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Выбор редакции
22 февраля, 00:04

Облака ускорились

В 2016 г. российский рынок облачных услуг вырос на 43% до 22,6 млрд руб. с 15,79 млрд руб. в 2015 г., следует из результатов совместного исследования немецкого разработчика программного обеспечения SAP и аналитической компании Forrester. Ими оценивался рынок публичных облаков. Рост ускорился – годом ранее он составил 31,6%.

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22 февраля, 00:04

Облачные услуги в России принесли 22,6 млрд рублей, показав рост в 43%

В 2016 г. российский рынок облачных услуг вырос на 43% до 22,6 млрд руб. с 15,79 млрд руб. в 2015 г., следует из результатов совместного исследования немецкого разработчика программного обеспечения SAP и аналитической компании Forrester. Ими оценивался рынок публичных облаков. Рост ускорился – годом ранее он составил 31,6%.

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21 февраля, 12:45

SAP подготовила крупное обновление для своего продукта S/4Hana Cloud

Немецкая фирма SAP SE представила обновление для своего продукта S/4HANA Cloud, который объединяет в облачной среде разработки компании в области управления бизнесом SAP и базу данных Hana. Читать дальше →

18 февраля, 14:00

'He said he could do what he wanted': the scandal that rocked Bikram yoga

Bikram Choudhury built hot yoga into a global brand, with trainees willing to pay him thousands. Then came the lawsuits – and a lawyer who now owns the businessWe’re 15 minutes into the Monday morning class at Hot 8 Yoga in Beverly Hills. Francesca Asumah, one of the most sought-after instructors in California, is putting 48 perspiring humans through a sequence of 26 poses and two breathing exercises popularised by the celebrity yogi Bikram Choudhury. The temperature is a sapping 40C. Sweat slicks over yoga mats. Beautiful bodies melt into shapes that seem beyond the realm of ordinary human geometry.Asumah’s class, titled A Dance With The Ancients, falls somewhere between gym session and sermon. “You must learn to love yourself, guys!” she encourages us in a northern English accent (she’s half-Ghanaian, half-English, and from Manchester). “If everyone loves themselves, then the whole world will be loved. And beware false gurus! Gurus are middlemen. We are all born in the temple. If anyone claims to be your guru, run a mile, people!” Continue reading...

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12 февраля, 20:15

Baftas 2017 live: the awards, the speeches and the frocks

Join us until 11.15pm for live coverage of this year’s British Academy Film Awards!• Full list of winners (and go here for nominees)•Gallery: best of the red carpet fashion• Peter Bradshaw’s predictions• BBC braced for glut of Trump-bashing speeches• Interview with this year’s Fellowship winner, Mel Brooks 10.07pm GMT Outstanding British Contribution to Film now, presented with verve by Isabelle Huppert with the briefest of Brexit barbs. Curzon wins it, by the way. Bad luck Peckhamplex. Maybe next year. 10.04pm GMT That was a lot of people. My goodness. Sensitively handled, too. Continue reading...

