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Sempra Energy
01 марта, 17:28

Maxwell (MXWL) Q4 Loss Wider than Expected, Revenues Beat

Maxwell (MXWL) incurred adjusted loss of 28 cents per share in the fourth-quarter of 2016, wider than the Zacks Consensus Estimate of a loss of 21 cents by 33.3%.

28 февраля, 20:23

Sempra Energy (SRE) Beats on Q4 Earnings, Lifts '17 View

Sempra Energy's (SRE) fourth-quarter 2016 adjusted earnings per share (EPS) came in at $1.52, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of $1.42 by 7%.

28 февраля, 17:46

Sempra Energy (SRE) Tops Q4 Earnings, Misses on Revenues

Sempra Energy (SRE) surpassed the earnings expectation by 7%, but missed the revenue expectation by 1%

24 февраля, 14:58

Will Sempra Energy (SRE) Upset Investors in Q4 Earnings?

Last quarter, Sempra Energy (SRE) recorded a 5.15% positive earnings surprise. Yet, in the trailing four quarters, the company recorded an average negative surprise of 3.37%.

17 февраля, 04:16

Readout of the Vice President's African American Economic Opportunity Listening Session

Vice President Mike Pence, along with Senator Tim Scott of South Carolina, hosted an African American economic opportunity listening session today with small business owners, and community and finance industry leaders. The Vice President underscored President Trump's commitment to remove barriers that hinder entrepreneurship and economic growth. The Vice President emphasized the need to create more access to capital for small businesses, reduce regulatory burdens from Dodd-Frank, expand access to better education via school choice and vocational education, and dedicate more resources to law enforcement to keep our communities safe. Overall, the group discussion focused on ways to empower and revitalize distressed communities through economic development so that all Americans, including African Americans, can improve their quality of life. The list of participants is as follows: Walter Davis – Co-founder/Managing Partner, Integrated Capital Strategies Dr. Dexter Easley – CEO of (DEM) Dexter Easley Ministries, New Life Salon, The Good News Christian Store, and is the Founder and CEO of New Life Christian Academy Robert Greene – President & CEO, National Association of Investment Companies Lt. Gen. Ronnie Hawkins USAF (Ret) – Director, Defense Information Systems Agency and Commander, Joint Force Headquarters - Department of Defense Information Networks Gary Hobbs – CEO of Black and White Investments (BWI) Jessie Knight – Philanthropist and former EVP of External Affairs for Sempra Energy Dan Martin – Owner of Dan Martin Allstate Insurance Agency and Financial Advisor Doyle Mitchell – President/CEO of Industrial Bank Bob Woodson – Founder and President of the Center for Neighborhood Enterprise

Выбор редакции
03 января, 17:42

Focus on Fidelity Value Fund (FDVLX)

Fidelity Value Fund (FDVLX) seeks capital appreciation

19 декабря 2016, 16:29

Sempra Energy (SRE) Unit Buys Ventika Facility in Mexico

Sempra Energy's (SRE) Mexican unit, Infraestructura Energetica Nova, S.A.B. de C.V. ("IEnova") has closed the acquisition of the Ventika I and Ventika II wind generation facilities in the country.

