Выбор редакции
22 октября, 20:04

A Comparison between the College Scorecard and Mobility Report Cards

​ Introduction   In 2015, the Department of Education launched the College Scorecard, a vast database of student outcomes at specific colleges and universities developed from a variety of administrative data sources. The Scorecard provides the most comprehensive and accurate information available on the post-enrollment outcomes of students, like whether they get a job, the rate at which they repay their loans, and how much they earn.   While labor-market success is certainly not the end-all-be-all of higher education, the notion that a college education is a ticket to a good job and a pathway to economic opportunity is intrinsic to the tax benefits and financial support provided by federal and state governments, to the willingness of parents and families to shoulder the burden of college’s high costs, and to the dreams of millions of students. More than 86% percent of freshmen say that “to be able to get a better job” is a “very important” reason for going to college.[1]   That is why the College Scorecard is a breakthrough—for the first time, students have access to detailed and reliable information on the economic outcomes of students after leaving college, including the vast majority of colleges that are non-selective or otherwise fall between the cracks of other information providers.   The data show that at every type of post-secondary institution, the differences in post-college earnings across institutions are profound. Some students attend institutions where many students don’t finish, or that don’t lead to good jobs.      Moreover, the analysis behind the Scorecard suggested not only that there are large differences across institutions in their economic outcomes, but that these differences are relevant to would-be students. For instance, the evidence in the Scorecard showed that when a low-income student goes to a school with a high completion rates and good post-college earnings, she is likely to do as well as anyone else there. While there are large differences between where rich and poor kids are likely to apply and attend, there is little difference in their outcomes after leaving school: the poorest aid recipients earn almost as much as the richest borrowers. This pattern suggests, at least, that low-income students are not mismatched or underqualified for the schools they currently attend. But it is also consistent with powerful evidence from academic studies that show that when marginal students get a shot at a higher-quality institution their graduation rates and post-college earnings converge toward those of their new peers (Zimmerman 2014, Goodman et al. 2015).   Hence, the Scorecard is likely to provide useful information for students, policymakers, and administrators on important measures of post-college success, access to college by disadvantaged students, and economic mobility.  Indeed, the College Scorecard shows that great economic outcomes are not exclusive to Ivy-League students. Many institutions have both good outcomes and diverse origins—institutions whose admissions policies, or lack thereof, take in disproportionate shares of poor kids and lift them up the economic ladder.   Nevertheless, the design of the Scorecard required making methodological choices to produce the data on a regular basis, and making it simple and accessible required choosing among specific measures intended to be representative. Some of these choices were determined by data availability or other considerations.  Some choices have been criticized (e.g. Whitehurst and Chingos 2015). Other valuable indicators could not be reliably produced on a regular basis or in a way that evolved over time as college or student outcomes changed.   In part to address these issues, we supported the research that lead to the creation of Mobility Report Cards, which provide a test of the validity and robustness of the College Scorecard and an expansion of its scope.   Mobility Report Cards (MRCs) attempt to answer the question “which colleges in America contribute the most to helping children climb the income ladder?” and characterize rates of intergeneration income mobility at each college in the United States. The project draws on de-identified administrative data covering over 30 million college students from 1999 to 2013, and focuses on students enrolled between the ages of 18 and 22, for whom both their parents’ income information and their own subsequent labor-market outcomes can be observed.  MRCs provide new information on access to colleges of children from different family backgrounds, the likelihood that low-income students at different colleges move up in the income distribution, and trends in access over time.   Background on College Scorecard   The College Scorecard provides detailed information on the labor-market outcomes of financial-aid recipients post enrollment, including average employment status and measures of earnings for employed graduates; outcomes for specific groups of students, like students from lower-income families, dependent students, and for women and men; and measures of those outcomes early and later in their post-college careers. These outcome measures are specific to the students receiving federal aid, and to the institutions those students attend. And the outcome measures are constructed using technical specifications similar to those used to measure other student outcomes, like the student loan Cohort Default Rate, which allows for a consistent framework for measurement while allowing institution outcomes to evolve from cohort to cohort.   The technical paper accompanying the College Scorecard spelled out the important properties and limitations of the federal data used in the Scorecard, regarding the share of students covered, the institutions covered, the construction of cohorts, the level of aggregation of statistics, and how the earnings measures were used.   These choices were made subject to certain constraints on disclosure, statistical reliability, reproducibility, and operational capacity, and with specific goals of making the data regularly available (updating it on an annual basis), using measurement concepts similar to those used in other education-related areas (like student loan outcomes), and providing measures that could evolve over time as characteristics of schools and student outcomes changed. These constraints imposed tradeoffs and required choices. Moreover, the research team producing the MRCs was not bound by certain of these methodological requirements or design goals, and thus could make alternative choices. Despite making different choices, however, the analysis below shows that on balance the outcome measures common to both projects are extremely similar.   In brief, the Scorecard estimates are based on data from the National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) covering undergraduate students receiving federal aid.  NSLDS data provides information on certain characteristics of students, the calendar time and student’s reported grade level when they first received aid, and detailed information on the institution they attended (such as the 6- and 8-digit Office of Postsecondary Education Identification number OPEID). These data and identifiers are regularly used as the basis for reporting institution-specific student outcomes, like the Cohort Default Rate or disbursements of federal aid.  For purposes of constructing economic outcomes using these data, all undergraduate aid recipients were assigned an entry cohort—either the year they first received aid if a first-year college student, or an imputation for their entry year based on the year they were first aided and their academic level. (For instance, if a student self-reported entering their second undergraduate year in the first year they received aid, they would be assigned a cohort year for the previous year.[2]) If a student attended more than one institution as an undergraduate, that student was included in the cohorts of each institution (i.e. their outcomes were included in the average outcomes of each institution—just as is done with the Cohort Default Rate). These data were linked to information from administrative tax and education data at specific intervals post-entry (e.g. 6, 8, and 10 years after the cohort entry year). Adjacent cohorts were combined (e.g. entry cohorts in 2000 and 2001 were linked to outcomes in 2010 and 2011, respectively).  Individuals who are not currently in the labor market (defined as having zero earnings) are excluded. And institution-by-cohort specific measures like mean or median earnings and the fraction of students that earn more than $25,000 (among those working), were constructed for the cohorts (e.g. mean earnings for non-enrolled, employed aid recipients ten years after entry for the combined 2000 and 2001 cohorts). Each year, the sample was rolled forward one year, with the earlier cohort being dropped and a new cohort being added, allowing the sample to evolve over time.   This focus on aid recipients is natural for producing estimates related to aid outcomes, like student debt levels or the ratio of debt to earnings. Moreover, these data are regularly used to produce institution-specific accountability measures, like the Cohort Default Rate, which are familiar to stakeholders and authorized and regularly used to report institution-specific outcomes. Constructing the sample based on entry year and rolling forward one year allowed for comparisons within schools over time, to assess improvement or the effects of other changes on student outcomes.   The focus of and choices underlying the Scorecard also had several potential disadvantages, which were noted in the technical paper or by reviewers offering constructive criticism (e.g. Whitehurst and Chingos 2015).  These limitations, criticisms, and omissions of the Scorecard include the following specific to the methodology and data limitations.    First, the Scorecard’s sample of students includes only federal student aid recipients. While these students are an obvious focus of aid policies, and comprise a majority of students at many institutions, high-income students whose families cover full tuition are excluded from the analysis. Moreover, schools with more generous financial aid often have a smaller share of students on federal financial aid, implying that the share and type of students included in the Scorecard vary across colleges.   Unfortunately, the information needed to assign students to a specific entry cohort at a specific educational institution and to report institution-specific data is not available at the same degree of reliability and uniformity for non-federal-aid recipients.  For instance, Form 1098-T (used to administer tax credits for tuition paid) may not identify specific institutions or campuses (e.g. within a state university system) and does not report information on the academic level or entry year of the student. In addition, certain disclosure standards prevented the publication of institution-specific data. Estimates based on aggregated statistics (as are used in the Mobility Report Cards) include an element of (deliberate) uncertainty in the outcomes, and subjectivity in terms estimation methodology.   Second, FAFSA family income may not be a reliable indicator of access or opportunity. FAFSA family income is measured differently depending on whether students are dependent or independent; it is missing for many that do not receive aid; and it can be misleading for those who are independent borrowers. Unfortunately, information on family background is generally only available for FAFSA applicants (aid recipients) who are dependents at the time of application. Mobility Report Cards provide a more comprehensive and uniform measure of family income, but only for the cohorts of students they are able to link back to their parents (e.g. those born after 1979.)   Mobility Report Cards   The above factors raised concerns about the Scorecard’s reliability and usefulness to stakeholders. In an effort to assess the validity and robustness of Scorecard measures using an alternative sample and with more consistent definitions of family income and more outcomes, we supported the analysis behind the study “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility in the U.S.” (Chetty, Friedman, Saez, Turner, and Yagan 2017).   Perhaps most importantly, the Mobility Report Card (MRC) uses records from the Treasury Department on tuition-paying students in conjunction with Pell-grant records from the Department of Education in order to construct nearly universal attendance measures at all U.S. colleges between the ages of 18 and 22. Thus the MRC sample of students is more  comprehensive of this population relative to the Scorecard. However, older students are generally not included in the MRC sample and certain institutions cannot be separately identified in the MRC sample. Furthermore, the MRC methodology relies on producing estimates of institutional outcomes rather than producing actual data on institution outcomes. At certain institutions, particularly those that enroll a disproportionate share of older students (such as for-profit and community colleges) and where a large share students receive Title IV aid, the Scorecard provides a more comprehensive sample of student outcomes.[3]   Another area of difference is that the MRC organizes its analysis around entire birth cohorts who can be linked to parents in their adolescence. It then measures whether and where each member of the birth cohort attends college. By following full birth cohorts, cross-college comparisons of adult earnings in the MRC measure earnings at the same age (32-34), unlike the Scorecard which measures adult earnings across colleges at different points in the lifecycle, depending on when the students attended the college.  The advantage of the MRC approach is that it allows a comprehensive analysis of the outcomes of the entire birth cohort at regular intervals.  However, the disadvantage mentioned above is that there is no information on older cohorts born prior to 1980.   In addition, the MRC includes zero-earners in its earnings measures, whereas the Scorecard excludes them from their measures of earnings outcomes.[4] Because it is not possible to differentiate individuals who are involuntarily unemployed (e.g. who were laid off from a job) from those who are out of the labor force by choice (in school, raising children, or retired), the Scorecard focused on measuring earnings specifically for those who clearly were participating in the labor market.   Finally, family income in the MRC is measured consistently across cohorts using a detailed and relatively comprehensive measure of household income: total pre-tax income at the household level averaged between the kid ages of 15 and 19, as reflected on the parents’ tax forms.   The design choices made in developing the MRC come at the cost of published statistics not being exact and instead being granular estimates (see Chetty Friedman Saez Turner Yagan 2016) and of not being as easily replicable over time. However, the MRC’s design addresses many of the critiques made of the Scorecard. If the critiques of the Scorecard are quantitatively important, one should find that the MRC and Scorecard values differ substantially. In other words, the MRC data provide an estimate of how much the data constraints and methodological choices affect the data quality.   Comparison of the College Scorecard and Mobility Report Cards   The most basic test of the robustness of the Scorecard to the variations embodied in the MRC is to compare the main Scorecard adult earnings measure—median earnings of students ten years after they attend a college—with the analogous measure from the MRC: median earnings in 2014 (age 32-34) of the 1980-1982 birth cohort by college. For shorthand, we refer to these measures as Scorecard median earnings and MRC median earnings, respectively.   Figure 1 plots MRC median earnings versus Scorecard median earnings.[5] Both median earnings measures are plotted in thousands of 2015 dollars. Overlaid on the dots is the regression line on the underlying college-level data.     Figure 1   The graph shows an extremely tight, nearly-one-for-one relationship: a slope of 1.12 with an R2 of 0.92. Visually one can see that not only does each extra thousand dollars of Scorecard median earnings typically translate into an extra thousand dollars of MRC median earnings, but the levels line up very closely as well. Hence across the vast majority of colleges, Scorecard median earnings are very close to MRC median earnings.   The close correspondence between MRC median earnings and Scorecard median earnings can also be seen when examining college-level comparison lists. For example, among colleges with at least 500 students, almost exactly the same colleges appear in the top rankings using either measure.  (This is natural given the very high R2 reported in Figure 1.) Hence, the Scorecard and MRC share a very tight relationship. In unreported analysis, we find that two offsetting effects tend to explain this very tight relationship between Scorecard median earnings and MRC median earnings. On the one hand, the MRC’s inclusion of students who earn nothing as adults somewhat reduces each college’s median adult earnings. On the other hand, the MRC’s inclusion of students from high-income families somewhat increases each college’s median adult earnings, as students from high-income families are somewhat more likely to earn high incomes as adults. The two competing effects tend to offset each other in practice, yielding MRC median earnings that are quite close to Scorecard median earnings.   While some schools are outliers, in the sense that the measures differ, those examples are often readily explained by differences in methodological choices. For instances, because the Scorecard conditions on having positive earnings, schools where an unusually high share of students voluntarily leave the labor force have different outcomes in the MRC than the Scorecard. The other important contributor to outliers is the MRC’s restriction to students enrolled between ages 18 and 22, which tends to exclude many older, mid-career workers. These individuals tend both to be employed, often have relatively high earnings, and tend to enroll at for-profit schools (or other schools aimed at providing mid-career credentials). The Scorecard includes these students, whereas the MRC tends to exclude them.   Conclusion   The College Scorecard was created to provide students, families, educators, and policymakers with new information on the outcomes of students attending each college in the United States, and improving the return on federal tax and expenditure programs. Mobility Report Cards expand the scope of the information on the outcomes and the characteristics of students attending American colleges. Our analysis finds a very high degree of agreement at the college level between Scorecard median adult earnings and Mobility Report Card median adult earnings, suggesting that the Scorecard is a reliable tool measuring the outcomes of students and institutions that benefit from federal student aid and tax expenditures. References   Chetty, Raj, John N. Friedman, Emmanuel Saez, Nicholas Turner, and Danny Yagan. “Mobility Report Cards: The Role of Colleges in Intergenerational Mobility in the U.S.”. (2016).   Goodman, Joshua, Michael Hurwitz, and Jonathan Smith. “Access to Four-Year Public Colleges and Degree Completion.” Journal of Labor Economics (2017).   Whitehurst, Grover J. and Matthew M. Chingos. “Deconstructing and Reconstructing the College Scorecard.” Brookings Working Paper (2015).   Zimmerman, Seth D. "The returns to college admission for academically marginal students." Journal of Labor Economics 32.4 (2014): 711-754.   Adam Looney, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tax Analysis at the US Department of Treasury. [1] https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/rampage/wp/2015/02/17/why-do-americans-go-to-college-first-and-foremost-they-want-better-jobs [2] This assignment was capped at two years, so that students reported entering their third, fourth, or fifth year were assigned a cohort two years prior. [3] For instance, in the 2002 Scorecard entry cohort, 42 percent of students were over age 22 when they first received aid.     [4] The Scorecard data base does include the fraction of borrowers without earnings, which allows for the computation of unconditional mean earnings. [5] We also restrict to colleges with at least 100 MRC students on average across the 1980-1982 birth cohorts and to colleges that have observations in both the Scorecard and the MRC. For MRC colleges that are groups of Scorecard colleges, we use the count-weighted mean of Scorecard mean earnings across colleges within a group. See Chetty Friedman Saez Turner Yagan (2016) for grouping details.

