  Revolution Messaging, the digital firm of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) presidential campaign, has launched a website connecting out-of-work progressives with job opportunities.  "Progressive.Work gives us a way to more efficiently and effectively play matchmaker between progressive professionals and progressive campaigns and organizations that would benefit from their experience," said Gabe Hammersmith, who leads Revolution Messaging's tech team. "While inspired by our desire to help our friends coming off the Sanders campaign, Progressive.Work is built to be a permanent solution that we hope will help progressives well beyond 2016." The New York Times reported Tuesday that Sanders planned to lay off at least half his campaign staff in the coming days. Hillary Clinton now has enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination, but Sanders has vowed to stay in the race and plans to be in Washington, D.C. for a rally and a meeting with President Barack Obama Thursday. The site is an effort to ensure the momentum from the Sanders campaign lives on in the progressive movement beyond this one cycle. Hammersmith emphasized that the site was a labor of love and not commissioned by any client. "For those whose work on progressive primary campaigns has come to an end, we wanted to let them know we have your back and the political revolution still needs you. We need to connect these talented campaigners with other progressive causes to keep the forward momentum," said Keegan Goudiss, partner at Revolution Messaging and digital advertising director for the Sanders campaign. Job seekers can upload their resume for prospective progressive employers and have the option to enter their cell phone number to access the site's jobs board. They'll also receive text message alerts when new jobs go up.   Revolution Messaging was central to Sanders' digital-savvy campaign and drove the strategy behind his record-breaking online fundraising. It has been working to assist laid-off Sanders campaign staffers for several weeks. Many Sanders supporters are already strategizing on what comes next, eager to ensure that the progressive energy from the 2016 campaign gets carried to other projects. Later this month, a group of prominent Sanders supporters will meet in Chicago to work on these issues, while other organizations are turning their focus to progressive candidates in down-ballot races.  Want more updates from Amanda? Sign up for her newsletter, Piping Hot Truth. Enter your email address: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 июня 2016, 01:18

Bernie Sanders' Digital Team Launches Job Site For Out-Of-Work Progressives

For progressives feeling Berned out by the 2016 campaign, there's a new site to help them get back on their feet.  Revolution Messaging, the digital firm of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) presidential campaign, has launched a website connecting out-of-work progressives with job opportunities.  "Progressive.Work gives us a way to more efficiently and effectively play matchmaker between progressive professionals and progressive campaigns and organizations that would benefit from their experience," said Gabe Hammersmith, who leads Revolution Messaging's tech team. "While inspired by our desire to help our friends coming off the Sanders campaign, Progressive.Work is built to be a permanent solution that we hope will help progressives well beyond 2016." The New York Times reported Tuesday that Sanders planned to lay off at least half his campaign staff in the coming days. Hillary Clinton now has enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination, but Sanders has vowed to stay in the race and plans to be in Washington, D.C. for a rally and a meeting with President Barack Obama Thursday. The site is an effort to ensure the momentum from the Sanders campaign lives on in the progressive movement beyond this one cycle. Hammersmith emphasized that the site was a labor of love and not commissioned by any client. "For those whose work on progressive primary campaigns has come to an end, we wanted to let them know we have your back and the political revolution still needs you. We need to connect these talented campaigners with other progressive causes to keep the forward momentum," said Keegan Goudiss, partner at Revolution Messaging and digital advertising director for the Sanders campaign. Job seekers can upload their resume for prospective progressive employers and have the option to enter their cell phone number to access the site's jobs board. They'll also receive text message alerts when new jobs go up.   Revolution Messaging was central to Sanders' digital-savvy campaign and drove the strategy behind his record-breaking online fundraising. It has been working to assist laid-off Sanders campaign staffers for several weeks. Many Sanders supporters are already strategizing on what comes next, eager to ensure that the progressive energy from the 2016 campaign gets carried to other projects. Later this month, a group of prominent Sanders supporters will meet in Chicago to work on these issues, while other organizations are turning their focus to progressive candidates in down-ballot races.  Want more updates from Amanda? Sign up for her newsletter, Piping Hot Truth. Enter your email address: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 июня 2016, 13:00

The Democratic Establishment Prevails

Both political parties experienced populist uprisings this year. But while Republicans were consumed by theirs, Democrats have defeated their insurgent wing, even if they haven’t tamed it.