09 декабря 2016, 15:27

Thy Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump

To paraphrase the famous Claude Raines line from Casablanca, “I am shocked—shocked—to find that corporate bribes are going on here!” Alarms are ringing from left, right and center over the $7 million grant by the state of Indiana to induce Carrier to keep 800 (not 1,100) jobs from moving to Mexico. (This downward revision comes from the Carrier Steelworkers local union president Chuck Jones who courageously called Trump out for inflating the numbers. Trump has tweeted back twice to attack Jones, who now is receiving threatening calls from anonymous Trump supporters.) Conservative pundits, so lost in their free market fictions, claim that Trump is interfering with the pristine operation of this system. He is picking winners and losers! He will ignite a trade war with his reckless tariffs! He will drive up prices of consumer goods! He will destroy more jobs than he will save! “This is the sort of package Republicans have traditionally loathed,” reports the New York Times. Hogwash. The “bribe” for Carrier is barely a rounding error in the tens of billions of dollars in public money and tax breaks lavished upon corporations each and every day by Republicans and Democrats alike. Profits deeply depend on the well-honed corporate art of playing states and countries against each other in order to feast at the public trough. The conservatives’ beloved free enterprise system has never been free of corporate bribes and corporate job blackmail. How big is the American Corporate Welfare Trough? Very Big The nonprofit research organization, Good Jobs First has developed a corporate welfare tracker that goes back to 1976. There are 34 corporate welfare recipients who received over $1 billion (not million) in corporate welfare for a total of $84.5 billion in tax breaks and subsidies of the kind Carrier will receive: Here are the top 10. Boeing $14,397,024,137 Intel $5,964,288,316 GM $5,832,287,385 Alcoa $5,798,922,493 Ford $4,044,067,895 NRG Energy $2,738,480,245 Sempra Energy $2,576,755,550 Tesla Motors $2,406,805,253 NextEra Energy $2,385,022,879 Iberdrola $2,248,534,669 The Alcoa-New York State Deal For just one example among thousands, let’s look at Alcoa, #4 on the corporate bribe list. In 2015, the company was scheduled to eliminate 600 jobs at its aluminum facility in upstate New York (500 layoffs and another 100 positions that would not be filled.) Low and behold, Democratic governor Andrew Cuomo and Democratic senator Charles Schumer, came to the rescue with $38.8 million in capital and operation expenses from the state’s economic development arm, and another $30 million in energy cost assistance. Alcoa promises to keep the jobs in New York State for at least three years. “I heard last night: Alcoa said they were going to keep the plant open,” Schumer, who turned 65 a day earlier said. “That was the best birthday present I could have received.” The War Between the States Not only do state and local governments worry about jobs evaporating or shifting abroad, but they are equally petrified about relocations to other U.S. states. New Jersey and Connecticut, for example, are in a cutthroat war to hold onto their own enterprises, while also luring other corporations to move jobs their way. New Jersey’s largess, under a Republican governor, knows no bounds, reports the Wall Street Journal. In fact, its corporate tax incentives, loans and cash bribes are rising rapidly. Connecticut Bribes Multi-Billion Dollar Hedge Funds Perhaps the most nauseating examples of corporate welfare are occurring in “The Constitution State,” the plush exurbia home to many Wall Street hedge funds. Granted it’s a stretch to claim that any hedge fund contributes positive economic value to society, given that often their goal is simply to siphon wealth away from the rest of the economy and put it into the pockets of the super rich. Also, it’s hard to make the case that saving high paying hedge fund jobs somehow benefits working people and the middle class. But from the state’s perspective, hedge funds bring revenues and economic activity to the state and therefore are coveted. Since hedge funds can operate wherever they place their people and computers, these jobs are mobile. One leafy suburb near New York and the Hamptons is as good as another. Therefore Connecticut is an easy target for some good old corporate blackmail coming from the richest of the rich. Here are two egregious examples, this time under a Democratic governor: 1. Bridgewater Associates LP, the world’s largest hedge fund gets $22 million: Supposedly this package announced in May 2016 was to induce Bridgewater, a $150 billion hedge fund, to keep 1,400 jobs in Connecticut, and then possibly to add 700 more by 2021. This deal is nothing short of obscene. Ray Dalio, the founder and CEO of Bridgewater, had a reported income of $1.4 billion in 2014. His net worth is $14.1 billion. So the subsidy from the state to his firm amounts to 0.16% of his net worth ― about one tenth of a penny on every wealth dollar. Worse still is that Dalio gets an enormous tax break called “carried interest.” Instead of being liable for a federal tax of 35 percent― before deductions ― on his $1.4 billion ($490 million), his liability is only 20 percent ($280 million). So this hedge fund mogul takes advantage of a needless $210 million federal tax loophole and then still has the nerve to shake down the state for another $22 million. One wonders how Dalio justifies this level of greed. 