• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании139
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы70
      • Показать ещё
      Разное28
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации7
      • Показать ещё
      Люди14
      • Показать ещё
      Издания4
      Сферы1
      Формат1
      Показатели1
06 ноября, 18:34

Be A Proxy: Vote Tuesday On Behalf Of The World

If you don't plan to vote because you think your vote doesn't count, please consider this: The world needs you to be their proxy. Polls show that most of the world passionately hopes that Hillary Clinton becomes president. Non-Americans can't vote for her, but you can, on their behalf. C'mon third-party-protest Millennials, party-over-country Repubs, and holdouts who are on the fence. If you live in a swing state, vote to help make sure that HRC wins. And if you live in a state that's solid red or blue, please vote to make sure the world sees that the popular vote numbers are as big as possible. I'm not a political expert, but in the year and a half since Trump glided down the escalator to make his presidential announcement, I've visited more than a dozen countries, going about my business. And wherever I go I've been asked over and over (and over): "What's happening to America? He can't win, right? How can a demagogue become your president?" Here, a few election-related anecdotes of the hundreds I've observed traveling this past year; small examples of great, global concern, and the reason we need a big win to assure the world it will be okay: On a four-hour ride in December to see a Monarch butterfly sanctuary near San Miguel de Allende, our driver/guide talked with typical dark humor: "Somebody made lots of money on Trump pinatas," he said. "And Mexicans can't wait to beat them up." And, "If Trump builds that damn wall we'll paint our side with our great history, and then charge Americans to come over and admire it." In South Korea in February, when the North Koreans were testing their first nuclear missiles, our guide told us that South Koreans appreciated Hillary Clinton's visits there as Secretary of State, and were especially frightened about Trump's confused comments about nuclear weaponry. They were watching CNN and knew the names of all the primary candidates. In Tanzania, where the Clinton Foundation has helped eradicate HIV/AIDS, Masai warriors who greeted our group of Americans jumped up and spontaneously chanted "O-ba-ma, Hill-a-ry" as we walked toward them. And when they chanted as we left, most of us joined in. In Vancouver this summer, Canadians nervously kidded about the election, with lots of talk about renting rooms to make money off the hoards of Americans who would be coming if Trump won. In Paris, last month the mood was darker. People realized that Trump had a chance of winning. Parisians wanted reassurance. "It couldn't happen in America, could it?" "It won't happen, right." The world will be watching this Tuesday night just about as closely and as anxiously as Americans will be. Climate change, international financial meltdowns, and the possibilities of nuclear war are only a few of the worries. There is general angst. I've realized, in this bittersweet way, that America is still considered the beacon of democracy, and we've sustained this precious position for 240 years. So please vote, and bring like-minded friends. Represent those who can't cast a ballot. Don't let the world down. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
02 ноября, 03:05

On Location For The Ultimate Day Of The Dead Experience In Mexico

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, celebrates the Day of the Dead like no place else on earth.