22 апреля 2016, 17:57

Save the Earth--Target Clean ETFs

A quick discussion about the rise in clean ETFs on the occasion of Earth Day.

30 марта 2016, 21:50

Is A Gas War Between The U.S. And Canada About To Start?

Submitted by Colin Chilcoat via OilPrice.com, The United States and Canada work well together. The countries share the world’s largest and most comprehensive trade relationship, exchanging more than $2 billion per day in goods and services; the U.S. is Canada’s largest foreign investor and Canada is the third-largest foreign investor in the U.S. The partnership clearly isn’t broken, but it may need some mending as bilateral and international gas trade stands to complicate matters in short order. As with most current global natural gas issues, we must first look back to the shale gas revolution. In 2005 – just as hydraulic fracturing was finding its feet in the Barnett shale – piped supplies from Canada met nearly 17 percent of total U.S. natural gas demand. By year’s end 2015 – with U.S. production some 50 percent higher – imports from Canada dipped below 10 percent of consumption. For Canadian producers, rising U.S. production is just one of a series of issues in what is a multifaceted and evolving problem: they struggle to compete. Of course, the resulting, and thus far persistent low prices are another. Canadian natural gas deliverability has taken a large hit as prices have moved below the supply cost of most new natural gas developments. Total production dipped slightly in 2015, though Alberta and British Columbia (BC) provinces – the Montney and Duvernay shales – proved resilient. While non-core plays will continue to struggle, the NGL-rich and relatively low-cost gas from the Montney looks to drive a rebound in 2016. Led by Petronas (Progress Energy Canada), Canadian Natural Resources, ARC Resources, and Encana as well as smaller-cap producers like Painted Pony Petroleum, marketed production from Alberta and BC is projected to grow approximately 2 and 6 percent respectively this year. Across all provinces and territories, Canadian production is slated to rise nearly 2.5 percent, to just over 15.3 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). For its part, U.S. producers have their own Montney – or six. The colossal Marcellus shale, which stretches across much of the Appalachian Basin, outputs more than 17.3 Bcf/d and counting. The neighboring Utica shale is no slouch either; production is up to 3.6 Bcf/d, 88 percent higher than a year ago. What’s more, they’re moving north. Positioned mere miles away from Canada’s hungrier eastern markets, cheap gas from the Marcellus and Utica shales is increasingly replacing supplies from Western Canada. Gas shipments to eastern Canada from western Canadian drillers are down more than 50 percent since 2005; U.S. cargoes have doubled in that time. Over the next decade, the flow is likely to more than double again. Spectra Energy’s Atlantic Bridge and NEXUS projects will soon (2017) deliver over 1.6 Bcf/d of U.S. shale to high-demand markets including Chicago, Ohio, New England, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. TransCanada’s South-to-North project plans to reverse the flow of the Iroquois line by late-2017, sending 0.65 Bcf/d to Canada’s eastern provinces. Energy Transfer’s $4.2 billion Rover pipeline will carry 3.25 Bcf/d of Marcellus and Utica gas through the Midwest to Enbridge and DTE’s Vector pipeline, where it will cross the border into Ontario. With its domestic eastern and U.S. Midwest markets shrinking or altogether disappearing, Canada’s slow-footed attempts to join the growing ranks of LNG exporters are all the more damaging. Canada’s federal government recently further delayed its decision on the $36 billion Pacific Northwest LNG facility. The Petronas project – while not alone – is make or break for Canada’s LNG hopes; prospective Asian buyers are running short on patience, and high on options. ‘Gas war’ is perhaps a misnomer – interconnectivity is increasing and the U.S. stands to remain a net importer of Canadian gas through 2040 – but continental and international competition will certainly re-characterize what was a largely humdrum relationship.

15 марта 2016, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PowerShares S&P SmallCap Energy Fund, SPDR S&P Metals & Mining ETF, ETRACS ISE Exclusively Homebuilders ETN and PowerShares WilderHill Progressive Energy Portfolio

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PowerShares S&P SmallCap Energy Fund, SPDR S&P Metals & Mining ETF, ETRACS ISE Exclusively Homebuilders ETN and PowerShares WilderHill Progressive Energy Portfolio

14 марта 2016, 17:36

4 Outperforming Sector ETFs Over the Past One Month

After a tumultuous ride in January and mid February, the U.S. stocks witnessed the fourth consecutive week of gains.

