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16 января, 14:56

‘Wait for the Government to Collapse and Then You’re in Power Again’

Liberal writer Jonathan Chait sees a model for Democrats in the Trump era. His name is Mitch McConnell.

16 января, 14:52

Democrats sweat Clinton vs. Sanders rift

Long after the presidential nomination was settled, the contentious 2016 primary fight continues to divide the party.

16 января, 14:25

"Where Do We Go From Here?" - Dr. King's Answer to Donald Trump

On Wednesday January 4, 2017, a full-page advertisement in the New York Times declared the Trump Presidency a fascist regime and called on millions who stand in opposition to rise up in a resistance movement that would create a political crisis in the nation. The group's webpage announced a month long action in conjunction with Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday to shut down Washington DC and prevent Donald Trump from taking office. I thought I was reading an old SDS Weatherman call for "Days of Rage" in Chicago in 1969 when revolution was supposed to be imminent (it didn't happen), and then I saw the ad was signed by some of the same "sixties" radicals. A friend joked that if they really wanted to shut down Washington this time they should join the Republican Party. A Donald Trump presidency is scary, but fascism has not arrived in the United States, at least not yet. I will join the January 21 Women's March on Washington Saturday to protest the Trump agenda, but I don't think the solution at this point is to take to the streets in rebellion. A lot of grassroots organizing has to be done to turn the nation around. Given today is the official holiday recognizing Dr. King, I thought it was appropriate to turn to him for on advice on how to proceed. In an August 1967 speech at the 11th Annual Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Atlanta, Georgia, the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. asked his audience, which included much of the leadership of the African American civil rights movement, "Where do we go from here?" The Civil Rights Movement had achieved many legislative and judicial victories. The Brown decision by a unanimous Supreme Court declared de jure segregation of public schools a violation of the equal protection clause of the 14th amendment to the United States Constitution. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawed discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in public accommodations, including schools, housing, at the workplace, and in facilities that served the general public. The Voting Rights Act of 1965 prohibited states and localities from imposing voting restrictions resulting in racial discrimination and empowered the federal Justice Department to enforce regulations. Yet despite these achievements support for civil rights was waning among White liberals who believed its goals had already been achieved with the passage of legislation and court rulings and urban Blacks, especially younger people, who did not see the conditions of their lives, education, employment, and housing, significantly improved. Many established Black leaders had renounced King because of his opposition to the War in Vietnam. Dr. King could have been discouraged, maybe he should have been discouraged, but he wasn't. These were dark times for the non-violent civil rights movement. In 1964 there were race riots in Harlem, New York and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Rioting had torn apart Watts in Los Angeles in 1965 and had just destroyed Black communities in Detroit and Newark. His campaign to desegregate housing in Chicago stalled in the face of intense northern racism. Instead of being discouraged Dr. King told the assembly that it was time to "honestly face the fact that the movement must address itself to the question of restructuring the whole of American society." Challenging racial discrimination within American society was proving to be insufficient. It was time to question the "edifice" that produced a society wrought with poverty, inequality, and injustice. He had concluded, the "problem of racism, the problem of economic exploitation, and the problem of war are all tied together . . . A nation that will keep people in slavery for 244 years will 'thingify' them and make them things. And therefore, they will exploit them and poor people generally economically. And a nation that will exploit economically will have to have foreign investments and everything else, and it will have to use its military might to protect them. All of these problems are tied together." When I re-read Dr. King's speech, the speech and the questions he posed seem remarkably contemporary and even prescient. Racial inequality has definitely not ended. According to a 2011 report by the Economic Policy Institute, "Millions of African Americans live in communities that lack access to good jobs and good schools and suffer from high crime rates. African American adults are about twice as likely to be unemployed as whites, black students lag their white peers in educational attainment and achievement, and African American communities tend to have higher than average crime rates." There are nearly one million African Americans in prison in the United States, a result of unfair drug laws, a privatized prison industry, and courtesy of the school-to-prison pipeline. In the "Age of Trump," rightwing ascendency and anti-democratic authoritarian movements across Europe, genocide in Africa, terror and war in the Islamic world, and environmental rapists in control of the world's most populous nations in Asia, where do we, progressives, people who believe in social justice, go from here? It is also the "Age of Barack Obama and Bernie Sanders." Dr. King believed the "arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice" and that that "Truth, crushed to earth, will rise again." But we live in an age of false news on Facebook and post-truth, what Steven Colbert calls truthiness, and I am not as confident. Martin Luther King, Jr. was sustained by a religious faith I do not share. He could call on the Bible and Christian theology for comfort and support. When Dr. King said, "Be not deceived. God is not mocked. Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap," I am sure he must have anticipated Donald Trump. Dr. King's beliefs sustained his "hope for the future," his certainty that "we will be able to sing in some not too distant tomorrow, with a cosmic past tense, 'We have overcome! We have overcome! Deep in my heart, I did believe we would overcome.'" There are lessons that can be learned n Dr. King's analysis and faith, in his life, hope, and commitment. In Letter from a Birmingham Jail, Dr. King addressed white clergy who were critical of the civil rights campaign in their Alabama city. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the SCLC were accused of being outsiders disrupting peaceful local accommodations. King responded, "I am in Birmingham because injustice is here . . . Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. Never again can we afford to live with the narrow, provincial 'outside agitator' idea. Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds." In this case I expand on Dr. King, in fact, I think he would as well. Anyone who lives on this planet can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds. Birmingham's white clergy deplored the demonstrations taking place in their city. Dr. King's response was that "your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations . . . It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative." Dr. King responded by explaining his strategy for promoting progressive change and social justice. "Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such a tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue. It seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored. My citing the creation of tension as part of the work of the nonviolent resister may sound rather shocking. But I must confess that I am not afraid of the word 'tension.' I have earnestly opposed violent tension, but there is a type of constructive, nonviolent tension which is necessary for growth." The words and actions of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. continue to offer vital lessons for social movements. We are not outside agitators. We must address underlying causes, not just symptoms. Our job as organizers is to promote action that precipitates crises. And we must always remember, "freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed." There is one last lesson that is fundamental to sustained struggle for progressive social change. The struggle ages and dies unless each generation prepares a new generation to be activists. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a teacher as well as a minister and an activist. At Birmingham, in Selma, young people were at the forefront of the struggle, learning to be activists in their own right. In Birmingham, thousands of young people joined the Children's Crusade. King told participants "What you do this day will have an impact on children yet unborn" and parents "Don't worry about your children; they are going to be alright. Don't hold them back if they want to go to jail, for they are not only doing a job for themselves, but for all of America and for all of mankind." During the Civil Rights Movement college students held sit-ins, road busses, taught literacy classes, and conducted voter registration drives. There is much to be hopeful for on the progressive left today despite the Trump ascendency. The Black Lives Matter movement continues to grow. The Bernie Sanders campaign energized a new generation of young people to political action, many who will return to local communities to build grassroots groups and where they will influence political decision-making. Globalization and technology have transformed how people live all over the world, ending isolation, and creating the potential multi-national political action across old boundaries. The environmental movement is global and should form the basis for expanding international networking. As old and new progressive activists try to figure out where we go from here there will be many opportunities for non-violent civil disobedience challenging imperialistic adventurism and nuclear rearmament, the privatization of schools and social services, environmental destruction in the United States and around the world, the erosion of civil liberties, and increasing economic inequality. I never got to meet or speak with Dr. King but I know he would have been at the front of the line in the next era of discussion, organizing, and protest. Follow Alan Singer on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReecesPieces8 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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16 января, 14:20