2. AQR Capital Management gets a new state subsidy of $35 million: Once you bribe one billionaire hedge fund manager, get ready to do it again and again. On November 16, 2016, Connecticut announced a $35 million package of subsidies to another hedge fund that only has 540 jobs in the state but promises to add 600 more over the next ten years. Its CEO, Clifford Asness has a reported net worth of $4 billion. So let’s do the simple math on these corporate bribes: 600 Alcoa = $114,667 per job. 1,400 Bridgewater jobs = $15,714 per job. AQR’s 540 jobs = $64,815 per job Carrier’s $7 million for 800 jobs = $8,750 per job. I hate to say this, but Trump got a deal. Faulty Logic, Flagrant Greed It’s not just conservatives who are using faulty logic and wishful thinking to belittle the jobs saved at Carrier (and perhaps Rexnord too.) For example, Obama’s press secretary Josh Earnest said, “If he [Trump] is successful in doing that 804 more times, then he will meet the record of manufacturing jobs created in the United States while President Obama was in office.” Say what? Earnest should know that new jobs created by the Obama administration aren’t going to the Carrier workers or to most other workers dislocated due to outsourcing. Economy wide job creation is an entirely different process than stopping jobs from moving to Mexico ― something no administration has done since NAFTA. Also, the human experience of losing a decent paying job is one of the most life wrenching events imaginable, and not comparable to finding a new job. Job insecurity correlates with a significant rise in disease and death. You can’t wish that away with macro-statistics. Unfetter Greed and Stock Buybacks Steven Rattner, a liberal Wall Streeter with close ties to the Democratic Party, also ignores the unconscionable greed that is fueling the rush to low-wage labor. He argues that losing Carrier jobs is inevitable, and therefore it is folly to try to save them. “The vast preponderance of American job losses,” he writes in the New York Times, “has come simply because emerging-market countries have gotten much better at making stuff with workers earning far less.” Further, he argues that working people actually benefit by the export of jobs to low wage areas because the goods we import from those countries are far cheaper, thereby increasing the standard of living of all Americans. So some people lose their jobs so that the rest of us can purchase cheaper products and make our declining incomes travel further. Meanwhile Rattner chooses to ignore the prime beneficiaries of moving production abroad: the top executives and their hedge fund partners who drive the process. For example, United Technologies, the parent company of Carrier, is not worried about foreign competition. Rather, its top executives and hedge fund investors are seeking more cash flow to finance the $10 billion stock buyback plan they instituted last year. Stock buybacks always raise share prices to enrich top executives and hedge funds. They are the key to runaway inequality. Instead of justifying Carrier-like job loss, all of these pundits should explain to the America public how those same stock buybacks were illegal before 1982. That’s because they were considered stock manipulation! (Yes, in free markets, you’re not supposed to be able to manipulate the price of anything.) Since the Reagan administration legalized them, stock buybacks jumped from 2% of all corporate profits in 1980 to a whopping 75% of all corporate profits by 2007. There’s nothing inevitable about that. Is protecting middle-class jobs a just cause? One senses hesitancy within the liberal-left community about the righteousness of saving decent paying American jobs. After all if Trump is for it, it must be suspect, no? In a recent Rolling Stone interview Senator Sanders was asked why liberal-minded people should support economic nationalism ― a policy of “our jobs first.” Instead, isn’t it a good thing that jobs from wealthy nations go to raising the standard of living for poor people in Mexico, and other developing nations? Sanders’ response is worth noting: “....I am deeply concerned about poverty in countries around the world, and I believe that the United States and other major countries have got to work to address those issues. But you do not have to sacrifice the American middle class in order to do that. I find it ironic that the billionaire class says, “We’re worried about the poor people in Vietnam, and that’s why we’re sending your job to Vietnam.” That’s the billionaire class talking. Clearly we know what that is about. And you have some “liberals” who echo that point of view.... .... How you create a sustainable global economy that protects the poorest people in the world is a very important issue for me. But you surely do not have to do that by wiping out the middle class of this country. I think we have a right in this country to hold corporate America accountable for gaining the benefits of being an American corporation, while at the same time turning their backs on the American working class and the consumers who helped create their profits and their wealth.” Will Trump Ride the Outsourcing Issue into a Second term? If Trump continues to prevent jobs from fleeing abroad, he will gain increasing support from working class voters, and not just from white people. At Carrier, African-Americans make up 50% of the workforce. Ten percent are immigrants. Half of the assembly line workers are women. These dues-paying members of the United Steelworkers, are not likely to forget who saved their jobs. Outsourcing should be a progressive cause. Conservatives and their corporate backers hate any effort to suppress it. Wall Street elites want us to believe job outsourcing is an act of God, while they line their pockets with stock buybacks. Trump deserves to be attacked for many reasons, but not because he has saved 800 Carrier jobs. We should mobilize around the job outsourcing issue rather than letting him capture it. We should unmask the hypocrites who praise their precious free market while lavishing billions of tax dollars on thousands of corporations. To counter Carrier-like outsourcing, we should be building a movement to again outlaw massive stock buybacks. (For a more detailed plan see here.) (This post originally appeared on Alternet.org) Les Leopold, the director of the Labor Institute, is currently working with unions and community organizations to build the educational infrastructure of a new anti-Wall Street movement. His latest book Runaway Inequality: An Activist Guide to Economic Justice serves as a text for this campaign. All proceeds go to support these educational efforts.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 декабря 2016, 15:27