22 октября, 20:04

Secretary Lew Sends Letter to 115th Congress on Puerto Rico

January 17, 2017   The Honorable Mitch McConnell Majority Leader United States Senate Washington, DC  20510   Dear Mr. Leader:  As the 115th Congress begins, we write to underscore the need for additional legislation early in this session to address the economic and fiscal crisis in Puerto Rico.  The Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA) provided Puerto Rico with important fiscal oversight and debt restructuring tools, and now the Oversight Board and Puerto Rico’s new Governor must take the critical next steps required by this federal legislation.  Working with the new Governor, the Oversight Board now must certify a Fiscal Plan and set a path to comprehensively restructure the debt before the expiration of PROMESA’s automatic stay.   Treasury has continued to provide both the Oversight Board and the new Governor with technical assistance as requested, and will remain able to do so after the transition to the next Administration.   Despite the important progress achieved to date with bipartisan support, the work is not done.  As Puerto Rico moves forward on these next steps, Congress must enact measures recommended by both Republicans and Democrats that fix Puerto Rico’s inequitable health care financing structure and promote sustained economic growth.  Without congressional action to address these issues, Puerto Rico’s return to growth and opportunity will be a significant challenge.   Most urgently, Congress should address Puerto Rico’s “Medicaid cliff” funding issue before April as recommended last month by the Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico.  Failure to do so would jeopardize health care for up to 900,000 poor U.S. citizens living in Puerto Rico. CONGRESSIONAL TASK FORCE REPORT On December 20, the Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico, established by PROMESA, released its Final Report.  The bipartisan report provides an overview of the economic challenges facing Puerto Rico and a series of potential solutions that, if crafted well and enacted quickly, are necessary for a sustainable economic recovery.  It is important that Congress not only turn ideas into action, but in doing so, address Puerto Rico’s significant remaining economic and social challenges in meaningful ways to help put Puerto Rico on a path of sustained economic growth. As the report acknowledges, Puerto Rico faces an imminent shortfall in health care funding that could leave up to 900,000 Americans without coverage if Congress does not act in the near future.  Puerto Rico’s already vulnerable health care system is stretched further by a Zika outbreak that, as of January 4, has resulted in over 34,000 cases, and will affect numerous women, children, and families for years to come.  It is time to provide a long-term solution to Puerto Rico’s historically inadequate federal Medicaid financing, which threatens the viability of Puerto Rico’s Medicaid program and worsens Puerto Rico’s fiscal crisis.  If Congress fails to craft a long-term solution, immediate action is still needed to ensure full fiscal year 2018 financing to avoid the “Medicaid cliff” identified in the report.  Without action before April, Puerto Rico’s ability to execute contracts for Fiscal Year 2018 with its managed care organizations will be threatened, thereby putting at risk beginning July 1, 2017 the health care of up to 900,000 poor U.S. citizens living in Puerto Rico. Additionally, Puerto Rico continues to suffer from double digit unemployment and a labor force participation rate that is only two-thirds that of the U.S. average.  A federally-financed, locally-administered Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) in Puerto Rico would create incentives for work and increase participation in the formal economy – just as it has done for decades in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.  Instead of recommending the immediate enactment of an EITC, the Task Force only suggested Congress further explore the proposal.  We strongly encourage Congress to enact this powerful economic driver to bolster Puerto Rico’s future.  Our analysis of the situation over the last several years demonstrates that an EITC would be the most effective and powerful tool to address these structural challenges to economic growth. Beyond those two major issues, the Task Force recommended a number of other policies that we agree should be enacted.  First, we appreciate the bipartisan recommendation for Congress to continue authorizing Treasury to provide technical assistance to Puerto Rico.  Furthermore, while we recommend a different approach to expand the Child Tax Credit to more Puerto Rican families, one that is locally administered, we welcome the Task Force recommendation for Congress to expand the Child Tax Credit in Puerto Rico, to the extent it is well-designed and supplements an EITC program for Puerto Rico.  We support the Task Force’s acknowledgment of the importance of data in benchmarking economic growth and fiscal developments in Puerto Rico and the recommendations to improve data quality and timeliness.  Finally, we are pleased with the recommendations on small business incentives, and the need to include Puerto Rico in funding and training programs that address Puerto Rico’s differential treatment in some Federal programs.  It is time for Congress to move quickly to put these recommendations into law. Last summer, Republicans and Democrats in Congress took decisive action in PROMESA to help improve Puerto Rico’s fiscal position by establishing an independent oversight board and providing it with comprehensive debt restructuring tools.  As you know, these tools were provided to Puerto Rico as an alternative to a federal bailout and provide Puerto Rico’s government and the Oversight Board with comprehensive authorities to address the debt crisis. Members of Congress now must work together quickly to enact well-crafted legislation to encourage growth and opportunity for our fellow citizens in Puerto Rico. The Treasury Department and the Department of Health and Human Services stand committed to working with you to achieving those goals throughout the remainder of the transition to the next Administration.                                                                    Sincerely,     Jacob J. Lew                                       Sylvia M. Burwell Secretary                                             Secretary Department of the Treasury                Department of Health and Human Services   Identical letter sent to:             The Honorable Charles E. Schumer             The Honorable Paul D. Ryan             The Honorable Nancy Pelosi​​​

22 октября, 20:04

One in Five 2014 Marketplace Consumers was a Small Business Owner or Self-Employed

​Independent Workers Are Almost Three Times More Likely To Rely on Marketplace Coverage than Other Workers   Today, Treasury released a report with new data on sources of health insurance coverage for small business owners and self-employed workers. These data show that the Affordable Care Act (ACA’s) Health Insurance Marketplaces are playing an especially crucial role in providing health coverage to entrepreneurs and other independent workers.   Prior to the Affordable Care Act, workers without employer-sponsored health insurance often lacked options for affordable coverage. Not only did high uninsured rates impede access to care and worsen financial security, but the risk of ending up without health insurance coverage prevented some individuals from striking out on their own. Experts considered “job lock,” or individuals’ need to stay in an employment situation to maintain health coverage, a significant impediment to entrepreneurship. To help address these challenges, the ACA’s Marketplaces were designed to offer portable health insurance coverage to small business owners and other independent workers, a growing segment of the economy.   One in five 2014 Marketplace consumers was a small business owner or self-employed   New data included in today’s Treasury Department report on alternative work arrangements show that small business owners and self-employed workers are taking advantage of the opportunity to purchase health coverage through the Marketplaces.[1] In 2014, 1.4 million Marketplace consumers were self-employed, small business owners, or both, indicating that about one in five 2014 Marketplace consumers was a small business owner or self-employed. Indeed, among the 5.3 million workers who purchased Marketplace coverage for themselves (excluding their children or non-working spouses), about 28 percent were workers whose income was not primarily earned from wages paid by an employer.   In fact, small business owners and self-employed individuals were nearly three times as likely to purchase Marketplace coverage as other workers. Nearly 10 percent of small business owners and more than 10 percent of gig economy workers got coverage through the Marketplace in 2014. Among small business owners and other independent workers, those with annual incomes below $65,000 were the most likely to rely on the Marketplace for health insurance. Middle- and lower-income Americans who buy coverage through the Marketplace are eligible for tax credits to help keep coverage affordable. About 65 percent of small business owners and 69 percent of all self-employed or independent workers have incomes below $65,000.   Between 2014 and 2015, the number of people who signed up for Marketplace coverage increased by around 50 percent. And enrollment increased further in 2016, and is poised to rise again in 2017. Marketplace coverage among independent workers has almost certainly risen as well. HHS is also partnering with outside companies that support freelance workers, entrepreneurs, and start-ups to reach more independent workers with information about Marketplace coverage and financial assistance.   Geographic patterns in small business owners’ and independent workers’ health coverage   Today’s report includes detailed state-by-state data on Marketplace participation among entrepreneurs and independent workers. In all 50 states and D.C., thousands of small business owners and independent workers bought Marketplace coverage in 2014. Of note:   ·         The ten states with the highest share of small business owners relying on the Marketplace for coverage were Vermont, Idaho, Florida, Montana, Maine, California, New Hampshire, Washington, D.C., Rhode Island, and North Carolina.   ·         The 10 states with the largest number of small business owners with Marketplace coverage were California, Florida, Texas, New York, Georgia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Washington, and Virginia.     Adam Looney is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Tax Analysis at the U.S. Department of Treasury. Kathryn Martin is the Acting Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation at the U.S Department of Health and Human Services.   [1] The Treasury report defines small business owners as Schedule C filers whose business activities (measured by expenses and gross receipts) exceed certain de minimis thresholds (a minimum of $5,000 of business expenses and either $15,000 of gross receipts or $10,000 of business expenses). Self-employed workers are defined as individuals who earn at least 85 percent of their earnings from operating a sole-proprietorship. “Gig economy workers” are those whose self-employment income derives in part or in whole from activities conducted through an online platform.  ​