The Trump Deficit

It is a post-financial-crisis myth that austerity-minded conservative governments always favor fiscal prudence while redistribution-oriented progressives view large deficits as the world’s biggest free lunch. This simplistic perspective badly misses the true underlying political economy of deficits.

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16 января, 14:14

Сегодня в США отмечается День Мартина Лютера Кинга

В понедельник, 16 января, в Соединенных Штатах Америки выходной день. Сегодня в стране отмечается День Мартина Лютера Кинга, торги проводиться не будут, статистика не публикуется. В календаре корпоративных отчетностей значится компания Progress Software, которая представит свои финансовые результаты рано утром 17 января.

16 января, 13:45

Newell Strengthens Portfolio, Agrees to Sell Rubbermaid Brand

Newell Brands Inc. (NWL) in a bid to further simplify and strengthen its portfolio, recently entered into a deal to sell the Rubbermaid consumer storage totes business and also put up a couple of more businesses for sale.

16 января, 12:09

Why Did Conservation Investors Leave $3 Billion On the Table Last Year?

This story is cross-posted on Ecosystem Marketplace. Five years ago, Prisca Mayende's four-acre farm looked just like those around her: treeless and flat, it baked in the sun, lay fallow for periods, and lived on expensive fertilizers. Today, it stands out like an oasis. Trees are everywhere - some in rows separating patches of corn and sorghum, others in clusters, and all pulling carbon out of the atmosphere, converting it to wood and infusing it into the soil. Many are "fixing" nitrogen into the soil as well, providing fertilizer for the crops that are thriving in this once-patchy plot. The temperature is noticeably cooler on her farm than on those around her; the trees provide just enough shade to protect delicate crops and hold moisture. Plump mangoes dangle from some of them; healthy bananas curl up from others; and all sprout thick leaves that she uses as fodder for the dairy cow she purchased with extra income from the increased yields. A teacher by training, she even took a patch of land out of production and built a small grammar school on it. As part of the curriculum, every pupil plants one tree and watches it grow as they progress in learning. When parents drop their children off, they often ask Mayende how she achieved so much on so little, and she directs them to an environmental NGO called VI Agroforestry, which has been teaching these farming methods - called "agroforestry" - since the early 1980s. Prisca Mayende gathers fodder on her tree-dense farm Like most NGOs, VI Agroforestry's impact is limited by the generosity of its donors, so in 2010 it started experimenting with carbon markets to see if it could expand its operations by generating carbon offsets through climate-safe agriculture, with the income mostly being divided among farmers. The experiment worked, in that it allowed VI Agroforestry to reach more farmers like Mayende, but the revenue-sharing part wasn't the hit they hoped for. "The yields are what I care for," says Mayende. "The little carbon bonus was nice, but it's not why I do this." Those little "carbon bonuses", however, add up - and caught the attention of the Livelihoods Funds, which invest money for food giants like Mars, Danone, and others. Livelihoods isn't a philanthropic endeavor: it's a bona fide impact investor that provides upfront financing to NGOs that help small farmers, and it expects to make its money back and then some by selling carbon offsets. As an impact investor, it aims to do well by doing good, so it only invests in projects that generate verifiable environmental benefits. That means its portfolio is comprised of "conservation investments", as are those of more and more of its peers, according to "State of Private Investment in Conservation 2016: A Landscape Assessment of an Emerging Market", which was published this week by Forest Trends' Ecosystem Marketplace. Want to learn more about Prisca Mayende and her involvement in the Livelihoods Funds? Then check out "Of Milk And Money: How Agroforestry Is Reshaping The Kenyan Countryside", which I posted last year as the first in a series to be unfolding throughout 2017. It's accompanied by the Bionic Planet podcast series "The CEO and the Subsistence Farmer", which you can access via iTunes, TuneIn, or wherever you access podcasts - or click below to hear the first installment on this device: Billions Invested; Billions Neglected Based on a survey of impact investors, the report shows that at least $8.2 billion in private-sector money flowed into conservation investments from 2004 through 2015. Nearly a quarter of that finance - $2.0 billion - came in 2015. The pot of money is growing, but investors also said they left $3.1 billion waiting in the wings - and that's enough to launch 30 Livelihoods Funds