• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании1454
      • Показать ещё
      Люди342
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации97
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы596
      • Показать ещё
      Разное750
      • Показать ещё
      Формат43
      Издания115
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели121
      • Показать ещё
28 апреля, 01:56

Senate Confirms Trump’s Labor Secretary

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― The Senate confirmed Alexander Acosta to be the next labor secretary on Thursday, filling an important but long-vacant role in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet. Lawmakers voted 60-38 in favor of Acosta’s nomination, with all Republicans and a handful of Democrats supporting the law school dean and former official in the George W. Bush administration. The son of Cuban immigrants, Acosta will be the first Latino to occupy one of Trump’s Cabinet posts. He will come to Washington to lead an agency in flux. Trump has signaled that he wants to dramatically reduce the budget at the Labor Department, which is tasked with enforcing the nation’s labor laws and administering federal jobs training programs. The White House clearly envisions a more limited role for the agency in the U.S. economy, having repealed or stalled several labor regulations issued by Barack Obama. While Democrats and labor groups brace for a more business-friendly Labor Department, Acosta, a former prosecutor, said in his March confirmation hearing that he was committed to enforcing wage and safety laws on behalf of workers. “Helping Americans find good jobs ― safe jobs ― should not be a partisan issue,” he told senators. And yet Acosta made clear he intends to carry out Trump’s agenda as it relates to labor issues, saying he would honor the White House’s order to review all regulations currently on the books for potential repeal. He also indicated he’s not a fan of Obama’s significant overtime reforms, which would extend new wage protections to millions of salaried workers but are currently tied up in court. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) made her case against Acosta’s confirmation on the Senate floor Wednesday. Warren chided Acosta for dodging her questions on issues like the silica rule, which would further limit the amount of cancer-causing dust that employers can expose construction workers to. Although that rule is projected to save 600 lives per year, the Trump administration has delayed enforcing it. Acosta made clear he would follow the administration’s orders on that. “Mr. Acosta has had multiple opportunities in the more than two months since he was nominated for this position to demonstrate that he would stand up for workers,” Warren said. “Time after time, he has refused.” Whatever concerns liberals have with Acosta, he is a vastly more palatable choice to them than Trump’s original labor nominee, Andrew Puzder, the former chief executive of CKE Restaurants. Puzder led the Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. burger chains and was a sharp critic of a $15 minimum wage and more generous overtime rules. His nomination collapsed in February amid a fierce campaign by Democrats and labor groups, leading Trump to the safer choice of Acosta. Acosta is currently dean of the law school at Florida International University. He’s been through the confirmation ringer before, having been a member of the National Labor Relations Board, which referees disputes between unions and employers. He also headed the Civil Rights Division at the Bush Justice Department, which led to perhaps the blackest mark on his government record. An inspector general report found that officials at the division had politicized hiring while Acosta led it. “It happened on my watch,” he acknowledged during his hearing. “It should not have occurred.” While many of Trump’s Cabinet members are hostile to their agency’s very missions, there’s nothing in Acosta’s past to suggest he wants to dismantle the department he will lead. That said, labor groups are not expecting him to be an ally. When he sat on the labor board, Acosta frequently sided with employers over unions, though former Democratic colleagues say he does have an independent streak. The Labor Department took on a central role in the Obama administration, taking the lead on some of the White House’s most consequential reforms, such as the overtime regulations that are now in limbo. That role will be greatly reduced in the Trump era, with a White House that wants to undo the administrative state. The agency’s core responsibilities, such as investigating minimum wage violations, fall on career civil servants and will continue as usual. But they may be given fewer resources, and there have already been signs that enforcement may be less aggressive under Trump. The Labor Department has all but stopped issuing press releases when employers are caught endangering workers, which was a major deterrent tactic during the Obama years. It remains to be seen what Trump and Acosta will do regarding overtime. Obama tried to change the rules so that more salaried workers are guaranteed time-and-a-half pay when they work more than 40 hours in a week. His changes would have brought overtime protections to an estimated 4.2 million additional workers. During his hearing, Acosta said Obama’s change may have been too drastic, suggesting he would pare it back to please employers. “We now see an update [Obama’s] that is a very large revision,” he told Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.). “Something that needs to be considered is the impact it has on the economy.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 01:56