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10 февраля, 14:00

Most Reorgs Aren’t Ambitious Enough

For many executives, the concept of organization design is an oxymoron. They are so consumed by working in the organization that they lack the patience to work on the organization. They don’t do the intricate, complex work of configuring their organization to execute strategy. Instead, they shift boxes on an organization chart, bolt on more resources that were lobbied for by a zealous executive, or cut costs across the board. They focus on communicating messages more inclusively or reassigning stronger leaders to troubled departments. These are surface-level, counterfeit solutions, and they do more harm than good. And yet when it comes to reorganization, they’re the norm. According to one McKinsey study, the success rate for organizational redesign efforts is less than 25%. It’s much more common for reorg efforts run out of steam before completion or fail to yield improvements once they’ve been implemented. These numbers reflect a fundamentally flawed approach to thinking about systems. Organization design is not a static, one-time event. It is an ongoing management discipline; as a living, breathing organism, your organization must be continually refined and improved. Intentional design can improve the health of the organization, position your team for success, and make life better for everyone. Such design should motivated by a desire to: Realize the benefits of scale, bringing together people who perform similar work. Improve decision making by ensuring information can move easily across the organization. Empower people by shaping behavior and motivating them to perform and contribute as the organization requires. In my experience, the organizations that succeed at organization design tend to do five things: Organize around competitive advantage. Organizations must answer critical questions of identity: What sets us apart? What are our markets? Who is our customer? It may sound obvious, but it’s astounding how often these questions go unasked. Without critical self-reflection, organizations build silos, bureaucracies, and cultures that impede rather than enable performance. If your competitive advantage is responsiveness or speed, the organization must be built for that. If it’s quality and service, that’s a different configuration. A narrowly defined set of critical choices is the foundation of good organization design. Create boundaries between competitive and necessary work. Competitive work — work that directly drives, or supports, the ability to compete — must be organized for effectiveness and mastery. This is the work you have to be better at than anyone else. On the other hand, necessary work — tasks that you have to do on par with anyone else, or in compliance with regulatory requirements — should be organized for maximum efficiency. Problems happen when competitive and necessary work get too close, and the urgency of the everyday undermines the strategic work of remaining competitively focused. To prevent this from happening, create boundaries around geographies, functions, customer segments, service or business lines, or a combination of them (a matrix). Again, those choices must be driven by strategic requirements noted above. Solid boundaries foster smooth coordination inside those groups. They also deepen expertise and enhance execution of a defined set of activities. The challenge with any set of boundaries is that it creates the need for coordination between groups. Without planning for how work will be coordinated and integrated, the grouping decisions become meaningless. Focus on the seams. The vast majority of an organization’s competitive muscle will reside across units, more so than within them. Great service sits at the intersection of sales, customer service, and supply chain. Product innovation sits at the intersection of R&D, marketing, and business intelligence. Where these seams come together, work must be tightly linked to ensure coordination is not encumbered by the boundaries between groups. Repeatable core processes, technology and information sharing platforms, and cross-functional teams are all design options that help create seamless linkages. Hierarchy, as an example, is simply a way to link vertically integrated tasks. Sadly, it’s usually the only thing that changes when people just change the “org chart.” Creating roles that cross organizational boundaries to coordinate with other parts of the organization is also a way to link work. Building effective linkages is one of the strongest ways to ensure organizational changes succeed. Distribute decision rights. How decision rights are distributed through the organization can promote desirable behaviors and avoid negative ones. A good decision architecture helps clarify everyone’s expectations about what they are accountable for. And most reorg efforts never touch it. It is foundational to how an organization works: It’s the set of authority structures, roles, and processes by which critical aspects of the organization are managed. More than just meeting cadences, it includes how strategy is set and prioritized, how resources are allocated, and how performance is measured. It includes the planning and building of P&Ls and budgets, managing the portfolios of products, clients, and talent, and the long-term financial and strategy processes that plan for results. While overhauling all of this is a huge task, it’s vital for making sure any reorg actually sticks. The ability to execute clear decisions is the central activity of an organization design, the activity from which the others all flow. It gives a predictable cadence to a business so that all of the interconnecting gears are working in coordinated fashion and the strategy is being executed and monitored appropriately. Fail to reform this, and your organization may simply retrench to silos and border wars, and fail to achieve common goals. Design clear, meaningful roles. It’s common in organizations for people to respond to the question, “So what do you do here?” with something like, “Well, there’s what my job description says, and then there’s what I do every day.” Jobs, like organizations, must be carefully crafted not around people’s preferences or idiosyncrasies, but around needed work and outcomes. The “mitosis” factor of organization growth usually has jobs “divide” the way cells do as humans form. Such mitosis is one of the worst ways to scale an organization. It creates both costly redundancies and soul-sapping jobs. Some people’s jobs may become boring and narrow, while other employees may find themselves juggling dozens of unrelated tasks. In other cases, organizations may bend the necessary work of a role to fit the employee within that role, diluting what needs to be done and settling for what can get done. Roles should be designed as widely and largely as possible so that people are continually challenged and fulfilled. Stretching people’s skills sustains a feeling of personal growth and satisfaction. It also enables great organizational breadth, something vital for when people are ready for expanded leadership responsibilities. With all of these approaches, remember to build an organization that you can actually implement. When you go to assign your talent base to your new design, if you are left with too many people “to be determined,” you have built a design that exceeds what you can implement. Designing organizations for “super humans” never goes well. It has to be a design that can stand up in the real world. That’s not an excuse to compromise, take an easy way out, or accept the mediocre talent you have to work with. There has to be a balance. To get further, design for your ideal state, and then adjust accordingly. Designing your optimal organization takes hard work, sacrifice, and significant trade-offs. They must be balanced against the realities and constraints of real life. But thoughtful design work pays great dividends and helps avoid the painful statistic of a failed reorg.