Thy Hypocrisy Of Corporate Welfare: It's Bigger Than Trump

To paraphrase the famous Claude Raines line from Casablanca, “I am shocked—shocked—to find that corporate bribes are going on here!” Alarms are ringing from left, right and center over the $7 million grant by the state of Indiana to induce Carrier to keep 800 (not 1,100) jobs from moving to Mexico. (This downward revision comes from the Carrier Steelworkers local union president Chuck Jones who courageously called Trump out for inflating the numbers. Trump has tweeted back twice to attack Jones, who now is receiving threatening calls from anonymous Trump supporters.) Conservative pundits, so lost in their free market fictions, claim that Trump is interfering with the pristine operation of this system. He is picking winners and losers! He will ignite a trade war with his reckless tariffs! He will drive up prices of consumer goods! He will destroy more jobs than he will save! “This is the sort of package Republicans have traditionally loathed,” reports the New York Times. Hogwash. The “bribe” for Carrier is barely a rounding error in the tens of billions of dollars in public money and tax breaks lavished upon corporations each and every day by Republicans and Democrats alike. Profits deeply depend on the well-honed corporate art of playing states and countries against each other in order to feast at the public trough. The conservatives’ beloved free enterprise system has never been free of corporate bribes and corporate job blackmail. How big is the American Corporate Welfare Trough? Very Big The nonprofit research organization, Good Jobs First has developed a corporate welfare tracker that goes back to 1976. There are 34 corporate welfare recipients who received over $1 billion (not million) in corporate welfare for a total of $84.5 billion in tax breaks and subsidies of the kind Carrier will receive: Here are the top 10. Boeing $14,397,024,137 Intel $5,964,288,316 GM $5,832,287,385 Alcoa $5,798,922,493 Ford $4,044,067,895 NRG Energy $2,738,480,245 Sempra Energy $2,576,755,550 Tesla Motors $2,406,805,253 NextEra Energy $2,385,022,879 Iberdrola $2,248,534,669 The Alcoa-New York State Deal For just one example among thousands, let’s look at Alcoa, #4 on the corporate bribe list. In 2015, the company was scheduled to eliminate 600 jobs at its aluminum facility in upstate New York (500 layoffs and another 100 positions that would not be filled.) Low and behold, Democratic governor Andrew Cuomo and Democratic senator Charles Schumer, came to the rescue with $38.8 million in capital and operation expenses from the state’s economic development arm, and another $30 million in energy cost assistance. Alcoa promises to keep the jobs in New York State for at least three years. “I heard last night: Alcoa said they were going to keep the plant open,” Schumer, who turned 65 a day earlier said. “That was the best birthday present I could have received.” The War Between the States Not only do state and local governments worry about jobs evaporating or shifting abroad, but they are equally petrified about relocations to other U.S. states. New Jersey and Connecticut, for example, are in a cutthroat war to hold onto their own enterprises, while also luring other corporations to move jobs their way. New Jersey’s largess, under a Republican governor, knows no bounds, reports the Wall Street Journal. In fact, its corporate tax incentives, loans and cash bribes are rising rapidly. Connecticut Bribes Multi-Billion Dollar Hedge Funds Perhaps the most nauseating examples of corporate welfare are occurring in “The Constitution State,” the plush exurbia home to many Wall Street hedge funds. Granted it’s a stretch to claim that any hedge fund contributes positive economic value to society, given that often their goal is simply to siphon wealth away from the rest of the economy and put it into the pockets of the super rich. Also, it’s hard to make the case that saving high paying hedge fund jobs somehow benefits working people and the middle class. But from the state’s perspective, hedge funds bring revenues