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Рейтинг Doing Business
25 марта, 02:51

Here’s How You’re Being Ripped Off at the Pharmacy

We dig into the dirty little secrets both doctors and pharmacists share to tell you how you're overpaying for drugs -- and what to do about it.

25 марта, 01:04

Weekend Reading: David Frum: Obamacare: The Republican Waterloo

We all remember how seven years ago American Enterprise Institute head Arthur Brooks fired David Frum for saying that Republican root-and-branch opposition to ObamaCare was a mistake. Therefore I take some things in Frum's very good piece today with huge blocks of salt. These include the last paragraph. And I...

24 марта, 23:38

The Republican Waterloo

Conservatives once warned that Obamacare would produce the Democratic Waterloo. Their inability to accept the principle of universal coverage has, instead, led to their own defeat.

24 марта, 18:39

What Exactly Did Paul Manafort Do Wrong?

If the lobbyist’s work did indeed “greatly benefit the Putin Government,” the contract wouldn’t be especially out of the ordinary for an American lobbyist—or for Russia.

24 марта, 18:39

What Exactly Did Paul Manafort Do Wrong?

If the lobbyist’s work did indeed “greatly benefit the Putin Government,” the contract wouldn’t be especially out of the ordinary for an American lobbyist—or for Russia.

24 марта, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Financial Select Sector SPDR

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Financial Select Sector SPDR

24 марта, 01:11

U.S. Banks Stock Outlook - March 2017

U.S. Banks Stock Outlook - March 2017

23 марта, 18:00

Печати больше не обязательны: ВР приняла важный закон для бизнеса

Предполагается, что изменения поднимут Украину в рейтинге Doing Business

23 марта, 07:50

Браверман – малому бизнесу Татарстана: «Все равно держитесь, но деньги есть!»

«Вчера через «Бизнес-инкубатор» было образовано 974 предприятия, сегодня, на половину шестого вечера, их 667», — нахваливал накануне свою машину по написанию бизнес-планов глава корпорации по развитию МСП Александр Браверман. Как узнала корреспондент «БИЗНЕС Online», на заседании комиссии ПФО по улучшению инвестклимата он рассказал, при каких условиях может быть продолжена программа «6,5», а также дал Татарстану многообещающие намеки на победу в конкурсе по созданию лизингового центра.

22 марта, 17:53

Экспорт «софта»: фикция или реальность?

В плохие для России времена софтверная индустрия может стать одной из немногих точек быстрого роста, наряду с вооружением и сельским хозяйством. Что для этого нужно?

21 марта, 19:01

China’s transformation drives global renewal

AFTER years, even decades, of predictable and mostly prosperous development, the world now seems to be in disarray. It almost seems like disorder is the new order — the new normal. Has the world gone

21 марта, 17:05

Russian Hawaii: The attempt at conquest that came to naught

If things had turned out differently 200 years ago, Russians could today be spending their holidays in the Russian Autonomous Republic of Hawaii. While this might sound far-fetched, in fact, in the early 19th century the Russian Empire had a chance to take control of the Hawaiian Islands. In the early 19th century, Russian explorers Ivan Kruzenstern and Yuri Lisyansky landed on the Hawaiian Islands and found many Americans already doing business there. Nevertheless, the Russians approached the Hawaiian king with offers of cooperation and friendship. After several years, however, they hastily left. Why? The two kings At the turn of the18th/19th centuries, the Hawaiian Islands had two kings: Kamehameha the Great, who united the kingdom in 1810 with his capital in Honolulu on the island of Oahu; and Kaumualii, a vassal who ruled over the two smaller islands of Niihau and Kauai. King of Hawaii Island, Kamehameha I (1758-1819) and his warriors, 1819. Engraving by E. Bayard / The Illustrated World, 1880. Source: Getty Images Members of the Russian expedition met with Kamehameha, an avid ship lover who boasted a small fleet of foreign vessels. Kamehameha welcomed the guests heartily and offered to begin trade with Russia’s colonies in Alaska. Since the first Russian visit, however, rumors began spreading among the locals and the Americans living in Hawaii that the Czar was bent on conquering the islands. Enter the German doctor In 1815, King Kaumualii’s soldiers commandeered the Russian merchant ship, Bering, traveling to California with supplies. The first governor of Russia’s colonies in America, Alexander Baranov, sent his envoy, Dr. George Schaffer, to negotiate with Kaumualii. Fort Ross: Russian-American shared history in California Schaffer, a German-born physician in Russian service, had no military, naval or diplomatic education. Perhaps Baranov simply had no one else to send. Schaffer was instructed to meet with Kamehameha, asking him to influence Kaumualii to return the ship. The ultimate goal, however, was not the Bering but instead to establish a way station in Hawaii to accommodate Russian ships carrying furs from Alaska to the booming markets of Canton, China. Also, Schaffer was instructed to negotiate Russia's monopoly in the trade of sandalwood, a very high-priced furniture material. Schaffer brought gifts and a letter from Baranov to Kamehameha. Things started on the wrong foot, however, immediately upon Schaffer’s arrival in Honolulu in late 1815. Influenced by local American merchants, Kamehameha first refused to receive the doctor, and Baranov's letter was returned unopened. Luckily for Schaffer, however, Kamehameha's wife fell ill, and the doctor managed to save her, which won him the king's trust and an allowance to buy plots of land to build factories. This, however, quickly earned him the reputation as a Russian spy, and living in Kamehameha's lands became more dangerous. Georg Anton Schäffer. Source: Archive Photo In May 1816, Schaffer left Oahu Island and set sail to Kauai, home of King Kaumualii. Upon Schaffer’s arrival, the second king decided to swear allegiance to Russian Emperor Alexander I, hoping that the distant empire would help him overthrow his local lord, King Kamehameha. Kaumualii also promised Russia the long-desired sandalwood monopoly. It seemed Schaffer had finally reached his ultimate goal. The Americans took action, however. A conquest that never was During his mission Schaffer signed a secret agreement with Kaumualii, upon which the king was obliged to assign 500 troops to assist Schaffer in the conquest of Kamehameha's land. Blinded by his earlier success, Schaffer sent the documents Kaumualii signed to St. Petersburg and to Baranov, and started buying warships for Kaumualii at the expense of the Russian-American company in Alaska. He also built three fortresses, naming them after Alexander I, his wife Elizabeth and Russian Marshal Barclay de Tolly. He also named one of Kauai’s valleys after himself. Two men paddle a small open boat in a pond in front of a coconut grove. Waikiki, Hawaii, ca. 1890. Source: Getty Images This haphazard effort at conquest, however, was soon put to an end by American merchants and sailors. Quickly they bought up all sandalwood, food supplies and salt in Kamehameha’s kingdom, leaving the Russians starving and without any goods to trade. Finally, the Americans in Russian service started defecting and moving to their compatriots' side. In 1817, Schaffer was forced to leave Hawaii. Cool reception in St. Petersburg A month after Schaffer left Hawaii his report reached Tsar Alexander I. While the chance of conquering Hawaii might have seemed attractive, Alexander firmly refused Schaffer’s offer. How would the Russian Empire look, condemning Napoleon's recent territorial acquisitions, but at the same time acquiring a colony in the Pacific? Moreover, Alexander didn't want the Hawaiian issue to spoil relations between Russia and its close partner, the United States. Hawaii remained an independent international trading port for many more decades, and the Russians, just like other countries, continued to trade there. Today, Fort Elizabeth, the only reminder of Schaffer’s ill-fated conquest, is a historical park. Ruins of the Russian Fort Elizabeth at Hawaii, Kauai island. Source: Legion Media Russian Fort Elizabeth Fort Elizabeth’s ramparts were taken down in 1862, long after Russia’s presence in Hawaii came to an end, but the site is now a National Historic Landmark. While the fort itself is no longer intact, visitors can see its foundation - an irregular octagon guarding the entrance into Kauai via the waterway. With outer rock walls built from ancient heiau (Hawaiian temples), the fort once included residences, a chapel, gardens, a trading center and the main fort building. Visitors can explore what’s left via a self-guided tour.   Why did Russia sell Alaska to the United States?