Senate Confirms Trump’s Labor Secretary

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― The Senate confirmed Alexander Acosta to be the next labor secretary on Thursday, filling an important but long-vacant role in President Donald Trump’s Cabinet. Lawmakers voted 60-38 in favor of Acosta’s nomination, with all Republicans and a handful of Democrats supporting the law school dean and former official in the George W. Bush administration. The son of Cuban immigrants, Acosta will be the first Latino to occupy one of Trump’s Cabinet posts. He will come to Washington to lead an agency in flux. Trump has signaled that he wants to dramatically reduce the budget at the Labor Department, which is tasked with enforcing the nation’s labor laws and administering federal jobs training programs. The White House clearly envisions a more limited role for the agency in the U.S. economy, having repealed or stalled several labor regulations issued by Barack Obama. While Democrats and labor groups brace for a more business-friendly Labor Department, Acosta, a former prosecutor, said in his March confirmation hearing that he was committed to enforcing wage and safety laws on behalf of workers. “Helping Americans find good jobs ― safe jobs ― should not be a partisan issue,” he told senators. And yet Acosta made clear he intends to carry out Trump’s agenda as it relates to labor issues, saying he would honor the White House’s order to review all regulations currently on the books for potential repeal. He also indicated he’s not a fan of Obama’s significant overtime reforms, which would extend new wage protections to millions of salaried workers but are currently tied up in court. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) made her case against Acosta’s confirmation on the Senate floor Wednesday. Warren chided Acosta for dodging her questions on issues like the silica rule, which would further limit the amount of cancer-causing dust that employers can expose construction workers to. Although that rule is projected to save 600 lives per year, the Trump administration has delayed enforcing it. Acosta made clear he would follow the administration’s orders on that. “Mr. Acosta has had multiple opportunities in the more than two months since he was nominated for this position to demonstrate that he would stand up for workers,” Warren said. “Time after time, he has refused.” Whatever concerns liberals have with Acosta, he is a vastly more palatable choice to them than Trump’s original labor nominee, Andrew Puzder, the former chief executive of CKE Restaurants. Puzder led the Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. burger chains and was a sharp critic of a $15 minimum wage and more generous overtime rules. His nomination collapsed in February amid a fierce campaign by Democrats and labor groups, leading Trump to the safer choice of Acosta. Acosta is currently dean of the law school at Florida International University. He’s been through the confirmation ringer before, having been a member of the National Labor Relations Board, which referees disputes between unions and employers. He also headed the Civil Rights Division at the Bush Justice Department, which led to perhaps the blackest mark on his government record. An inspector general report found that officials at the division had politicized hiring while Acosta led it. “It happened on my watch,” he acknowledged during his hearing. “It should not have occurred.” While many of Trump’s Cabinet members are hostile to their agency’s very missions, there’s nothing in Acosta’s past to suggest he wants to dismantle the department he will lead. That said, labor groups are not expecting him to be an ally. When he sat on the labor board, Acosta frequently sided with employers over unions, though former Democratic colleagues say he does have an independent streak. The Labor Department took on a central role in the Obama administration, taking the lead on some of the White House’s most consequential reforms, such as the overtime regulations that are now in limbo. That role will be greatly reduced in the Trump era, with a White House that wants to undo the administrative state. The agency’s core responsibilities, such as investigating minimum wage violations, fall on career civil servants and will continue as usual. But they may be given fewer resources, and there have already been signs that enforcement may be less aggressive under Trump. The Labor Department has all but stopped issuing press releases when employers are caught endangering workers, which was a major deterrent tactic during the Obama years. It remains to be seen what Trump and Acosta will do regarding overtime. Obama tried to change the rules so that more salaried workers are guaranteed time-and-a-half pay when they work more than 40 hours in a week. His changes would have brought overtime protections to an estimated 4.2 million additional workers. During his hearing, Acosta said Obama’s change may have been too drastic, suggesting he would pare it back to please employers. “We now see an update [Obama’s] that is a very large revision,” he told Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.). “Something that needs to be considered is the impact it has on the economy.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 апреля, 22:37

