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Saint-Gobain
23 января, 12:24

Фондовые индексы Европы снижаются

Европейские фондовые индексы снижаются в ходе торгов в понедельник, британский FTSE 100 ликвидировал подъем с начала 2017 года на фоне укрепления фунта стерлингов, пишет Financial Times.

20 января, 12:42

Украинская IТ-компания SoftServe приобрела польскую компанию-разработчика Coders Center

Глобальная IТ-компания с украинскими корнями SoftServe (Львов) объявила о приобретении частной технологической компании Coders Center с главным офисом в Польше.

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22 декабря 2016, 09:00

Clarivate Analytics представит новый корпоративный бренд

Участники услышат последние новости ExxonMobil, Marvell Technology Group, Philips и Saint-Gobain и узнают, что необходимо, чтобы находиться в "сердце" инноваций

08 декабря 2016, 18:55

Europe’s nastiest takeover battle reaches its second anniversary

THE life of a predator can be fraught. Expend too much energy on hunting your prey and even success can be costly. Saint-Gobain, a French maker of glass and other building materials, might be learning that lesson. It mostly grows by snapping up smaller fry, but an attempt to buy a midsized Swiss rival, Sika, has gone on for two years. It could take as long again for Swiss courts to resolve the most intractable corporate struggle in Europe. Pierre-André de Chalendar, Saint-Gobain’s CEO since 2007, was doubtless impressed by Sika’s high returns on its business selling industrial adhesives, mortar and construction chemicals. Its annual return on capital over the past decade has been an attractive 12.6%, more than double Saint-Gobain’s 5.1% (see chart). So when in 2014 the current, fourth generation of the Burkard family, which founded Sika in 1910, offered to sell 52.4% of the voting rights in their firm, Mr de Chalendar bit. The family investment is kept in a body called Schenker-Winkler Holding (SWH) which, following the death of the matriarch in 2013, the dynasty agreed to sell to the French firm for SFr2.75bn ($2....

23 ноября 2016, 18:11

The Future of the FTC Looks a Lot Like Its Past

On the campaign trail, Trump hinted that he would take a more aggressive role in policing corporate mergers, but things don’t seem to be headed in that direction.