or help tens of millions of farmers like Mayende. Yet it's just sitting there, and not for lack of investment opportunities. All around the world, for example, environmental entrepreneurs are planting trees or saving endangered forest to generate carbon offsets - a process that requires rigorous verification and validation of the environmental benefits. They often work by promoting exactly the kinds of sustainable practices that Mayende is implementing, and they deliver results in part by making it possible for farmers to earn enough from their own land that they don't have to chop forests for wood or fodder. Last year's annual State of Forest Carbon Finance report showed that such projects now cover at least 28 million hectares - an area slightly larger than Burkina Faso - but it also showed that offsets representing 80 million tonnes of carbon dioxide went either unsold or undeveloped. That means project developers did all the hard work but decided prices were too low to bring their offsets to market - at least for now. "It all goes back to demand," says Kelley Hamrick, who authored the report. "While some investors are willing to risk high market volatility and invest in carbon offsetting, the majority won't until they see clear demand signals." What Are They Investing in? The report focuses on investments that are "intended to return principal or generate profit while also resulting in a positive impact on natural resources and ecosystems," and it explicitly adds that "conservation impacts must be the intended motivation for making the investment; they cannot be simply a by-product of an investment made solely for financial return." By that definition, forest-carbon projects are a no-brainer, while sustainable agriculture could be in a grey area. Nonetheless, of the $8.2 billion that did get invested, $6.5 billion went to food and fiber - primarily sustainable farming and forestry - with the rest going into habitat conservation and water trading programs, which are explicit "payments for ecosystem services" (forest carbon falls under habitat conservation). When asked about that undeployed $3.1 billion, respondents didn't say which projects they'd reviewed and rejected, but simply that the available projects didn't meet their criteria. So, what are those criteria? Function and Familiarity The most important criteria may be more psychological than logical: investors - like all people - tend to stick with what they know. "Private investors viewed agriculture and forestry as asset classes long before 'sustainability' entered investors' vocabularies," the report says - although later it adds that "environmental credit investments...entail greater risk for various reasons including the influence of public policy on the long-term viability of environmental markets." Project developers can certainly attest to the risk, but most aren't giving up. Indeed, they're holding the offsets they've generated because they believe prices will rise - and with good reason. To begin with, forest carbon is a pillar of the Paris Climate Agreement, which will proceed even if the United States bails out, and the US state of California has shown that demand can ratchet up quickly when a government shows it's serious about climate action. Respondents identified a 5-10% sweet spot for returns on investment, and that's more than achievable - especially if the carbon offsets are embedded in a larger agriculture project, as they usually are. Most forest-carbon projects - especially those that save endangered forests (called "REDD+") - work by helping farmers boost yields so they don't have to chop trees, but most of the sustainable farming and forestry initiatives identified in the survey work by purchasing land and managing it sustainably. The Livelihoods Funds buck that trend, because they explicitly don't buy land, but instead work with hundreds of thousands of small, independent farmers, and they're not alone. Althelia Ecosphere follows a similar model, and many REDD project developers - perhaps most of them - don't take ownership of the land, but rather work with farmers or indigenous people to manage their land more sustainably. Carbon finance, in other words, is increasingly blended with sustainable agriculture initiatives - and it could help investors address another shortfall identified in the report: namely, the inability to quantify the environmental impacts they're aiming to deliver. Layering in carbon, it turns out, means adopting rigorous and time-tested verification and validation of all environmental benefits - which Mayende says helped her boost her yields. "To get the carbon bonus, I had to keep better records," she says. "That made me a better farmer, and that meant more income, which enabled me to build all that you see her." And that, in the end, is language all investors understand. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 января, 12:00