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09 февраля, 20:45

SAP Coins 'Intelligent ERP' Label For HANA Cloud

In the heavy-lifting world of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), the idea that we can work on some elements of a firm’s data workload in one area… but then sprinkle on some special functions (as and when needed) very much reflects what cloud computing is supposed to be all about.

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08 февраля, 19:01

Boom spurs SAP to open cloud data hub in China

SAP, Europe’s biggest enterprise software firm, launched a data center with cloud computing features in China yesterday, after posting a triple-digit growth in its cloud business in the country last year. SAP’s

08 февраля, 03:04

DeVos defeat just the start for reeling Democrats

But the party sees a comeback strategy in its opposition to Donald Trump's team.

07 февраля, 19:25

How To Get Out Of The Cycle Of Outrage In A Trump World

Have you heard about the latest outrage? Can you believe what the administration just did? I’m not actually talking about anything specific, but between the time I’m writing this and the time you’re reading it, there will no doubt have been plenty of examples. Your inbox and notifications are likely full of them. Your friends are probably texting you about them. You may well be talking about them at dinner tonight, before settling in to watch outraged pundits rehash them. Then there’s one last check for late-breaking outrages before a night of restless, fitful sleep. In the morning, with a check on the accumulation of whatever new outrages rained down overnight, the cycle starts all over again. Trump has brought many new things to our lives. And one of them is this state of perpetual outrage (Trumprage? Trumpdignation?) provoked in reaction to the state of perpetual chaos his administration seems to generate on a daily, even hourly basis. This is no way to live. Literally. We’re only 17 days in, and people are already exhausted by it. Trump hasn’t invaded any countries (yet), but he’s certainly invaded our minds and hearts. As Kevin Baker wrote in Politico, “thanks to social media, and to the nature of our new president and his administration, politics is suddenly with us always, in every aspect of our lives, including wherever we may look for diversion.” And that’s not healthy. There is — as our president might say — a tremendous mountain that shows that when we live in an ongoing state of outrage, anxiety, fear and stress, it wreaks an awful toll on our physical and mental health. It’s not sustainable. And there is another way. It’s not that the outrage is unwarranted. Trump’s executive order on refugees, his endless petty feuds — with allies, with judges, with Arnold Schwarzenegger — his constant stream of up-is-down and down-is-up fabrications is outrageous. Any president’s actions have real consequences in real people’s lives. This is high stakes and it really matters. But that’s precisely why it’s so important to take back control of how we react. Because only then will we be able to mitigate the effects of those presidential actions on the lives of people most vulnerable to them. So we need to go back to the truth that helped the country recover after 9/11: if we are consumed by fear, the terrorists win. If we live in a perpetual state of outrage, Trump wins. Because when we become depleted and exhausted, and sapped of our energy, we’re not as resourceful, creative, or effective. The goal of any true resistance is to affect outcomes, not just to vent. And the only way to affect outcomes and thrive in our lives, is to find the eye in the hurricane, and act from that place of inner strength. It’s the centered place Archimedes described when he said “give me a place to stand and I shall move the world.” It’s the place from which I imagine Judge James Robart issued his historic order to reverse Trump’s executive order on refugees. And it’s the place from which Viktor Frankl, who lost his pregnant wife, parents and brother in the Holocaust and spent 3 years in concentration camps, could write, “Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way…every day, every hour, offered the opportunity to make a decision, a decision which determined whether you would or would not submit to those powers which threatened to rob you of your very self, your inner freedom.” When we are robbed of our inner freedom, we feel like victims — victims of our circumstances, of Trump’s outrages, policies and chaos. If we want one more reason not to live in a state of victimhood and perpetual outrage, think of this: that’s the world Trump lives in. He wakes up feeling victimized by the media, he goes to sleep outraged at Alec Baldwin’s portrayal on SNL, and then he wakes up outraged at Judge Robart’s decision. And it’s from that place that he reacts and lashes out with language his administration has to spend news cycles explaining — like the “so-called” judge. So whatever you do, don’t just let yourself get stuck in the outrage storm — that particular weather pattern is likely to be here for a long time. Remember, you have the