28 февраля 2016, 21:21

Democrats Should Be Very Nervous About Their Terrible Turnout Numbers

WASHINGTON -- Hillary Clinton had a great night on Saturday. The Democratic Party had a terrible one. Clinton trounced Sen. Bernie Sanders by nearly 3-to-1 in the South Carolina primary, winning every single county in the state. The thumping followed a convincing Clinton victory in the Nevada caucuses less than a week earlier, and sets the stage for a strong showing for Clinton on Super Tuesday, when 11 states are in play. For the Democratic Party establishment, these wins are being interpreted as a sign that the universe is back in order, after a 74-year-old democratic socialist from Vermont had seemingly knocked everything out of orbit. Party leaders long ago picked Clinton as their standard-bearer for 2016 and worked to clear the field of potential primary challengers. When Sanders began closing on Clinton in national polls and clobbered her in New Hampshire, the establishment bet was starting to look shaky. Had they lost touch with the core concerns of the party's base? After South Carolina, Sanders' chances to secure an upset nomination are dwindling. Exit polling showed that Clinton won every demographic tracked except voters under 30. Even here, she was far more competitive with Sanders than in prior contests, losing just 54 percent to 46 percent. She even won a higher share of the black vote than Barack Obama did in 2008. But Democratic Party elites shouldn't be high-fiving each other. They should be very, very worried. In primary after primary this cycle, Democratic voters just aren't showing up. Only 367,491 people cast a ballot for either Clinton or Sanders on Saturday. That's down 16 percent from the 436,219 people who came out in 2008 for Clinton and Obama. Factor in the 93,522 people who voted for John Edwards back in the day, and you can see the scope of the problem. Democrats in 2016 are only getting about two-thirds of the primary votes that they received eight years ago. Republican turnout in the South Carolina primary, by contrast, was up more than 70 percent from 2008. South Carolina's turnout numbers are not an anomaly. They're consistent with other primaries to date. Republicans are psyched. Democrats are demoralized. Presidential elections increasingly hinge on each party's ability to turn out the faithful. There simply are not many truly independent voters who cast their ballots for different parties in different cycles. A big chunk of voters who identify as independents do so not because they cherish a moderate middle ground between two parties, but because they see their own party as insufficiently committed to its ideological principles. In this era, lousy primary turnout spells big trouble for the general election. The poor Democratic turnout figures are not an indictment of Clinton alone. Maybe the DNC's decision to bury the party's debates on weekends and holidays helped Republicans generate more early enthusiasm with primetime coverage. And part of Sanders' pitch, of course, is his insistence that progressive energy will bring out high numbers of enthusiastic voters that an old party insider just can't compete with. It's a good pitch. But so far, it isn't happening. It's always hard to motivate voters for four more years of the same old thing after getting eight years of it -- especially when many of those years were mired in an awful recession, followed by a weak economic recovery. Opposition parties typically have a better hand after eight years. That's why 12-year runs in the presidency by a single party don't happen very often. If Republicans nominate Donald Trump for president -- and barring a cataclysm or a coup, they will -- there will be plenty of energized Democrats who turn out in the general election for no other reason than to cast a ballot against a billionaire who has predicated his campaign on raw bigotry. That will help even the energy some. But the flip side of the coin is that lots of angry white people will show up to vote for Trump. We know because they're already doing so in the primaries. And a lot of Republican partisans who prefer other candidates still care more about turning the page on the Obama era than they do about Trump's flirtations with fascism (and even, at times, liberal critiques of GOP orthodoxy). Trump's overtly racist campaign makes it hard to see how he wins Western swing states like Nevada or New Mexico that have high numbers of Latino voters. But his economic pitch to the white working class holds obvious appeal in traditional Democratic strongholds in the upper Midwest -- communities that have been ravaged by the past three decades of U.S. economic policy. Even if Trump lost every other swing state in the country, turning the Rust Belt red would be enough for him to win the Electoral College. That's a difficult maneuver. But it's time to start worrying about President Trump. Zach Carter is a co-host of the HuffPost Politics podcast "So, That Happened." Subscribe here or listen to the latest episode below:  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 января 2016, 18:03