13 октября, 14:18

The 9 Top Spots For Americans Who Want To Live In Mexico

9 Top Spots For Living In Mexico In most of the countries I talk about, there is usually one stand-out place. Sometimes, two... When I talk about Colombia, for instance, Medellín comes out tops. In the Dominican Republic, it's the Samana Peninsula. In Belize, it's a toss-up between the Cayo and the Cayes. But in Mexico, there are so many top options for living and investing on the table that it's hard to pick a winner. So here's a rundown of my favorite nine places to hang your hat In Mexico, to the beach and beyond: The Beaches The options are so broad for seaside living that you can actually specify a price point, a convenience factor, and a lifestyle, and still have plenty of options. On the east coast, you have: 1. Cancún, one of Mexico's top two resort towns. Cancún was nothing more than a small fishing village when it was targeted for development in 1974. As it exploded into a tourist mecca of more than 700,000, the swath of development extended southward to Playa del Carmen... transforming Cancún from a fishing village to a town of more than 150,000 today. 2. Playa del Carmen ("Playa" to the locals) It's just 57 minutes south of Cancún, and it has taken over as the region's chic place to be (and the place to be seen). You'll find vacationing Europeans and North Americans as well as a sizeable number of expats in residence. Just off the town square is the renowned Avenida Quinta (5th Avenue) running parallel to the shore and offering more than 20 blocks of fine restaurants and shops. It's almost as big a draw as the beautiful beaches. The Riviera Maya is the section of Caribbean coast on the eastern side of the Yucatán Peninsula between Playa del Carmen and Tulum. It's about 125 miles long. 3. Tulum Just a few years ago, the town of Tulum (where we convened for our conference last week) consisted of a handful of cabins and a few fishing shacks. Today, the census counts more than 18,000 people in Tulum. This is a particular point of opportunity. The Riviera Maya features warm Caribbean waters and pristine beaches. Also, the Great Mayan Reef -- the largest coral reef in the Atlantic Ocean -- is located offshore, providing world-class diving and snorkeling. Another draw to this area is the presence of the best preserved Mayan archeological sites... plus a few world-class golf courses to round out the local attractions. Moving to the west coast, there's... 4. Puerto Peñasco The seaside resort that's most convenient to the United States by car... just over an hour from the border. Also known as Rocky Point, it has been a playground for the western United States and Canada for almost 100 years. Homeowners in Puerto Peñasco can drive over the border and head right for their seaside home without even stopping to register their car. Yet the beaches are second to none. Puerto Peñasco enjoys warm, calm waters all year, broad, sandy beaches, lots of housing options, and low property prices. Best of all, you can find two-bedroom condos on this beach starting at just US$109,000. Perfect for a vacation home or a weekend getaway. 5. Mazatlán Mazatlán has rebounded from the 70s and 80s when it was mostly forgotten as a resort. Today, its 20 miles of beaches and boardwalks are once again as busy as when John Wayne and Gary Cooper were in town. Even better, the historic center has been renovated over the past 10 years. Now it's a fine example of Spanish-colonial America, with plenty of world-class restaurants, sidewalk cafés, and a beachfront promenade. 6. Puerto Vallarta It has been one of Mexico's most popular resorts since the 1960s, although its rich colonial history goes back hundreds of years. Unlike many resort areas, PV has a number of coastal sections with beaches interspersed among them... meaning different areas have their own unique character. Puerto Vallarta excels when it comes to ocean views. Here you'll find lots of properties perched on lush, green hillsides and long views looking out to the ocean. Beyond The Beach Not everyone is a beach person. Many full-time expats prefer the ambiance and brilliant weather of Mexico's colonial heartland, including these three top towns where expats have settled... 7. San Miguel de Allende San Miguel de Allende is a remarkably beautiful and sociable colonial town. Many expats believe that it's the finest example of colonial living abroad... in any country... and thousands of expats call it home. Its magnificent historic center is mostly level -- great for walking -- and full of delights for visitors and residents. The quantity of first-class restaurants and fine shopping venues per block is probably unmatched anywhere else in Mexico. 8. Guanajuato Guanajuato is another colonial gem, but it's a gem that's less polished and more natural than San Miguel de Allende. Instead of San Miguel's thousands of expats, Guanajuato's expat community numbers in the hundreds. It's still a large town with everything you need--plus beautiful architecture--but it's more of a "Mexican" town, with less expat influence. 9. Álamos A small town of less than 25,000 people, but the state of restoration and preservation in its historic center is beyond anything we've seen anywhere. Of the dozens of Latin American cities that bill themselves as a "bohemian town that's home to artists, writers, musicians, and poets," Álamos is the only one where we've actually seen a large percentage of artists, writers, musicians, and poets. For a small-town alternative to cities like San Miguel, Guanajuato, and Oaxaca, Álamos is the best we've found. Faced with all these options, how do you find the place that's right for you? It all comes down to personal taste and priorities. But it's hard to imagine how anybody couldn't find something to suit them in Mexico... whatever their budget. Related Articles: Why Living In Mexico Is An Easy Option For Expats Best Place To Invest In Mexico's Riviera Maya? Think Tulum! Why This Expat Chose Mérida, Mexico, As His Overseas Home Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

30 сентября, 16:25

TriMas' (TRS) Facility Consolidation to Boost Performance

TriMas (TRS) has initiated facility consolidation actions to efficiently utilize existing locations and better serve customers.