power to step out of the storm, think carefully about how best to channel your valuable energy, and then take action. And there are so many ways to do that. Laura Moser is a freelance writer and mother in Washington, D.C. After the election, she found she couldn’t disengage. So to channel her energy, and that of others as well, she created Daily Action, a daily text people can sign up for that gives them one concrete and specific action to take. In just a matter of weeks, she’s amassed over 100,000 subscribers. One is Aaron Becker, an author from Massachusetts. “People are feeling fatigue,” he told the Washington Post . “We are not really designed as human beings to take on the responsibility of everything at once.” But since channeling his energy in a specific way, he’s gotten a measure of control back in his life. “Now I feel like I can turn off my browser window and do some work,” he said. And there are plenty of other groups doing a similar thing — making it easy to channel that outrage in productive ways that can change outcomes. • 5 Calls gives you five calls that you can make in five minutes. • The Resistance Manual is an open source guide to taking action on a range of issues, from incarceration to immigration. • Run For Something is dedicated to helping young people get off the sidelines and into the leadership pipeline. • No One Left Behind is dedicated to helping obtain special immigration visas for those — like translators and interpreters — who have helped U.S. soldiers abroad. • The March for Science will be held on Earth Day, April 22nd. Showing up will be a way of demonstrating that we care about facts, data, science and what they tell us about climate change. •The Indivisible guide bills itself as a “practical guide to resisting the Trump agenda,” and also shows you how to get involved with one of the over 4,500 local indivisible groups that have already been started. When you fight a disease — and the Trump presidency is a disease, an assault on the health of our entire system — the most important thing is to give yourself the resources to allow your immune system to prevail over the disease. And that includes taking care of ourselves to strengthen our resilience — making sure we sleep, exercise, enjoy nature, eat healthily, take breaks from technology, and don’t start and end our day by going straight to the latest news before we’ve found that eye in the hurricane. As Marcus Aurelius, who spent nineteen years as the Emperor of Rome facing nearly constant war, a horrific plague, an attempt at the throne by one of his closest allies and an incompetent and greedy step-brother as co-emperor, wrote, “People look for retreats for themselves in the country, by the coast, or in the hills. There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. ... So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.” So how do you put this into action in your everyday life? How can we renew ourselves and thrive in the Age of Trump? Here are a few of our ideas. I hope you’ll add your own by telling me on social media at @ariannahuff on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook: 1) As they say on airplanes, put your own oxygen mask on first. Take care of yourself so you can take care of others. 2) Take action. Once you’ve taken care of step one, you’ll be ready to put your outrage to work, and the list above is a great place to start. 3) Remember that humor has always been a great way to find light in dark times. So seek out ways to laugh. There are, of course, the usual sources: Bill Maher, SNL (and Melissa McCarthy as Sean Spicer!). But you can also lead the way, as did whoever thought of the fake vigils to honor the victims of the “Bowling Green Massacre” made up by Kellyanne Conway. 4) Get creative — as did those who started the viral hashtag #dresslikeawoman in response to Trump’s narrow (and antiquated) ideas of how women should dress in the White House. 5) Find your own Thrive Tribe — reach out to people, seek out encouragement and inspiration from friends and be there for those who need the same, including those most vulnerable to Trump’s decisions. 6) Don’t limit your reading to social media — read the Greats and surround yourself with their wisdom. Here are two of my favorite quotes that I’m keeping by my bed right now: “Our actions may be impeded, but there can be no impeding our intentions or dispositions. The impediment to action advances actions, what stands in the way becomes the way.” That’s from Marcus Aurelius. The other is from Albert Schweitzer: “One who gains strength by overcoming obstacles possesses the only strength which can overcome adversity.” 8) Unplug. Calendar time in your day when you choose to separate yourself from your devices, from the news, from social media. 9) Breathe. Seriously. It’s good for your brain. 10) Trust: As Martin Luther King Jr. said, “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.” Remember: truth and justice ultimately always win. This post was originally published on Thrive Global. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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06 февраля, 17:54