This Billionaire Environmental Activist Hasn't Picked A Democrat To Back Yet

Billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer said he is not yet prepared to back Hillary Clinton as the Democratic nominee for president and he would not rule out supporting her main rival, Bernie Sanders, if he beats her in the primaries. One of the biggest Democratic donors, Steyer could help Clinton boost her standing among environmentalist activists who are a key constituency within the Democratic party. Clinton is locked in tight races with Sanders in Iowa and New Hampshire, which both have early nominating contests. "Our real goal has been not to support any one candidate, but to emphasize and highlight the issue (of climate change) so that the candidates can lay out their solutions and so the American people can have a chance to make a decision," Steyer said in a telephone interview on Tuesday. After the Democratic party picks its presidential nominee, that will change. "We have always come out and supported the climate champion," Steyer said. "The idea that for some reason we wouldn’t do that, I’d have to understand why in hell we didn’t. Because that has been our practice always." Steyer, 58, made his fortune through investments, some in fossil fuel energy, at Farallon Capital Management, the San Francisco-based hedge fund he founded in 1986. He stepped down as co-managing partner of Farallon in 2012 to devote himself to full-time activism because, as he later wrote, he "no longer felt comfortable being at a firm that was invested in every single sector of the global economy, including tar sands and oil." He spent heavily in the 2014 congressional elections to back candidates who could help further his anti-fossil fuel agenda. He paid out over $70 million, more than any other single donor in both parties. Of the seven candidates he supported, three won. Steyer said the 2016 election was critical to consolidating gains for the climate movement in 2015 - a year in which the Obama administration signed onto a global climate pact, blocked the Keystone XL oil sands pipeline from Canada, and ushered in new curbs on oil drilling and air pollution. "If you look at the Republicans, there are a whole bunch of serious Republican candidates who are diametrically opposed to everything the president has spoken about in terms of progressive energy and climate policies. So when you think about what is at stake: almost everything," he said. CLINTON PLAN NEEDS MORE WORK Steyer said Clinton's position on energy and climate - which calls for increased use of solar and wind power, lower oil use, and a revamping of the aging U.S. oil and gas pipeline network - was good but needed some work. (here) "I don’t think she’s fully fleshed out everything she has to say about energy and climate," Steyer said. "I think that as the campaign goes on I would imagine she will put out more detailed plans of exactly what she thinks. I don't find what she's said inadequate, but I don't think it's complete yet." Sanders has a climate agenda that on its face appears to resonate more closely with Steyer's - an aggressive move away from fossil fuels, including a ban on hydraulic fracturing. But he has also railed against billionaire influence in politics and has pledged not to accept cash from big donors. (here) Steyer said Sanders' views on big money "certainly wouldn’t disqualify him for us, I can tell you that." "What Bernie Sanders is talking about, which is trying to get back to a more perfect democracy, is something that we support too. We just think that the idea of ... wishing the rules were different and then pretending they were, is something which, unfortunately, probably would be disastrous from the standpoint of energy and climate," Steyer said. YOUNG VOTERS Steyer says he has learned the lessons of the 2014 campaign, when he spent a lot of money in return for relatively little. "When you look at 2014, it was a question of turnout. Americans turned out, and specifically Democrats, turned out in the lowest level they’ve done for 70 years. You’d have to go back to 1942 to see turnout that low. And in young people, the numbers are incredibly low. So the question is, how are we going to motivate those voters to show up?" he said. His environmental organization NextGen Climate is running information campaigns on college campuses in Iowa and New Hampshire and elsewhere in an effort to raise awareness about climate change and the positions of all the presidential candidates. Steyer hopes the effort will reach people of 35 and under, a group he says represents about a third of the country’s electorate and who generally agree that climate change is a problem, but who often pass up the chance to vote. "We’ve been pushing really hard to get them involved to make them aware of what’s at stake," he said. Steyer said he was not sure yet how much money the 2016 effort would cost, but acknowledged the project would likely be larger than the one NextGen undertook in 2014. "We never have a budget. We know this stuff changes. What we do will depend on what happens." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 декабря 2014, 16:42

Duke Energy: Clean Energy, International Business To Drive Future Growth

Over the last three years, Duke has completed many power generation projects, resulting in significant revenue gains. The company has also started reporting the results of indirectly owned subsidiary Progress Energy in its income statements, leading to additional reported growth. Along with the increased retail pricing of electricity due to revised rates and a more streamlined cost structure, as a result of lower operational and maintenance costs in the Carolinas, these have been the most significant growth drivers for the company.