Выбор редакции
13 июня, 16:50

San Miguel realigns to Philippine politics

Group ditches telecoms plans in U-turn to invest instead on incoming president’s home turf

10 июня, 14:04

Retiring In Mexico: Culture Vultures Will Love Guanajuato

If you're a fan of the arts ... especially the performing arts ... there's no place better than Guanajuato. For that reason ... and for its sheer beauty, convenience, and near-perfect climate, Guanajuato makes our "where to retire in Mexico" list. City View, Guanajuato, Mexico You'll find it 50 miles west of another popular and better-known expat retirement enclave, San Miguel de Allende. Both are in the state of Guanajuato, and the city of the same name is the state capital. At an elevation of 6,600 feet, Guanajuato enjoys a mild climate, with temperatures rarely dipping below 60 F on a winter day or topping 90 F on a summer day. If you've an open spot on your calendar in October, Guanajuato is the place to be. That's when the city hosts the International Cervantes Festival, one of the biggest and best-known performing-arts festivals in all of Latin America -- a two-week extravaganza that attracts top-flight performers in theater, dance, and music from around the world. During the Cervantes Festival, these events are sometimes going on simultaneously in concert halls, churches, cathedrals, and event spaces throughout the city, including in the magnificent Teatro Juárez, right in the center of historic Guanajuato. A visit to the Juárez Theater should be on your "must-do" list. It's one of the most important performing-arts centers in Mexico. Our Lady of Guanajuato Basilica, Guanajuato, Mexico If you can't make it to Guanajuato in October, don't worry. This city lives and breathes music year-round. There are concerts almost every night somewhere or other. On weekends the city band plays and roving mariachi bands sing for café patrons in the Jardín de la Unión -- the Union Gardens -- and in the Plaza de la Paz. At night, you'll often find the University of Guanajuato's roving band of troubadour singing away in 16th-century dress. This huge state university, which traces its history to 1732, is located right in the city center, and thousands of students live here much of the year. You'll see them in the restaurants and bars, attending concerts, strolling the streets, and lending the city its energy. That's why expats who live in Guanajuato contrast it to San Miguel de Allende by saying that while the latter has better restaurants, Guanajuato has a more youthful vibe. That's over simplifying, of course. But it's true that each city has its own distinct personality. For sure, Guanajuato has much to offer. For centuries it was one of the richest cities in Mexico. Gold and silver mines around Guanajuato produced a river of wealth from the 16th century onwards, and mining remains an important industry even today. The city's beautiful historic center, which trails up and down steep hills, has been a UNESCO World Heritage site since 1988. It's an extraordinarily beautiful city. Guanajuato played a key role in Mexico's War of Independence from Spain. The first major victory of the war was won here, when Mexican forces captured the former grain storage building known as El Alhóndiga. Today, it's a museum with a large open-air performance space. Plaza de la Paz, Guanajuato, Mexico Near it is Hidalgo Market, Guanajuato's large central market. If you lived here, this is where you might do your grocery shopping, catch a quick meal, and buy any number of locally made ceramics or leather products. Founded in 1548 (shortly after San Miguel de Allende) the oldest neighborhoods of Guanajuato date from the 16th and 17th centuries and its narrow streets were designed for horses and burros, not for SUVs. Many of these streets are actually very narrow stair-stepped passageways. Nothing on wheels can get up them. Much of Guanajuato's historic center, in fact, is pedestrian only. To get around by car, the city has constructed a maze of incredible underground tunnels, complete with road signs. (On our first drive to Guanajuato, we were lost in this maze for three hours, popping up now and then to get our bearings and then heading back underground to try to locate the proper exit. Take it from us, driving here is not for the faint hearted.) The best advice if you're looking to live in the historic center is to be sure to check street access if you want to have a car. Otherwise, get used to toting groceries and supplies up those steep hills or hiring a delivery service. While you may want a car, you don't really need a car in Guanajuato ... taxis are plentiful and think of the workout you'll get hiking up and down those hills. And of course, as you'd imagine in a city of this size, with more than 150,000 inhabitants in the municipality, you'll find all the modern malls, supermarkets and hospitals and healthcare facilities you'd expect -- most in neighborhoods just outside the central historic district. For a target cost of living, a couple could easily live on a budget of $2,000 a month in Guanajuato, including rent -- especially with today's strong dollar and weak peso. At time of writing the exchange rate hovers close to 1 USD:18 MXN. See current rates here. You can find a comfortably furnished rental starting at about $700 a month. You won't need heat or air conditioning so your utility costs will be low. Shop at the local mercado for fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables and your grocery bill will be low, too. If you'd like to buy a home, you'll find prices more reasonable in Guanajuato than in the more-popular-with-expats San Miguel de Allende. (Note that the international airport at Léon is just 20 minutes from Guanajuato.) On a recent visit, we found a property in the San Isidro neighborhood of Guanajuato's central historic district (known as centro), with two 1,000-square-foot apartments. On the lower level is an open-plan apartment with dining room, living room, bedroom, and bathroom. The upper-level apartment offers two bedrooms, a large bathroom, a study, and a small terrace. The two apartments share a large back garden. Completely furnished, the price is just $240,000. If you look beyond centro, there are several neighborhoods where the terrain is relatively flat and you might easily have a car. Two that are particularly popular with expats are Marfil and La Presa. In Marfil, one of Guanajuato's oldest and most historical neighborhoods, homes tend to be Spanish-colonial style and are large and gracious. They often have ample garden spaces. La Presa takes its name from the reservoir at its center where you'll often see people rowing boats or picnicking around the shore. Streets here are wide, and many of the homes are large, 19th-century style. One thing to note: Guanajuato's expat community is much smaller than San Miguel's...perhaps 1,000 expats live here, as compared to San Miguel's 10,000 or so ... and fewer locals in Guanajuato speak English. Instead, it's very much a Spanish-speaking city, and if you live here long-term you'll want to learn Spanish, which makes day-to-day life much easier. Appearance-wise, this corner of the world feels a bit lost in time ... yet every modern amenity is here. The cultural appeal can't be beat. And neither can the climate or the cost of living ... That's why we're high on this part of Mexico -- and if you're looking for an amazing quality of life at an affordable price tag, you should be, too. Related Articles Having Fun Is a Full-Time "Job" In Mexico Exploring the Charms of San Miguel De Allende What's My Favorite Retirement Haven? I Don't Know Yet... Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
31 мая, 13:19