22 октября, 20:04

The Economic Security of Older Women

Today, the Office of Economic Policy at the Treasury Department released the fourth in a series of briefs exploring the economic security of American households. This brief​ focuses on the economic security of older women. In this brief, we ask: Are older women at greater risk of poverty or being unable to manage their expenses than other populations? Are there specific groups of women at risk? What are the implications for policy? Compared with men, we find that elderly women are much more likely to be economically insecure. We attribute this finding to a variety of factors. Women live longer than men, meaning they have to finance a longer retirement and that they are more likely to reach an age in which they must finance disability costs.  In addition, women tend to have lower lifetime earnings than men. Finally, women are more likely than men to live alone and thus are less likely to live with someone with whom to share economic risks.  In this brief, we assess economic insecurity in a number of ways but focus on two measures: the poverty rate and the “overextended” rate—the share of the population whose spending exceeds what it can afford based on its income and annuitized wealth. We view this latter measure as reflecting economic insecurity, because elderly women who are overextended and on fixed incomes must reduce spending to live within their means. For women with low levels of consumption, this could entail cutting back on necessities like food and medicine. Comparing different measures of economic security, we find that the overextended share of the female population is 29 percent, far higher than the poverty rate of 12 percent. The implication is that economic insecurity is broader than the poverty rate implies. We find that single women are far more economically insecure on all measures than married women and that widowhood dramatically increases the likelihood of becoming insecure relative to remaining married. Widowhood is associated with a large loss in income and wealth; and while widows experience a large drop in household spending at widowhood, they continue to cut spending at rates faster than single women and married households.  We also find that disability is associated with economic insecurity. The median disabled woman’s household assets (including non-liquid assets like housing) are sufficient only to finance six months in a nursing home, and the median disabled woman’s household has financial wealth sufficient to cover less than half a month of nursing home expenses. Women who remain married throughout their elderly years, on the other hand, do not experience high rates of economic insecurity. And holding constant marital status and disability status, we do not observe sharp increases in economic insecurity as women age. Notably, even though the poverty rate rises for women as they age, the overextended rate falls as women rely more on wealth to support themselves.   All told, our findings suggest that public policy should focus on specific risks associated with aging, particularly living alone and living with a disability. We note that married couples might benefit from shifting more of their wealth from periods in which both spouses are alive to periods in which only one spouse is alive. Such an outcome could be accomplished in the private sector with greater use of financial products with survivor benefits. Experts have also suggested ways that public policy could help address the challenge, such as by restructuring Social Security to increase survivor benefits. Looking at disability, we note that while Medicaid and private long-term care insurance provide protection for some households, there is still a large unmet need that is apparent when looking at the economic security risks posed by disability. Karen Dynan is the Assistant Secretary of Economic Policy at the Department of the Treasury.

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

Пол-экономики поименно

  • 0

Первый эшелон отечественных компаний быстро укрупняется и наращивает производительность

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

Пределы роста не достигнуты

Лидеры ритейла даже не заметили кризиса: они наращивали выручку и число магазинов. Остановить этот рост могут только излишне жесткие правила регулирования отрасли или ошибки менеджмента

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

Случай как бизнес-стратегия

Томский холдинг «КДВ Групп», известный своей непубличностью и декларируемым отсутствием хоть сколько- нибудь долгосрочной стратегии, продолжает поступательное развитие. Драйверы — экспорт, в том числе в Китай, и экспансия подконтрольной розничной сети «Ярче!» в Центральную Россию

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

Малый — вперед

Независимые мини-НПЗ Юга России демонстрируют завидный рост оборотов. Однако планируемая модернизация, направленная на кардинальное увеличение глубины переработки нефти, потребует не только гигантских инвестиций, но и смены привычной бизнес-модели

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

В эпсилон-окрестности от нирваны

Бизнес российской ИТ-компании «АйТеко» растет, ни разу не упав в выручке, более двадцати лет подряд. Составляющие успеха — суперкомпетенции отцов-основателей, госзаказы и четкое следование долгосрочному тренду цифровой трансформации экономики

Выбор редакции
22 октября, 00:00

Шагреневая кожа

Суммарная капитализация российских компаний за год выросла сразу более чем на 20%. Но обеспечили этот результат 20 крупнейших фирм. В остальные, похоже, мало кто верит. «Входной билет» в топ-200 по капитализации упал до смехотворного уровня — четыре миллиона долларов

Выбор редакции
19 октября, 13:16

Москва возглавила мировой рейтинг качества услуг

Таллин оказался столицей ЕС с самыми развитыми электронными услугами, согласно составленному ООН рейтингу.

Выбор редакции
19 октября, 12:59

Назван самый дорогой город Испании

За последние 5 лет цены на жилье в Барселоне выросли на 49% и теперь оказались самыми высокими в Испании.

Выбор редакции
18 октября, 17:22

Эксперты рассказали, сколько в Европе тратят на культуру

Доля расходов Венгрии на сферу культуры, досуга и религии больше, чем в других странах ЕС.

Выбор редакции
18 октября, 16:39

Роскачество назвало лучшее светлое пиво

Роскачество провело исследование светлого пива 40 торговых марок.

Выбор редакции
15 октября, 15:16

Названа самая бедная страна Европы

По информации Владимира Компанийца, который ссылается на данные МВФ, Украина — самая бедная страна Европы.

Выбор редакции
15 октября, 10:52

Moody's: США гибнут под гнетом неравенства

«Суверенный кредитный профиль может быть подорван через каналы экономических, институциональных и политических рисков», — характеризует агентство Moody’s положение в США и указывая как на основную причину этого сценария «растущее неравенство, связанное с возможностями по доходам и занятости». Неравенство может стать причиной, по которой будет понижен суверенный кредитный рейтинг Соединенных Штатов

Выбор редакции
15 октября, 00:00

За краем нефтегазового горизонта

Рейтинг инвестиционной активности в России показывает: в среднесрочной перспективе у нас нет ненефтегазового будущего. До сих пор основная бизнес-идея страны —добыча углеводородов, и это парадоксально, потому что уже давно экономически выгодны совсем другие проекты

Выбор редакции
15 октября, 00:00

Критическое послесловие

Обсуждение пионерского рейтинга в профессиональной среде вышло заинтересованным и острым

Выбор редакции
10 октября, 17:14

Россиянам хватает на Новый год недели для отдыха

Biletix выяснил, где россияне хотят провести новогодние праздники.

24 мая 2017, 13:33

Moody's и MSCI предупредили о проблемах Китая

После всех заявлений китайских чиновников о необходимости сдерживать рост задолженности и открывать рынки для мировых инвесторов, руководство страны получило двойное предупреждение, пишет Bloomberg.