24 сентября 2014, 12:57

Инвестиции в стиле Рокфеллеров

Все больше крупных инвесторов стремятся вкладывать свои деньги в акции социально ответственных компаний, подражая нынешнему поколению семейства Рокфеллеров. MarketWatch предлагает всем желающим следовать их примеру и покупать паи «зеленых» ЕTF и взаимных фондов. В отличие от самого Джона Рокфеллера, ставшего самым богатым человеком за всю историю человечества именно благодаря добыче нефти, его потомки избегают акции ресурсных компаний и инвестируют в социально ответственные и экологически чистые проекты. По крайней мере один фонд семейства размером $860 млн точно следует этим принципам, говориться в исследовании The Wall Street Journal. Инвесторы, поступающие аналогичным образом, делают это не только по доброте душевной или «напоказ». Они также апеллируют к повышенным рискам долгосрочного инвестирования в «грязные» компании на фоне быстрого развития альтернативной энергетики и все ужесточающихся ограничений на вредные выбросы со стороны правительств по всему миру. Также зачастую суды взыскивают очень высокие штрафы c таких компаний или вовсе отзывают лицензии в случае аварий, что в итоге больно бьет по их финансовым показателям. Суммарный объем средств под управлением финансовых институтов, которые вкладываются только в «зеленые» проекты, довольно невелик и составляет порядка $50 млрд, что никак не может напрямую повлиять на глобальную инвестиционную среду. Однако такая позиция помогает создавать мощный общественный ресурс и позволяет оказывать влияние на глобальную политику в области защиты окружающей среды, что опять-таки бьет «плохим» компаниям. Одним самых простых способов быть в модном тренде – это инвестировать в «социально ответственные» фонды коллективных инвестиций. Хотя, по мнению колумнистов MarketWatch, сам термин «социально ответственный» является слишком лукавым, поскольку их богатые управляющие, учредители и инвесторы способствуют добыче ископаемого топлива, продолжая ездить на дорогих спорткарах, лимузинах, летать на бизнес-джетах, плавать на яхтах и заказывать себе дорогие товары, которые доставляются по железным дорогам. По этой теме Morningstar составил список самых «социально ответственных» и «экологически чистых» взаимных и биржевых фондов, которые при этом показывают неплохую доходность. Самые доходные «социально ответственные» «экологически чистые» взаимные фонды Фонд Тикер Доходность с начала года Средняя доходность за последние 5 лет Great-West Ariel Mid Cap Value Initial Class MXMCX 5% 20% DFA U.S. Sustainability Core 1 Portfolio DFSIX 9% 18% Green Century Equity Fund GCEQX 8% 15% Meeder Utilities and Infrastructure Fund FLRUX 14% 15% Calvert Global Water Fund Class CFWAX 5% 14% AllianzGI Global Water Fund Class A AWTAX 1% 12% Pax World Global Environmental Markets Fund Inst. Class PGINX 1% 12% Green Century Balanced Fund GCBLX 4% 11% Portfolio 21 Global Equity Fund Class R PORTX 2% 9% DFA International Sustainability Core 1 Portfolio DFSPX 3% 9%  Самые доходные «социально ответственные» и «экологически чистые» ETF Фонд Тикер Доходность с начала года Средняя доходность за последние 5 лет First Trust ISE Water Index Fund FIW 0% 15% Guggenheim S&P Global Water Index ETF CGW 5% 13% Market Vectors Environmental Services Index Fund EVX 3% 13% PowerShares Water Resources ETF PHO 0% 11% PowerShares WilderHill Progressive Energy Portfolio PUW 5% 11% PowerShares Global Water ETF PIO 6% 9% First Trust NASDAQ Clean Edge Green Energy Inded Fund QCLN 17% 8% PowerShares Cleantech Portfolio PZD 0% 8% Market Vectors Global Alternative Energy ETF Trust GEX 17% -1% Huntington EcoLogical Strategy ETF HECO 14% -1%  

31 августа 2014, 19:02

Government Looking For Trains To Haul Radioactive Waste, But There's Nowhere For Them To Go