Melania Trump Has Upended The Role Of First Lady In 100 Days

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― Nearly 100 days into President Donald Trump’s administration, first lady Melania Trump has been reluctant to embrace her new role, and it’s unclear how she will define what can be a somewhat nebulous, arcane and sexist position. Just as she avoided involvement in her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump has chosen to remain out of the spotlight as first lady. She and their son Barron continue living at Trump Tower in New York, and reportedly plan to move into the White House this summer once Barron’s school year ends. Her staff remains unfilled, and she has eschewed many ceremonial duties. This failure to embrace even basic functions has been particularly unusual, according to Kate Andersen Brower, author of First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies. Melania Trump’s decision not to immediately move into the White House, for example, is “unprecedented,” Brower said. Some of Trump’s slowness to fill her staff can be attributed to her lack of involvement in her husband’s campaign. Many first ladies will bring on advisers and staff members who worked closely with them before they entered the White House. “Even at the very beginning, they have a dozen staffers working for them,” Brower said of previous first ladies. “Because she was barely on the campaign, she didn’t develop those relationships with staffers, and I think that was detrimental.” Trump hired a communications director only a month ago. Leaving the key post unfilled for the first two months of her husband’s administration was particularly glaring, Brower said. Without someone to coordinate her message, Trump remains mostly unknown to the public, generating further speculation about her. “She’s like a cipher,” Brower said. “You have to direct that message.” A full staff could help Trump avoid kerfuffles at otherwise routine events. For instance, she read a passage from a Dr. Seuss book last month to children at a hospital in New York. The event was described by a White House pool reporter, but the White House later issued a statement that appeared to embellish Trump’s remarks and actions.  Today, @FLOTUS @MELANIATRUMP read to children at New York–Presbyterian. Compare the pool report to the White House's official readout: pic.twitter.com/IkzrMW6C5M— David Gura (@davidgura) March 2, 2017 Trump has sporadically joined her husband in Washington and at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida for ceremonial events, like dinners with foreign leaders. In his wife’s absence, the president has sometimes dispatched his daughter, White House adviser Ivanka Trump, to handle duties that might normally be performed by the first lady. In February, Melania Trump broke a longstanding tradition that the first lady accompanies the spouse of a visiting foreign leader. Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s wife, Akie, was alone during her visit to Washington. The White House claimed Melania Trump’s absence was the result of a scheduling error with Abe. Brower called the White House’s handling of the visit “embarrassing.” “You’re being a rude host, really,” Brower said. “Part of the job of the first lady is to escort spouses, men or women, around Washington, and you kind of just suck it up and do it, even if you don’t want to.” While some first ladies have spent a large portion of their time away from Washington, “you at least make the effort to say that you live in the White House and that you understand of the responsibility of the position,” Brower said. Modern first ladies have pressed policy issues that interest them. Laura Bush focused on literacy. Michelle Obama pursued initiatives on wellness, girls’ education and military families. Brower said it’s not unusual for first ladies to take a while to find their footing and “figure out how they can help.” But for Melania Trump, choosing a policy area could be challenging. The first lady can pick up the phone and change someone’s life. To not take advantage of it, it seems, to me, like a shame.” Kate Andersen Brower, author of “First Women: The Grace and Power of America’s Modern First Ladies" If she were to advocate health and physical fitness, for example, she could expose the administration to controversy, given the president’s long history of denigrating women by talking about their physical appearance. “These are such innocuous things, but because of her husband, everything is so politically charged,” Brower said. “It’s very hard to find something that doesn’t offend people.” During her husband’s campaign, Melania Trump pledged that as first lady, she would combat cyberbullying — a promise that immediately drew mockery because of her husband’s frequent Twitter rants. She has yet to follow through. Last month, military veterans criticized the first lady for not commenting on a scandal involving Marine Corps personnel sharing explicit photos of female service members on social media. “We are waiting for our first lady to support our women in uniform against continued harassment,” Navy veteran Trina McDonald, a member of the group Common Defense, said in a press release. The group urged Trump to “break her silence and speak up,” according to the Military Times. But in recent weeks, the first lady appears to have been tiptoeing into her new reality. She has hosted events that have included a women’s empowerment panel and the annual White House Easter Egg Roll, a tradition that some people worried would end under Trump. On Wednesday, the first lady appeared with the president at a White House event honoring the National Teacher of the Year. On Thursday, she joined him during a visit from Argentina’s President Mauricio Macri and first lady Juliana Awada. “Maybe she’ll figure it out,” Brower said. “I think she’s caving to the pressure. I think it takes time to realize that you have to live in the White House and make some sacrifices.” First ladies come under intense scrutiny, often in gendered terms, especially when they become involved in crafting policy. Hillary Clinton, in particular, faced sharp criticisms throughout her husband’s presidency for having an office in the West Wing and for spearheading the Clinton administration’s failed attempt at health care reform. Trump’s approach is not without historical analogues. Brower compared her with Bess Truman, who also was reluctant to become first lady and did not like the spotlight. “I think Melania is bringing us back to the 1950s approach to first lady,” Brower said. “In her actions, she has been traditional.” Still, her decision to eschew tradition and continue living in New York could be perceived as “strangely feminist,” and a sign of independence, Brower said.  As she settles into the role, Trump will face unique challenges, Brower said. “She’s not from the U.S., and I do think that’s part of it,” Brower said. “Growing up in this country, the first lady symbolically is a part of your life, and a part of American culture, and so I think people should give her some slack for that. She didn’t grow up with that, and so in a way, it is a very foreign concept.”  Further, Michelle Obama was a popular first lady who left “big shoes to fill” in finding creative ways to reach the public, from late-night TV appearances to making viral videos, Brower said. “You can’t picture yourself having coffee, or in a carpool with Melania Trump,” Brower said. “She’s not relatable in the same way. But clearly, she does not plan to do as much as Michelle Obama or Laura Bush.” Trump’s distant approach could indicate that the role of the presidential spouse is no longer necessary, Brower suggested. “I still think it’s important,” Brower added. “You can do a lot of good. The first lady can pick up the phone and change someone’s life. To not take advantage of it, it seems, to me, like a shame.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 19:48

