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10 ноября, 13:02

Biden sees one Democrat who can beat Trump in 2020: Joe Biden

'He’s a great respecter of fate,' said one person close to the former vice president. 'At some point, it may turn into fate and planning.'

09 ноября, 15:23

OBAMA excluded from JURY just in time for PAID speech — RAHM walks out on CHANCE the RAPPER — RAUNER's Southern Illinois BLIND SPOT

By Natasha Korecki ([email protected]; @natashakorecki) and Kristen East ([email protected]; @kristenicoleast)Good Thursday morning, Illinois. THE BUZZ: In the annals of Chicago and Illinois politics, Wednesday’s was one for the books. Former President Barack Obama showed up for jury duty while across the street, hometown hero and national rap star, Chance the Rapper, was addressing Chicago’s city council even as Mayor Rahm Emanuel walked out on him.Down in Springfield, lawmakers were being schooled on sexual harassment policies amid an ever-expanding crisis. After all the hoopla created by Obama’s reporting for his jury call, including a security undertaking, the former president was quickly dismissed from duty. That was an amazingly convenient coincidence since he was booked to keynote a speech downtown that same afternoon.Tribune’s Kim Janssen reports: “The ‘random’ decision to quickly exclude former President Barack Obama from jury duty in Chicago on Wednesday was good news for major Obama Foundation donor Michael Sacks — who’d paid Obama to give a lunchtime keynote speech at a downtown conference organized by his firm GCM Grosvenor. Investment managers and other business world big shots paid up to $850 to attend the conference and for the right to hear the former president give a lunchtime speech as advertised at the Fairmont Chicago Millennium Park Hotel. So it would have been embarrassing, to say the least, if Obama’s highly publicized call for jury service got him stuck across the Loop at the Daley Center.” Story hereHAVE HARLEY, WON’T TRAVEL — “Where’s Gov. Rauner on Cairo housing crisis?” by the Southern's Molly Parker: “Meanwhile, one prominent Illinois political leader has not visited Cairo since HUD announced in April its decision to relocate about 400 people from two derelict public housing complexes that have been deemed beyond repair: Gov. Bruce Rauner. It’s also been difficult for The Southern to get much detailed information about what Rauner’s administration is doing alongside the federal government to assist public housing residents and the city through this housing crisis, or to address the related health and economic issues facing southernmost Illinois. A shortage of affordable housing in Cairo and access to basic amenities and jobs means most residents are relocating to other communities, generally in excess of an hour away.” — The piece points to a litany of state and federal officials who have visited the area since the housing crisis — from HUD Secretary Ben Carson to former state Rep. Christine Radogno. Rauner’s office says he couldn’t get down there because he’s been “tethered to Springfield.’” Say what? As the piece points out, Rauner just traveled to Israel and Asia. And recall Rauner’s big reelection ad features him traveling the state to take on its problems. Why ignore Southern Illinois, a Republican-friendly zone? Does he fear the greeting he’ll receive after signing the controversial HB40, a bill expanding the public funding of abortion? Or is there a blind spot here?Here’s what his office told the Southern: “Asked why Rauner has not been among the many regional and statewide officials to visit the city and meet directly with the residents, Schuh said he's been tethered to Springfield as session ran long this summer, and for the current veto session. ‘Given the distance, I'm not sure he's gotten that far down in Southern Illinois in recent months,’ she said. Since April, when HUD announced the relocation decision, Rauner has traveled on trade and research missions to China, Japan and Israel and announced his 2018 re-election plans.” Story hereWelcome to the POLITICO Illinois Playbook! We welcome your tips, events, announcements. Send to [email protected] or @natashakorecki SUBSCRIBE to Illinois Playbook For more Illinois news visit: http://www.politico.com/news/illinois VETO SESSION— “State agencies now have to provide monthly updates of bills they’ve accumulated,” by Belleville News-Democrat’s Joseph Bustos: “State agencies now will have to report how many bills they accumulate on a more timely basis. The state senate on Wednesday overrode a veto of the Debt Transparency Act in a 52-3 vote. Gov. Bruce Rauner vetoed the measure in August but Comptroller Susana Mendoza pushed for an override, including making visits around the state to newspaper editorial boards in order to gain their support.” Story here— “Veto override requires monthly accounting of Illinois bills,” by AP’s John O’Connor: “Democratic Comptroller Susana Mendoza pushed the plan, arguing it would help her prioritize debt payments as the state faces a $16.7 billion mass of overdue bills. In vetoing it, the Republican governor argued his political rival was trying to ‘micromanage’ his budgeting authority, and he later expressed concern the proposal could ultimately lead to even more spending. … The reporting law updates the current requirement, which calls for state agencies to report annually in October on bills they had on hand as of June 30. Mendoza said that information is critically out of date and monthly data would help her know which bills are coming, which should be paid first and which of 900 state accounts should fund them. The monstrous backlog is one distasteful legacy of the budget standoff, the nation’s longest of any state since at least the Great Depression. It ended in July when Democrats adopted an income-tax increase and annual budget over Rauner’s vetoes.” Story here— “Senate overrides Rauner’s veto of cursive writing bill,” by NBC 5 Chicago’s James Neveau: “Teachers in Illinois will have one more thing to add to their lesson plans in future years, as the Illinois Senate has overridden Governor Bruce Rauner’s veto of a bill mandating that students learn how to write in cursive. The measure, which Rauner vetoed in September, passed overwhelmingly in the Senate on Wednesday by a 42-12 margin. The Illinois House had already overridden Rauner’s veto in October, meaning that the measure will now come into force.” Story here— “Schoenburg: Lawmaker takes issue with Rauner’s $125K ‘digital director’ hire,” by the State Journal-Register’s Bernard Schoenburg: “A state legislator is taking issue with Gov. Bruce Rauner hiring a ‘digital director’ for $125,000 a year, with the salary, according to state records, coming from the mental health budget. But Patty Schuh, spokeswoman for the governor, said this week that while governor’s employees’ works benefits all agencies, it was not intended that James Vetrano be coded under a mental health line in the Department of Human Services, and he would be moved to a more appropriate designation, possibly outside that agency budget. Comptroller’s records say Vetrano started Oct. 10.” Story here— “Illinois gets bond proceeds, transparency act for bill backlog,” by Reuters: “Illinois began tackling its $16.7 billion backlog of unpaid bills on Wednesday as it received recent bond sale proceeds and enacted a law requiring more frequent spending reports by state agencies. In October, Illinois sold $6 billion of general obligation bonds to help pay off the backlog. State Comptroller Susana Mendoza said her office would prioritize the payment of bills eligible for federal matching funds in order to maximize revenue. ‘These payments will effectively stop the bleeding of late payment interest penalties on this portion of the backlog,’ Mendoza, a Democrat, said in a statement. ‘There is still a long, hard road ahead of us, but this is a vital first step toward smart planning for FY 2019 and beyond.’ The comptroller’s office has estimated that the state owes an additional $900 million to vendors and service providers for late payment penalties of as high as 12 percent annually.” Story hereDepartment of Endorsements: State Sen. Andy Manar BACKS PRITZKER — Manar held a joint news conference to announce his endorsement: “It’s time for a leader with a track record of helping regular families and a clear vision to get Illinois headed in the right direction,” Manar said in a statement. ... “in an issue close to my heart, he has helped our school children, creating new early childhood education opportunities and helping expand the state’s school breakfast program to over 175,000 students in at-risk districts in rural and urban areas. I look forward to working with him to build a stronger future in Illinois for our children and generations to come.”Northside Democracy for America BACKS BISS — “Daniel Biss has been a champion for progressive issues for more than a decade, first as a community organizer, then as a lawmaker. Daniel is the only candidate in this race with a record of passing laws that solve the problems facing our state. NDFA has a commitment to electing socially progressive, fiscally responsible, ethically committed Democrats, and we took this endorsement seriously, hearing from five major Democratic candidates for governor. Our members proudly voted to endorse Daniel Biss for governor," said Melissa Lindberg and Carl Nyberg, co-chairs of Northside DFA.” STATE — “Fact-check: Mike Madigan and the definition of ‘function,’” by Better Government Association’s Matt Dietrich: “Madigan said the Illinois Legislative Ethics Commission continued to function for nearly three years while the Office of Legislative Inspector General was vacant. To the extent that the eight-member commission continued to schedule monthly meetings and saw to internal matters, it did ‘continue to function.’ This included its executive director receiving numerous reports of alleged ethics violations. But without an inspector general, it could not function in its capacity to take substantive action on alleged ethics violations. This is why Denise Rotheimer’s complaint saw no action until she went public with her allegations in a House committee hearing. There’s an element of truth in Madigan’s statement but there’s a lot more that’s missing.” Story here— “How governments support higher education through the tax code,” by Pew Charitable Trusts: “To maximize the impact of higher education investments and achieve desired policy goals, policymakers should have knowledge of the full range of assistance provided to institutions and students. This means having an understanding of the billions of dollars made available through spending programs and the tax code. However, too frequently these two types of support are not considered in tandem, and most states lack the cost estimates they would need to determine how tax provisions for higher education compare in size to other postsecondary investments. The federal government and the states each invested more than $70 billion in higher education-related spending programs, excluding loans, in academic year 2014, the latest year for which data are available.” Story here— “Slusher: Without respect, there’s no ‘more perfect union,’” by The Daily Herald’s Jim Slusher: “If I could one day have some personal impact on the world, it would not be to advance a social or political issue, even though, like anyone, I feel strongly about certain issues. It would be to advance the level of respect and self-control we all employ when we promote the social and political ideals we hold, whatever they may be. Civility in public discourse is hardly a novel topic these days, but two separate encounters this week emphasized what a challenge we face, and, frankly, left me more than a little discouraged.” Story here— “With Madigan leaving office, will public records access suffer?” by The Daily Herald’s Jake Griffin: “When a government denies access to records you want to see or closes a meeting you believe should be open to the public, what's your recourse? In 4,720 instances last year, the next stop was the office of the public access counselor, run by Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan, where 14 lawyers judge whether public officials are meeting transparency laws and can nudge them to grant access, giving members of the public an alternative to filing suit.” Story hereCook County — “Defenders sue Cook County over sex abuse from inmates,” by Chicago Daily Law Bulletin’s David Thomas: “Six Cook County Public Defender employees on Wednesday filed a federal lawsuit against their employer and the Cook County Sheriff’s Office for not cracking down on the allegedly rampant sexual abuse they experience from the inmates in the county jail. The lawsuit filed by Assistant Public Defenders Crystal Brown, Saran Crayton, Samantha Slonim, Celeste Addyman, Erika Knierim and Julie Hull says they — and others — frequently encounter Cook County Jail detainees who ‘have repeatedly exposed their penises, masturbated, and engaged in other acts of sex-based aggression, verbal threats and harassment, and on an almost daily basis.’” Story here CHICAGO— “Rap from Chance can’t stop land sale for new police and fire academy,” by Chicago Sun-Times’ Fran Spielman: “Chance the Rapper accused the City Council Wednesday of having misplaced priorities, but the celebrity scolding did not stop aldermen from authorizing a $9.6 million land sale that will pave the way for construction of a $95 million public-safety training campus on the West Side. ‘What is y’all doing?,’ Chancelor Bennett asked aldermen during a raucous public participation session. ‘Financially, this proposed plan doesn’t make sense. We don’t have $95 million. They’re just asking for $10 million today to purchase the land. But we don’t have the rest of the money to do it, so why let them go ahead with this right now? There’s a lot of different services that need to be funded.’ Chance entered the council chambers surrounded by an entourage of assistants.” Story here— Bill Ruthhart on Twitter: “[email protected] says Chicago should be spending millions on underfunded schools, not on a new $95M police academy that he says the city can’t afford. Mayor Rahm Emanuel left the chamber before his remarks.” Video— “Obama does the unthinkable at Daley Center: Makes jury duty a thrill,” by Chicago Tribune’s Steve Schmadeke and Elvia Malagon: “He won two presidential elections and a Nobel Peace Prize, but on Wednesday the former leader of the free world performed the unthinkable — he made Cook County jury duty exciting. … The Obamas own a home in the South Side’s Kenwood neighborhood — from which Obama was followed by a media scrum to the Daley