ATLANTA (AP) — The U.S. government is looking for trains to haul radioactive waste from nuclear power plants to disposal sites. Too bad those trains have nowhere to go. Putting the cart before the horse, the U.S. Department of Energy recently asked companies for ideas on how the government should get the rail cars needed to haul 150-ton casks filled with used, radioactive nuclear fuel. They won't be moving anytime soon. The latest government plans call for having an interim test storage site in 2021 and a long-term geologic depository in 2048. No one knows where those sites will be, but the Obama administration is already thinking about contracts to develop, test and certify the necessary rail equipment. U.S. Energy Department officials did not return messages seeking detailed comment. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Transportation share responsibility for regulating shipments. "We know we're going to have to do it, so you might as well do it," said James Conca, senior scientist at the geoscience and environmental consulting firm UFA Ventures Inc. He has monitored a nuclear waste disposal site, helped design another and worked on cleanup efforts. In a public solicitation, the Energy Department asked for opinions on whether it should buy or lease the rail cars. It expects the cars could last 30 years, run at standard speeds on regular tracks, accommodate the heavy protective casks and be used up to eight times annually. Besides a car to carry the cask, the trains would have buffer cars to maintain a safe distance between the crew and the radioactive cargo. The U.S. military already sends fuel by rail from its reactors on Navy ships to federal labs for storage. The civilian power industry hauled more than 2,300 tons by rail from 1979 to 2007, averaging just over nine trips annually, according to NRC data. Nuclear fuel is extremely hot and radioactive when it is removed from a reactor. Utilities first cool spent fuel in a water-filled pool, then can transfer it to massive casks that sit on land. Neither option is supposed to be final. One of the biggest rail shippers was Progress Energy, which moved spent fuel from two of its plants to a third plant, Shearon Harris in North Carolina, because it had spare room in its spent fuel pool. The rail shipments prompted protests and appeals from environmental groups and local governments, and the company announced in 2003 it would halt those shipments after building land-based storage facilities at its other plants, eliminating the need for the transfers. "Their story to us was that it was basically they were tired of fighting," said Jim Warren, executive director of NC WARN, which opposed the transfers on safety grounds. The tracks were supposed to lead to a depository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, where Congress intended to send radioactive fuel. Instead, the Obama administration cancelled a project that had been criticized as inadequate and opposed by many Nevadans. By law, the federal government is responsible for nuclear fuel disposal and once charged electric customers to fund its work. After a lawsuit, the Energy Department quit collecting that fee this year. No one is certain what comes next. Federal timelines would put off many big decisions about a permanent resting place for the waste until long after Obama leaves office. Industry officials are praising even limited signs of forward movement, including federal interest in a train. "This is a good timing," said Everett Redmond, who works on waste policy for the Nuclear Energy Institute, an industry lobbying group. "You don't want to wait until you're close to opening the facility to try and design a rail car." ___ Follow Ray Henry on Twitter: http://twitter.com/rhenryAP.

19 августа 2014, 16:48

Here Is How Much You Spend On Electricity In Each State

If you live in Louisiana, you likely use more than twice as much electricity as the average New Yorker does each month. And if you live in Arkansas, you likely pay about half as much as than someone in Vermont does for a unit of electrical power. The maps below, created using data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration, show how electricity consumption and costs vary across state lines. The data measures the price and monthly per capita usage of electricity, which is produced by converting fuels like coal, natural gas, or renewable resources into usable electric power. Lifestyle habits affect how much power we're using. In the South, people consume a lot more electricty due to the hot and humid climate. More progressive, energy-efficient states tend to be in the West and Northeast where the climate is generally cooler and less humid. (Story continues below map.)  The cost of electricity is affected by a wide range of factors -- local infrastructure, climate, availability of natural gas, labor costs, transmission capacity, among others. For example, electricity is relatively more expensive in Hawaii because the isolated state has to import petroleum and coal to make electricity.  (Hat tip: Nerdwallet) 

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11 августа 2014, 18:49

Highwoods Properties gets new CFO

Terry Stevens, 66, will retire at the end of September and be replaced by board member and CFO of Exco Resources, Mark Mulhern.Stevens has been CFO at Highwoods Properties (HIW +0.9%) for the past 11 years. Mulhern joined Exco as CFO a little more than a year ago. Prior to that, he had been CFO of Progress Energy until its merger with Duke Energy in 2012. He's been on the Highwoods board since January 2012.Source: Press Release Post your comment!