Dollar gains vulnerable as Trump trade questioned

US economic and political uncertainty sap momentum for reserve currency

Выбор редакции
06 февраля, 17:23

Как платформа SAP HANA работает с большими данными

Привет, Хабр! В прошлой статье мы рассказали про решение для малого бизнеса SAP Business One и кратко упомянули про возможности SAP HANA в области вычислений и аналитики. Сегодня мы подробнее остановимся на том, как платформа SAP HANA может работать с большими данными и на сценариях применения этих технологий в бизнесе. SAP HANA: как это работает Читать дальше →

03 февраля, 19:05

china’s rates rises surprise markets

CHINA’S central bank surprised financial markets yesterday by raising short-term interest rates on the first day back from the Spring Festival holiday — a further sign of policy tightening as the economy

03 февраля, 19:05

China’s rates rises surprise markets

CHINA’S central bank surprised financial markets yesterday by raising short-term interest rates on the first day back from the Spring Festival holiday — a further sign of policy tightening as the economy

Выбор редакции
03 февраля, 18:09

Paylocity (PCTY) Posts Narrower-than-Expected Loss in Q2

Paylocity Holding Corporation (PCTY) reported better-than-expected results for the second quarter of fiscal 2017.

03 февраля, 12:05

'Sagaan Sag' on Olkhon Island

Olkhon Island is a sacred place for Buddhists and shamans. It’s always sunny here, and there are only 30 cloudy days a year: from mid-December to mid-January. During this time Baikal slowly but surely starts to freeze over; but the ice is not yet strong enough for vehicles, making the island off-limits to tourists. Baikal is enveloped in thick fog, temporarily screening Olkhon and its inhabitants from the outside world. In the emptiness of this snow-covered island, man becomes a small part of a larger world. The days merge endlessly into each other, as local folk while away the time on domestic matters. Elena Anosova Every winter morning Viktor rises at 7 am, heats the stove and gets busy around the house. Elena Anosova An old-timer now, he’s used to an austere lifestyle and refuses to be cared for by relatives. Elena Anosova Viktor used to fish aboard ships belonging to the local fish factory, but it was closed down. Elena Anosova Viktor lives with a cat called Vasily, who lends a paw in everything, especially when it comes to reading and writing letters to friends. Elena Anosova Viktor makes wine from Siberian berries and birch sap. Elena Anosova There’s no plumbing on Olkhon Island, so until the freeze-over locals take their cattle to Lake Baikal to drink. At other times water is brought from the water carrier. Elena Anosova The strong winds on the shore of Olkhon Island have bent many pines over backwards. Locals call them “walking” trees. Elena Anosova Strolling along Cape Burkhan, you might come across sergyes—ritual poles with ribbons and offerings to the spirits. Cape Burkhan is considered the earthly palace of Chief Tengri (the overlord of Olkhon). It culminates with the “two-legged” Shamanic rock, which houses a sacred cave. The renowned Russian academic Vladimir Obruchev, who studied Baikal, wrote: “... most remarkable of all is the superstitious fear that Olkhon Buryats have of the cave. It is not allowed to pass by the Shamanic rock on wheels—only on horseback or in a sleigh, which is why in summer travel between the western and eastern parts of Olkhon is strictly on horseback, and only then on rare occasions, because Buryats are generally reluctant to go past the cave. Moreover, if there has been a death in the family, all kin, i.e. half the island, are forbidden from passing by the cave for a certain period of time. For this reason, my guide—a Buryat from Dolon-Argun—brought me to Khuzhir and went back. I passed by the cave with another baptized Buryat to the settlement of Kharantsy, where I found another guide; it was the same on the way back.” Elena Anosova One of the Olkhon airport buildings. In summer the island can be reached from Irkutsk by private small aircraft. In Soviet times such flights were weekly. Elena Anosova In summer, maritime navigation on the Maly Sea (part of Lake Baikal separated from Olkhon island) is regulated by a series of lighthouses. Baikal experiences major storms. For example, in late September 1902 the ship Alexander Nevsky was badly damaged on the Maly Sea, wrecking the barges being towed, aboard which fishermen and their families were returning after the fishing season. Elena Anosova A memorial to a drowned young man. Because it's a Buryat grave, offerings have been left. Elena Anosova The skeletal hulls of fishing vessels that once belonged to the local fish factory. It opened in 1932, but today barely operates. Elena Anosova The island is home to a local Cossack community, which peacefully coexists with the Buryats. The island is generally tolerant of all religions: Buddhism, shamanism and Christianity.  