and economic activity to the state and therefore are coveted. Since hedge funds can operate wherever they place their people and computers, these jobs are mobile. One leafy suburb near New York and the Hamptons is as good as another. Therefore Connecticut is an easy target for some good old corporate blackmail coming from the richest of the rich. Here are two egregious examples, this time under a Democratic governor: 1. Bridgewater Associates LP, the world’s largest hedge fund gets $22 million: Supposedly this package announced in May 2016 was to induce Bridgewater, a $150 billion hedge fund, to keep 1,400 jobs in Connecticut, and then possibly to add 700 more by 2021. This deal is nothing short of obscene. Ray Dalio, the founder and CEO of Bridgewater, had a reported income of $1.4 billion in 2014. His net worth is $14.1 billion. So the subsidy from the state to his firm amounts to 0.16% of his net worth ― about one tenth of a penny on every wealth dollar. Worse still is that Dalio gets an enormous tax break called “carried interest.” Instead of being liable for a federal tax of 35 percent― before deductions ― on his $1.4 billion ($490 million), his liability is only 20 percent ($280 million). So this hedge fund mogul takes advantage of a needless $210 million federal tax loophole and then still has the nerve to shake down the state for another $22 million. One wonders how Dalio justifies this level of greed. 2. AQR Capital Management gets a new state subsidy of $35 million: Once you bribe one billionaire hedge fund manager, get ready to do it again and again. On November 16, 2016, Connecticut announced a $35 million package of subsidies to another hedge fund that only has 540 jobs in the state but promises to add 600 more over the next ten years. Its CEO, Clifford Asness has a reported net worth of $4 billion. So let’s do the simple math on these corporate bribes: 600 Alcoa = $114,667 per job. 1,400 Bridgewater jobs = $15,714 per job. AQR’s 540 jobs = $64,815 per job Carrier’s $7 million for 800 jobs = $8,750 per job. I hate to say this, but Trump got a deal. Faulty Logic, Flagrant Greed It’s not just conservatives who are using faulty logic and wishful thinking to belittle the jobs saved at Carrier (and perhaps Rexnord too.) For example, Obama’s press secretary Josh Earnest said, “If he [Trump] is successful in doing that 804 more times, then he will meet the record of manufacturing jobs created in the United States while President Obama was in office.” Say what? Earnest should know that new jobs created by the Obama administration aren’t going to the Carrier workers or to most other workers dislocated due to outsourcing. Economy wide job creation is an entirely different process than stopping jobs from moving to Mexico ― something no administration has done since NAFTA. Also, the human experience of losing a decent paying job is one of the most life wrenching events imaginable, and not comparable to finding a new job. Job insecurity correlates with a significant rise in disease and death. You can’t wish that away with macro-statistics. Unfetter Greed and Stock Buybacks Steven Rattner, a liberal Wall Streeter with close ties to the Democratic Party, also ignores the unconscionable greed that is fueling the rush to low-wage labor. He argues that losing Carrier jobs is inevitable, and therefore it is folly to try to save them. “The vast preponderance of American job losses,” he writes in the New York Times, “has come simply because emerging-market countries have gotten much better at making stuff with workers earning far less.” Further, he argues that working people actually benefit by the export of jobs to low wage areas because the goods we import from those countries are far cheaper, thereby increasing the standard of living of all Americans. So some people lose their jobs so that the rest of us can purchase cheaper products and make our declining incomes travel further. Meanwhile Rattner chooses to ignore the prime beneficiaries of moving production abroad: the top executives and their hedge fund partners who drive the process. For