Center on Wednesday –- as well as a residence in Washington, D.C. His appearance at the Daley Center came as another Chicago celebrity, Chance the Rapper, testified across the street at a City Hall budget hearing, denouncing the city’s plans to build a new $95 million police academy.” Story here— “City selling $1 vacant lots to develop affordable housing,” by Chicago Tribune’s Corilyn Shropshire: “A new city program approved Wednesday by the Chicago City Council will offer vacant lots to affordable housing developers for $1 each. Developers can purchase eight to 20 city-owned lots, each with a maximum appraised value of $125,000, to build single-family and two-flat homes in neighborhoods primarily on the South and West sides, according to a news release from Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s office.” Story here— “Aldermen want to fine pedestrians up to $500 for ‘distracted walking,’” by Chicago Sun-Times’ Fran Spielman: “How many times have you crossed the street, only to bump into someone who has their face buried in their cellphone? It won’t happen much longer if two of Chicago’s most powerful aldermen have anything to say about it. Finance Committee Chairman Edward Burke (14th) and Transportation Committee Chairman Anthony Beale (9th) want to discourage “distracted walking” behavior by slapping those pedestrians with hefty fines. A first offense would cost you $90. The fine for repeated offenses would rise to a whopping $500.” Story hereAROUND THE COLLARS — “Rockford Police release processional route for Jaimie Cox funeral,” by The Rock River Times: “The Rockford Police Department, on Tuesday, announced the processional route for the funeral of Officer Jaimie Cox. Visitation for is 3-9 p.m., Friday, Nov. 10, at First Free Rockford, 2223 N. Mulford Road. The law enforcement walk-through is scheduled for 6 p.m. Cox’s funeral will be at 10 a.m., Saturday, at the church. … Cox’s visitation and funeral are open to the public. Officer Jaimie Cox, 30, died Sunday, Nov. 5, after an altercation during a traffic stop near Rockford University. He is only the seventh Rockford Police officer to die in the line of duty.” Story hereDIS & DATSay it isn’t so! — “Chicago Brauhaus closing in December, says owner,” by Chicago Tribune’s Grace Wong: “After more than five decades in Lincoln Square, Chicago Brauhaus is closing Dec. 11, according to a note posted by a user on LTH Forum. This is only eight months after co-owner Harry Kempf told the Chicago Tribune that the German restaurant and beer hall was going to stay open. ‘Nothing is set until I decide,’ Kempf said at the time.” Story hereNATION (and beyond)— “Venezuelan president eats empanada on live TV while addressing starving nation,” by Newsweek’s Christal Hayes: Story here— Listen: “Can they call it a comeback?” by WAMU 88.5’s 1A: “After winning some hard fought victories in Virginia, New Jersey and elsewhere, Democrats may be feeling renewed strength. But what will it take to maintain this energy until future elections?” Story here— “Will Trump and Xi ‘solve’ North Korea?” by Graham Allison for POLITICO Magazine: Story here— “Johnstown never believed Trump would help. They still love him anyway,” by POLITICO Magazine’s Michael Kruse: Story here— “A year after Trump, women and minorities give groundbreaking wins to Democrats,” by The New York Times’ Michael Tackett, Trip Gabriel and John Eligon: Story here— “Tee times, smoothie diets, and fat paychecks: A look inside post-Trump life,” by POLITICO’s Josh Dawsey and Matthew Nussbaum: Story hereTODAY — In Springfield: State Senators Heather Steans (D-Chicago), Karen McConnaughay (R-St. Charles), Toi Hutchinson (D-Chicago Heights) and other women currently serving in the Illinois Senate will speak with reporters about plans for a new initiative to promote legislation that addresses women’s issues. WHERE’S RAHM? tours soon-to-open Chicago Blackhawks training facility and community center.WHERE’S RAUNER? attends Illinois National Guard deployment in Springfield. Want to make an impact? POLITICO Illinois has a variety of solutions available for partners looking to reach and activate the most influential people in the Land of Lincoln. Have a petition you want signed? A cause you’re promoting? Seeking to increase brand awareness amongst this key audience? Share your message with our influential readers to foster engagement and drive action. Contact Jesse Shapiro to find out how: [[email protected]] [email protected] SUBSCRIBE to the Playbook family: POLITICO Playbook http://politi.co/2lQswbh ...New York Playbook http://politi.co/1ON8bqW … Florida Playbook http://politi.co/1OypFe9 ... New Jersey Playbook http://politi.co/1HLKltF ...Massachusetts Playbook http://politi.co/1Nhtq5v … Illinois Playbook http://politi.co/1N7u5sb ... California Playbook http://politi.co/2bLvcPl ... 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09 ноября, 00:00