U.S. Ranks 23rd Out of 30 Developed Countries for Inequality

A comprehensive index from the World Economic Forum finds that for such a rich country, America isn't doing all that well at creating prosperity.

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16 января, 09:20

Barack Obama's race legacy: Progressive or divisive?

The BBC's Aleem Maqbool reports on the polarised perspectives over Obama's race legacy.

16 января, 09:00

Progressing up the mountain of LNG

Only 30% of the mountain of new LNG supply has so far been commissioned. LNG market evolution from 2017-20 will focus on how the remaining 70% is absorbed.

16 января, 06:52

China IPO normalization good for real economy: experts

THE normalization of initial public offerings (IPOs) in China could help raise the financing efficiency of companies and direct more capital into the real economy, experts have said. Since an IPO suspension

16 января, 06:13

HIGHER EDUCATION BUBBLE UPDATE: Old white dons ‘unable to teach black students.’ Black stude…

HIGHER EDUCATION BUBBLE UPDATE: Old white dons ‘unable to teach black students.’ Black students’ progress is being stalled by university tutors who are “60-year-old white men” and “potentially racist”, according to students at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas) in London. In a report called Degrees of Racism, the student union demands that […]

16 января, 04:48

Bernard Tomic beats Thomaz Bellucci in the Australian Open first round – live!

Live updates from the match on Margaret Court ArenaEmail Mike your thoughts or tweet him at @mike_hytner 4.04am GMT And in other good news for Australia, young gun Alex De Minaur has won his first-round encounter with Gerald Melzer in five sets. A stunning result for the 17-year-old Sydneysider! 3.57am GMT Here’s Bernie: “Amazing thing to be back. I’m feeling good practising hard doing the right things. When you do the right things, good things happen on the court. Continue reading...

16 января, 02:47

REASON: The Case Against Hamilton: The hit Broadway musical was all that was wrong with 2016, and …

REASON: The Case Against Hamilton: The hit Broadway musical was all that was wrong with 2016, and will likely be wrong with 2017, too. On first take, I thought it sounded a bit like a University of Iowa freshman—the kind who only listens to “real hip-hop”—attempting his first mixtape. One of my Twitter followers corrected […]

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16 января, 01:07

6 Design Trends To Watch in 2017

In recent years, design has progressively gone from minimal to completely flat; and for some, this style doesn’t represent an accurate message. Illustration by Propoint designer Monica S. Users are being drawn to design that seems “real”, whether real means VR and AR apps that almost feel lifelike or packaging that showcases [...]

