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Progress Energy
23 февраля, 21:24

Harrison throws support to Perez in DNC race

ATLANTA — South Carolina Democratic Party Chairman Jaime Harrison is exiting the race for Democratic National Committee chair and throwing his support to former Labor Secretary Tom Perez, the second major shakeup of the party leadership race within a week.The deal, finalized as the party’s voting members arrive here for Saturday’s election, cements Perez’s place as the likely front-runner in his tight race against Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison. Ellison won the backing of New Hampshire Democratic Party Chair Raymond Buckley, another former candidate, over the weekend.Harrison’s endorsement likely puts Perez closer to the needed tally of roughly 224 votes, given Harrison’s estimated support of 20-30 party members, according to Democrats familiar with the whip counts.“In a former job, I whipped votes for House Democrats. I know what a path to victory looks like. Despite strong performances at the debate and DNC regional forums, the votes are simply not there for me to secure victory on Saturday. But this election is not about the individuals in the race; it is about unifying and rebuilding our Democratic Party. Therefore, today, I am ending my campaign for DNC Chair, but I am more confident than ever that our Party will come back strong. I am confident because I have seen tremendous progressive energy all across our country and the commitment of State Party leaders to channel this energy into winning elections. I am confident because of the amazing Democratic talent running for various positions at the DNC, including a field of stellar candidates for DNC Chair,” said Harrison, in a note out to party members alerting them to the move. "In particular, I am confident because we have a candidate for DNC Chair who can unite the Democratic Party behind the goal of enacting progressive change, a candidate who can take the fight to Donald Trump and rebuild our Party infrastructure, and a candidate whom I, as a voting member of the DNC, am proud to support: Tom Perez."“Jaime's commitment to the party is like no other and I'm proud to have his support as we both work together to invest in state parties, turnaround the DNC, and get back to winning. Over the last year, from campaigning for Democrats in South Carolina to running our own campaigns for Chair, Jaime and I have grown close through our shared commitment to turning our party around through organizing and communicating our values of inclusion and opportunity,” added Perez in a statement. "If elected chair, I will work with Jaime and others who are running for chair to bring our party together because it will take every one of us to unite a party that is suffering from a crisis of confidence and relevance."The race, which has raged for months, is coming to a head at the DNC winter meeting this weekend. In the final run-up to the vote, the field has slimmed to the two likely front-runners, Perez and Ellison, plus South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Idaho Democratic Party Executive Director Sally Boynton Brown and a handful of others. Widely read as a redux of the Hillary Clinton versus Bernie Sanders primary due to Ellison’s support of Sanders and Perez’s role as a Clinton surrogate, the relatively civil race has gotten chippy in the final days, with a back-and-forth over the vote counts being circulated by the campaigns.Harrison has increasingly been seen as a potentially important dealmaker due to his level of support and his standing as neither a Clinton nor Sanders loyalist. Democrats are looking to avoid a messy vote that could stretch into multiple rounds of balloting if no one reaches a simple majority of the present voters.