05 ноября 2016, 19:43

Electing A Climate Denier In 2016 Is Lunacy

It's disturbing to elect a racist and women-hater. It's dumb to elect a con man who's gone bankrupt many times. It's truly dangerous to elect a raging, thin-skinned narcissist with no self-control. But electing a climate denier? Now that's utterly insane. The media may avoid the topic, but climate change is the biggest challenge the world has ever faced. Acknowledging that climate change is a threat to humanity does not make you an emotional, tree-hugger, but just practical and science-based. I won't try to pick from the abundant evidence of how screwed up the climate is getting. That's nearly impossible. So let me just cite some perspectives from other people who are convinced - some of the least emotional, hard-headed people in society: CEOs. · With $44 billion in revenue, Saint-Gobain is the world's largest building products manufacturer. The CEO, Pierre-Andre De Chalendar, wrote a book on the climate crisis. His calm assessment of the situation: "...the Earth is entering a new phase of climatic change, threatening the edifice patiently built by man since the beginning of the industrial era. Our civilization could be in peril." · PepsiCo's Indra Nooyi has said, "Combating climate change is absolutely critical to the future of our world." · Mark Wilson, CEO of the $35B insurance giant Aviva gave his expert opinion on the danger: "Climate change in particular represents the mother of all risks - to business and to society as a whole." · During a speech yesterday, the CEO of Walmart, Doug McMillon, announced new carbon reduction and renewable energy goals, based explicitly on the science of climate change. Can we agree that if you base your goals on science, you must believe that the science is compelling? And McMillon has said they just ignore the climate skeptics. I could go on and on with CEO examples (even the CEO of ExxonMobil is no longer a denier). Or let's listen to the Pope, whose encyclical last year was crystal clear: "Climate change is a global problem with grave implications...it represents one of the principal challenges facing humanity." We're at a critical juncture for humanity, when the world is finally coming together to do something about our greatest challenge. So what's at stake? The future of humanity. It's all too easy to talk about elections in overwrought terms. Each side claims it will be the end of the world if the other is elected. I'm sorry to disappoint and fit some stereotype, but in this election, it's actually true. There are more reasons than I can count that Trump is a dangerous choice for President (and Slate has a tidy list of 230!). But for all his rampant racism, misogyny, and narcissism, his perspective on climate could represent his craziest ideas. Not only is it a hoax, he says, but it's a Chinese hoax! (We apparently outsource everything now.) Let's put aside the extreme, but possible, scenarios like Trump starting a war or the economy crashing if he's elected (the markets do not seem happy with his rising poll numbers). Even if he changes his tune and acts like some semblance of a decent human being toward women and minorities, but still maintains his position on climate change, we're all in deep trouble (even the most intolerant among us). Now is really not the time to elect a conspiracy-theory-spouting denier. The core of global action on climate is the Paris accords, which, for the first time in human history, got all the representatives of humanity to agree to something. The deal is historic, but fragile. The former Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, said recently at the Business for Social Responsibility conference, "This deal ain't done yet...so celebrate the success, but maintain your rage." Meaning, we have to keep the world focused on reducing carbon fast (the very new estimates from PwC say we need to decarbonize the world at a pace of 6.5% per year). Rudd says that three things will keep the wheels moving on the climate deal: political pressure, corporate pressure, and finance. If the leader of the country that's producing a fifth of the world's emissions thinks climate change is bogus, and wants to stop all pro-climate policy and clean economy investment, it's a big problem. His election would greatly weaken the political pressure toward climate action and certainly slow commitment from companies and the finance world. Look, I'm sorry for the downer scenario here. The environmental movement has long been criticized for being doom and gloom and always talking about the end of the world. Fair enough - we in sustainability could do a better job painting a compelling picture of a better, thriving world. But that said, it's still true that sounding the alarm in an emergency is justified. When a doctor says you have stage 3 or 4 cancer, you don't dismiss the diagnosis as some biased hoax. I hope someone will yell "fire" - even in a crowded theater - if the theater is, you know, on fire. And we should all want a leader that recognizes that there is in fact a fire, stays calm and level-headed, works well with others, and immediately starts doing something about it. We know who that leader is, and she'll be terrific. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 ноября 2016, 07:24

Обзор новых производств: октябрь 2016 г

В Ясногорском районе Тульской области открыт новый завод по производству кормовых добавок для селькохозяйственных животных и птиц.