21 марта, 14:27

When You Agree to a Networking Meeting But Don’t Know What You’re Going to Talk About

For some networking meetings, the agenda is obvious: Your companies are considering doing business together, or you’re looking for a job and this person might help you get one. But many professionals find themselves in networking meetings where the goals are murkier. Perhaps a friend thought you’d hit it off with someone and introduced you, or you met the person briefly at an event and they followed up for indeterminate reasons. In some cases, you’ll decline the invitation (see “5 Ways to Say No to a Networking Request” for my tips on how to do it). But if the connection seems promising, you may decide to say yes and see where it leads. Here are four ways to ensure your networking meeting is productive and meaningful, even if the agenda is amorphous. First, it’s important to be clear on your reasons for accepting the meeting. It may be to do a favor — say, a friend asks you to advise his sister-in-law on career opportunities. You might have informational goals (the person works in a field you’d like to learn more about), social goals (you think they could become an interesting friend), or long-term business goals (there’s a possibility you might collaborate someday, but you’re not sure when or how). The possibility of making a friend or learning more about artificial intelligence isn’t an “agenda,” per se, but it can help you keep in mind why you agreed to the meeting and help you steer the conversation accordingly. It will help the meeting feel like a win, instead of a waste of time. Next, align your personal goals with the type and duration of your meeting. If you’re doing a favor for a friend, spending several hours dining one-on-one with your contact is going above and beyond; a phone call would likely suffice. Alternately, if you think the person could become a personal friend, you may want to invite them to a more relaxed event, where you can get to know them better. Just this week, when I found myself with an extra ticket to a hockey game, I invited a business colleague with whom I’d spent a lot of group time but hadn’t connected much one-on-one. “Meeting for coffee” has become our professional default, but it doesn’t have to be the only way to get to know someone. Remember that, depending on your preferred level of investment in the relationship, you can suggest a range of options that vary by time and energy investment, including a 30-minute phone call, a 60-minute phone call, a small group gathering (like a lunch or dinner), a large group event (like a cocktail reception), or a coffee or meal for just the two of you. During the meeting, be sure you’re asking the right questions. Even without a formal agenda, it’s important to draw the person out based on your reasons for accepting the invitation. If you’re doing a favor for someone, let them take the lead; you can simply ask, “How can I be most helpful?” If you’re interested in learning from them and have an informational goal, let your curiosity shine and have your questions ready. If your new contact works at NASA, for instance, you could ask her: What’s the hiring process like? What projects are you most excited about and why? What’s a typical day like? How do people get selected as astronauts? What do you think of private companies in the space exploration field? People enjoy being asked about their area of expertise, and if your questions are sufficiently nuanced, you can almost guarantee an interesting encounter. If you’re thinking of someone as a potential friend or long-term business partner, your goal is to get a better feel for chemistry and compatibility. Are they easy to talk to? Does the conversation sustain your interest? Do you get a sense that they’re trustworthy? Competent? Because you’re not planning to rush into a formal relationship, you don’t have to make any snap decisions; the main goal is to start the evaluative process and determine whether you’d like to spend time with them in the future. Finally, too many networking meetings are wasted because they’re treated as one-offs. If there’s no follow-up, even someone with whom you’ve had an in-depth meeting will be quickly forgotten. If you’re meeting with someone purely as a favor, you don’t need to worry about this, because your goal isn’t to establish a relationship with them — it’s to solidify your relationship with your mutual friend. But for anyone else, if you enjoyed their company, it’s useful to create your own follow-up plan. Contact management systems, such as Contactually, can help you stay organized, or you can do it on your own with calendar reminders. During the meeting, strive to learn at least one thing about the person that can serve as a cue to reconnect. For instance, if they love sports, perhaps you can invite them to join you for a game in the future; if they want to meet more people in the consulting industry, you could loop back next month with an offer to join you and a friend who’s a consultant for lunch. Those thoughtful gestures, repeated over time, will make even the most tenuous of initial connections stick. The best networking takes a long-term approach; you can be yourself and get to know others authentically because you’re not fixated on making an immediate “sale.” Agreeing to a networking meeting without a formal agenda may seem like a waste of time, with little ROI. But by using the approach above, you can create your own metrics for success and potentially develop life- and career-changing connections.