20 февраля, 22:41

Bustos declines run for Illinois governor

Democratic Rep. Cheri Bustos is ruling out a run for governor of Illinois, as her party looks to take on multimillionaire Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner in 2018. Bustos, a former journalist and three-term member of Congress who represents the northwestern corner of Illinois, would have faced a huge funding challenge, with Rauner already giving his own campaign $50 million for his reelection run and several wealthy Democrats eyeing the race. Bustos acknowledged the fundraising hurdles but said in an interview Monday that her new leadership position in the House Democratic Caucus was also a key factor in deciding not to run. “As much of anything, it’s based on the fact that I was just elected to the House Democratic leadership,” she told POLITICO. “I think it’s a big responsibility and I serve as a voice for the folks in the heartland who feel that they’ve been left behind.”Bustos had been viewed as an attractive statewide candidate. For one, no other woman has filed or has publicly shown serious interest in a gubernatorial run. For another, Bustos had potential to draw Democratic votes from outside the Chicago area, where Republicans tend to be more competitive. But Illinois Democratic insiders for weeks had doubted Bustos would enter the fray, with much of the momentum behind a big-money candidate who could compete against Rauner or an outsider who could rally progressive energy in the party. Democrat Chris Kennedy, a wealthy Illinois businessman and nephew to former President John F. Kennedy, jumped in the race earlier this month. Billionaire businessman J.B. Pritzker, brother to former Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker, is also considering a bid.Three candidates have already filed for the Democratic gubernatorial primary, and that is even before billionaire Pritzker makes a final decision. Several Democratic legislators, including state Sens. Daniel Biss, Andy Manar and Kwame Raoul have also shown interest in the office. However, Rauner in December deposited $50 million into his campaign account, making clear the contest will not only be a brawl, but necessitate large sums of cash to compete. Bustos is one of three Democrats running the messaging arm for the House Democratic Caucus this Congress, known as the Democratic Policy and Communications Committee. While a lower-rung leadership position, it is viewed by ambitious House Democrats as a launching point for when the current longtime regime, led by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), retires. Bustos is also the only member in the House Democratic leadership ranks to hail from the Midwest, where Democrats struggled mightily with Rust Belt voters during the election. Protecting Bustos' seat without her could have been a challenge for Democrats next year, after President Donald Trump carried the district in 2016. “I want to make that as we’re sitting around looking at policy and messaging…that we have an understanding of how we talk with people in the heartland,” Bustos said. Bustos said she spent Presidents Day making calls to Illinois Democrats letting them know her decision, starting with Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), who ruled out his own bid for the governor’s mansion in the fall. Her second call was to Durbin’s wife, Loretta, a longtime lobbyist in the state. Bustos said she’s not ready to endorse a candidate in the governor’s race — she expects to weigh in on that in a month or so — but that didn’t stop her from hitting Rauner. “It is an absolute disaster, I can’t even call it leadership, under his tenure,” she said.Bustos’ decision not to run comes in the midst of an intense, bitter financial crisis in Illinois. The state has gone nearly two years without an operating budget, as Rauner and the Democratic-controlled Legislature has been locked in partisan fighting. That has left courts in control of prioritizing payments, leaving many of the state’s social service agencies in financial free-fall. The next governor will not only have to sort that out, but must also contend with the worst funded pension system in the nation and a more than $11 billion bill backlog.

15 февраля, 18:04

Energy Sector 1Q17: Best and Worst

The Energy sector ranks last out of the ten sectors as detailed in our 1Q17 Sector Ratings for ETFs and Mutual Funds report. Last quarter, the Energy sector ranked last