21 июля 2014, 18:34

Snakes and Ladders at Netroots Nation

At the emotional high point of this year's Netroots Nation conference in Detroit, Rev. William Barber II concluded his roof-raising opening-night invocation by asking, "Can I be a preacher for three minutes?" "My son is an environmental physicist," Rev. Barber said, "and he told me, 'Daddy, if you ever get lost in mountainous territory ... don't walk out through the valley but climb up the mountain to higher ground."  The Reverend spoke of the "snakeline," above which dangerous reptiles cannot live. "Reptiles," Barber intoned, "are cold-blooded.They can't survive up there." "In America," he said, "we've got to get our policies above the snakeline! We've got to get to higher ground." Barber was just warming up. "There are some snakes out here!" he continued. There are some low-down policies out here!" He rocked back and forth, testifying. "Going back on voting rights, that's below the snakeline! Going back on civil rights, that's below the snakeline!" The Reverend mopped his forehead and continued. "Touch your neighbor and say 'Neighbor, we've got to take our country above the snakeline!" "... Say 'We're on our way to higher ground!'" The good word. The word "snakeline" immediately entered the conference lexicon. By late evening it was affectionately being used in everything from philosophical debates to bar conversation. "These chicken wings," someone announced at a late-night drinking session, "are definitely above the snakeline." For Netroots veterans, that bonding moment was a welcome reminder of the subculture which first gave rise to this conference. This year's event was far more polished than the gathering of keyboard-addicted bloggers which first convened as "Yearly Kos" (a play on the blog name "Daily Kos") in 2005. Rev. Barber had some words of caution, admonishing his audience to criticize Democrats as well as Republicans when appropriate. He told them that theirs is a moral mission, not a partisan one.  And he said that change begins with a vision, not a plan. "The slaves didn't get free by figuring out how to get freedom," he said. "They got free by singing 'before I'll be a slave I'll be buried in my grave, and go home to my Lord ...'" The Reverend was saying, in effect, that freedom begins with freedom songs. The strategy sessions come later. The crowd was enraptured. As my friend Dave Johnson said, "They came for Elizabeth Warren and discovered William Barber." These are not the nerds you're looking for. This Internet-born group, which once prided itself on its 'nerdiness,' found itself sharing a hotel with the only kind of conference which was inarguably nerdier: a gathering of science-fiction fans dressed as Star Wars characters, medieval fantasy figures, and combatants in steampunk video games. One of them asked me about Netroots in a crowded elevator. "Half of you are in t-shirts and jeans, and the other half are in suits and ties," he said. "What's that about?"  I told him that the people in t-shirts were blogging nerds, while the people in suits were political operatives trying to influence the blogging nerds. Someone dressed as a pirate shouted "Nerds rule!" as I left the elevator. The Sci-Con attendees reserved an entire floor of the hotel and used it for celebrations and raves. At 2 am on a Sunday morning we mounted a reconnaissance party. What we found looked like a cross between the bar scene in Star Wars and the party scenes in Boogie Nights. The Netroots Nation events, while convivial and celebratory, were a little tamer. Beyond the mothership. The science-fiction theme was amplified by the Renaissance Center itself. The "RenCen" seems like a physical metaphor for wealth inequality, with the 1 percent as glass-encapsulated off-worlders hovering above the 99 percent's poverty-stricken dystopia.   The nearly forty-year old Center is a 20th-Century vision of the future, with shimmering glass walls and cavernous spaces punctuated by elevated catwalks. There's even a monorail. The Center hovers like a starship over the heart of poverty-stricken Detroit. Entering it is like penetrating a topological anomaly, a space where directions and dimensions lose meaning. Its circular walkways and undefined spaces seemed to exert a hallucinogenic influence on baffled conference-goers. "I'm just trying to get to the CVS on Level Three," a leading activist said plaintively. (It's in the "Red" zone, right by the "People Mover" monorail station.) In what might have been the conference's finest moment, a number of Netroots attendees left their glittering hypercube to march with local activists against Detroit's policy of shutting off water to poor homes. That was a just and moral action. This policy violates the UN charter, which states that access to clean water is a basic human right. It was implemented by Detroit's unelected "Emergency Manager." And speaking of international policy: It was unfortunate that Netroots, which focuses on domestic policy, was held at a time when global crises are dominating public attention. Had things been different, progressives might have challenged leading Democrats over their tacit endorsement of the humanitarian horror show now being staged in Gaza. Snakes and Ladders Earlier conference populations were weighted toward independent bloggers, most of whom paid their own way to an event which offered them a chance to meet people in person they'd only known through their online names."So you're