12 мая 2017, 07:04

Легкая добыча: Forbes составил рейтинг крупнейших покупателей российской нефти

На 20 участников рейтинга приходится почти 85% российского экспорта нефти, а он в 2016 году достиг 254,8 млн т. На первом месте — Litasco, швейцарский трейдер «Лукойла»

15 марта 2017, 11:16

Топ-20 городов с самым высоким уровнем жизни

Mercer, одна из крупнейших консалтинговых компаний в сфере HR, публикует свой ежегодный индекс качества жизни Quality of Living Index, в рамках которого города мира оцениваются с точки зрения качества жизни по целому ряду параметров.

20 февраля 2017, 15:46

Квадратный метр в Монако взлетел до $44 тысяч

Стоимость недвижимости в Монако достигла рекордной отметки 41,42 тыс. евро ($44,1 тыс) за квадратный метр в 2016 г., поднявшись на 15%, пишет Bloomberg со ссылкой на предварительные статистические данные.

04 февраля 2017, 22:38

Продажи электромобилей в 2016 году

Мировые продажи легковых электромобилей и подключаемых гибридов в 2016 году составили 774 тыс.единиц с ростом в 42% к  2015 и долей 0,86%К концу 2016 общее количество электромобилей в мире превысило 2 миллиона.Продажи по регионам(Китай - данные только по легковым электромобилям без коммерческих, которых еще около 160 тысяч, в основном электробусов)Рейтинг производителейРейтинг по моделямПрогноз на 2017 годhttp://www.ev-volumes.com/

02 февраля 2017, 14:18

7 самых успешных управляющих хедж-фондов

Лондонский фонд LCH Investments, подразделение Edmond de Rothschild Capital Holdings Limited, опубликовал свой ежегодный рейтинг 20 самых успешных фондовых управляющих 2016 года.

02 февраля 2017, 13:10

Управляемые компьютером хедж-фонды вышли в лидеры

Искусственный интеллект вновь демонстрирует свое могущество: хедж-фонды, которые используют алгоритмы, выходят в лидеры рейтингов эффективности, что, тем не менее, делает математиков и программистов главными компонентами успешного инвестирования

30 сентября 2016, 17:09

Топ-10 самых инновационных университетов мира

Считается, что американская университетская система – это двигатель инноваций и прогресса, и это подтверждает рейтинг инновационных университетов мира от Reuters.

29 сентября 2016, 03:00

Фрицморгены недоумевают...

Что так нахраписто выстраиваемая ими пропагандистская реальность внезапно рушится, когда выясняется, что международные медицинские эксперты из журнала The Lancet помещают Россию в рейтинге смертности и заболеваемости стран на место весьма далекое от их пропагандистских грез. На место ниже Северной Кореи, Украины, Киргизстана и Бутана. Впрочем, смотрите все сами:Россия на 119 месте в мире из 188 стран, находясь в предпоследней группе стран наряду с развивающимися странами Африки и Азии. Хуже дела обстоят только в последней группе стран центральной Африки.Среди критериев, которые учитывались при ранжировании стран, — детская и младенческая смертность, смертность в дорожно-транспортных происшествиях, избыточный вес у детей, уровень потребления алкоголя и табакокурения, заболеваемость ВИЧ, туберкулезом и гепатитом B, число самоубийств. Кроме того, эксперты смотрели на смертность от насильственных действий и смертность в войнах. Расчет по каждому критерию велся на основе анализа ситуации с 1990 по 2015 год.Фрицморгены и прочие пропагандоны, конечно же, не верят этим данным, однако, если взглянуть на ситуацию даже сквозь призму официальных данных Росстата, то в стране действительно случилась после буржуазной контрреволюции 1991-93 годов настоящая катастрофа по всем показателям, включая медицинские. Выросла, как смертность:Так и заболеваемость:Советская модель профилактики и недопущения заболеваний практически разрушена, а новая, основанная на идеологии получения прибыли с пациента, привела к гуманитарной катастрофе, что наряду с социально-экономической и демографической катастрофами, отбросило Россию в ряд неразвитых и развивающихся стран. А ведь еще при Бреженеве страна входила в третью десятку стран по мировому рейтингу здравоохранения. То есть была в крепких середняках, находясь несколько ниже США.Вообще, практически все страны СНГ постигла схожая с Россией судьба. Исключение составляет только Эстония.Вот полный список этого рейтинга: 1 Iceland 51 Montenegro 101 Algeria 151 Bangladesh 2 Singapore 52 Argentina 102 El Salvador 152 Yemen 3 Sweden 53 Albania 103 Turkey 153 Zambia 4 Andorra 54 Chile 104 Iran 154 Tanzania 5 UK 55 Uzbekistan 105 Saudi Arabia 155 Papua New Guinea 6 Finland 56 Trinidad and Tobago 106 Georgia 156 The Gambia 7 Spain 57 Costa Rica 107 Samoa 157 Equatorial 8 Netherlands 58 Saint Vincent 108 Tunisia 158 Guinea 9 Canada 59 Jamaica 109 Morocco 159 Nepal 10 Australia 60 Turkmenistan 110 Guyana 160 Congo 11 Norway 61 Macedonia 111 Mongolia 161 Sudan 12 Luxembourg 62 Bahrain 112 Thailand 162 Cote d'Ivoire 13 Ireland 63 Maldives 113 Kyrgyzstan 163 Eritrea 14 Malta 64 Peru 114 Bhutan 164 Nigeria 15 Germany 65 Serbia 115 Honduras 165 Togo 16 Denmark 66 Cuba 116 North Korea 166 Benin 17 Cyprus 67 Bulgaria 117 Syria 167 Liberia 18 Belgium 68 Kuwait 118 Ukraine 168 Rwanda 19 Switzerland 69 Mexico 119 Russia 169 Malawi 20 Italy 70 Grenada 120 Belarus 170 Lesotho 21 Brunei 71 Ecuador 121 Bolivia 171 Angola 22 Portugal 72 Panama 122 Timor-Leste 172 Cameroon 23 Israel 73 Bosnia and Herzegovina 123 Cape Verde 173 Burkina Faso 24 France 74 Romania 124 Egypt 174 Uganda 25 Slovenia 75 Azerbaijan 125 Guatemala 175 Ethiopia 26 Greece 76 Palestine 126 Libya 176 Guinea 27 Japan 77 Lebanon 127 Philippines 177 Guinea-Bissau 28 USA 78 Venezuela 128 Iraq 178 Mozambique 29 Estonia 79 Sri Lanka 129 Kiribati 179 Madagascar 30 New Zealand 80 Moldova 130 Cambodia 180 Sierra Leone 31 Austria 81 Micronesia 131 Sao Tome and Principe 181 Afghanistan 32 Taiwan 82 Dominican Republic 132 Vanuatu 182 Mali 33 Antigua and Barbuda 83 Tonga 133 Botswana 183 Burundi 34 Czech Republic 84 United Arab Emirates 134 South Africa 184 Congo 35 South Korea 85 Kazakhstan 135 Myanmar 185 Chad 36 Hungary 86 Armenia 136 Laos 186 Niger 37 Slovakia 87 Suriname 137 Namibia 187 South 38 Uruguay 88 Colombia 138 Solomon Islands 188 Sudan 39 Poland 89 Qatar 139 Gabon 189 Somalia 40 Seychelles 90 Brazil 140 Djibouti 190 Central African Republic 41 Barbados 91 Indonesia 141 Ghana 42 Croatia 92 China 142 Comoros 43 The Bahamas 93 Oman 143 India 44 Jordan 94 Vietnam 144 Senegal 45 Latvia 95 Fiji 145 Haiti 46 Malaysia 96 Belize 146 Kenya 47 Lithuania 97 Marshall Islands 147 Zimbabwe 48 Mauritius 98 Paraguay 148 Swaziland 49 Dominica 99 Tajikistan 149 Pakistan 50 Saint Lucia 100 Nicaragua 150 Mauritania