PLDT и Globe Telecom выставили совместное предложение по приобретению активов San Miguel

Вчера, 30 мая, появились сообщения о том, что две филиппинские телекоммуникационные компании Philippine Long Distance Telephone и Globe Telecom выставили совместное предложение по приобретению активов пивовара San Miguel в секторе телекоммуникаций. Сообщается, что сумма предложения составила 69,1 млрд песо ($1,48 млрд), при этом Philippine Long Distance Telephone и Globe Telecom будет принадлежать по 50% акций приобретенного подразделения.

Выбор редакции
31 мая, 10:40

PLDT и Globe Telecom выставили совместное предложение по приобретению активов San Miguel

Вчера, 30 мая, появились сообщения о том, что две филиппинские телекоммуникационные компании Philippine Long Distance Telephone и Globe Telecom выставили совместное предложение по приобретению активов пивовара San Miguel в секторе телекоммуникаций. Сообщается, что сумма предложения составила 69,1 млрд песо ($1,48 млрд), при этом Philippine Long Distance Telephone и Globe Telecom будет принадлежать по 50% акций приобретенного подразделения.

25 мая, 14:10

How To Retire In The Prettiest Town South Of The Border

Is San Miguel de Allende the prettiest colonial town in Mexico? Many people think so. Home to one of Mexico's largest communities of N.O.B. (north-of-the-border) expats for several generations now, American GIs are credited with kick starting the trend after World War II when they discovered they could use their education grants to study at Instituto Bellas Artes under the direction of an American artist and writer named Stirling Dickinson. In 1947, Life magazine sent a reporter and photographer to San Miguel to report on this post-war phenomenon. Under the headline "GI Paradise: Veterans go to Mexico to study art, live cheaply and have a good time," it reported the possibility to rent an apartment for $10 a month, pay 65 cents a quart for rum, and 10 cents a pack for cigarettes. More than 6,000 American veterans immediately applied to study in San Miguel. Today, as many as 10,000 expats call San Miguel home, and it continues to attract international artists: designers, sculptors, painters, writers, musicians ... You'll find top-notch local artisans here, too and you'll love browsing the shops and markets. And although San Miguel has traditionally been a haven for retirees, these days many younger singles and couples with children are discovering its charms -- opening businesses or working remotely via the Internet. You'll find at least four bilingual schools, including a private academy offering an international baccalaureate that covers kindergarten through grade 12. Why is San Miguel so popular? The city's striking beauty is, of course, a big reason for its appeal. Walking through the central historic district, known simply as "centro," is like stepping back in time. Stroll the winding cobblestone streets, past the historical old buildings painted shades of rose, ochre and umber, and you never know what you'll see. Behind giant and intricately carved wooden doors are flower-filled patios, restaurants, bars, boutiques, art galleries, offices, and homes. History is a constant companion in San Miguel. Founded by the Spanish in 1541, the little town became an important stop on the so-called 'silver road' between the rich silver mines north and west of here, and on to Mexico City to the south. Wealthy landowners built homes here, many of which still remain. In the state of Guanajuato, this part of Mexico is called El Bajío -- the colonial highlands -- and is known as the "Cradle of Independence" where the cry for independence from Spain began in 1810 in the town of Dolores Hidalgo, not far from San Miguel. One of the most important leaders of the independence movement, Ignacio Allende, was born in San Miguel in a home that is now a museum. After the revolution, his name was added to the town's official designation, and that's why it's known as San Miguel "de Allende." All this well-preserved history earned San Miguel a UNESCO World Heritage designation in 2008, and even more attention came in 2013 when Conde Nast named