Выбор редакции
20 марта, 23:20

Trump used to criticize Obama for golfing. Now the White House is defending his own frequent outings.

A White House spokesman defended Trump's golfing, saying the president has used the outings not just for personal pleasure but to do business for the public.

19 марта, 14:56

A 40-year 'conspiracy' at the VA

The Department of Veterans Affairs built perhaps the most important medical computer system in history. Now it’s about to spend billions to throw it away.

Выбор редакции
18 марта, 20:41

THIS LOOKS SERIOUS: Former Rep. Steve Stockman charged with diverting charitable funds to campaign. …

THIS LOOKS SERIOUS: Former Rep. Steve Stockman charged with diverting charitable funds to campaign. “It is a crime to make a campaign contribution by one person in the name of another, and to make a false statement to the Federal Elections Commission,” according to a sworn statement by FBI Agent Vanessa Walther, which was unsealed […]

18 марта, 06:42

Berkeley Becomes First City To Divest From Border Wall Companies

Berkeley, California, has become the first U.S. city to yank investments and business dealings with any company aiming to work on President Donald Trump’s Mexican border wall. The Berkeley City Council unanimously passed a resolution this week that divests the Bay Area city from any company that builds, designs, helps finance or does any other work to construct or maintain the $4.1 billion border wall planned by the president. Berkeley also will cease doing business with those companies. “Our city is one that is known for breaking down walls, not building them,” Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin said at the meeting when the resolution was passed, reported the East Bay Express. “We will continue in that tradition regardless of what happens at the federal level.” It wasn’t immediately clear if Berkeley holds investments in companies that will build the wall. The city will “examine the existing companies it does business with and find ways to disengage from companies found to be participating in the construction of a wall,” a document accompanying the resolution says. “The city must vet companies before entering into new contracts.” “Hatred and xenophobia have once more gained currency in our country,” the city said in a statement. “Therefore, it is our duty to uphold and promote values of inclusion [and] shared prosperity.” Berkeley’s statement also notes that Trump’s border wall would cause “harm and stigma” to Latinos in California and would “waste ... taxpayer money, hurt the environment, contribute to climate change, divide ancestral native lands, disrupt tribal communities, increase international tensions, and reinforce failed Cold War policies of isolationism and exclusion.” Some two dozen Bay Area businesses — including construction companies and high-tech surveillance operations — responded to a pre-solicitation notice last month by the Department of Homeland Security expressing interest in work related to the wall. Oakland and San Francisco are considering similar laws. Arreguin said he thinks nearby Richmond will pass a measure much like Berkeley’s. Similar legislation has also been discussed in the Illinois and New York legislatures. Berkeley also is discussing whether to cut ties with Wells Fargo bank, which has helped finance construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58b5f363e4b02f3f81e44d7b,58a5fd57e4b045cd34bfb9c8,58891a63e4b061d64fa20c67 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 марта, 06:42

Berkeley Becomes First City To Divest From Border Wall Companies

Berkeley, California, has become the first U.S. city to yank investments and business dealings with any company aiming to work on President Donald Trump’s Mexican border wall. The Berkeley City Council unanimously passed a resolution this week that divests the Bay Area city from any company that builds, designs, helps finance or does any other work to construct or maintain the $4.1 billion border wall planned by the president. Berkeley also will cease doing business with those companies. “Our city is one that is known for breaking down walls, not building them,” Berkeley Mayor Jesse Arreguin said at the meeting when the resolution was passed, reported the East Bay Express. “We will continue in that tradition regardless of what happens at the federal level.” It wasn’t immediately clear if Berkeley holds investments in companies that will build the wall. The city will “examine the existing companies it does business with and find ways to disengage from companies found to be participating in the construction of a wall,” a document accompanying the resolution says. “The city must vet companies before entering into new contracts.” “Hatred and xenophobia have once more gained currency in our country,” the city said in a statement. “Therefore, it is our duty to uphold and promote values of inclusion [and] shared prosperity.” Berkeley’s statement also notes that Trump’s border wall would cause “harm and stigma” to Latinos in California and would “waste ... taxpayer money, hurt the environment, contribute to climate change, divide ancestral native lands, disrupt tribal communities, increase international tensions, and reinforce failed Cold War policies of isolationism and exclusion.” Some two dozen Bay Area businesses — including construction companies and high-tech surveillance operations — responded to a pre-solicitation notice last month by the Department of Homeland Security expressing interest in work related to the wall. Oakland and San Francisco are considering similar laws. Arreguin said he thinks nearby Richmond will pass a measure much like Berkeley’s. Similar legislation has also been discussed in the Illinois and New York legislatures. Berkeley also is discussing whether to cut ties with Wells Fargo bank, which has helped finance construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58b5f363e4b02f3f81e44d7b,58a5fd57e4b045cd34bfb9c8,58891a63e4b061d64fa20c67 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

18 марта, 04:38

Report: Russian Elite Invested Nearly $100 Million In Trump Buildings, Records Show