29 октября 2016, 06:11

Elon Musk Unveils Shingles That Could Finally Make Rooftop Solar Sexy

Elon Musk late Friday debuted glass roofing shingles that generate electricity from the sun, a critical step toward merging Tesla Motors with his solar energy firm, SolarCity. At a 30-minute press conference on a movie studio lot in Los Angeles, the billionaire tech titan unveiled a suite of shingles, some made to replicate traditional roof tiles, that he said were designed to make rooftop solar chic, the way his Tesla cars made zero-emissions vehicles fashionable. “Just like with electric cars, which didn’t look good, had low range and didn’t have good performance, they looked like golf cars. People had a really hard time buying electric cars,” Musk told a crowd gathered at the outdoor event, which was broadcast on both Tesla and SolarCity websites. “Something similar needs to happen to solar. We need to make solar panels as appealing as electric cars have become.” Musk showed off four houses ― which looked to be from the set of the ABC’s “Desperate Housewives” ― with different styles of glass shingles. The first, using a laminate coating, replicated a Tuscan terra cotta tile. The second mirrored the design of French slate. The third modeled a gray, textured look commonly seen on suburban homes. The fourth sported a sleek, modern look. Photovoltaic cells, embedded under layers of glass, become visible as the tiles are tilted in different directions. Musk didn’t say how much the solar shingles would cost or when they’ll be available. As you change the angle of the shingle, the PV cells become more visible pic.twitter.com/FgVktnuj4I— Alexander C. Kaufman (@AlexCKaufman) October 29, 2016 The shingles aren’t necessarily supposed to replace the solar panel business that has buoyed SolarCity. Rather, Musk said he’s targeting the roughly 5 million homeowners who replace their roofs in a given year. He said the new solar tiles are more visually appealing than traditional shingles or solar panels. “Over time, every house would be a solar house,” he said. “It’s a neighborhood where the aesthetics get better over time. You’ll want to call your neighbors over and say, ‘Check out the sweet roof.’” The PV tiles are made of glass, which Musk insists are stronger than traditional roof tiles pic.twitter.com/9tuXPZQFDQ— Alexander C. Kaufman (@AlexCKaufman) October 29, 2016 Tesla in June made a bid to buy SolarCity in hopes of combining the companies into a one-stop shop for clean energy needs. Together, the companies would sell panels to produce electricity, which would be stored in Tesla Powerwall batteries and charge the Tesla vehicle in the garage. The deal, which has been panned by skeptical Wall Street analysts, seems likely to win approval from shareholders when it comes up for a vote on Nov. 17. After all, investors who buy stock in Tesla and SolarCity ― both cash-hungry companies that have historically struggled to turn profits ― tend to be among Musk’s most devoted believers. Musk also announced an update to the $5,500 Powerwall, a lithium-ion battery meant to store excess solar energy during the day for use at night. The new Powerwall doubles the amount of energy that can be stored and deployed. “You can take a four-bedroom house and you can power your fridge, sockets and lights for a day,” Musk said. “If you have solar on your house, you can power indefinitely.”  Still, the economics of storing energy may not yet make sense in most parts of the United States. In most states, electricity rates are higher during the day and cheaper at night. Through a process called net metering, utility companies buy excess solar energy from homeowners at the higher day rate. When the sun sets, those customers buy electricity back at the cheaper night rate. Only a handful of states lack such policies.    “It only makes sense for storage if it’s more expensive to buy electricity at night and sell it back during the day,” Brian Warshay, an analyst for Bloomberg New Energy Finance, told The Huffington Post in May 2015, when the Powerwall was announced. “But most people aren’t on those types of rates.” Musk, however, focused on the big picture, outlining a vision for a distributed system of energy production in which utilities ― with the help of Tesla and SolarCity software ― manage a grid fed by massive clean-energy power plants and homeowners’ rooftop solar. Along with the Powerwall II, Musk unveiled a new Powerpack, a scaled-up battery meant for use by utility companies. Already, Tesla is working on three projects with utilty companies in southern California, Hawaii and New Zealand, he said. Climate change, caused by carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels, makes such an energy transition necessary, Musk said. The presentation began with Musk standing in front of a NASA chart showing a massive spike in the amount of carbon particles, which trap heat from the sun and cause global warming, in the atmosphere. “The future is bright for electricity,” he said. “It’s a very bright future for both utilities and for rooftop.”   Musk isn’t the first to launch a solar shingle product. But, with star power almost unprecedented for an energy or auto executive, he is likely the highest-profile person to try. “The allure that this guy has for sparking the imagination of people, he does bring a certain panache to this for sure,” Tensie Whelan, director of New York University’s Stern Center for Sustainable Business, told HuffPost ahead of the announcement. “How he thinks in systems is really interesting ― connecting the roof, the battery and the car. That broader, fully integrated solution is a smart way to go.” Still, the solar roofing market remains a nascent industry with more losers than winners. Industrial giant Dow Chemical Co. discontinued its solar shingle in June, five years after predicting the product would pull in $1 billion and capture one-fifth of the market. Over the last few years, at least a dozen other companies manufacturing similar products have closed down or gone bankrupt. A few seem to have succeeded. For example, French behemoth Saint-Gobain, which rolled out its solar shingle soon after Dow, still sells the product, called Apollo II. And Luma Resources, a small startup based in southern Michigan, has spent nine years honing its solar roofing product. It has installed about 750,000 watts of shingles, enough for roughly 150 to 200 individual homes in the U.S., Canada and Jamaica. The company’s president, Robert Allen, credits his staying power with his earlier career as a roofer, and his view of the product foremost through that lens. “Musk is in for a much, much, much bigger challenge to create a solar roof than he thinks he’s in for,” Allen recently told HuffPost. But, then again, automakers ― nearly all of which are now rolling out electric cars to rival Musk’s ― likely said much the same thing about Tesla. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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28 октября 2016, 22:59

Swiss court blocks Saint-Gobain move for Sika

Latest twist in takeover saga as ruling bars family from selling controlling stake

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Выбор редакции
27 октября 2016, 21:41