ECB Keeps Extreme Measures Despite More Ordinary Times

Mario Draghi drew a sharp contrast between the ECB’s views on growth and inflation. The tipping point away from ultra-loose policy remains some way off.

27 апреля, 16:03

Chemed's (CHE) Earnings and Revenues Beat Estimates in Q1

Chemed Corp.'s (CHE) first-quarter 2017 adjusted earnings per share (EPS) (considering stock-based compensation expense and related tax benefit as a regular one) were $1.92, as compared to the year-ago adjusted EPS figure of $1.52, up 26.3% year over year.

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 15:18

Drivers of the post-crisis slump in the Eurozone and the US

The Global Crisis led to a sharp contraction and long-lasting slump in both Eurozone and US real activity, but the post-crisis adjustment in the Eurozone and the US shows striking differences. This column argues that financial shocks were key determinants of the 2008-09 Great Recession, for both the Eurozone and the US. The post-2009 slump in the Eurozone mainly reflects a combination of adverse aggregate demand and supply shocks, in particular lower productivity growth, and persistent adverse shocks to capital investment linked to the poor health of the Eurozone financial system. Mono-causal explanations of the persistent slump are thus insufficient. Adverse financial shocks were less persistent for the US.

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 12:44

Football quiz: name the player or manager in the suit

When footballers wear suits the results can be, well, interesting. Here are some pictures from the archive. Put a name to the player or managerFlaresJohn ToshackFrank WorthingtonKevin KeeganMick ChannonSpotsJamie VardyEden HazardCraig BellamyLionel MessiStripesMark HughesRyan GiggsLee SharpeGary PallisterFloralPaul PogbaPierre-Emerick AubameyangMario BalotelliNeymarShowyKevin KeeganMario KempesFranz BeckenbauerGeorge BestCasualBryan RobsonDiego MaradonaMark HughesJavier Zanetti CheckPaul TisdaleRobbie SavagePaolo Di CanioTim SherwoodJust name the team for this one. It felt unfair to crop just one out. LiverpoolManchester UnitedMilanArsenalBusy blueDavid BeckhamVinnie JonesJamie RedknappRobbie SavageDisco kitCarlos AlbertoPeleJairzinhoLuther BlissettBurtonsAlan ShearerDavid SeamanPaul GascoigneDavid BattyThose infamous white suitsJamie RedknappRobbie FowlerJason McAteerIan RushAnd another white suit. And what a white suitCristiano RonaldoDavid BeckhamEmmanuel PetitFernando TorresBoss collarSol CampbellAshley ColeThierry HenryGilberto SilvaWallpaper effectTim SherwoodStuart PearceSven Goran Eriksson Steve McManamanPinstripeGeoff HurstPeter ShiltonBobby MooreRay ClemenceGoal!Franz BeckenbauerBobby MooreJohan CruyffBob McNabJust name the team doing some bonding? It was a while ago, so you're allowed to see their faces.ArsenalEvertonTottenham HotspurManchester UnitedLooseGordon StrachanDidier DeschampsStuart McCallBryan RobsonTrailblazerBobby MooreJimmy HillBobby CharltonMatt Busby Continue reading...

27 апреля, 11:50

Can the Democratic Party Reconcile Two Divergent Economic Visions?

In the party’s bid to regain power, centrists and Bernie Sanders’s allies offer seemingly incompatible strategies—that target wildly different voters.

27 апреля, 10:57

Donald Trump Wants To Break Up The Court That Blocked His Travel Ban