MIAMI/MOSCOW, March 17 (Reuters) - During the 2016 presidential campaign, Donald J. Trump downplayed his business ties with Russia. And since taking office as president, he has been even more emphatic. “I can tell you, speaking for myself, I own nothing in Russia,” President Trump said at a news conference last month. “I have no loans in Russia. I don’t have any deals in Russia.” But in the United States, members of the Russian elite have invested in Trump buildings. A Reuters review has found that at least 63 individuals with Russian passports or addresses have bought at least $98.4 million worth of property in seven Trump-branded luxury towers in southern Florida, according to public documents, interviews and corporate records. The buyers include politically connected businessmen, such as a former executive in a Moscow-based state-run construction firm that works on military and intelligence facilities, the founder of a St. Petersburg investment bank and the co-founder of a conglomerate with interests in banking, property and electronics. People from the second and third tiers of Russian power have invested in the Trump buildings as well. One recently posted a photo of himself with the leader of a Russian motorcycle gang that was sanctioned by the United States for its alleged role in Moscow’s seizure of Crimea. The Reuters review of investors from Russia in Trump’s Florida condominium buildings found no suggestion of wrongdoing by President Trump or his real estate organization. And none of the buyers appear to be from Putin’s inner circle. The White House referred questions from Reuters to the Trump Organization, whose chief legal officer said the scrutiny of President Trump’s business ties with Russia was misplaced. “I can say definitively that this is an overblown story that is media-created,” Alan Garten said in an interview. “I’ve been around this company and know the company’s dealings.” The tally of investors from Russia may be conservative. The analysis found that at least 703 – or about one-third – of the owners of the 2044 units in the seven Trump buildings are limited liability companies, or LLCs, which have the ability to hide the identity of a property’s true owner. And the nationality of many buyers could not be determined. Russian-Americans who did not use a Russian address or passport in their purchases were not included in the tally. SUNNY ISLES The review focused on Florida because the state has a large concentration of Trump-branded buildings, and determining the ownership of properties is easier there than in some other states. The resort town of Sunny Isles Beach, site of six of the seven Trump-branded Florida residential towers, stands out in another way: The zip code that includes the Sunny Isles buildings has an estimated 1,200 Russian-born residents, among the most in the country, U.S. Census data show. The Trump organization advertises all seven Florida buildings on its website as it pursues similar branding deals around the world. Exactly how much income Trump has earned from the buildings is unclear. Six of the seven properties were the product of an agreement the New York property magnate struck in 2001 with father-and-son American developers Michael and Gil Dezer. The six buildings operated by the Dezers in Sunny Isles would bear Trump’s name under a licensing agreement. In an interview, Gil Dezer said the project generated $2 billion in initial sales, from which Trump took a commission. Dezer declined to say how large a commission, citing confidentiality agreements. Garten, the Trump Organization’s chief legal officer, said Trump’s income was a mix of flat fees and percentages but declined to disclose them. Edgardo Defortuna, a leading Miami developer, estimated that Trump likely made between one percent and four percent in initial sale commissions, based on the standard fees paid on similarly branded projects. If so, Trump stood to reap a total of $20 million to $80 million in Sunny Isles. Trump receives no commission on subsequent sales in all seven of the Florida residential towers. He continues to make money from one of the six Sunny Isles buildings, however, according to disclosure forms Trump filed in the 2016 U.S. presidential race. The disclosure form states that Trump received between $100,000 and $1 million from a business called Trump Marks Sunny Isles I LLC. Dezer said these funds came from the Trump International Beach Resort, a hotel and condominium complex. Trump reported no income on his disclosure form from his seventh Florida property, the Trump Hollywood in the city of Hollywood. How much he has made over the years from that property’s 200 units is unclear. BH3, an investment fund which took over 180 units in a foreclosure sale, paid Trump a licensing fee of $25,000 for each unit, according to Daniel Lebensohn, a principal at the fund. If the remaining 20 units generated the same fee, Trump’s take would have been $5 million. Garten declined to confirm Trump’s commission. Informed of the Reuters analysis of Trump’s Russian condo investors, two Democratic opponents of the president, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA), renewed their calls for greater disclosure of his finances. “While the president has denied having invested in Russia, he has said little or nothing aboutRussian investment in his businesses and properties in the United States or elsewhere,” said Rep. Adam Schiff, ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee. “This should concern all Americans and is yet another reason why his refusal to release his tax returns should be met with considerable skepticism and concern.” Sen. Richard Burr (R-NC) and Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), the Republican chairs of the Senate and House intelligence committees, declined to comment. Schiff, as well as two U.S. intelligence officials and one former senior law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the Russian government sometimes directs funding at prominent individuals in the United States and Europe in hopes of improving their perception of Russia. Reuters found no evidence of such an effort with Trump. Garten, the Trump Organization’s chief legal officer, scoffed at the idea. “This is politics at its worst,” he said.   RUSSIAN ELITE The glimpse inside the condominium dealings offers a look at how the wealthy in Putin’s Russia use foreign property to stow cash. One wealthy Russian buyer was Alexander Yuzvik. In 2010, he and his wife bought unit 3901 of Trump Palace in Sunny Isles for $1.3 million, according to Florida property records. The three-bedroom apartment has 2,100 square feet and panoramic views, according to an online real estate listing. From 2013 to 2016, Yuzvik was a senior executive at Spetstroi, a state-owned company that has carried out construction projects at military facilities. The Spetstroi website says the firm was involved in construction projects at the Moscow training academy of the FSB, Russia’s primary civilian intelligence service and successor of the KGB. Spetstroi also did construction work in the administrative building of the general staff of the GRU, Russia’s military intelligence service. In a statement sent to Reuters, Spetstroi said Yuzvik worked there until he stepped down in March 2016. Employees of some state-owned Russian companies are typically required to disclose their assets and income. Yuzvik and his wife filed a declaration for 2013. In that declaration, which is publicly available, they list only assets inside Russia. The Florida condo isn’t included. Yuzvik could not be reached for comment. Andrey Truskov, another Trump condo owner, is a founder and co-owner of Absolute Group LLC, a holding company involved in wholesale electronics, banking and property development, with projects in Moscow, London and New York. The wholesale electronic business is the biggest in Russia, an Absolute representative told Reuters. The company does not disclose its financial results. Truskov bought apartment 1102 in the Trump Hollywood building for $1.4 million in 2011. The three-bedroom, 3.5-bath unit is 3,100 square feet, according to online real estate listings. In a telephone interview, Truskov confirmed that he purchased the Trump Hollywood unit. He said the Florida apartment was the same price as a three-room apartment outside Moscow at the time, and Florida was a nice place to have a property. He said the purchase was a personal decision that had no connection with his business. Several wealthy buyers were from Moscow and St. Petersburg, the country’s two largest cities, according to interviews in Russia, Florida public records and the Bureau Van Dijk company database Orbis. Among them: Alexey Ustaev, the founder and president of St. Petersburg-based Viking Bank, one of the first private investment banks established in Russia after the fall of Communism. A donor to orphanages and chess clubs in St. Petersburg, Ustaev has received awards from theRussian Sports Ministry and the St. Petersburg chamber of commerce for his banking and charitable work, according to his biography on the bank’s website.   