31 января, 13:09

Progressives ready all-out assault on Trump's Supreme Court pick

Progressive groups will mount a multi-phase effort against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, targeting specific Democratic and GOP senators and preparing a broader assault on Republicans to pressure them against blowing up the filibuster — even as some Senate Democrats pledged Monday to block Trump’s pick.Leaders of key groups have been meeting privately to coordinate strategy for the past month, and have already begun to talk protest plans in senators’ home states and at the Supreme Court in Washington, with early conversations about fundraising and advertising underway.They are still outraged by the Republican blockade of Barack Obama’s nomination of Merrick Garland last year but are trying to cast their own opposition as different — particularly as Trump already has issued a series of executive orders that have prompted court challenges nationwide.Foremost is Trump’s far-reaching and controversial executive order to ban immigrants from several predominantly Muslim nations, a directive sure to be a focus in the coming Supreme Court fight.“There is now an urgency to oppose anyone who won’t be a powerful check on the Supreme Court against the executive branch excesses and impulses,” said Nan Aron, founder and president of the Alliance for Justice. “I would predict that there will be a huge outcry if the nominee cannot demonstrate that he or she could be independent and serve as the check on presidential power.”On the Democratic side, progressives are zeroing in on red-state Democrats like West Virginia’s Joe Manchin and North Dakota’s Heidi Heitkamp. Among Republicans, they’re looking at Arizona’s Jeff Flake and Nevada’s Dean Heller, who are both up for reelection in 2018, and the moderate Susan Collins of Maine.And while conservative forces are already putting the finishing touches on a $10 million ad blitz targeting red-state Senate Democrats who will come under enormous pressure to back Trump’s nominee, People for the American Way is readying a television ad campaign of its own as a counterbalance.“There will be resources available to make the case,” said Marge Baker, the group’s executive vice president. “This is a fight that we’re going to be in, in an absolutely serious way.”The advocates contend they have both the progressive energy to pressure Democrats to hold the line, and enough of a buffer in a Democratic caucus of 48 members to lose several while still being able to block a nominee.“There is a lot of energy in the progressive space to say, ‘This seat was stolen from a Democratic president, period. It was grand larceny,’” said Brad Woodhouse, president of Americans United for Change. “Democrats in the Senate, and progressives and liberals who care about the unprecedented nature of that theft by Republicans, shouldn’t roll over for Donald Trump and his Supreme Court pick.”Along the way, they’re hoping to drive a major wedge between Republicans in the Senate, many of whom are wary of blowing up the filibuster completely, and Trump, who’s made clear that’s what he wants if Democrats don’t confirm his nominee.“I don’t advocate taking the same approach that GOPers took to Garland (in refusing meetings, hearings and votes),” said one former Obama White House official. “I’d advocate for close, intense scrutiny at every stage of the process — which I think will eventually lead just about every Dem to oppose the nominee and likely at least some GOPers.”For months, groups such as the Alliance for Justice and People for the American Way have done extensive research on the nearly two dozen judicial candidates whom Trump named during his campaign, with special focus recently on names that have popped up more frequently — such as Third U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Thomas Hardiman and 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Neil Gorsuch, two jurists reportedly at the top of the pack.The pro-abortion rights group NARAL Pro-Choice America has also been distributing its own research on where potential nominees stand.A broad array of liberal groups, including People for the American Way, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, Alliance for Justice Action Campaign, and Center for American Progress Action Fund, have organized a protest for Tuesday night at the steps of the Supreme Court against Trump’s nominee, who’ll be announced earlier that evening.Senate Democrats — who are also waging a political fight over Trump’s executive orders and Cabinet nominees — for the most part have tried to reserve judgment until the president actually unveils his pick. Democrats have been insisting on a so-called mainstream nominee, although Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) has conceded that he believes Trump won’t pick such a candidate.Still, Democrats are almost sure to face a massive level of pressure from the base to hold the line against Trump’s pick.“They need to fight like hell and do all they can to confirm only someone who is fair and an independent judge who can serve as a check to this president,” said Ellen Buchman, executive vice president for field and communications at the Leadership Conference for Civil Rights.Though the advocacy groups insist they are not simply trying to go tit for tat over the obstruction of Garland, there’s little doubt that the lingering frustration over how Obama’s final nominee was treated has permeated thinking among many Democrats.“That’s how we see this,” one Democratic senator said of the Garland blockade. “The anger, we feel it in our stomach.”Whenever the Supreme Court fight begins in earnest, Democrats won’t be hungry for help from the outside.The Constitutional Responsibility Project, organized by former Obama aides last year to push for Garland’s confirmation, will be reconstituted at the offices of SKDKnickerbocker, with Sheila O’Connell, most recently Chris Van Hollen’s 2016 Senate campaign manager, coming on board.The opposition-research group American Bridge is preparing a full-research, rapid-response and video-tracking operation to “expose the nominee as too conservative and out of step with mainstream Americans,” said Kevin McAlister, a spokesman for the group.And End Citizens United, a political action committee that advocates for campaign finance reform, is readying a national grass-roots campaign that will push its 3 million members to flood senators with calls, emails and petitions, as well as a digital advocacy effort, spokesman Adam Bozzi said.All that is to counter the expected assault and pressure from conservatives, who backed the Senate GOP’s nearly yearlong blockade of Garland but now expect Democrats to fall in line.Schumer “said it’s hard for him to imagine a nominee … from President Trump who Senate Democrats could support,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Monday. “We don’t even have one yet. I hope we can get past that and get down to our serious work.”

25 января, 13:14

6 Ways Not to Resist Donald Trump

Keep it together, liberal America.

25 января, 13:14

6 Ways Not to Resist Donald Trump

Keep it together, liberal America.