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16 января, 00:12

Сегодня в США отмечается День Мартина Лютера Кинга

В понедельник, 16 января, в Соединенных Штатах Америки выходной день. Сегодня в стране отмечается День Мартина Лютера Кинга, торги проводиться не будут, статистика не публикуется. В календаре корпоративных отчетностей значится компания Progress Software, которая представит свои финансовые результаты рано утром 17 января.

15 января, 23:54

Democrats Lead Nationwide Day Of Rallies In Defense Of Obamacare

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act gathered to protest the health care law’s repeal in rallies across the country on Sunday. The demonstrations were in response to an appeal by Democratic leaders in Congress for a day of action against ACA repeal, the defunding of Planned Parenthood and other policies promoted by the incoming Donald Trump administration. Perhaps the highest-profile gathering was a rally at Macomb County Community College in Warren, Michigan, that drew thousands of people. Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Gary Peters (D-Mich.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and several other members of Congress addressed the large crowd that had waited in long lines in below-freezing weather to attend the event. Many who have received health insurance thanks to the ACA shared their emotional stories as well. When Sanders finally took the stage after his colleagues, the roar of the audience and chants of “Bernie, Bernie Bernie” made it clear that for many in the crowd, the Vermont senator was the main attraction. Sanders’ political action nonprofit, “Our Revolution,” live-streamed the event on YouTube and Facebook. “This is the wealthiest country in the history of the world,” Sanders said. “It is time we got our national priorities right. The United States today and I hope everybody in America understands it: We are the only major country on Earth not to guarantee health care to all people as a right!” True to his democratic socialist form, Sanders, who won an upset victory against Hillary Clinton in the Great Lakes State presidential primary, went beyond defending the ACA. “So our job today is to defend the Affordable Care Act. Our job tomorrow is to create a Medicare-for-all, single-payer system,” he exhorted the crowd. There were some 70 similar rallies across the country, according to Sanders. Photos on social media show significant crowds in Portland, Maine; Richmond, Virginia; Tampa, Florida; Boston, New York City and many other metropolises. NYC ACA rally. Couple thousand people according to attending police. Where is everyone???? pic.twitter.com/4NXUy5M2GO— Katy Keiffer (@kcorrigank) January 15, 2017 Here taking #OurFirstStand with my fellow Tampa citizens fighting for the 1.7M Floridians insured thanks to #ACA #savehealthcare pic.twitter.com/ETEATQCJeJ— Sofía Aluma (@sofialuma) January 15, 2017 Burlington High School auditorium is PACKED for #OurFirstStand Rally with @RightsVT @OurRevolution @ppnne & many others! #vtpoli pic.twitter.com/P5iptkhgAT— Dustin Tanner (@dtanner2194) January 15, 2017 The cold can't stop #OurFirstStand in Syracuse, NY. pic.twitter.com/vDFOtfiaqW— Zachary Olsavicky (@zolsavicky) January 15, 2017 YUGE crowd in Portland, Maine at the #Medicare4All rally today. Crowd is chanting "I have a Dream! Universal healthcare!" #OurFirstStand pic.twitter.com/SXKZe8d7av— NationalNursesUnited (@NationalNurses) January 15, 2017 Huge crowd in #Boston for rally against #ACARepeal, in support of #Obamacare with @SenWarren @EdMarkey @marty_walsh #bospoli #mapoli pic.twitter.com/f47QaRtl9Y— Joyce Linehan (@ashmont) January 15, 2017 Folks in #RVA are FIRED UP for the #SaveHealthcare rally! pic.twitter.com/XP67VKJDML— Virginia Democrats (@vademocrats) January 15, 2017 Other grassroots efforts suggest that the prospect of the ACA being repealed is finally mobilizing Democrats and their allies to take unified, concerted action. The progressive organizations MoveOn.org, the Working Families Party and People’s Action reported that they were holding 500 “resist Trump” meetings on Sunday. And on Saturday, over 100 people angry about ACA repeal packed Republican Rep. Mike Coffman’s constituent meeting in Aurora, Colorado. It was a scene that resembled past politically effective moments of protest, including the raucous anti-ACA town hall meetings in the summer of 2009. Coffman only let people speak to him in groups of four at a time, then sneaked out a side entrance earlier than the event officially ended. Head over here to learn about protest events scheduled for inauguration day this Friday. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 января, 23:54