PROVINCIAL POWERS In 2009, Ustaev bought unit 5006, a 3-bed, 3.5-bath apartment in the Trump Palace complex in Sunny Isles, for $1.2 million in cash, according to Florida public records. Two years later, Ustaev bought another apartment, a penthouse unit, this time in the nearby Trump Royale condominium development, for $5.2 million. In an email reply to questions, Ustaev said he purchased the properties in the Trump buildings for private use, but declined to comment on his family’s U.S. business. “I am living in Russia, I am working in Russia, and going abroad only for business purposes or vacations,” he said. Many of the Russian buyers were from the country’s provinces. One is Oleg Misevra, a wealthy coal magnate and former traffic police commander whose company’s main assets are in the Pacific island of Sakhalin in Russia’s Far East. He has caught Putin’s eye: At a 2010 regional meeting of Putin’s United Russia party, Putin praised Misevra’s work and held a lengthy question and answer session with him. A corporation Misevra controls, Swiss Residence Aliance Inc, purchased Penthouse #1 in Trump Hollywood for $6.8 million in 2010. The six-bedroom duplex is 8,200 square feet and boasts 12-foot ceilings, according to real estate listings. Misevra did not respond to requests for comment. Some of these Russian buyers appear to have done well in America. Another local politician, Vadim Valeryevich Gataullin, bought an apartment for $3.5 million in the Trump Hollywood. He did the deal through a company registered in Florida called VVG Real Estate Investments LLC. Five years later, Gataullin sold the apartment for $4.1 million to a Delaware-based limited liability company whose owner is not identified in state records. In early 2012, Gataullin bought a second apartment in the same building, unit 2701, for $920,000, according to Florida records. Several months later, Gataullin sold the apartment for $1.1 million to a couple from Venezuela, property records show. Gataullin is from the semi-autonomous Russian Republic of Bashkortostan, an oil-producing region in the foothills of the Ural Mountains. The son of a deputy regional prosecutor, he was a deputy in the regional parliament from 2013 until 2015. As a member of the regional parliament, he was required to declare his income and assets underRussian federal law, according to a representative of the Bashkortostan regional parliament. A copy of the income declaration Gataullin filed for in 2013, when he was still owner of the second Trump unit, contains no mention of the apartment. Gataullin did not respond to messages sent to his company in Bashkortostan.   FRIEND OF A BIKER More recently, Gataullin has been actively investing in the Miami area. His VVG Real Estate has spent at least $28 million on property in Broward County between 2012 and 2016. It also bought and sold six properties in Miami Dade County between 2015 and 2016 for a total profit of $238,400, property records show. VVG is also the registered licensee on a small motel close to the beach in Hollywood. An employee there told Reuters that Gataullin “appears and disappears like a ghost” and was currently in Russia. A secretary at Gataullin’s holding company in Russia told Reuters on March 17 that he is not in Russia. The American experience has been a mixed one for some of the Trump buyers. Among them is Pavel Uglanov, a businessman who served as a deputy minister for industry and energy in the regional government of Saratov, in central Russia, from 2010 to 2011. Uglanov bought unit 3704 of Trump Hollywood in Hollywood, Florida, for $1.8 million in 2012. He sold the 3-bed, 3,395 square foot apartment for $2.9 million two years later. Back in Russia, Uglanov made unsuccessful runs for the Saratov city assembly in 2006 and 2011, the second time as a member of Putin’s United Russia party. After leaving his deputy ministership in 2011, Uglanov told his then-wife, Anastasia, they were moving to Florida. Anastasia said in an interview in her Miami apartment that her ex-husband never told her why. “I don’t know what goes on in a man’s head,” she said. In Miami, Uglanov opened a gas station, called Niko Petroleum. When that business struggled, he sold it. He then started a charter boat business and a trucking firm. They struggled, too. Uglanov did not have connections in the United States like he did in Russia and he didn’t understand how Americans do business, his ex-wife said. Last August, Uglanov posted a photograph of himself on his Facebook page posing alongside Alexander Zaldostanov, leader of the “Night Wolves” biker gang. The Wolves, and Zaldostanov personally, were made subject to U.S. financial and travel restrictions. The U.S. government said gang members stormed a Ukrainian government naval base and a gas facility during Russia’s annexation of Crimea. An aide to Zaldostanov did not respond to questions from Reuters. The group, in interviews inRussian media, has denied storming the base and the gas facility. Zaldostanov has had multiple meetings with Putin, according to the Kremlin’s website. The Russian president awarded Zaldostanov the country’s “medal of honor” in 2013. In a phone interview late last month, Uglanov confirmed the Trump apartment purchase. He said it was a personal matter and declined to answer questions. “Basically, my private life is not your business,” he said.   THE RAINMAKER For Dezer, Trump’s American partner in Sunny Isles, the six buildings have been a win for his family, the Trumps and Sunny Isles. Trump visited the sites at least four times as the buildings – including a hotel – were constructed and promoted between 2001 and 2011, according to Dezer and former employees of Dezer’s company. Trump had approval over the look of the buildings and apartments, Dezer said. “His people were very much involved in quality control and construction,” Dezer said. “They were down here once every quarter checking on us, the progress. They wanted to see we were making money.” In 2008, when the housing market crashed, buyers defaulted on 900 Trump apartments, according to Dezer. Dezer said he worked hard over the coming years to pay back creditors. Until those 900 apartments were sold off, Trump did not earn any money for them, he added. Foreign buyers bought into the Trump buildings as the developers dropped their prices after the crash, according to Dezer and local realtors. The majority of these buyers were from South America, with a smaller percentage of Russians and other former Soviet nationals. Tanya Tsveyer, a realtor whose Russian clients have bought in the Trump buildings, described her customers as primarily business people, including several with investments across the United States and Russia. “They bought in the Trump because they liked how the buildings fit their lifestyle,” she said, referring to the Russians. By early 2011, the Trump buildings had started to turn a profit, according to Dezer. He invited Trump to a mortgage burning ceremony to celebrate Dezer’s paying off the project’s $475 million dollar mortgage. Dezer recalled Trump telling him that he planned to run for president. At the party, Dezer, his father and Trump gleefully set flame to a stack of mortgage documents, applauded by a crowd of tenants from the Trump buildings and local business people. A video of the event shows Trump smiling, joking and working the crowd. “I was with Michael Jackson when he had the hair burned with the Pepsi, and it was a disaster,” Trump told revelers, referring to the time the pop superstar’s hair caught fire during the 1984 filming of a Pepsi commercial. “I am sitting next to that friggin’ fire, and if my hair goes, I am out of business.” Dezer and Trump got help selling the condos from Elena Baronoff, who immigrated from the Soviet Union in the 1980s. Baronoff, who grew up in Uzbekistan, had been active in Soviet cultural associations. In Miami, she soon began bringing Russian tour groups to Miami. Gil Dezer’s father, Michael, recruited Baronoff to work alongside the Dezer corporation. She traveled to Moscow, St Petersburg, France and London to bring in Russian buyers, according to Dezer, selling apartments to them for between $1 million and $2 million. Baronoff was diagnosed with Leukemia in 2014 and died a year later. “She was huge, she was big for them,” Dezer said, referring to Russian buyers. “No one has filled her shoes.”   (Additional reporting by Jack Stubbs in Moscow, John Walcott, Mark Hosenball, Jonathan Landay, Arshad Mohammed and Warren Strobel in Washington, and Astha Rajvanshi in New York. Editing by David Rohde and Christian Lowe) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 марта, 23:18