20 января, 17:20

March This Weekend, Organize for the Next Four Years

The inauguration isn't the only mass gathering in Washington this weekend. In response to the swearing-in of the new president, thousands upon thousands of Americans are flocking to the nation's capital to give voice to their views and their values -- many of which are in conflict with the incoming administration. I salute everyone who is taking to the streets for these marches, to speak their mind about the direction their country should take -- there is no greater expression or exercise of our rights in a free society. Some of the labor movement's finest hours were at events like these. Our nation is great precisely because it encourages this kind of demonstration. The question is: Now what? After everyone has gotten back on the bus, how do we continue to apply pressure and generate heat? If these marches were nothing more than a one-off, then we have wasted an opportunity. With all the challenges facing our country, the progressive movement needs to build a sturdy and sustainable infrastructure from the bottom up, one that is capable of galvanizing people to take action locally. That's when politicians in Washington -- and in your state or community -- take notice and respond. What does this mean exactly? It means greater involvement in schools, workplaces and civic groups. It means rallying neighbors, for example, to save a health clinic that could close because of budget cuts. It means building coalitions to protect children and seniors, to reduce inequality and expand opportunity. It also means organizing workers, helping them achieve greater bargaining power and growing the ranks of labor unions. This engagement can take many forms -- local marches, like many also taking place in cities and states nationwide this weekend, are an important movement-building tool. President-elect Trump ran on a promise to directly address the very real economic anxieties of working people. Now, it's time to make sure he keeps his word. Early signs are that he will govern on behalf of the 1 percent and corporate special interests, and on the backs of people struggling just to pay the bills. A tax cut for the wealthy is in the works. The Affordable Care Act is in jeopardy. National right-to-work is a real possibility. The hard work of holding the Trump administration to account has to happen in Akron, Dubuque and Kalamazoo; in Tucson, Greensboro and Tallahassee. A series of crowd events in Washington, D.C. won't provide a magic bullet; they have to be the launch, not the culmination. We have to harness the tremendous progressive energy in these marches, bringing it back to our hometowns to build power and make change. If you're marching this weekend, make sure when you go home that you talk to your family and neighbors and start building a groundswell. Carry a sign on Saturday, but organize and mobilize on Monday. We need more than catharsis; we need community action. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 сентября 2016, 15:05

Five Years Later, Occupy Gets Its Moment

Given up for dead, the leftist movement born in Zuccotti Park had an unlikely big year—but it’s still not clear how its supporters can turn its energy into permanent wins.

08 сентября 2016, 19:05

Argentina Considering Energy Partnership With Britain Over Falklands

Argentine Foreign Minister Susana Malcorra stated that her country would be willing to engage in a joint fossil fuels exploration project with Britain near the disputed Falklands Islands. In remarks to what The Guardian published on Thursday, Argentina’s top diplomat under President Mauricio Macri said any energy ventures with Britain would be a “sensible thing to discuss and could make sense.” Doing so would be part of a change in rhetoric from the less diplomatic exchanges under Macri’s predecessor, Cristina Fernandez…

08 сентября 2016, 01:28

API: U.S. Crude Inventories See Biggest Draw Since 1999

U.S. crude inventories collapsed by 12 million barrels this week, marking the largest inventory draw since January 1999, according to analysis of this week’s American Petroleum Institute inventory report by ZeroHedge. Brent oil prices had hovered around $47.92 before the API figures became public Wednesday afternoon, which caused the price to spike above $48.54 a barrel within five minutes of the release. Also, barrel prices for West Texas Intermediate jumped to $46.14 from $45.48 after the weekly numbers were released. Tomorrow’s Energy…

07 сентября 2016, 18:59

Norway’s Giant Oil Fund Excludes Duke Energy on Environment Concerns

The world’s largest sovereign wealth fund, Norway’s US$870-billion oil fund, said that it excludes, effective Wednesday, Duke Energy Corp (NYSE:DUK) and three subsidiaries from its investment universe on the grounds that the companies have caused severe environmental damage. Central bank Norges Bank, which oversees the Government Pension Fund Global, said that along with Duke Energy Corp, its wholly-owned subsidiaries Duke Energy Carolinas LLC, Duke Energy Progress LLC, and Progress Energy Inc have all been excluded. The fund’s…