Democrats Lead Nationwide Day Of Rallies In Defense Of Obamacare

Supporters of the Affordable Care Act gathered to protest the health care law’s repeal in rallies across the country on Sunday. The demonstrations were in response to an appeal by Democratic leaders in Congress for a day of action against ACA repeal, the defunding of Planned Parenthood and other policies promoted by the incoming Donald Trump administration. Perhaps the highest-profile gathering was a rally at Macomb County Community College in Warren, Michigan, that drew thousands of people. Sens. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Gary Peters (D-Mich.), Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and several other members of Congress addressed the large crowd that had waited in long lines in below-freezing weather to attend the event. Many who have received health insurance thanks to the ACA shared their emotional stories as well. When Sanders finally took the stage after his colleagues, the roar of the audience and chants of “Bernie, Bernie Bernie” made it clear that for many in the crowd, the Vermont senator was the main attraction. Sanders’ political action nonprofit, “Our Revolution,” live-streamed the event on YouTube and Facebook. “This is the wealthiest country in the history of the world,” Sanders said. “It is time we got our national priorities right. The United States today and I hope everybody in America understands it: We are the only major country on Earth not to guarantee health care to all people as a right!” True to his democratic socialist form, Sanders, who won an upset victory against Hillary Clinton in the Great Lakes State presidential primary, went beyond defending the ACA. “So our job today is to defend the Affordable Care Act. Our job tomorrow is to create a Medicare-for-all, single-payer system,” he exhorted the crowd. There were some 70 similar rallies across the country, according to Sanders. Photos on social media show significant crowds in Portland, Maine; Richmond, Virginia; Tampa, Florida; Boston, New York City and many other metropolises. NYC ACA rally. Couple thousand people according to attending police. Where is everyone???? pic.twitter.com/4NXUy5M2GO— Katy Keiffer (@kcorrigank) January 15, 2017 Here taking #OurFirstStand with my fellow Tampa citizens fighting for the 1.7M Floridians insured thanks to #ACA #savehealthcare pic.twitter.com/ETEATQCJeJ— Sofía Aluma (@sofialuma) January 15, 2017 Burlington High School auditorium is PACKED for #OurFirstStand Rally with @RightsVT @OurRevolution @ppnne & many others! #vtpoli pic.twitter.com/P5iptkhgAT— Dustin Tanner (@dtanner2194) January 15, 2017 The cold can't stop #OurFirstStand in Syracuse, NY. pic.twitter.com/vDFOtfiaqW— Zachary Olsavicky (@zolsavicky) January 15, 2017 YUGE crowd in Portland, Maine at the #Medicare4All rally today. Crowd is chanting "I have a Dream! Universal healthcare!" #OurFirstStand pic.twitter.com/SXKZe8d7av— NationalNursesUnited (@NationalNurses) January 15, 2017 Huge crowd in #Boston for rally against #ACARepeal, in support of #Obamacare with @SenWarren @EdMarkey @marty_walsh #bospoli #mapoli pic.twitter.com/f47QaRtl9Y— Joyce Linehan (@ashmont) January 15, 2017 Folks in #RVA are FIRED UP for the #SaveHealthcare rally! pic.twitter.com/XP67VKJDML— Virginia Democrats (@vademocrats) January 15, 2017 Other grassroots efforts suggest that the prospect of the ACA being repealed is finally mobilizing Democrats and their allies to take unified, concerted action. The progressive organizations MoveOn.org, the Working Families Party and People’s Action reported that they were holding 500 “resist Trump” meetings on Sunday. And on Saturday, over 100 people angry about ACA repeal packed Republican Rep. Mike Coffman’s constituent meeting in Aurora, Colorado. It was a scene that resembled past politically effective moments of protest, including the raucous anti-ACA town hall meetings in the summer of 2009. Coffman only let people speak to him in groups of four at a time, then sneaked out a side entrance earlier than the event officially ended. Head over here to learn about protest events scheduled for inauguration day this Friday. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 января, 22:30

Сирия новости 15 января 22.30: в Дамаске продолжаются бои, ВВС Сирии уничтожили штабы ИГ в Хаме

Продолжаются бои между правительственными войсками и боевиками в провинции Дамаск, удары ВВС Сирии уничтожили несколько штабов ИГ* в Хаме.

15 января, 20:00

The Problem With Obama's Faith in White America, Cont'd

Tressie McMillan Cottom’s piece, “The Problem With Obama’s Faith in White America,” got an enormous response…