it the world's "most livable city." Today, San Miguel is one of Mexico's top tourist destinations -- including for Mexicans themselves who are well-acquainted with its charms. Beneath the porticoes that line the main plaza -- called el Jardín (the garden) -- are boutique-style shops, sidewalk cafés, and more. Pull up a chair and relax for a minute while you take in the view, including the frothy pink creation known as la Parroquía, San Miguel's parish church and the emblem of the city. The action fans out from here. Whether you're looking for a good hotel or restaurant or romantic colonial home to make your own, you'll probably measure by how far it is from el Jardín. Just a few blocks from el Jardín, the public library -- la Bibliotéca -- serves as a community center for locals and expats alike. You'll find a comfy café and the second-largest collection of English-language books in Mexico here. The library publishes Atención, San Miguel's bi-lingual local newspaper, a must-read each week to keep abreast of local events. And of course, you'll find good healthcare facilities in San Miguel. Local public and private hospitals can satisfy just about every need. For extremely serious procedures, you'll find excellent hospitals in Querétaro, a major city of well more than two million inhabitants that's only about an hour's drive away. (Querétaro is also where you'll find an international airport that services San Miguel. Another is near Léon, an hour-and-a-half to the northwest. And Mexico City is just three-and-a-half hours south.) Another big draw for this area is the agreeable climate. San Miguel sits at about 6,000 feet above sea level. Days are usually warm to hot, but dry. Nights are cool, but temperatures seldom get below freezing, even in winter. You'll seldom need more than a light jacket, but you might want a heater for cool winter evenings. Many homes have fireplaces, but few bother with air conditioning. Where to live: The most popular neighborhoods for expats have typically been in or near centro, for its proximity to all the action. Most of the largest colonial homes here have been beautifully restored, and most come with multi-million-dollar price tags. But as more and more tourists come to enjoy the lively culture (including nightlife) of San Miguel, you'll find both locals and expats looking to quieter neighborhoods, such as Guadalupe, Independencia, San Antonio, and beyond ... even into the high-desert countryside. Long-term rentals of, say, a two-bedroom property in centro can run $1,500 to $2,000 a month and up. Short-term rentals of these properties start at about $1,000 a week. To get better deals, look farther from centro. In Independencia, for example, a two- or three-bedroom furnished property can be rented for less than $1,000 a month. On our last visit, we toured a newly built 1,400-square-foot home in Independencia with two bedrooms and three bathrooms. Completely furnished, the asking price was $175,000. Across the street, a modern 2,400-square-foot home, unfurnished, was priced at $275,000. Or you can rent it for $1,200 a month. An important note: In this part of Mexico, you can buy property via direct deed instead of using the fideicomiso bank trust option that must be used along the coast or a border. Isn't San Miguel expensive? That's certainly what you'd expect in a world-class city and major tourist destination. But the answer to that depends totally on your lifestyle. As one longtime San Miguel expat told us recently, "We're busy all the time. The social scene in San Miguel is lively, and there's always something to do. Mostly, we have dinner parties at friends' houses or have them come to our house. Our utility costs are low, our property taxes are hardly anything at all, we live in a beautiful place, and it doesn't really cost us much to do that. We have a good life here." RELATED ARTICLES A Relaxed, Caribbean-Island Retirement without the High Price Tag Mexico: A Firm Expat Favorite Living My Dream Retirement in Caribbean Beach-Town Mexico Earlier on Huff/Post50: -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 января, 21:50