18 августа 2016, 00:18

King Coal Is Losing Its Lobbying Edge

WASHINGTON ― While the coal lobby is often blamed for a lot of Washington’s foot-dragging on addressing climate change, two major coal industry groups may be losing some of their clout. A new report from the environmental group Climate Investigations Center looks at recent losses in the membership of two major coal lobbies: the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) and the National Mining Association. ACCCE was once a significant player in Washington, allowing major coal companies to lobby under the banner of their self-proclaimed cleanliness. The group’s ads were everywhere when it seemed like Congress might pass legislation addressing climate change, and it spent nearly $40 million in 2008 alone. (It also got some bad press in 2009 when an ACCCE subcontractor was caught sending fake letters to House members opposing the climate bill.) The group’s controversial tactics and climate change position pushed some coalition members away. Major utilities Progress Energy and Duke Energy and the French manufacturer Alstom left at the end of 2009. But the coalition has soldiered on, dutifully blasting out statements against any and all executive action the Obama administration has taken to curb greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. While the more recent departures have gone unnoticed, they’ve been pretty significant. The Midwestern power companies Ameren and DTE Energy both quietly left ACCCE, the report notes. And Arch Coal, which filed for bankruptcy in January, is also no longer listed as a member on ACCCE’s website, nor is Consol Energy. Consol spokesman Brian Aiello said the company’s affiliate, CNX Coal Resources, now handles all relationships with coal trade associations ― and while it is a member of the National Mining Association, it is not involved in ACCCE. Those companies were once some of the biggest funders of ACCCE. According to a Greenwire report from November 2009, Arch and Consol each gave the coalition $5 million in 2008. Duke gave $2 million, while DTE, Ameren and Progress gave $1 million each. The National Mining Association has also had some big departures. The carmaker Volvo made a public split last December, calling the group’s position on policies to address climate change “quite crazy.” And the report confirms that one of the world’s largest mining companies, Anglo American, has left ― which the company attributed to both budgeting issues and its decision to move away from mining coal. The bank Wells Fargo and insurance company Zurich have also left the association. Chevron confirmed it has been out of the mining association since 2014, which spokeswoman Melissa Ritchie said coincided with the closure of Chevron’s Questa Mine. The company “no longer has active coal or mineral mining operations,” she said. The Western utility PacifiCorp also confirmed to The Huffington Post that it is no longer active in the organization. To be sure, there are still some major companies involved in ACCCE ― Southern Company, Caterpillar and Peabody Energy among them. And the National Mining Association still has dozens of members. But spending was down at both organizations last year. Bloomberg reported earlier this year that ACCCE spent 51 percent less money on lobbying in 2015 than in 2014. But ACCCE’s lobbying and political spending was already pretty low in 2014, as the new report notes ― just $1.8 million, down from a high of $11.9 million in 2011. The National Mining Association spent $4.8 million on lobbying in 2015, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, down from nearly $5.9 million in 2014 ― though its lobbying spending has been relatively consistent in the longer term. Joe Smyth, a researcher with the Climate Investigations Center, said the shift likely reflects the fact that coal groups have maintained positions on climate policies that are out of step with other major businesses, and that the coal industry overall is on the downturn. “So the coal mining industry and its lobbying efforts are increasingly isolated ― that’s why these companies are leaving coal lobby groups like the National Mining Association and ACCCE,” Smyth said. Neither ACCCE nor the National Mining Association responded to a request for comment. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 июня 2016, 01:18