The Case for Healthy Offices

Medibank, Melbourne by Hassell Studio The evidence is growing daily that organizations of all sizes stand to benefit by creating buildings which improve the health and wellbeing of their occupants. People are the most valuable resource of an organization, typically accounting for 90% of business operating costs, so even a 1% improvement in productivity can have a major impact on the bottom line and competitiveness of any business. Since 2014 the World Green Building Council have undertaken to put wellbeing at the heart of buildings and demonstrate the business value of doing so through their Better Places for People initiative. Their latest report: Building the Business Case: Health, Wellbeing and Productivity in Green Offices, highlights the global momentum behind healthy and green office design and operation and showcases over 15 buildings from around the world that are leading the way. World Green Building Council CEO, Terri Wills says the report presents "overwhelming evidence between office design and improved health and wellbeing of workers and demonstrates tangible action businesses are taking to improve their workspaces." Simple steps like improving air quality, increasing natural light and introducing greenery - which typically have environmental benefits such as using less energy - can also have a dramatic impact on the bottom line by improving employee productivity and reducing absenteeism, staff turnover and medical costs. The World Green Building Council have developed a simple framework to help companies take action. The framework issues calls for organisations to assess key environmental factors which affect health and wellbeing, survey employees to find out how they experience them, and measure the economic factors they influence, such as productivity, absenteeism and medical costs. Eight Features that Make Healthier and Greener Offices The report identifies eight key factors in creating healthier and greener offices which can impact on the bottom line. Air Quality & Ventilation - a well-ventilated office can double cognitive ability Thermal Comfort - staff performance can fall 6% if offices are too hot and 4% if they too cold Daylighting & Lighting - a study found people in offices with windows get 46 minutes more sleep a night Noise & Acoustics - noise distractions led to 66% drop in performance and concentration Interior Layout and Active Design - flexible working helps staff feel more in control of workload and encourages loyalty Biophilia & Views - processing time at one call centre improved by 7-12% when staff had a view of nature Look & Feel - visual appeal is a major factor in workplace satisfaction Location & Amenities - a Dutch cycle to work scheme saved €27m in absenteeism. The Impact of Working in a Green Certified Building on Cognitive Function and Health, is a new study from Harvard University and SUNY Upstate Medical University that makes the case for green and WELL certification. It suggests that occupants of high-performing, certified green buildings had nearly a third (30 percent) fewer sick building symptoms, a 6.4 percent higher sleep quality score and a 26.4 percent higher cognitive function score, compared to people in high-performing buildings without green certification. Australia continues to be the global market leader of proving healthy and green workplaces that improve the wellbeing of people, boost productivity and contribute to the bottom line. One of the Australian workplaces highlighted is Medibank's new office in Melbourne which is the centrepiece of a culture change programme for Australia's largest health insurer. The plant-filled building includes 26 types of workspaces, from tranquil areas to collaborative hubs, fireplaces on every floor, herb gardens, sports facilities and a program of curated community events. The benefits are significant; two in three staff feel healthier, 80 per cent are working more collaboratively and absenteeism is down five per cent. There are also some excellent examples around the world: French manufacturing giant Saint-Gobain's call centre staff at its new North American headquarters, in Malvern, Pennsylvania, doubled their productivity after moving into the new building, with a 97% increase in sales-generated leads and 101% increase in leads per call. The building has a fitness centre, 1.3 miles of walking trails, more than 100 collaborative workspaces, and 92% of offices have outdoor views. Swedish construction and development company Skanska, was able to cut sick days by two-thirds after it rebuilt its office in Doncaster, improving indoor air quality, cutting down on noise levels and installing a central light well that increased the natural daylight in the building. The company was able to save £28,000 ($34,209) in staff costs in 2015, and achieve a 34% increase in overall employee satisfaction. Employee satisfaction and engagement is known to boost productivity: a Gallup meta-analysis of 1.4 million employees found that companies with a high level of engagement reported 21% higher productivity. As Wills says "The results are clear - putting both health and wellbeing, and the environment, at the heart of buildings, is a no brainer for businesses' employees and the bottom line." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 октября 2016, 11:03