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); President Donald Trump is threatening to break up the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, which blocked his executive order banning travel from several nations with large Muslim populations and restricted the acceptance of refugees.  Asked by the Washington Examiner if he had considered proposals to split the court, Trump replied: “Absolutely, I have.”  “There are many people that want to break up the 9th Circuit. It’s outrageous,” Trump told the website. “Everybody immediately runs to the 9th Circuit. And we have a big country. We have lots of other locations. But they immediately run to the 9th Circuit. Because they know that’s like, semi-automatic.” Trump claimed that those who oppose him are “shopping” for sympathetic judges by going to the 9th Circuit, where 18 of the 25 jurists were appointed by Democratic presidents. “You see judge-shopping, or what’s gone on with these people, they immediately run to the 9th Circuit,” he said. “It’s got close to an 80 percent reversal period, and what’s going on in the 9th Circuit is a shame.” Trump’s comments echoed a series of tweets he fired off on Wednesday: First the Ninth Circuit rules against the ban & now it hits again on sanctuary cities-both ridiculous rulings. See you in the Supreme Court!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 26, 2017 Out of our very big country, with many choices, does everyone notice that both the "ban" case and now the "sanctuary" case is brought in ...— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 26, 2017 ...the Ninth Circuit, which has a terrible record of being overturned (close to 80%). They used to call this "judge shopping!" Messy system.— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 26, 2017 There are some flaws in Trump’s logic. The most recent ruling against Trump, in which Judge William Orrick issued an injunction blocking his executive order targeting so-called sanctuary cities, didn’t occur in the 9th Circuit. It was in the United States District Court in San Francisco, which is one level below.  In addition, judge-shopping did not occur. The case was brought by the city and county of San Francisco and the nearby county of Santa Clara, which are within the district as well as within the jurisdiction of the 9th Circuit. The statistic Trump cited about the court’s rulings being overturned 80 percent of the time was also misleading.  According to the Washington Post, 80 percent of the 9th Circuit decisions taken up by the Supreme Court were reversed in 2015-2016. Yet only one-tenth of 1 percent of the 9th Circuit’s decisions were heard by the Supreme Court. In addition, other circuit courts had even higher reversal rates.  Finally, Trump can’t break up a circuit court on his own. He needs the help of Congress. And while some Republicans have pushed the idea of splitting the circuit and creating a new court, Democrats in the Senate would almost certainly block the move. Responding to Trump’s comment that he “absolutely” was looking at breaking up the court, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) responded with two words:   "Absolutely" not. https://t.co/tfhn0Yruu6— Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) April 26, 2017 Trump’s comments about the court also drew a sharp reaction from critics on Twitter:  Trump's gonna break up the 9th circuit the way he sued all those women who accused him of sexual assault.— Christopher Hayes (@chrislhayes) April 26, 2017 Pretty great CNN chyron right now pic.twitter.com/gPax7s0Y0r— Jon Passantino (@passantino) April 27, 2017 You know why Trump wants to disband a Court (9th Circuit)? Because he thinks he's a CEO. He doesn't understand the constitution. #FireTrump— fraudfeasor (@fraudfeasor) April 27, 2017 Trump's response to his fed ct loss in CA -- "I'll break up the 9th Circuit" -- is really dumb. What would he do: slice Judge Orrick in two?— Laurence Tribe (@tribelaw) April 26, 2017 The President absolutely doesn't have the authority to do this. https://t.co/F79llnRNvC— ACLU National (@ACLU) April 26, 2017 If you're more upset about Ann Coulter cancelling her own speech than about Trump threatening to break up 9th Circuit, you're doing it wrong— Kaivan Shroff (@KaivanShroff) April 27, 2017 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 09:27