02 февраля, 16:25

The locals know it best: Khakassian countrymen on finding food in the wild

In Khakassia, a region of Russia in the south of Siberia, one out of ten locals from age 18 to 80 makes his or her living by selling natural resources. Hunting and fishing, along with harvesting of berries, medicinal herbs and cedar nuts, provide extra food and income for local families. A seasonal worker can make up to 100,000 rubles ($1675) in cash over six months of intensive labor. The monthly cost of living in Khakassia for a family of three is under 20,000 rubles ($335), so the money earned during the season is enough to get a family through the winter.   Mubarak Kashimovich Aikulov, 57, cedar cone harvester Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev I've been roaming the taiga for 20 years. I learned to harvest cones from the Shors in Kemerovo Region, where I tried gathering cedar nuts for the first time. Now I'm in charge of a team of locals. Jobs are scarce in villages, and I pay in cash on a daily basis. A worker earns 3000 rubles a day ($50), if he works hard. This way, people can put aside some money to support their families through the winter. I can't complain either: I’ve bought a house and a car, and I’m going to build a warehouse soon. Cedar cone harvesting in Khakassia Cedar-nut season is from October to December, depending on the temperatures and the yield. Harvesters start by picking up cones which have fallen to the ground. When there are no more fallen cones, harvesters take a long wooden staff, wrap one end in a piece of cloth and hit cedar trunks with it. The ripe cones fall to the ground, while the green ones are left to ripen. In the old days, cones were threshed with flails, after which the mass was sifted for nuts. Today harvesters make use of special machines powered by diesel generators. The equipment speeds up the cone processing and improves the quality of the end product. An average team of five harvesters yields five tons of nuts per season. Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev The price for nuts depends on the crop. Over the previous four years, nut crops were poor and prices went up. We sold nuts at 350 rubles a kilo ($6). This year there’s a good harvest, so the same amount sells for 150 rubles ($2.5). People buy a lot; we have a local tradition of cracking the nuts with our teeth, like Russians do with sunflower seeds. Cedar nuts are also used for infusions and healing decoctions.   Aigul Sadykova, 66, berry harvester Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev I gather berries and sell them at the market. Some people I know live in villages far away and gather all sorts of natural resources, and they sell their berries through me: It is easier and more profitable to deal through an intermediary than to travel 200 kilometers to the city market. Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev The harvesting season starts in May. Wild garlic is the earliest crop, followed by honeysuckle in June, first in Askiz District and in the mountains along the Khakassia–Tuva border. Summers are warmer there, so the earliest berries come from that region. In July, the wild strawberries are ready for harvesting, in August we harvest bog bilberries and blueberries, while the lingonberries aren’t ready until September. Wild berry gathering in Khakassia Not only do Siberians eat forest berries, but they also make use of their medicinal properties: Lingonberries are considered to be a natural antibiotic and cranberries are good for people with heart conditions, while blueberries are beneficial for people with bad eyesight. Wild garlic is the best remedy for spring avitaminosis. It is preserved in jars for the winter, salted and pickled as a spicy starter. We make natural chewing gum from cedar sap by dipping a piece of gauze into a pot with boiling sap, and the gauze absorbs the foam. When the sap thickens, the gum is ready. Strips of cedar gum help prevent various diseases of the mouth, as well as stomach conditions.   