Elon Musk Is Betting Big On Solar Roofing

Elon Musk is expected to unveil a new solar roofing product for his energy company, SolarCity, this week. Based on what Musk has already said about the product, his solar roofing would put the photovoltaic cells used to generate electricity from the sun in the shingles themselves, instead of in a system of solar panels on a roof. When the billionaire tech titan teased the product in August, he vowed it would be all but unrivaled ― “a different ballgame.” On that claim, Robert Allen is calling Musk out. Allen is the president of Luma Resources, a solar roofing startup based in southern Michigan. He has been installing these systems for the better part of a decade. “Before he launches whatever he’s going to launch on the 28th, I’d like to have the record clear,” Allen, 62, told The Huffington Post in a recent phone interview. “We’ve been here, we’ve been doing this. We’ve been doing it for a long time, and we’ve got lots of recognition.” Luma first developed its solar shingling in 2007. The product is made by adhering a sheet of silicon containing photovoltaic cells to metal shingles, which are customized to fit the shape and contours of a customer’s roof. Luma was slow to get the product off the ground at first, but got approval from UL, the safety consultant and certification giant, in November 2010. That certification came just in time, as industrial behemoth Dow Chemical Company began touting its own solar shingle that month. Dow, whose headquarters are not far from Luma’s home base in suburban Detroit, set ambitious goals, projecting $1 billion in revenue from the shingles and an overall market worth at least $5 billion. French industrial giant Saint-Gobain also launched its own solar roofing product several months later. “We had two behemoths that could have easily done the same thing we already did, but we were ahead,” Allen said. “We were the first out.” But solar shingles ― “building-integrated photovoltaics,” or BIPVs, in industry jargon ― have proved a challenging business. Though Saint-Gobain is still selling its Apollo system, Dow discontinued its product in June 2016. At least a dozen other companies producing solar shingles or similar products have closed down or gone bankrupt in the last few years. Eric Wesoff, editor at large for the website Greentech Media, said the problem may be that while solar shingles sound cool, people don’t always trust novel devices to provide something as fundamental to a building as its roof. “You’re looking to drive a completely new type of product through the very conservative roofing channel ― and that’s a daunting marketing challenge,” Wesoff wrote in an open letter to Musk in August. “Traditional solar modules on racks may be less than aesthetically perfect, but they have a distribution channel and technical expertise.” And yet Luma has been able to hang on, even as others failed. Allen says this is because they have a competitive advantage ― they are roofers, first and foremost. His father founded Allen Brothers Roofing 67 years ago. Robert and his brother, Gary, 55, took over the business in 1986, and they were among the contractors hired to help rebuild the Pentagon after the Sept. 11 attacks. Their move into solar roofing was an attempt to reinvent the company in the midst of the Great Recession, and they did so with a loan from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. President Barack Obama touted the brothers as model of American innovation in his 2011 State of the Union address: “That’s what Americans have done for over 200 years: reinvented ourselves. And to spur on more success stories like the Allen brothers, we’ve begun to reinvent our energy policy.” Robert Allen says their success in the space is due to their long history in the industry. “Because we are roofers, we approached it totally from a roofing perspective,” Allen said. “People think roofs are dummy simple, but they’re not. They’re complicated. A roof can’t fail. It can’t leak.” Luma, technically an independent company that functions like a subsidiary of Allen Brothers, has faced challenges. The company has sold about 750,000 watts of the solar shingles, or between roughly 150 and 200 individual homes in the U.S., Canada and Jamaica. For now, the price is steep. The average 5.5 kilowatt system ― typically enough to offset more than 80 percent of a homeowner’s electricity bill ― costs about $33,000 to install, not counting the cost of getting an electrician to complete the process. It’s difficult to train roofers to install the solar shingles, and as a result, Luma has had to send its in-house crew of about six staffers to complete projects around the country. While Luma has hung on, SolarCity’s roofing product could become a serious contender. The company is building a factory in Buffalo, New York, that could mass-produce its roofing, potentially making it cheaper than Luma. And the product will likely pair with the lithium-ion battery units that Musk’s automotive company, Tesla, already sells that can store excess energy solar panels produce for use at night. Tesla made a bid to buy SolarCity in June, and has marketed the merger to investors as a marriage of battery storage with solar technology. Shareholders are slated to vote on the deal on Nov. 17.   “It’s your typical David versus Goliath story,” Allen said. “Whether it’s Musk or Dow or Saint-Gobain ― we’ve hunkered down, did it right and got a product out there that’s been operational for almost 10 years.” SolarCity declined to comment for this story. Allen isn’t the only solar industry player peeved about SolarCity’s roofing play. Last month, the San Jose, California-based solar panel maker SunPower Corp. sued SolarCity for allegedly ripping off their shingle design. In the complaint, SunPower said it had shared confidential blueprints with a module maker SolarCity later acquired. Musk is also facing four other lawsuits accusing him of breaching his fiduciary duty to shareholders in attempting to buy SolarCity. Many investors fear the deal would be a bailout for financially troubled SolarCity, and would distract Tesla from delivering on the Model 3, an affordably priced electric car that is supposed to be the company’s path to profitability. There’s a nearly 400,000-long waitlist for the Model 3, and its anticipated release date has slipped from 2018 to “mid-2018 or later.” Musk also last month revealed his plans to send human colonists to Mars via his privately held spaceship startup, SpaceX. So he has a lot on his plate. Allen says the solar roofing business might be harder than Musk thinks. “It may not compare to populating outer space,” Allen said, “but Musk is in for a much, much, much bigger challenge to create a solar roof than what he thinks he’s in for.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 октября 2016, 11:03