example, United Technologies, the parent company of Carrier, is not worried about foreign competition. Rather, its top executives and hedge fund investors are seeking more cash flow to finance the $10 billion stock buyback plan they instituted last year. Stock buybacks always raise share prices to enrich top executives and hedge funds. They are the key to runaway inequality. Instead of justifying Carrier-like job loss, all of these pundits should explain to the America public how those same stock buybacks were illegal before 1982. That’s because they were considered stock manipulation! (Yes, in free markets, you’re not supposed to be able to manipulate the price of anything.) Since the Reagan administration legalized them, stock buybacks jumped from 2% of all corporate profits in 1980 to a whopping 75% of all corporate profits by 2007. There’s nothing inevitable about that. Is protecting middle-class jobs a just cause? One senses hesitancy within the liberal-left community about the righteousness of saving decent paying American jobs. After all if Trump is for it, it must be suspect, no? In a recent Rolling Stone interview Senator Sanders was asked why liberal-minded people should support economic nationalism ― a policy of “our jobs first.” Instead, isn’t it a good thing that jobs from wealthy nations go to raising the standard of living for poor people in Mexico, and other developing nations? Sanders’ response is worth noting: “....I am deeply concerned about poverty in countries around the world, and I believe that the United States and other major countries have got to work to address those issues. But you do not have to sacrifice the American middle class in order to do that. I find it ironic that the billionaire class says, “We’re worried about the poor people in Vietnam, and that’s why we’re sending your job to Vietnam.” That’s the billionaire class talking. Clearly we know what that is about. And you have some “liberals” who echo that point of view.... .... How you create a sustainable global economy that protects the poorest people in the world is a very important issue for me. But you surely do not have to do that by wiping out the middle class of this country. I think we have a right in this country to hold corporate America accountable for gaining the benefits of being an American corporation, while at the same time turning their backs on the American working class and the consumers who helped create their profits and their wealth.” Will Trump Ride the Outsourcing Issue into a Second term? If Trump continues to prevent jobs from fleeing abroad, he will gain increasing support from working class voters, and not just from white people. At Carrier, African-Americans make up 50% of the workforce. Ten percent are immigrants. Half of the assembly line workers are women. These dues-paying members of the United Steelworkers, are not likely to forget who saved their jobs. Outsourcing should be a progressive cause. Conservatives and their corporate backers hate any effort to suppress it. Wall Street elites want us to believe job outsourcing is an act of God, while they line their pockets with stock buybacks. Trump deserves to be attacked for many reasons, but not because he has saved 800 Carrier jobs. We should mobilize around the job outsourcing issue rather than letting him capture it. We should unmask the hypocrites who praise their precious free market while lavishing billions of tax dollars on thousands of corporations. To counter Carrier-like outsourcing, we should be building a movement to again outlaw massive stock buybacks. (For a more detailed plan see here.) (This post originally appeared on Alternet.org) Les Leopold, the director of the Labor Institute, is currently working with unions and community organizations to build the educational infrastructure of a new anti-Wall Street movement. His latest book Runaway Inequality: An Activist Guide to Economic Justice serves as a text for this campaign. All proceeds go to support these educational efforts.   -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 ноября 2016, 22:36