16 июля 2016, 12:31

Американцам очень не нравятся оба кандидата в президенты

          По результатам последних опросов Трамп впервые за 2 месяца догнал Клинтон по уровню поддержки среди избирателей. За Трампа также как и за Клинтон собираются голосовать примерно по 40% избирателей.                    Это интегральный рейтинг по результатам последних 5 опросов. Ниже можно увидеть перечень из этих 5 опросов.              Наиболее авторитетным среди этих опросов является опрос, проведенный совместно NY Times и CBS News (вторая строчка). Он как раз и показал паритет между уровнями поддержики Клинтон и Трампа. Обратить внимание следует на 2 вещи. Во-первых, предыдущий опрос NY Times и CBS, проведенный в июне показывал отрыв Клинтон от Трампа в 6 проц. пунктов, а в апреле отрыв составлял 10 проц пунктов.                      Во-вторых, антирейтинги и Клинтон и Трампы бьют рекорды. В американском полит процессе есть понятия favorable rating, что в переводе на русский означает рейтинг одобрения и unfavorable rating - соответственно рейтинг неодобрения. Так вот, рейтинг неодобрения у обоих кандидатов бьет исторический рекорд (см. таблицу)                  Трамп нравится 30% избирателей, Клинтон - 28% избирателей. При этом 54% процентам избирателей не нравится ни Трамп, ни Клинтон. Избирателей также спросили доверяют ли они кандидатам. 62% избирателей не доверяют Трампу, 67% избирателей не доверяют Клинтон (источник).          Такого не было последние 10 избирательных компаний. Смотрите, ниже приведена диаграмма с рейтингом неодобрения обоих кандидатов по состоянию на апрель последних 10 (десяти) избирательных компаний.                    Ни разу с 1980 года ни у одного из кандидатов в президенты не было такого высокого рейтинга неодобрения как у Клинтон и Трампа. Обращаю внимание на то что это данные за апрель, когда между Трампом и Клинтон еще был сильный разрыв. А ниже такая же диаграмма но с разницей между рейтингом одобрения и рейтингом неодобрения обоих кандидатов. В нормальной ситуации разница должна составлять что-то около нуля.                    Как мы видим у Трампа сальдо минус 40%, у Клинтон минус 20%. В прежние годы сальдо минус 5% считалось неординарным событием (источник). Вообще по уму сальдо между рейтингом одобрения и неодобрения должно быть положительным, в противном случае партия неправильно выбрала кандидата.          Что сложившаяся ситуация означает? Население США не доверяет обеим политическим партиям, считает политическую систему сломанной, о чем сейчас не говорит только ленивый.          Уже не имеет значения кто победит. Политическую систему США можно утилизировать. Теперь она будет только источником нестабильности и проблем. Потому что население больше не верит в политическую систему резонно предполагая, что обе партии манипулируются олигархами. Соответственно, президент будет иметь низкий рейтинг, любое его действие будет вызывать раздражение населения. Короче, США вступают в период нестабильности.

20 мая 2016, 12:59

Самые богатые наследники российских миллиардеров!