Elon Musk Is Betting Big On Solar Roofing

Elon Musk is expected to unveil a new solar roofing product for his energy company, SolarCity, this week. Based on what Musk has already said about the product, his solar roofing would put the photovoltaic cells used to generate electricity from the sun in the shingles themselves, instead of in a system of solar panels on a roof. When the billionaire tech titan teased the product in August, he vowed it would be all but unrivaled ― “a different ballgame.” On that claim, Robert Allen is calling Musk out. Allen is the president of Luma Resources, a solar roofing startup based in southern Michigan. He has been installing these systems for the better part of a decade. “Before he launches whatever he’s going to launch on the 28th, I’d like to have the record clear,” Allen, 62, told The Huffington Post in a recent phone interview. “We’ve been here, we’ve been doing this. We’ve been doing it for a long time, and we’ve got lots of recognition.” Luma first developed its solar shingling in 2007. The product is made by adhering a sheet of silicon containing photovoltaic cells to metal shingles, which are customized to fit the shape and contours of a customer’s roof. Luma was slow to get the product off the ground at first, but got approval from UL, the safety consultant and certification giant, in November 2010. That certification came just in time, as industrial behemoth Dow Chemical Company began touting its own solar shingle that month. Dow, whose headquarters are not far from Luma’s home base in suburban Detroit, set ambitious goals, projecting $1 billion in revenue from the shingles and an overall market worth at least $5 billion. French industrial giant Saint-Gobain also launched its own solar roofing product several months later. “We had two behemoths that could have easily done the same thing we already did, but we were ahead,” Allen said. “We were the first out.” But solar shingles ― “building-integrated photovoltaics,” or BIPVs, in industry jargon ― have proved a challenging business. Though Saint-Gobain is still selling its Apollo system, Dow discontinued its product in June 2016. At least a dozen other companies producing solar shingles or similar products have closed down or gone bankrupt in the last few years. Eric Wesoff, editor at large for the website Greentech Media, said the problem may be that while solar shingles sound cool, people don’t always trust novel devices to provide something as fundamental to a building as its roof. “You’re looking to drive a completely new type of product through the very conservative roofing channel ― and that’s a daunting marketing challenge,” Wesoff wrote in an open letter to Musk in August. “Traditional solar modules on racks may be less than aesthetically perfect, but they have a distribution channel and technical expertise.” And yet Luma has been able to hang on, even as others failed. Allen says this is because they have a competitive advantage ― they are roofers, first and foremost. His father founded Allen Brothers Roofing 67 years ago. Robert and his brother, Gary, 55, took over the business in 1986, and they were among the contractors hired to help rebuild the Pentagon after the Sept. 11 attacks. Their move into solar roofing was an attempt to reinvent the company in the midst of the Great Recession, and they did so with a loan from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. President Barack Obama touted the brothers as model of American innovation in his 2011 State of the Union address: “That’s what Americans have done for over 200 years: reinvented ourselves. And to spur on more success stories like the Allen brothers, we’ve begun to reinvent our energy policy.” Robert Allen says their success in the space is due to their long history in the industry. “Because we are roofers, we approached it totally from a roofing perspective,” Allen said. “People think roofs are dummy simple, but they’re not. They’re complicated. A roof can’t fail. It can’t leak.” Luma, technically an independent company that functions like a subsidiary of Allen Brothers, has faced challenges. The company has sold about 750,000 watts of the solar shingles, or between roughly 150 and 200 individual homes in the U.S., Canada and Jamaica. For now, the price is steep. The average 5.5 kilowatt system ― typically enough to offset more than 80 percent of a homeowner’s electricity bill ― costs about $33,000 to install, not counting the cost of getting an electrician to complete the process. It’s difficult to train roofers to install the solar shingles, and as a result, Luma has had to send its in-house crew of about six staffers to complete projects around the country. While Luma has hung on, SolarCity’s roofing product could become a serious contender. The company is building a factory in Buffalo, New York, that could mass-produce its roofing, potentially making it cheaper than Luma. And the product will likely pair with the lithium-ion battery units that Musk’s automotive company, Tesla, already sells that can store excess energy solar panels produce for use at night. Tesla made a bid to buy SolarCity in June, and has marketed the merger to investors as a marriage of battery storage with solar technology. Shareholders are slated to vote on the deal on Nov. 17.   “It’s your typical David versus Goliath story,” Allen said. “Whether it’s Musk or Dow or Saint-Gobain ― we’ve hunkered down, did it right and got a product out there that’s been operational for almost 10 years.” SolarCity declined to comment for this story. Allen isn’t the only solar industry player peeved about SolarCity’s roofing play. Last month, the San Jose, California-based solar panel maker SunPower Corp. sued SolarCity for allegedly ripping off their shingle design. In the complaint, SunPower said it had shared confidential blueprints with a module maker SolarCity later acquired. Musk is also facing four other lawsuits accusing him of breaching his fiduciary duty to shareholders in attempting to buy SolarCity. Many investors fear the deal would be a bailout for financially troubled SolarCity, and would distract Tesla from delivering on the Model 3, an affordably priced electric car that is supposed to be the company’s path to profitability. There’s a nearly 400,000-long waitlist for the Model 3, and its anticipated release date has slipped from 2018 to “mid-2018 or later.” Musk also last month revealed his plans to send human colonists to Mars via his privately held spaceship startup, SpaceX. So he has a lot on his plate. Allen says the solar roofing business might be harder than Musk thinks. “It may not compare to populating outer space,” Allen said, “but Musk is in for a much, much, much bigger challenge to create a solar roof than what he thinks he’s in for.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 октября 2016, 14:35