FACT SHEET: Young Leaders of the Americas Initiative (YLAI)

Today, during a town hall with 1000 young leaders from Latin America and the Caribbean, President Obama will announce a series of investments and new programs in support of the Young Leaders of the Americas Initiative (YLAI) which was launched in 2015.  Through YLAI, the United States is investing in the next generation of Latin American and Caribbean leaders, and has committed significant resources to enhance leadership skills, bolster entrepreneurship, and connect young leaders with one another, the United States, and the American people.  Signature additional investments in YLAI and young people across the hemisphere include: Growing the YLAI Network  The YLAI Network is a growing online and in-person community of nearly 20,000 young people-- entrepreneurs, activists, and public servants--working together to solve shared challenges for their continent and the world.  Through YLAI Empowers, YLAI Network members will now have access to an array of online courses and training materials, along with virtual mentoring and networking opportunities.  YLAI Empowers will also provide access to tailor-made training videos on leadership, business and entrepreneurship, civic leadership, and public management featuring U.S. university professors and experts in their field.    USAID will leverage $150,000 to support the creation of a collaboration platform where members can work together on projects, business, and share expertise to increase the impact of the YLAI Network in communities across Latin America and the Caribbean. The platform will be developed in collaboration with YLAI members. Increasing Access to Mentorship from the Private-Sector The U.S. State Department, in partnership with the private sector, will launch the YLAI Professional Fellows Reverse Exchange Program to implement collaborative community projects and strengthen partnerships between companies and organizations in the U.S. and Latin America and the Caribbean.  U.S. Government funding of $125,000 and private sector cost-sharing of over $75,000 will fund projects and travel for 45 U.S. Fellowship Hosts to visit YLAI Fellows’ home countries to expand YLAI’s impact and build lasting partnerships. New Entrepreneurship Grants The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs YLAI Small Grants will leverage $125,000 in U.S. Government funding to build public private partnerships for community training projects for YLAI Professional Fellowsover the next two years in the form of small-business entrepreneurship grants. These grants will support robust communities of entrepreneurs and the expansion of businesses and social ventures across Latin America and the Caribbean. The U.S. Department of State has set aside $250,000 USD to be used by YLAI Fellows, in coordination with our U.S. Embassies, for follow-on projects, programs and activities to keep the momentum going after their U.S. exchange program and strengthen the broader YLAI Network. Increasing Digital Literacy for Entrepreneurs The U.S. Department of State will host a series of YLAI TechCamps, starting in Paraguay in 2017, for social entrepreneurship with participants from neighboring countries.  Participants will gain new digital literacy and technology skills to enhance the work they are doing to make social change in their community. Bolstering Innovation and Connectivity for Civil Society The Latin America and Caribbean Civil Society Innovation Initiative (CSII) Hub (LAC Hub), supported through the Stand with Civil Society Initiative, will connect civil society organizations in Latin America to each other and to key allies across sectors through peer-to-peer investments and digital tools. The LAC Hub—established by representatives from 44 organizations from 23 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean—supports the work of civil society by amplifying their voices and developing innovative approaches that expand the reach and impact of civic activism in open, closing, and closed spaces. YLAI participants will partner with the LAC Hub to provide their expertise to an online marketplace of civil society innovators who are looking for partners to expand the impact of their work. The LAC Hub is one of six regional CSII Innovation Hubs globally. Investing in Youth to Curb Crime and Violence The U.S. Agency for International Development is investing $40 million in the Community, Family, and Youth Resilience (CFYR) Program to reduce youth involvement in crime and violence in the Eastern and Southern Caribbean. CFYR builds youth resilience to create pathways away from crime and toward productive participation in the community and economy. CFYR will also build the capacity of service providers to administer risk-screening tools and to deliver quality services that meet identified needs in collaboration with communities and families, and through partnerships with the government and private sector. Increasing Global Competency through 100,000 Strong in the Americas The 100,000 Strong in the Americas Innovation Fund will launch the first Peru-specific grant competition in 2017 that will stimulate and facilitate 20 new higher education institutional partnerships exclusively between Peruvian and U.S. colleges and universities on topics including water, climate change, STEM, and environmental sciences. This $600,000 Peru-specific Innovation Fund grant opportunity is made possible due to the public-private sector collaboration and commitments of the U.S. Department of State, Sempra Energy, and CAF: The Development Bank for Latin America.  This Innovation Fund grant competition up will benefit student mobility between Peru and the United States, creating new opportunities for students to work and study in teams and increase regional education cooperation and competiveness. ###

05 ноября 2016, 00:18

Utility ETFs to Shelter Portfolio from Market Turmoil

Is it the right time to focus on utility ETFs?

02 ноября 2016, 17:58

Sempra Energy (SRE) Beats on Q3 Earnings, Keeps '16 View

Sempra Energy's (SRE) third-quarter 2016 adjusted earnings per share came in at $1.02, beating the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 97 cents by 5.2%.