Если взять совокупное состояние всех 77 миллиардеров из последнего списка Forbes ($283 млрд) и поделить его на детей (всего у миллиардеров 243 ребенка), получится чуть больше миллиарда на каждого. Forbes решил посмотреть, кому из наследников повезло больше всех. В списке представлено 20 семей, где на каждого ребенка приходится не менее $1,82 млрд. Общее количество детей — 47.Формально этот список нельзя назвать рейтингом наследников — мы, например, не учитывали в расчетах супружеские доли. Для простоты мы делили все состояние бизнесмена на всех его признанных детей. Получилась интересная картина — дети Романа Абрамовича, например, не попали в список. Их у миллиардера семеро, и на каждого приходится лишь по $1,1 млрд. Зато в списке можно увидеть младшего партнера Искандера Махмудова в УГМК Андрея Козицына — на его $2,4 млрд пока может претендовать единственная дочь.На сегодняшний день самым богатым наследником ($8,9 млрд) является Юсуф Алекперов, единственный сын президента «Лукойла» Вагита Алекперова. На этом месте должна была быть Виктория Михельсон, дочь основного владельца «Новатэка» и «Сибура» Леонида Михельсона, но неожиданно выяснилось, что у ее 60-летнего отца недавно родился сын. Состояние бизнесмена пришлось делить пополам.Своих наследников миллиардеры воспитывают по-разному. Алекперов, например, сделал все, чтобы его сын остался в России и продолжил его дело. Юсуф получил профильное образование и по настоянию отца работал простым инженером в разных компаниях «Лукойла».Основной владелец «Альфа-Групп» Михаил Фридман, напротив, дает своим детям полную свободу выбора. Он не хочет «создавать династию» и никого из своих четверых детей трудоустраивать не собирается.Дети миллиардеров — неважно, где они учатся, в России или за рубежом — предпочитают специальности «экономика» и «менеджмент». Самым популярным высшим учебным заведением, как ни странно, остается МГИМО. Этот же институт был самым популярным и среди их отцов.1. Вагит АлекперовСостояние: $8,9 млрдРебенок: Юсуф Алекперов (1990)Доля одного ребенка: $8,9  млрдЕдинственный сын крупнейшего акционера «Лукойла» Вагита Алекперова перестал быть одним из самых завидных женихов России. В апреле 2016 года он выложил в Instagram фото с церемонии бракосочетания с блондинкой по имени Алиса. Незадолго до этого он хвастался перед своими подписчиками вторым красным дипломом. Первый он получил в РГУ нефти и газа им. Губкина по специальности «инженер-нефтяник». Второй — по специальности «экономика и менеджмент». Юсуф хочет стать продолжателем дела отца — миллиардер завещал ему пакет акций «Лукойла» с условием, что он не будет продавать или делить его.2. Андрей МельниченкоСостояние: $8,2 млрдРебенок: Тара Мельниченко (2012)Доля одного ребенка: $8,2  млрдВладелец компаний «Еврохим» и СУЭК женился в 2005 году на Сандре Николич, бывшей солистке белградской группы Models, состоящей из четырех сербских профессиональных моделей. Одна из участниц группы — Ивана Берендика — стала женой американского мультимиллионера, сегодня исполнительного директора Bell Laboratories Томаса Ермолюка. Дочери Мельниченко Таре четыре года, в школу она пока не ходит. Девочка вместе с родителями путешествует по всему миру — у Мельниченко есть свои дома в России, США, Великобритании, Франции, Швейцарии и Монако.3. Леонид МихельсонСостояние: $14,4 млрдРебенок: Виктория Михельсон (1992); сын (2015)Доля одного ребенка: $7,2  млрдДочь основного владельца компаний «Новатэк» и «Сибур» Леонида Михельсона Виктория специализируется на contemporary art. Она изучала историю искусств в Нью-Йоркском университете, а ее отец создал в 2009-м в Москве фонд, который активно поддерживает молодых российских художников, организует их выставки на Западе. Название фонду «Виктория — Искусство Быть Современным» (V-A-C Foundation) дано в честь дочери. Она не участвует активно в его работе, но в курсе всех проектов, рассказал представитель фонда. У Михельсона, которому 60 лет, недавно родился второй ребенок — сын.4. Алексей КузьмичевСостояние: $6,7 млрдРебенок: Алексис Кузьмичев (2009)Доля одного ребенка: $6,7  млрдПартнер Михаила Фридмана и Германа Хана по «Альфа-Групп» Алексей Кузьмичев впервые женился в 40 с лишним лет на Светлане Успенской, бывшей сотруднице американского PR-агентства Hill & Knowlton, которое в ноябре 2002 года помогло «Альфе» разрешить ситуацию с катастрофой у берегов Испании танкера Prestige, перевозившего принадлежащий «Альфе» мазут. Сегодня Светлана занимается своим проектом Project Perpetua — с помощью известных деятелей современного искусства устраивает мероприятия по сбору средств для благотворительных программ. Сын Кузьмичева Алексис ходит в школу в Париже.5. Сергей ГалицкийСостояние: $5,7 млрдРебенок: Полина Галицкая (1995)Доля одного ребенка: $5,7  млрдДочь владельца сети «Магнит» окончила гимназию в Краснодаре и сейчас учится в Кубанском госуниверситете на экономическом факультете. Пять лет назад Галицкий говорил газете «Ведомости», что огорчился бы, «если бы… дочь интересовалась [его] бизнесом». «Я хочу, чтобы у меня вырос нормальный ребенок, и не хочу, чтобы моя дочь занималась бизнесом, потому что женщина и бизнес — это разные понятия». Он считает, что не имеет права «моделировать ее жизнь» по своему вкусу. Тем не менее признался Forbes, что отговорил Полину поступать на факультет иностранных языков, чего она очень хотела.6. Виктор ВексельбергСостояние: $10,5 млрдРебенок: Ирина Вексельберг (1979); Александр Вексельберг (1988)Доля одного ребенка: $5,25  млрдДочь и сын владельца ГК «Ренова» Виктора Вексельберга окончили Йельский университет. Александр остался в США, работает в венчурном фонде «Реновы» Columbus Nova Technology Partners (CNTP), который инвестирует в американские стартапы. Ирина живет в Москве, вместе с мужем-предпринимателем воспитывает сына и дочь. После окончания университета работала аналитиком в Citigroup, занималась M&A в «Ренове», а сегодня является советником главы международной инвестиционной компании New Age Capital Partners, которая специализируется на российско-китайских сделках. ГК «Ренова» — один из крупнейших клиентов компании.7. Искандер МахмудовСостояние: $4 млрдРебенок: Джахангир Махмудов (1987)Доля одного ребенка: $4  млрдЕдинственный сын основного акционера УГМК Искандера Махмудова юные годы провел в Лондоне, окончил Лондонскую школу экономики и Международную школу бизнеса Халта. Вернулся в Россию, чтобы стать преемником бизнеса отца. В 2009 году был советником гендиректора «Аэроэкспресса» (Махмудов-старший — акционер). В 2010-м ушел в Goldman Sachs, через два года вернулся. Жил в Екатеринбурге, работал в службе директора по горному производству «УГМК-Холдинга». В 2015-м перебрался в Челябинск и стал замом гендиректора входящего в холдинг «Челябинского цинкового завода». Отдыхает, как и отец, на охоте.8. Дмитрий РыболовлевСостояние: $7,7 млрдРебенок: Екатерина Рыболовлева (1989); Анна Рыболовлева (2001)Доля одного ребенка: $3,85  млрдСтаршая дочь бывшего владельца «Уралкалия» Екатерина в октябре 2015 года вышла замуж за уругвайского финансиста Хуана Сартори. Свадьба прошла на греческом острове Скорпиос, который Рыболовлев ей подарил. Дата была выбрана не случайно — 47 лет назад, 20 октября 1968 года, в этом месте была свадьба бывшего владельца острова Аристотеля Онассиса и Жаклин Кеннеди. Скорпиос — не первый щедрый подарок отца. В 2011-м, когда Екатерина училась в Гарвардском университете, он купил ей пентхаус в Нью-Йорке за $88 млн. Младшую дочь Анну миллиардер не балует. Она живет в Женеве с матерью Еленой Рыболовлевой.9. Геннадий ТимченкоСостояние: $11,4 млрдРебенок: Наталья; Ксения Франк (1985); Иван Тимченко (1995)Доля одного ребенка: $3,8  млрдСтаршая дочь Геннадия Тимченко Наталья изучала английскую литературу в Оксфордском университете. Несколько лет назад она вернулась в Россию, где, по словам источников Forbes, занялась кинематографом. Младшая дочь Ксения с отличием окончила Эдинбургский университет, где изучала философию и французский язык. Ее муж Глеб Франк — сын гендиректора «Совкомфлота» Сергея Франка. Ксения работает членом совета директоров транспортной компании «Трансойл». Сын Тимченко Иван учится в Женевском университете, изучает международные отношения.10. Михаил ФридманСостояние: $13,3 млрдРебенок: Лора Фридман (1993); Катя Фридман (1996); Александр Ожельский (2000); Ника Ожельская (2006)Доля одного ребенка: $3,3  млрд«Я не хочу создавать династию», — сказал Фридман в интервью Financial Times в апреле 2016 года. Он не намерен брать на работу в «Альфа-Групп» или LetterOne своих детей. Его старшая дочь Лора в 2015-м окончила Йельский университет, где изучала экономику, а в годы учебы танцевала в балетной труппе YaleDancers. Средняя дочь Катя изучает в Йеле историю. Сын Саша учится в престижной частной школе Kent School. Саша дружит с сыном другого участника списка Forbes Олега Тинькова Пашей. Они вместе придумывают IT-проекты, например информационный сайт Apple Tech Info. Младшая дочь Ника пока живет с мамой в Москве.11. Владимир ЛисинСостояние: $9,3 млрдРебенок: Дмитрий Лисин (1981); Юрий Лисин (1984); Анастасия Лисина (1998)Доля одного ребенка: $3,1  млрдДети владельца НЛМК Владимира Лисина избегают публичности. Даже старший, Дмитрий, еще не дал ни одного интервью и ни разу не попал в объективы фотографов. А ведь он уже несколько лет помогает отцу управлять активами: входит в совет «Первой грузовой компании», Волжского и Северо-Западного пароходств, Туапсинского морского торгового порта и медиахолдинга «Румедиа». Больше всего времени он уделяет радиостанциям Business FM и «Шоколад». Средний сын Юрий, по словам отца, занят венчурными проектами, а Анастасия в этом году оканчивает школу и хочет поступить в один из российских вузов.12. Михаил ГуцериевСостояние: $5,9 млрдРебенок: Саид Гуцериев (1988); Софья Гуцериева (1990)Доля одного ребенка: $2,95  млрдСын основателя группы БИН Михаила Гуцериева Саид 17 лет жил в Англии и получил там второе гражданство. Окончив престижную школу Хэрроу, поступил в Оксфорд на факультет археологии и геологии. Потом учился в Плимутском университете по специальности «менеджмент нефтегазовой отрасли». Работал в нефтетрейдере Glencore, в конце 2014 года вернулся в Россию и возглавил третью нефтяную компанию группы БИН — «Фортеинвест». В апреле 2016-го Саид женился. Свадьбу отпраздновали сначала в Москве, потом в Лондоне. Дочь Гуцериева Софья учится в МГУ на факультете иностранных языков.13. Владимир ПотанинСостояние: $12,1 млрдРебенок: Анастасия Потанина (1984); Иван Потанин (1989); Василий Потанин (2000); Варвара Потанина (2012); сын (2014)Доля одного ребенка: $2,4  млрдУ старших детей совладельца и гендиректора ГМК «Норильский никель» Владимира Потанина Анастасии и Ивана Потаниных долгое время был общий интерес — аквабайк. За годы выступлений на российских и мировых соревнованиях они завоевали несколько десятков чемпионских титулов. Оба уже не занимаются профессиональным спортом. Иван работает аналитиком в международной инвестиционной компании LR Global, а Анастасия помогает отцу в управлении горнолыжным курортом «Роза Хутор» и недавно организовала некоммерческий проект Artis, который направлен на популяризацию молодых российских художников.14. Андрей КозицынСостояние: $2,4 млрдРебенок: Мария Козицына (1999)Доля одного ребенка: $2,4 млрдЛетом 2015 года единственная дочь генерального директора Уральской горно-металлургической компании (УГМК) Андрея Козицына окончила Ломоносовскую школу «Интек» в Истринском районе Подмосковья с золотой медалью «За особые успехи в обучении», после чего поступила на экономический факультет Высшей школы экономики. В социальных сетях дружит с дочерью коммерческого директора «УГМК-Холдинга» Игоря Кудряшкина Настей и дочерью гендиректора «Торгового дома УГМК» Эдуарда Чухлебова Марией.15. Петр АвенСостояние: $4,6 млрдРебенок: Денис Авен (1994); Дарья Авен (1994)Доля одного ребенка: $2,3 млрдБлизнецы председателя совета директоров банковского холдинга «Альфа-Групп» Петра Авена в 2016 году закончат учебу в Йельском университете. Денис, который изучает экономику и математику, в мае — июле 2015-го прошел стажировку в международной инвестиционной компании Lazard, которая специализируется на финансовых консультациях и управлении активами. Его сестра Дарья увлекается искусством и проходила практику в Sotheby’s. Оба входят в число лучших учеников университета, так что Авен, член Президентского совета при Йельском университете, может ими только гордиться.16. Сергей ПоповСостояние: $4,5 млрдДоля одного ребенка: $2,25 млрдУзнать что-то либо о наследниках бывшего владельца МДМ Банка Сергея Попова непросто. Бизнесмен избегает публичности и требует от сотрудников прикладывать максимум усилий, чтобы СМИ не упоминали его фамилию. Знакомые бизнесмена рассказали Forbes, что у него двое детей младшего школьного возраста. Их потенциальное наследство — несколько миллиардов долларов в трасте, зарегистрированном на Джерси. Эти деньги Попов получил после раздела бизнеса Группы МДМ с Андреем Мельниченко и продажи активов. Бизнесмен — учредитель благотворительного фонда «Агат», который помогает молодым предпринимателям.17. Герман ХанСостояние: $8,7 млрдРебенок: Ева Хан (1995); Элеонора Хан (2001); сын (2005); сын (2012)Доля одного ребенка: $2,2 млрдСтаршая дочь совладельца «Альфа-Групп» Германа Хана Ева живет в Лондоне, изучает историю искусств в Институте искусства Курто (Courtauld Institute of Art) и сама пишет картины. Ее работы можно купить на сайте oilyoil.com, они стоят от 20 000 до 70 000 рублей. За время учебы в Лондоне она прошла стажировку в аукционном доме Sotheby’s, потом в Еврейском музее и центре толерантности и в русском Tatler. Ее младшая сестра Элеонора учится в одной из престижных школ Великобритании, увлекается рисованием.18. Леонид ФедунСостояние: $3,9 млрдРебенок: Антон Федун (1985); Екатерина Федун (1988)Доля одного ребенка: $1,95  млрдСын совладельца «Лукойла» Леонида Федуна Антон живет в Лондоне. Окончил Университет Суррея по специальности «менеджмент и туризм» и Школу бизнеса Риджентс. Прошел курс управления отелями в австралийском Университете Бонда и сегодня управляет собственным пятизвездным The Ampersand Hotel в Лондоне. Параллельно работает директором Garlick Hill Hotel Project. Екатерина — специалист по пиару. Окончила МГИМО, а потом Школу бизнеса Риджентс. В 2014 году вышла замуж за Юхана Гераскина, в то время менеджера ФК «Спартак», которым владеет ее отец. Назначение Гераскина на пост гендиректора клуба так и не состоялось.19. Виктор РашниковСостояние: $3,8 млрдРебенок: Ольга Рашникова (1977); Татьяна РахноДоля одного ребенка: $1,9  млрдМладшая дочь владельца ММК Виктора Рашникова Ольга работает в компании отца 11 лет. Она прошла путь от старшего менеджера управления экономики до директора по финансам и члена совета директоров. Старшая Татьяна в середине нулевых тоже принимала участие в управлении компанией, однако затем, как рассказывал сам миллиардер, решила заняться собственным бизнесом. По данным «СПАРК-Интерфакс», Татьяна Викторовна Рахно владеет строительной компанией «Реконструкция» и ООО «Театральный роман», специализирующемся на организации театральных и оперных представлений и концертов.20. Алексей МордашовСостояние: $10,9 млрдРебенок: Илья Митюков (1986); Кирилл Мордашов (1999); Никита Мордашев (2000); Мария Мордашова (2009); Анастасия Мордашова (2012); Даниил Мордашов (2014)Доля одного ребенка: $1,8  млрдАлексей Мордашов женат третьим браком. С первой женой Еленой Митюковой развелся в 1996 году, когда сыну Илье было 10 лет. Позже бывшая супруга решила отсудить у бизнесмена 32% «Северстали». От второй жены у него два сына — Кирилл и Никита. «Беспокоит то, что мало общался с сыном, пока он рос. Да и с младшими детьми тоже мало общаюсь», — говорил Мордашов «Ведомостям» в 2001 году. Теперь миллиардер уделяет больше времени семье — в 2015-м на День металлурга он приезжал в Череповец с третьей женой Мариной и двумя дочерьми. Старшая, Маша, учится в школе Wunderpark на Новой Риге, которую открыла ее мать.