Maria Maksimovna, 64, medicinal herb harvester Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev I gather, dry and sell medicinal herbs. As soon as the herbs come into bloom, my grandson and I set out for the taiga. Herbalists gather plants only when the moon is waxing, when they have accumulated the most healing properties, and dry them in a dark, dry place. Mass harvesting takes place from June to the end of July. Sometimes Old Believers come out of the taiga and sell rare herbs which are hard to find near cities. Iceland moss is a popular commodity in cold weather. It’s a natural antibiotic used to treat lung diseases and colds. Creeping thyme is also popular: The locals believe that it can cure 35 diseases. People buy highland juniper, which is used by the locals to smoke their homes to keep evil spirits away. Juniper brew is also used to treat children when they have hysterical fits. The most valued herbs are clustered rhodiola and sweetvetch. These herbs grow only in Khakassia and Altai. Clustered rhodiola helps with tumors and gynecological conditions; it also boosts your immune system. Sweetvetch is believed to possess life-prolonging properties. Where to buy the best Siberian herbs in Khakassia Khakassians say that the best herbs are sold in the settlement of Tanzybei, 151 kilometers from Abakan along Road M54. Local sellers sometimes have rare species to offer, such as sagan-dale, which grows only in Siberia and the Tibetan foothills. This strong tonic is cheaper here than if you buy it from dealers. Nikolay Semenovich Konovalov, 79, fisherman Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev I was born with a fishing rod in my hands: My entire life has been linked to fishing. During World War II, we had food shortages and my grand-uncle organized fishing in the Yenisei channels to feed the settlement. Kids went fishing too; they did all they could to help the adults, as it was a hard time for everyone. Once, my brother and I caught a 30-kilogram dogfish. In autumn, the Yenisei is full of slush ice rising from the riverbed; it scares the fish away, and the dogfish go to places where the river has frozen. We put a tractor spring on a long wooden staff and beat it against the ice. This stunned the dogfish, and all you had to do was to take an ax, chop a hole in the ice, and pull the fish out.  Photo credit: Nikolai Okunev The best time for fishing on the Yenisei is from June 5 to June 19. That’s when the common and the crucian carps start spawning, and you can go fishing with a rod. April is the best time for ice fishing. Once in the spring, I caught so many roach that my horse could barely pull the sledge. The Yenisei and the Krasnoyarsk Reservoir are home to common carp, perch, roach, bream and peled. The grayling lives in small taiga rivers, and many people spend weeks looking for it because this species has become rare in Khakassia. Fishermen rarely sell fish: The catch is divided among family and neighbors to save money on food. However, sometimes the catch is so big that it is impossible to carry. In that case, the fisherman stands by the road and sells fresh fish at one-third its market price. This is not a stable source of income, but sometimes you can make a bundle. I once sold enough bream to buy a cow. 

02 февраля, 13:20

Democrats Should Not Fear the Nuclear Option

Why liberals have every reason to fight the Gorsuch nomination to the hilt, filibuster be damned.

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02 февраля, 10:52

BRIEF-SAPpeers.com to take part in SAP Startup program

* Has been qualified and invited by SAP AG to SAP Startup program