Bernie Sanders' Digital Team Launches Job Site For Out-Of-Work Progressives

For progressives feeling Berned out by the 2016 campaign, there's a new site to help them get back on their feet.  Revolution Messaging, the digital firm of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) presidential campaign, has launched a website connecting out-of-work progressives with job opportunities.  "Progressive.Work gives us a way to more efficiently and effectively play matchmaker between progressive professionals and progressive campaigns and organizations that would benefit from their experience," said Gabe Hammersmith, who leads Revolution Messaging's tech team. "While inspired by our desire to help our friends coming off the Sanders campaign, Progressive.Work is built to be a permanent solution that we hope will help progressives well beyond 2016." The New York Times reported Tuesday that Sanders planned to lay off at least half his campaign staff in the coming days. Hillary Clinton now has enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination, but Sanders has vowed to stay in the race and plans to be in Washington, D.C. for a rally and a meeting with President Barack Obama Thursday. The site is an effort to ensure the momentum from the Sanders campaign lives on in the progressive movement beyond this one cycle. Hammersmith emphasized that the site was a labor of love and not commissioned by any client. "For those whose work on progressive primary campaigns has come to an end, we wanted to let them know we have your back and the political revolution still needs you. We need to connect these talented campaigners with other progressive causes to keep the forward momentum," said Keegan Goudiss, partner at Revolution Messaging and digital advertising director for the Sanders campaign. Job seekers can upload their resume for prospective progressive employers and have the option to enter their cell phone number to access the site's jobs board. They'll also receive text message alerts when new jobs go up.   Revolution Messaging was central to Sanders' digital-savvy campaign and drove the strategy behind his record-breaking online fundraising. It has been working to assist laid-off Sanders campaign staffers for several weeks. Many Sanders supporters are already strategizing on what comes next, eager to ensure that the progressive energy from the 2016 campaign gets carried to other projects. Later this month, a group of prominent Sanders supporters will meet in Chicago to work on these issues, while other organizations are turning their focus to progressive candidates in down-ballot races.  Want more updates from Amanda? Sign up for her newsletter, Piping Hot Truth. Enter your email address: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 июня 2016, 01:18

Bernie Sanders' Digital Team Launches Job Site For Out-Of-Work Progressives

For progressives feeling Berned out by the 2016 campaign, there's a new site to help them get back on their feet.  Revolution Messaging, the digital firm of Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vt.) presidential campaign, has launched a website connecting out-of-work progressives with job opportunities.  "Progressive.Work gives us a way to more efficiently and effectively play matchmaker between progressive professionals and progressive campaigns and organizations that would benefit from their experience," said Gabe Hammersmith, who leads Revolution Messaging's tech team. "While inspired by our desire to help our friends coming off the Sanders campaign, Progressive.Work is built to be a permanent solution that we hope will help progressives well beyond 2016." The New York Times reported Tuesday that Sanders planned to lay off at least half his campaign staff in the coming days. Hillary Clinton now has enough delegates to clinch the Democratic nomination, but Sanders has vowed to stay in the race and plans to be in Washington, D.C. for a rally and a meeting with President Barack Obama Thursday. The site is an effort to ensure the momentum from the Sanders campaign lives on in the progressive movement beyond this one cycle. Hammersmith emphasized that the site was a labor of love and not commissioned by any client. "For those whose work on progressive primary campaigns has come to an end, we wanted to let them know we have your back and the political revolution still needs you. We need to connect these talented campaigners with other progressive causes to keep the forward momentum," said Keegan Goudiss, partner at Revolution Messaging and digital advertising director for the Sanders campaign. Job seekers can upload their resume for prospective progressive employers and have the option to enter their cell phone number to access the site's jobs board. They'll also receive text message alerts when new jobs go up.   Revolution Messaging was central to Sanders' digital-savvy campaign and drove the strategy behind his record-breaking online fundraising. It has been working to assist laid-off Sanders campaign staffers for several weeks. Many Sanders supporters are already strategizing on what comes next, eager to ensure that the progressive energy from the 2016 campaign gets carried to other projects. Later this month, a group of prominent Sanders supporters will meet in Chicago to work on these issues, while other organizations are turning their focus to progressive candidates in down-ballot races.  Want more updates from Amanda? Sign up for her newsletter, Piping Hot Truth. Enter your email address: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 июня 2016, 13:00

The Democratic Establishment Prevails

Both political parties experienced populist uprisings this year. But while Republicans were consumed by theirs, Democrats have defeated their insurgent wing, even if they haven’t tamed it.

22 апреля 2016, 17:57

Save the Earth--Target Clean ETFs

A quick discussion about the rise in clean ETFs on the occasion of Earth Day.

30 марта 2016, 21:50

Is A Gas War Between The U.S. And Canada About To Start?