How to Win Like Bill Clinton

Rahm Emanuel & Bruce Reed, Washington PostWhen Bill Clinton won the White House 25 years ago this month, he rescued his party from its worst electoral drought in more than a century. Today, as Democrats wonder how we lost the heartland and Republicans wonder how their base lost its mind, both sides could look to Clinton’s 1992 playbook for clues on how to revive a flagging party’s fortunes.

02 ноября, 12:19

Rod Blagojevich Is Asking for Mercy. His Case Is Stronger Than You Might Think.

The Illinois governor seemed like the ultimate political crook. But some legal experts are not so sure anymore.

25 октября, 09:00

Как и кто выдвигали Обаму

Кто обеспечил путь Обамы в политические звёзды? Является ли Барак Обама продуктом большого социалистического заговора, созданного для разрушения принципов, заложенных Отцами-Основателями, оплачиваемого и организованного финансистами? Ответ на этот вопрос решительное «да». Чтобы разобраться в этой смахивающей на лабиринт сети, нужно начать с самого верха, с бизнесмена Джорджа Сороса (George Soros) и его связей с самой […]

14 октября, 01:16

Judge won't limit order blocking Trump anti-sanctuary policy

The federal court turns down a Justice Department request to prevent a Chicago ruling from applying nationwide.

Выбор редакции
12 октября, 16:00

Chicago Considers 'Good Food' Standards But Not Taxpayer Expense

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants the city to follow a "Good Food" policy when purchasing food. Such a policy will cost taxpayers money without delivering much in the way of benefits for its residents.

06 октября, 00:22

How Will Democrats Respond to the Harvey Weinstein Allegations?

The film mogul has been a major donor and fundraiser for Democratic causes and candidates, including Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and several possible 2020 candidates.

28 сентября, 23:46

Illinois governor signs bill expanding public funding for abortion

CHICAGO -- Republican Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner announced Thursday he plans to sign a bill that will expand the public funding of abortion in Illinois, a decision that already has conservatives sounding the death knell for his reelection campaign.The move immediately increases the chances that the first-term governor will get a primary challenge and raises doubts over whether he can motivate a Republican base in a general election. “Today, I am announcing that I am signing House Bill 40,” Rauner said at a news conference. “I am personally pro-choice, I always have been. I made no qualms about that when I was elected governor. I have not and never will change my views. I personally believe that a woman must have the right to decide what goes on in her own body.”The bill would expand public funding of abortion to include Medicaid recipients and to those who are covered under state health care plans.Rauner said for months he’s tried finding common ground between two impassioned sides of the argument, but ultimately he could not. Advocates for the bill cheered, and both Rauner and his wife, Diana -- a driving force behind his decision – believe politically the move is necessary in a blue state. But Rauner had told Republican lawmakers in April that he would veto the measure, calling it too "divisive."“He has no hope. If he is the ILGOP nominee, the IL GOP is effectively conceding the Governor’s race to whichever Leftist of privilege the Dems nominate,” conservative political operative and radio host Dan Proft said over text message. “Apparently he either thinks running as Jan Schakowsky [a liberal Chicago congresswoman] is his path to victory or he is not running again.”