Турецкий холдинг Sisecam открыл два завода в особой экономической зоне "Алабуга" за $310 млн

8 октября. FINMARKET.RU - Турецкий холдинг Sisecam ("Шишеджам"), крупный мировой производитель листового стекла и стеклотары, открыл два завода в особой экономической зоне "Алабуга" (Татарстан), передает "Интерфакс". Министр экономики Турции Нихат Зейбекджи сообщил на мероприятии, что одно из предприятий - АО "Тракья Гласс Рус" (совместный проект компаний Sisecam, Турция, владеет 70% и Saint-Gobain, Франция, 30%) по производству строительного (листового) стекла, зеркал и стекол с напылением. Объем инвестиций составил $210 млн. Объем продукции - 230 тыс. тонн в год.

15 сентября 2016, 11:30

Грант: Запуск совместного пилота с Saint-Gobain

$ 200 000Заявки до 22 сентября 2016Мировой лидер в строительной отрасли и инновациях — компания Saint-Gobain — проводит конкурс для предпринимателей из России и СНГ, бизнес которых связан с технологиями для строительства, ремонта и создания комфортного жизненного пространства, а главное для тех, кто упрощает жизнь профессиональных строителей и конечных потребителей.Прием заявок на Saint-Gobain Challenge — до 22 сентября 2016 года. Заявки подавать здесь — http://rb.ru/saint-gobainПо результатам конкурса компания Saint-Gobain планирует запустить совместные пилоты с победителями и поможет им масштабироваться на федеральный и международные рынки. Помимо этого, победители также получат доступ к различным призам в виде профессиональных услуг на общую сумму более $ 200 000, которые будут способствовать развитию бизнеса.Главная задача Saint-Gobain Challenge — найти технологии и бизнес-модели, которые улучшат или кардинально изменят нынешний подход к работе с клиентами, занятыми строительством, ремонтом или обустройством жилья.КОМУ СТОИТ ПОДАВАТЬ ЗАЯВКУ?Тем, чьи решения и технологии соответствуют одному из следующих направлений: если вы создаете решения для тех, кто делает ремонт сам: от поиска вдохновения до реализации;если вы создаете сервисы для работы бригадиров и прорабов;если вы занимаетесь вопросами энергоэффективности в зданиях;если вы создаете технологии и материалы для комфортного дома. КАКИЕ ПРИЗЫ МОГУТ ПОЛУЧИТЬ ПОБЕДИТЕЛИ?Команды, вышедшие в финал, получают шанс запустить совместный пилотный проект с Saint-Gobain на российском и, возможно, международном рынке.Важное преимущество Saint-Gobain Challenge — это то, что вы также можете указать, что именно вы хотите получить от Saint-Gobain, или выбрать из предложенного списка: запуск совместного бизнес-проекта (пилота) на российском или международном рынке;2 поездки в Париж (каждая на 2 человека) для знакомства с центральными командами Saint-Gobain по R&D и маркетингу;офис в Москве для 5 человек на год;офис для 10 человек в научно-исследовательском центре WEBER в Егорьевске и доступ к оборудованию центра;доступ по запросу к услугам по развитию бизнеса и специалистам по продуктам в сфере строительства. Кроме того, победители выступят 17 октября 2016 года в Москве перед крупнейшими российскими компаниями в области строительства и инноваций. Встреча будет только по приглашениям.