Silver Standard Posts Q4, FY15 Production; Guides FY16

Silver Standard (SSRI) posted fourth-quarter and full-year 2015 operational results alongside providing its production and cost guidance for 2016.

18 января, 20:14

San Miguel может начать сотрудничество с Kirin с целью приобретения брендов Grolsch и Peroni

Крупнейшая по величине продаж на Филиппинах пивоваренная компания San Miguel может начать сотрудничество с японской Kirin Holdings с целью приобретения брендов Grolsch и Peroni, принадлежащих бельгийскому пивовару SABMiller, который был недавно приобретен фирмой AB InBev.

18 января, 11:10

San Miguel может начать сотрудничество с Kirin с целью приобретения брендов Grolsch и Peroni

Крупнейшая по величине продаж на Филиппинах пивоваренная компания San Miguel может начать сотрудничество с японской Kirin Holdings с целью приобретения брендов Grolsch и Peroni, принадлежащих бельгийскому пивовару SABMiller, который был недавно приобретен фирмой AB InBev.

Выбор редакции
13 января, 17:59

Компания San Miguel заинтересована в приобретении брендов Grolsch и Peroni

Крупнейшая по величине продаж на Филиппинах пивоваренная компания San Miguel заявила о том, что заинтересована в приобретении брендов Grolsch и Peroni, принадлежащих бельгийскому пивовару SABMiller, который был недавно приобретен фирмой AB InBev. Напомним, что после заключения сделки с SABMiller компания AB InBev выставила вышеупомянутые бренды на продажу.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
13 января, 12:12

Компания San Miguel заинтересована в приобретении брендов Grolsch и Peroni

Крупнейшая по величине продаж на Филиппинах пивоваренная компания San Miguel заявила о том, что заинтересована в приобретении брендов Grolsch и Peroni, принадлежащих бельгийскому пивовару SABMiller, который был недавно приобретен фирмой AB InBev. Напомним, что после заключения сделки с SABMiller компания AB InBev выставила вышеупомянутые бренды на продажу.

Выбор редакции
13 января, 06:00

Philippines' San Miguel eyes SABmiller's Grolsch and Peroni

Philippine conglomerate San Miguel Corp said on Wednesday it is interested in acquiring SABMiller PLC's Grolsch and Peroni beer brands, its President Ramon Ang told Reuters. Anheuser Busch InBev SA , which ...