Submitted by Colin Chilcoat via OilPrice.com, The United States and Canada work well together. The countries share the world’s largest and most comprehensive trade relationship, exchanging more than $2 billion per day in goods and services; the U.S. is Canada’s largest foreign investor and Canada is the third-largest foreign investor in the U.S. The partnership clearly isn’t broken, but it may need some mending as bilateral and international gas trade stands to complicate matters in short order. As with most current global natural gas issues, we must first look back to the shale gas revolution. In 2005 – just as hydraulic fracturing was finding its feet in the Barnett shale – piped supplies from Canada met nearly 17 percent of total U.S. natural gas demand. By year’s end 2015 – with U.S. production some 50 percent higher – imports from Canada dipped below 10 percent of consumption. For Canadian producers, rising U.S. production is just one of a series of issues in what is a multifaceted and evolving problem: they struggle to compete. Of course, the resulting, and thus far persistent low prices are another. Canadian natural gas deliverability has taken a large hit as prices have moved below the supply cost of most new natural gas developments. Total production dipped slightly in 2015, though Alberta and British Columbia (BC) provinces – the Montney and Duvernay shales – proved resilient. While non-core plays will continue to struggle, the NGL-rich and relatively low-cost gas from the Montney looks to drive a rebound in 2016. Led by Petronas (Progress Energy Canada), Canadian Natural Resources, ARC Resources, and Encana as well as smaller-cap producers like Painted Pony Petroleum, marketed production from Alberta and BC is projected to grow approximately 2 and 6 percent respectively this year. Across all provinces and territories, Canadian production is slated to rise nearly 2.5 percent, to just over 15.3 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d). For its part, U.S. producers have their own Montney – or six. The colossal Marcellus shale, which stretches across much of the Appalachian Basin, outputs more than 17.3 Bcf/d and counting. The neighboring Utica shale is no slouch either; production is up to 3.6 Bcf/d, 88 percent higher than a year ago. What’s more, they’re moving north. Positioned mere miles away from Canada’s hungrier eastern markets, cheap gas from the Marcellus and Utica shales is increasingly replacing supplies from Western Canada. Gas shipments to eastern Canada from western Canadian drillers are down more than 50 percent since 2005; U.S. cargoes have doubled in that time. Over the next decade, the flow is likely to more than double again. Spectra Energy’s Atlantic Bridge and NEXUS projects will soon (2017) deliver over 1.6 Bcf/d of U.S. shale to high-demand markets including Chicago, Ohio, New England, Ontario, and Atlantic Canada. TransCanada’s South-to-North project plans to reverse the flow of the Iroquois line by late-2017, sending 0.65 Bcf/d to Canada’s eastern provinces. Energy Transfer’s $4.2 billion Rover pipeline will carry 3.25 Bcf/d of Marcellus and Utica gas through the Midwest to Enbridge and DTE’s Vector pipeline, where it will cross the border into Ontario. With its domestic eastern and U.S. Midwest markets shrinking or altogether disappearing, Canada’s slow-footed attempts to join the growing ranks of LNG exporters are all the more damaging. Canada’s federal government recently further delayed its decision on the $36 billion Pacific Northwest LNG facility. The Petronas project – while not alone – is make or break for Canada’s LNG hopes; prospective Asian buyers are running short on patience, and high on options. ‘Gas war’ is perhaps a misnomer – interconnectivity is increasing and the U.S. stands to remain a net importer of Canadian gas through 2040 – but continental and international competition will certainly re-characterize what was a largely humdrum relationship.

15 марта 2016, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PowerShares S&P SmallCap Energy Fund, SPDR S&P Metals & Mining ETF, ETRACS ISE Exclusively Homebuilders ETN and PowerShares WilderHill Progressive Energy Portfolio

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: PowerShares S&P SmallCap Energy Fund, SPDR S&P Metals & Mining ETF, ETRACS ISE Exclusively Homebuilders ETN and PowerShares WilderHill Progressive Energy Portfolio

14 марта 2016, 17:36

4 Outperforming Sector ETFs Over the Past One Month

After a tumultuous ride in January and mid February, the U.S. stocks witnessed the fourth consecutive week of gains.