ЖЮРИ КОНКУРСАПьер-Андре де Шаландар (Председатель совета директоров и генеральный директор Группы «Сен-Гобен»)Эрван Дюпюи (Генеральный директор, «Сен-Гобен СНГ»)Татьяна Ким (Соучредитель и управляющий партнер, Simile Venture Partners)Алексей Комиссаров (Директор, Фонд развития промышленности)Юлия Соловьева (Директор по бизнес операциям в развивающихся рынках региона EMEA, Google Russia)УСЛОВИЯ ДЛЯ УЧАСТНИКОВ Участник может представлять технологию/компанию из любой страны СНГ.Компания-участник должна иметь доход, при этом прибыльной быть не обязательно (прототипы без клиентов или идеи не принимаются).Годовая выручка компании не должна превышать $5 млн в год.Компания должна понимать, какой совместный проект/бизнес она может предложить руководству Saint-Gobain ВАЖНЫЕ ССЫЛКИ И ИНФОРМАЦИЯ КОНКУРСА Заявки принимаются по ссылке до 22 сентября 2016 года (23:59 по московскому времени).Финалисты будут известны 3 октября 2016 года.Закрытая встреча финалистов с представителями компании Saint-Gobain и партнерами состоится 17 октября 2016 года

03 августа 2016, 18:37

Обзор новых производств: июль 2016 г.

Общая стоимость проекта на данный момент составляет 1 млрд рублей. С запуском второй очереди будет создано 500 новых рабочих мест. В 2017 году запланировано открытие 3-й очереди комплекса. 2-я очередь включает проектный центр, подразделения по разработке, испытаниям и серийному выпуску изделий преобразовательной техники для пуска и регулировки скорости мощных высоковольтных электродвигателей, а также низковольтных комплектных устройств.

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Выбор редакции
18 июля 2016, 19:32

Французская Saint-Gobain локализовала производство в России до 92%

Компания, занимающаяся производством строительных смесей, планирует увеличить показатель до 98%

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04 июля 2016, 14:41

BRIEF-Cegedim SRH partners with Saint-Gobain on a pilot program for easy-to-read pay stubs

* Cegedim SRH partners with Saint-Gobain on a pilot program for easy-to-read pay stubs

17 июня 2016, 16:56

Минстрой России и Saint-Gobain внедрят инновации в российское ЖКХ

Минстрой России совместно с французской Saint-Gobain создаст рабочую группу по внедрению современных технологий в ЖКХ. Об этом сообщило ведомство. Группа компаний "Сен-Гобен" разрабатывает инновационные решения для строительства, реновации, промышленности, науки. В СНГ группа пришла в 1990-х годах. На сегодняшний день в России группа имеет девять заводов: в Московской, Челябинской, Нижегородской, Свердловской областях и в Татарстане.