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26 сентября, 00:45

RAHM EMANUEL’S CHICAGO: Fired Chicago Police Superintendent Blasts Obama, Lynch. He said that pol…

RAHM EMANUEL’S CHICAGO: Fired Chicago Police Superintendent Blasts Obama, Lynch. He said that politicians and political leaders have characterized data-driven policing as systemic racism, but according to McCarthy, the issue is a flawed economic system that disenfranchises African-American communities. Police, he said, have been repeatedly used as the poster child for questionable interactions involving African-Americans […]

22 сентября, 01:14

Group Therapy Is Saving Lives in Chicago

Teaching kids to think slowly interrupts the cycle of violence that has bedeviled one of America’s most violent cities.

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20 сентября, 01:22

With Foxconn Coming, Wisconsin Gov. Walker Isn't Eager To Share Economic Bounty With Illinois

llinoisans had better hope that Gov. Bruce Rauner and Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel can land Amazon's "HQ2" because Scott Walker isn't promising them a windfall from the Foxconn project locating to the north in Wisconsin.

16 сентября, 01:41

Federal Court Blocks Trump's Crackdown on Sanctuary Cities

A judge in Illinois temporarily put the initiative on hold while legal proceedings continue.

16 сентября, 00:22

Judge blocks Justice Department move against sanctuary cities

Chicago suit leads to nationwide order against new rules for public-safety grants

29 июля, 00:21

Trump's Vision of Lawless Order

The president suggests he sees the rule of law as an impediment to getting tough on crime.

28 июля, 21:08

Trump on health care: 'Let Obamacare implode,' then 'we'll get it done'

The president made his first public comments about the failed 'skinny' repeal in a speech otherwise devoted to crime and immigration.

24 июля, 12:07

Blue Dogs eye comeback in 2018

The caucus of conservative House Democrats thinks Trump’s election can fuel their resurgence.

Выбор редакции
17 июля, 14:38

SCENES FROM RAHM EMANUEL’S CHICAGO: 30 people shot, 3 fatally, in 18 hours in Chicago….

SCENES FROM RAHM EMANUEL’S CHICAGO: 30 people shot, 3 fatally, in 18 hours in Chicago.

12 июля, 21:00

Illinois governor cleans house after budget showdown

Republican Bruce Rauner, the most politically vulnerable governor in the nation, fires top staffers in office shake-up.

09 июля, 05:42

WHY ARE DEMOCRAT-MONOPOLY CITIES SUCH CESSPITS OF VIOLENCE? A longtime Insta-reader from Chicago exp…

WHY ARE DEMOCRAT-MONOPOLY CITIES SUCH CESSPITS OF VIOLENCE? A longtime Insta-reader from Chicago explains one huge reason why: As you are aware, the murder rate in Chicago soared in 2016 and this year it is well on its way to equal last year’s numbers.  There have been a couple of recent cases where they have […]

21 марта 2016, 13:00

«Черный дом»: фильм о коррупции, запрещенный в США

Фильм «Черный дом», раскрывающий коррупционные схемы Госдепа США и лично Барака Обамы, был запрещен к показу как минимум на территории США. Однако картина все же стала доступна для массовой аудитории. По мнению изначально опубликовавшего его Дмитрия Пучкова, фильм должны посмотреть как за рубежом, так и в России. И для того, чтобы сделать картину более доступной, журнал «Политическая Россия» публикует фильм «Черный дом» с собственным дублированным переводом.