Joint Press Conference with President Trump and German Chancellor Merkel

East Room 2:09 P.M. EDT PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Thank you very much.  Chancellor Merkel, it is a great honor to welcome you to the People’s House, the White House.  Our two nations share much in common, including our desire for security, prosperity and peace.   We just concluded a productive meeting with the German and American companies to discuss workforce development and vocational training -- very important words.  Germany has done an incredible job training the employees and future employees, and employing its manufacturing and industrial workforce.  It’s crucial that we provide our American workers with a really great employment outlook, and that includes making sure that we harness the full potential of women in our economy.   My administration is in the process of rebuilding the American industrial base.  A stronger America is in the interests, believe me, of the world as a whole.  I reiterated to Chancellor Merkel my strong support for NATO, as well as the need for our NATO allies to pay their fair share for the cost of defense.  Many nations owe vast sums of money from past years, and it is very unfair to the United States.  These nations must pay what they owe.   During our meeting, I thanked Chancellor Merkel for the German government’s commitment to increase defense spending and work toward contributing at least 2 percent of GDP.  I want to thank the Chancellor for her leadership in supporting NATO and its efforts in Afghanistan.  This has come at significant cost, including the lives of over 50 German soldiers, whose sacrifice we greatly honor.   I also appreciate Chancellor Merkel’s leadership, along with the French President, to resolve the conflict in Ukraine, where we ideally seek a peaceful solution. Most importantly, our two countries must continue to work together to protect our people from radical Islamic terrorism and to defeat ISIS.  I applaud Chancellor Merkel for Germany’s contributions, both civilian and military, as a counter-ISIS coalition member.   We also recognize that immigration security is national security.  We must protect our citizens from those who seek to spread terrorism, extremism and violence inside our borders.  Immigration is a privilege, not a right, and the safety of our citizens must always come first, without question. Over lunch, the Chancellor and I will talk about our economic partnership.  We must work together towards fair and reciprocal trade policies that benefit both of our peoples. Millions of hardworking U.S. citizens have been left behind by international commerce, and together, we can shape a future where all of our citizens have a path to financial security. The United States will respect historic institutions, and we will also recognize the right of free people to manage their own destiny. The close friendship between America and Germany is built on our shared value.  We cherish individual rights, we uphold the rule of law, and we seek peace among nations.  Our alliance is a symbol of strength and cooperation to the world.  It is the foundation of a very, very hopeful future.  Thank you. CHANCELLOR MERKEL:  (As interpreted.)  Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen, it is a great pleasure and privilege to be here today in the White House, together with President Donald Trump, and have a first personal, one-on-one meeting and an exchange of views. In the period leading up to this visit, I’ve always said it’s much, much better to talk to one another and not about one another, and I think our conversation proved this.  We talked about the international situation.  We talked about also apprenticeship programs when we met with CEOs and apprentices around a roundtable, as regards the shared interests that we have.   Let me look back into the past.  We, the Germans, owe a lot to the United States of America, particularly as regards the economic rise of Germany.  This was primarily due to the help through the Marshall Plan.  We were also able to regain German unity after decades of the United States standing up for this, together with other allies, and standing by our side during the period of the Cold War.  And we are very gratified to know that today we can live in peace and freedom as a unified country due to that. I was gratified to know that the President had aligned how important he thinks NATO is.  NATO is of prime importance for us, and it was not without very good reason that we said during our summit meeting in Wales that also Germany needs to increase expenditure.  We committed to this 2-percent goal until 2024.  Last year we increased our defense spending by 8 percent, and we’re going to work together again and again on this.   And we said that, obviously, defense and security has a lot of different assets and facets to it.  One the one hand, it’s supporting missions in Africa, for example.  It’s also promoting development assistance, but it’s also helping mission in Africa, for example, in trying to stand up for their own safety and security.   We continue to be in conversation.  What was important for us today was that we were able to talk about Afghanistan, talk about, as the President quite rightly said, the continuing mission of Germany in Afghanistan.  I am very glad that the United States are intending to continue to commit to the Afghan mission as well. Together, we fight against Islamist terrorism.  Germany is going to step up its work and is going to continue its work in Afghanistan and also in Syria.  We’re going to monitor the situation there very closely.  We’re going to work on political solutions in Syria, but also in Libya -- what we talked about.   I am very gratified to know that the American administration and also the President, personally, commits himself to the Minsk process.  We need to come to a solution of this problem.  There has to be a safe and secure solution for Ukraine, but the relationship with Russia has to be improved, as well, once the situation there on the ground is clarified. Minsk is a good basis, but, unfortunately, we haven’t made yet the headway that we want to.  But we are going to work together with our experts in the next few months to come on this issue. I am also here in my capacity as G20 president.  You know that we will be hosting the G20 visit -- the G20 Summit -- sorry -- this year, and I’m very pleased that the President has committed to attending this summit.  We’re going to talk at some length over lunch about the issues.   We say trade has to be rendered fairer, there has to be a win-win situation.  We can talk about the details of that.  We’ve already seen today when we had an exchange with our CEOs and also with our apprentices what sort of potential we can tap, what sort our potential our two economies have.  It’s very moving to see, particularly meeting with these young people, what sort of work towards the future is being done by our companies there.   So, particularly in this period where we are transiting from traditional manufacturing to industry -- capacity-building skills are so important, incidentally, not only for young people, but also for those who maybe have lost their jobs and need to be reskilled in order to find a job again.  And that is an issue I know is very important for you here in the United States, but it’s also important for us in Germany. So I can say there are a number of issues where we will continue to cooperate very closely on the level of our experts, but also on our level.  