02 ноября 2016, 16:57

Sempra Energy (SRE) Beats on Q3 Earnings, Revenues Miss

Sempra Energy surpassed the earnings expectation by 5.2%. Our consensus called for third-quarter EPS of 97 cents, and the company reported adjusted EPS of $1.02.

01 ноября 2016, 14:29

FirstEnergy (FE) Q3 Earnings: Stock to Post a Beat Again?

We expect FirstEnergy Corp. (FE) to beat estimates when it reports third-quarter 2016 results on Nov 4

Выбор редакции
31 октября 2016, 15:50

Why Sempra Energy (SRE) Might Surprise This Earnings Season

Sempra Energy (SRE) is seeing favorable earnings estimate revision activity and has a positive Zacks Earnings ESP heading into earnings season.

28 октября 2016, 23:34

An End to the Earnings Recession

An End to the Earnings Recession

14 октября 2016, 21:32

Continuing the Administration’s Commitment to Deploying Clean Energy on Federal Facilities

Addressing climate change remains a top priority for President Obama. The Administration is committed to take action on climate change by continuing to promote the transition to clean energy sources and create good paying jobs. As the President made clear in his Climate Action Plan, he firmly believes that the federal government should lead by example in improving energy efficiency and cutting harmful carbon pollution. Today the Administration is celebrating the achievement of one federal leadership goal, and setting a new one. In 2012, President Obama announced the Department of Defense's (DoD) commitment to deploy three gigawatts on Army, Navy, and Air Force installations by 2025 – enough to power 750,000 homes. Today, in Arlington, Arizona, the Department of Navy, Department of Energy, Sempra Energy, and the White House Office of Federal Sustainability are participating in a ribbon cutting ceremony to announce the operationalization of 210 megawatts of solar power at the Mesquite III facility, the federal government's largest investment in clean energy in history.  Mesquite III will supply 14 Navy and Marine Corps installations in California with clean energy, providing one-third of their electricity needs for 25 years at a cost savings of more than $90 million.   In addition to announcing a major milestone towards the DoD renewable energy goal, today the Obama Administration is launching another ambitious target – a new goal for civilian agencies to procure and facilitate development of 1 gigawatt of new renewable electricity by 2021. This goal promotes installation of renewable energy on federal land, the development of new solar through power purchase agreements, and procurement of bundled green energy to power federal facilities. Additionally, this target will also incentivize projects on federal land where the government is not the sole user, such as enhanced use leases and facilitation of private development. This goal builds on last year’s goal that 30 percent of electricity used by the federal government will come from renewable sources by 2025, and solar will play a large part. Since 2010, federal agencies have increased use of solar five-fold, with solar now accounting for 19 percent of renewable electricity use and 180 megawatts of onsite power.  Federal leadership in deploying renewable energy has contributed to significant progress in deploying solar. When President Obama took office, there wasn’t a single utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) solar plant in America larger than 20 megawatts. But beginning in 2009, the Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office stepped in to provide more than $4.6 billion in loan guarantees to support construction of the first five utility-scale PV solar facilities in the U.S. larger than 100 MW. Mesquite I was one of those projects.  Since those first five solar plants were financed, dozens of utility-scale PV projects have been financed without DOE loan guarantees and are either under construction or already producing clean energy. The dedication of Mesquite III takes the success of these projects even further by demonstrating how government can work together across agencies and with the private sector. From solar to wind, renewables across the board have seen costs drop and deployment increase. Last year, the United States brought online as much solar energy every three weeks as it did in all of 2008, and the solar industry added jobs 10 times faster than the rest of the economy. And since the beginning of 2010, the average cost of a solar electric system has dropped by 50 percent. By leading at the federal level, agencies, both military and civilian are not only reaping the benefits of transitioning to renewable power, but also leading by example.

13 октября 2016, 17:14

Alliant (LNT) to Expand Wind Portfolio with 500MW Projects

Alliant Energy Corporation (LNT) announced that it has reached a settlement with customer groups for its proposed new 500 MW New Wind Projects.