14 апреля 2016, 00:00

200 богатейших бизнесменов России — 2016

13-й ежегодный рейтинг самых богатых предпринимателей страны по версии Forbes

Выбор редакции
25 февраля 2016, 14:40

Топ-23 города с самым высоким уровнем жизни

Каждый год Mercer, одно из крупнейших в мире HR-агентств, публикует свой отчет Quality of Living Index (индекс качества жизни), в котором также указаны самые безопасные города для жизни и работы.

25 февраля 2016, 14:38

В Кремле прокомментировали рейтинг Forbes «Короли госзаказа»

Пресс-секретарь президента Дмитрий Песков в четверг заявил, что в Кремле знакомы с рейтингом «Короли госзаказа», опубликованным журналом Forbes, передает ...

20 февраля 2016, 19:05

25 самых богатых людей Британии

Для самых любопытных раскроем секрет сразу: Елизаветы Второй в этом списке нет. По версии Sunday Times, скромная английская королева в текущем году не вошла даже в топ-300.

05 января 2016, 07:00

Top 20 biggest companies in the world by market capitalization

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-12-20/decade-techtonic-shifts

03 декабря 2015, 09:40

S&P снизило рейтинг восьми крупнейших банков США

Американское рейтинговое агентство Standard & Poor's объявило о понижении кредитного рейтинга восьми крупнейших банков США, среди которых JPMorgan Chase & Co., Bank of America Corp. и Citigroup Inc., сообщает Bloomberg.

Выбор редакции
23 ноября 2015, 14:18

Где в России жить хорошо?

В очередной раз решил заглянуть в бюджеты наших городов и посмотреть, кто как живет. Прошлый раз я сравнивал бюджеты 2014 года. В этом году, как и в прошлом, рейтинг замыкают Махачкала и Омск. Это самые нищие российские города. Самыми богатыми, как и в прошлые годы оказались Москва и Питер, к ним присоединились Сургут, Ханты-Мансийск и Южно-Сахалинск. Тут нужно учитывать, что Москва и Питер, это отдельные субъекты федерации и их финансирование больше, чем у обычного города.Сегодня я сравнил бюджеты 2015 года. Бюджет Москвы немного просел до 122 тысяч на жителя (в 14 году был 144). Москва уже давно не самый богатый город в мире, как принято считать. Нью-Йорк и Берлин в 5 раз богаче! Зато если сравнивать с другими столицами бывшего СССР, то у нас все неплохо. Например, Киев, Тбилиси или Ташкент тратят на одного жителя в год как средней российский город. А вот Минск или Рига уже ближе к Санкт-Петербургу по расходам.(Значения даны в тысячах рублей. Все данные из открытых источников. Они весьма условные, так как бюджет в течение года меняется, но принципиально ситуация примерно такая)Посты по теме:Рейтинг за 2012 годРейтинг за 2014 год