We had a very good first exchange of views, so I’m very much looking forward to the talks we will have over lunch. Thank you.   PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Thank you very much.  We’ll do a couple of questions.   Mark Halperin. Q    Mr. President, thank you.  There are a lot of Americans who have anxiety now like they did eight years ago as the government debates what to do about healthcare.  I'm wondering if you can tell people what your bottom lines are, what’s non-negotiable.  You’ve talked in the past saying no one should be denied health insurance if they can't afford it.  You’ve talked about no cuts to Medicaid and Medicare.  Are those your bottom lines and would you veto legislation that violated those? Q    Chancellor Merkel, if I could ask you, President Trump has got a different style than most recent, past U.S. Presidents.  I'm wondering what you think about that style, if you think it's good for the world, or if you’ve got reservations about it. PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Thank you, Mark.  We just have a really wonderful group of people meeting later.  We met with 12 pretty much “no’s” in Congress -- you saw that a little while ago -- and they went from all “no’s” to all “yeses” and we have a lot of “yeses” coming in.  It's all coming together.  We're going to have great healthcare.  It's going to be passed, I believe, I think substantially, pretty quickly.  It's coming together beautifully.  You have conservative groups, you have other groups.  Everybody wants certain things.  In the end, we're going to have a great healthcare plan. Now, I have to tell you that Obamacare is a disaster.  It's failing.  I was in Tennessee -- we had a tremendous crowd the other night, and they have -- half of the state is uncovered.  The insurance companies have left, and the other half has one insurance company and that will probably be bailing out pretty soon also.  They’ll have nobody.  You have many states where they have one.  You have a lot of places now where they’ll have none. Obamacare will fail.  It will fold.  It will close up very, very soon if something isn't done. I've often said politically, the best thing I can do is absolutely nothing.  Wait one year and then even the Democrats will come say, please, please, you got to help us.  But it's not the right thing to do for the people.  We have a great plan. We have a plan that’s getting more and more popular with the Republican base, with the conservative base, and with people, generally.  The press has covered it very inaccurately.  People are truly covered well, and I think it's going to be something that's going to be a model to be looked upon. Q    May I ask what’s non-negotiable for you, Mr. President? PRESIDENT TRUMP:  I'll tell you after we're finished.  (Laughter.)   CHANCELLOR MERKEL:  (As interpreted.)  Thank you very much. Well, I'm here as Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany. I represent German interests.  I speak with the President of the United States, who stands up for, as is right, American interests.  That is our task, respectively.  And I must say that I was very gratified to know the very warm and gracious hospitality with which I have been received here. We held a conversation where we were trying to address also those areas where we disagree, but to try to bring people together, try to show what is our vantage point, what is the American vantage point, and then try to find a compromise which is good for both sides.  Because we need to be fair with each other.  Each and every one is expecting for his or her leader that something good comes out of it for their own people.   For Germany, I can say, well, people are different.  People have different abilities, have different traits of character, have different origins, have found their way into politics along different pathways.  All that is diversity, which is good.  Sometimes it's difficult to find compromises, but that's what we've been elected for.  If everything just went like that and without problem, we wouldn't need politicians to do these jobs. Q    -- from the German Press Agency.  Madam Chancellor, given the experience of the GDR, you are always saying that you are so confident that walls can fall also.  How dangerous do you think this isolationist policy of the U.S. President is?  What was the import of terrorists that he plans?  And also, with the fact that he doesn’t think that the EU -- doesn’t deal with the EU in a very respectful way?   And then, Mr. President, America First -- don't you think that this is going to weaken also the European Union?  And why are you so scared of diversity?  In the news and in the media, you speak so awful of fake news and that things, also, cannot be proven.  For example, the fact that you have been wiretapped by Mr. Obama. PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Nice, friendly reporter.  (Laughter.)  First of all, I don't believe in an isolationist policy, but I also believe a policy of trade should be a fair policy.  And the United States has been treated very, very unfairly by many countries over the years.  And that's going to stop. But I'm not an isolationist.  I'm a free trader, but I'm also a fair trader.  And free trade has led to a lot of bad things happening -- you look at the deficits that we have and you look at all of the accumulation of debt.  We're a very powerful company -- country.  We're a very strong, very strong country.  We'll soon be at a level that we perhaps have never been before. Our military is going to be strengthened -- it's been depleted. But I am a trader.  I am a fair trader.  I am a trader that wants to see good for everybody, worldwide.  But I am not an isolationist by any stretch of the imagination.  So I don't know what newspaper you're reading, but I guess that would be another example of, as you say, fake news. CHANCELLOR MERKEL:  (As interpreted.)  Well, allow me, if I may, to project in the following terms.  We haven't yet had time to talk at great length about economic issues, but I would say that the success of Germany in the economic area, but also on security and peace -- that the success of Germans have always been one where the German success is one side of the coin, and the other side of the coin has been European unity and European integration.  That's something of which I'm deeply convinced.  And I'm not only saying this back home, I'm saying this here.  I'm saying it in the United States and also here in Washington in my talks with the President. Secondly, I believe that globalization ought to be shaped in an open-minded way, but also in a very fair way.  Freedom of movement within the European Union, for example, is a very important element of our economic progress, of peace; has been for many, many decades.  The European countries for many, many centuries waged wars against each other.  We have to protect our external borders because -- and there we have to work on the basis of mutual interests with our neighbors. Migration, immigration, integration has to be worked on, obviously.  Traffickers have to be stopped.  But this has to be done while looking at the refugees as well, giving them opportunities to shape their own lives where they are; help countries who right now are not in an ability to do so -- sometimes because they have civil war.  I think that’s the right way of going about it.  And this is obviously what we have an exchange of views about, but my position is the one that I have just set out for you. PRESIDENT TRUMP:  I might add that we have many plants and factories coming back into the United States.  