Ghost183!" But the cost of travel seems to have skewed attendance toward people with organizational affiliations. There was a dizzying array of breakout panels - 16 choices for each time slot, most of them rich with talent and ideas - but much of the action seemed to take place in restaurants, waiting areas, and other social spaces. Activists huddled over coffee to plot new ways of defeating Rev. Barber's metaphorical "snakes" while other attendees networked over drinks as they sought to climb career ladders. Snakes or ladders: in some ways, that was the conference's basic divide. The Swagging of the President, 2016 Some Netroots "old timers" expressed dismay that Vice President Joe Biden, whom they consider an embodiment of old-line Democratic politics, spoke on Day One. Biden, burnishing his progressive cred for an anticipated Presidential run, endeared himself to the crowd with warm words for immigration rights activists who interrupted his speech by shouting "Stop deporting our families." Then he dampened that enthusiasm with a Joe Biden-length - i.e., interminable - talk. I understood the reasoning behind Biden's invitation. But Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), who followed him, is a stalwart Wall Street ally, a camera-obsessed politico who seems to embody everything the original Netroots despised. His presence was both a surprise and a disappointment to some attendees. Hillary Clinton, the presumptive nominee-by-acclamation, didn't show up. But her de facto campaign machine was there in force under the "Ready for Hillary" banner, hosting a polished covers band at a "Motown dance party" and handing out free "I'm Ready for Hillary" cups and stickers. Most attendees did seem ready for Hillary, or at least ready enough. By contrast, Sen. Elizabeth Warren's speech was received with wild enthusiasm. Warren's supporters were the clear winners in the War of the Swag. A group called "Ready for Warren," unaffiliated with the Senator was in attendance, and their hats and bumper stickers were the most popular item at the convention. A number of attendees used Warren stickers to cover up the branding on their Ready for Hillary cups. (Dave Johnson has a more detailed take on Warren's talk. So does Esquire's Charles P. Pierce, who, together with John Nichols and other people I admire, proved to be a delightful Thursday night dinner companion. These sorts of happy accidents and chance encounters still happen in Netroots-land.) Changing channels Despite Warren's reception, the Clinton operatives at the conference must have been pleased. Sure, attendees cheered for Warren. But most of the ones I encountered made it clear that they would vote for Clinton without hesitation, despite the vast gulf between Warren's positions and the Clinton economic record (not to mention Hillary's Walmart and Wall Street ties.) A more appropriate slogan for the event, at least for some attendees, might have been "I'm resigned to Hillary." But in politics, "resigned" is good enough. If the Clinton team concludes that it can keep tacking to the right without losing the left, than this year's attendees will have partially failed in one part of the mission Rev. Barber laid out for them: to hold leaders of both parties accountable while staying true to a moral vision. When it comes to influencing the presidential campaign, this year's Netroots Nation was a missed opportunity. Ready for Warren had an extraordinary impact on the convention, however, and there will be other opportunities. Growing signs of activism at the state and local level were more promising.  Community- and state-based groups showed up in force. Their issues ranged from education to water rights and immigration. Groups like the Progressive Change Campaign Committee (PCCC) are working to change the composition of Congress, while others are focusing on statehouses and mayoral races. And an increasing number of groups recognize the key role of cities as engines of change. If Clinton or another corporate-friendly Dem heads the ticket in 2016, these seem like promising alternative channels for progressive energy. Razing Arizona The conference ended on a controversial note when organizers announced that next year's meeting would be held in Phoenix, and Markos "Kos" Moulitsas (founder of Daily Kos) announced that he would not attend because of that state's oppressive immigration policies. Some attendees have already taken Kos' position, while others have argued that they'll go to Phoenix because they endorse the organizers' plans to support local activists' efforts. Notwithstanding this controversy, this year's conference organizers deserve great praise for creating an event broad enough to contain multitudes. The open question is, What's happening to the broad and independent progressive movement which gave rise to the conference? One hint: There were a lot of strategy sessions, but not many songs of freedom. Another, more hopeful sign: By Friday morning some attendees were wearing freshly-minted buttons that exhorted people to rise "above the snakeline.' That spontaneity was a reminder of the "DIY" spirit of earlier years, when an offhand remark or suggestion could turn into action overnight. Spontaneous creation is, after all, how freedom songs were born. This small, lighthearted gesture rekindled the hope that an independent progressive movement still lives on, inside and outside Netroots Nation, in elevated places where reptiles fear to tread.