28 февраля 2016, 21:21

Democrats Should Be Very Nervous About Their Terrible Turnout Numbers

WASHINGTON -- Hillary Clinton had a great night on Saturday. The Democratic Party had a terrible one. Clinton trounced Sen. Bernie Sanders by nearly 3-to-1 in the South Carolina primary, winning every single county in the state. The thumping followed a convincing Clinton victory in the Nevada caucuses less than a week earlier, and sets the stage for a strong showing for Clinton on Super Tuesday, when 11 states are in play. For the Democratic Party establishment, these wins are being interpreted as a sign that the universe is back in order, after a 74-year-old democratic socialist from Vermont had seemingly knocked everything out of orbit. Party leaders long ago picked Clinton as their standard-bearer for 2016 and worked to clear the field of potential primary challengers. When Sanders began closing on Clinton in national polls and clobbered her in New Hampshire, the establishment bet was starting to look shaky. Had they lost touch with the core concerns of the party's base? After South Carolina, Sanders' chances to secure an upset nomination are dwindling. Exit polling showed that Clinton won every demographic tracked except voters under 30. Even here, she was far more competitive with Sanders than in prior contests, losing just 54 percent to 46 percent. She even won a higher share of the black vote than Barack Obama did in 2008. But Democratic Party elites shouldn't be high-fiving each other. They should be very, very worried. In primary after primary this cycle, Democratic voters just aren't showing up. Only 367,491 people cast a ballot for either Clinton or Sanders on Saturday. That's down 16 percent from the 436,219 people who came out in 2008 for Clinton and Obama. Factor in the 93,522 people who voted for John Edwards back in the day, and you can see the scope of the problem. Democrats in 2016 are only getting about two-thirds of the primary votes that they received eight years ago. Republican turnout in the South Carolina primary, by contrast, was up more than 70 percent from 2008. South Carolina's turnout numbers are not an anomaly. They're consistent with other primaries to date. Republicans are psyched. Democrats are demoralized. Presidential elections increasingly hinge on each party's ability to turn out the faithful. There simply are not many truly independent voters who cast their ballots for different parties in different cycles. A big chunk of voters who identify as independents do so not because they cherish a moderate middle ground between two parties, but because they see their own party as insufficiently committed to its ideological principles. In this era, lousy primary turnout spells big trouble for the general election. The poor Democratic turnout figures are not an indictment of Clinton alone. Maybe the DNC's decision to bury the party's debates on weekends and holidays helped Republicans generate more early enthusiasm with primetime coverage. And part of Sanders' pitch, of course, is his insistence that progressive energy will bring out high numbers of enthusiastic voters that an old party insider just can't compete with. It's a good pitch. But so far, it isn't happening. It's always hard to motivate voters for four more years of the same old thing after getting eight years of it -- especially when many of those years were mired in an awful recession, followed by a weak economic recovery. Opposition parties typically have a better hand after eight years. That's why 12-year runs in the presidency by a single party don't happen very often. If Republicans nominate Donald Trump for president -- and barring a cataclysm or a coup, they will -- there will be plenty of energized Democrats who turn out in the general election for no other reason than to cast a ballot against a billionaire who has predicated his campaign on raw bigotry. That will help even the energy some. But the flip side of the coin is that lots of angry white people will show up to vote for Trump. We know because they're already doing so in the primaries. And a lot of Republican partisans who prefer other candidates still care more about turning the page on the Obama era than they do about Trump's flirtations with fascism (and even, at times, liberal critiques of GOP orthodoxy). Trump's overtly racist campaign makes it hard to see how he wins Western swing states like Nevada or New Mexico that have high numbers of Latino voters. But his economic pitch to the white working class holds obvious appeal in traditional Democratic strongholds in the upper Midwest -- communities that have been ravaged by the past three decades of U.S. economic policy. Even if Trump lost every other swing state in the country, turning the Rust Belt red would be enough for him to win the Electoral College. That's a difficult maneuver. But it's time to start worrying about President Trump. Zach Carter is a co-host of the HuffPost Politics podcast "So, That Happened." Subscribe here or listen to the latest episode below:  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.