Many jobs are coming back to Michigan, to Ohio, to Pennsylvania, to a lot of places where they were losing jobs.  And we will have a different policy, but it’s going to be a great policy for not only the United States but a great policy worldwide, and I look very much forward to it. Kevin Cirilli. Q    Yes, Mr. President, (inaudible) healthcare -- what exactly does the (inaudible)?   And then, for Chancellor Merkel, what do you anticipate could be a concession you would be willing to give to the administration (inaudible)? PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Well, Kevin, I think we have a very unified Republican Party.  After all, we have the presidency, we have the House, we have the Senate.  And we’re getting along very well, I will tell you.  And if you were at the meeting that I just attended where we took 12 “no’s” or semi-“no’s” -- no “yeses” -- and within a short period of time, everybody was very much on board, and a commitment to vote yes. I think we have a very unified party.  I think we're actually more unified than even the election.  You see -- when they talk about me, I seem to be very popular, at least this week, within the party because we have our highest numbers -- the highest numbers that I’ve ever had in the party.  So I think there’s a great unification.   Now, healthcare is a very, very difficult subject, it’s a very complex subject, and it’s a subject that goes both ways.  You do something for one side and the other side doesn’t like it. But it’s really something that’s come together very well, and I think it’s going to be very, very popular -- extremely popular. On trade with Germany, I think we’re going to do fantastically well.  Right now, I would say that the negotiators for Germany have done a far better job than the negotiators for the United States.  But hopefully we can even it out.  We don’t want victory, we want fairness.  All I want is fairness.   Germany has done very well in its trade deals with the United States, and I give them credit for it, but -- and I can speak to many other countries.  I mean, you look at China, you look at virtually any country that we do business with.  It’s not exactly what you call good for our workers.   You look at the horrible NAFTA transaction -- NAFTA has been a disaster for the United States.  It’s been a disaster for companies, and in particular, it’s been a disaster for the workers.  A lot of the companies just moved, but the workers are screwed.  And it’s probably the reason I’m standing here, maybe number one -- that and maybe the military -- building up our military, which we will do, and we will be stronger than ever before -- and hopefully not have to use it.  But we will be stronger, and perhaps far stronger than ever before.  But it’s probably the reason I’m here, is when you talk about trade. So I think that we are going to be a very different country. I think we’re going to be -- we’re going to have great values.  But in terms of our military, it’s going to be much stronger.  And our trade deals are going to be good, solid deals.  Not deals that lead to closing plants and tremendous unemployment.   Okay?  Thank you. CHANCELLOR MERKEL:  (As interpreted.)  When we speak about trade agreements, and the European Union is negotiating those agreements for all of the member states of the European Union, but obviously there’s also input by the member states -- they bring to the table what’s important to them. We have underlined as a German industry, German business community, and have made the experience that any kind of agreement that we have concluded -- for example, at the very latest with South Korea -- brought us more jobs, actually.  People were very much concerned about losing jobs -- for example, the automotive industry -- but in the end, it turned out -- particularly as it regards South Korea -- in the end it turned out that both sides benefited.   And I think it’s only fair.  That’s the purpose of concluding agreements -- that both sides win.  And that is the sort of spirit, I think, in which we ought to be guided in negotiating any agreement between the United States of America  and the EU.  I hope that we can resume the agreement that we started.  We have just now concluded our agreement with Canada, and I hope that we will come back to the table and talk about the agreement between EU and the U.S. again.  Q    Madam Chancellor, a question addressed to you.  Today we're talking about trade.  The President, in the past, always said that he doesn’t like multinational trade agreements but he does bilateral trade agreements.  Do you think from the EU’s point of view, T-TIP is a bilateral agreement with Washington on one side, the EU the other side?  Now, is the problem that America, the President of the United States, and the Europeans have a basically different understanding of what the EU is all about?  That’s my question addressed to you. And Mr. President, my question addressed to you, if I may -- rejected White House claims, is that the alleged wiretapping on you, on the Trump Tower, on Trump organization, or on members of your campaign was -- that British intelligence was either responsible for it or involved in it?  After these claims are rejected, what is your take on that?  Are there other suspects, or do you think it was a mistake to blame British intelligence for this.   And by the way, my second question, are there, from time to time, tweets that you regret in hindsight -- PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Very seldom. Q    Very seldom.  So you never would have wished not to have -- PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Very seldom.  Probably wouldn’t be here right now -- but very seldom.  We have a tremendous group of people that listen, and I can get around the media when the media doesn’t tell the truth, so I like that. As far as wiretapping, I guess, by this past administration, at least we have something in common perhaps.  (Laughter.)  And just to finish your question, we said nothing.  All we did was quote a certain very talented legal mind who was the one responsible for saying that on television.  I didn’t make an opinion on it.  That was a statement made by a very talented lawyer on Fox.  And so you shouldn’t be talking to me, you should be talking to Fox, okay? Q    Thank you. CHANCELLOR MERKEL:  (As interpreted.)  Well, I believe that the President has clearly set out his philosophy as to what trade agreements have to bring about for the American side as well.  I personally don’t think that Germany needs to negotiate and not the European Union.  We’ve devolved our competences to the European Union, so the European Union, or rather the Commission negotiates on behalf of the member states, so that’s not going to prevent us from concluding agreements.  Indeed, this would be then qualify as a bilateral agreement between the EU and the United States if we had it.   But the question is, will it be of benefit to both countries or not, and let me be very honest, very candid -- a free trade agreement with the United States of America has not always been all that popular in Germany either.  There have been less demonstrations against this free trade agreements in the United States that in Europe, and also in Germany.  So I am very glad to note that apparently the perspective on that has changed a little bit at least in Germany, too. PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Thank you very much.  Great honor.  Thank you.  Thank you. END 2:36 P.M. EDT