GBP/USD - Strong Demand

GBP/USD is consolidating lower after sharp bullish rally. Resistance at 1.2905 (18/04/2017 low) has been broken. The pair has exited the short-term bearish momentum. Hourly support can be found at 1.2757 (21/04/2017 low).

Выбор редакции
27 апреля, 09:14

14 Heart Conditions You Never Knew Existed

Not all heart problems have symptoms. Many people have serious heart conditions and don't even know it. Here are a few you might not know exist.

27 апреля, 08:22

Donald Trump proposes sharp tax cuts

Donald Trump proposes sharp tax cuts President Donald Trump has unveiled his plans to cut corporate taxes and streamline the US tax system. Trump's administration has called the plan "one of the broadest overhauls of the US tax system". But it's heading for a tough fight in congress, which has to approve the proposal. Al Jazeera's Diane Eastabrook reports from Washington, DC. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

26 апреля, 22:41

Donald Trump Has 'No Intention' Of Releasing His Tax Returns, Treasury Secretary Says

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― President Donald Trump has “no intention” of releasing his tax returns, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said Wednesday. “The president has no intention. The president has released plenty of information and I think has given more financial disclosure than anybody else. I think the American population has plenty of information on his taxes,” Mnuchin said at a White House press briefing, contradicting prior statements from the administration that the president would release his tax returns once they were audited by the IRS. Mnuchin’s comments about the level of the president’s disclosure are blatantly false. During the campaign, Trump released a financial disclosure form as required by all presidential candidates. But he has not released any of his tax filings, as has been done by every major party nominee in the past 40 years. His tax returns would provide a much more comprehensive picture of his financial holdings, assets and charitable givings. Most importantly, they would reveal the effective rate of tax he pays on his income. Such information would offer crucial context regarding Trump’s tax reform proposal that Mnuchin laid out at the White House on Wednesday. The plan, while similar to the one Trump unveiled during the campaign, calls for sharp reductions to both individual and corporate income tax rates ― a huge boon to wealthy Americans. The proposal would also repeal the estate tax and the alternative minimum tax ― which would save the wealthy real estate mogul and his family billions of dollars. Democrats on Wednesday slammed Trump’s plan as an unpaid giveaway to the wealthiest Americans and again called on him to release his tax returns. “President Trump should release his own tax returns if he wants to have any credibility in a debate about America’s tax code,” said Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), the No. 2 Democrat in the Senate. “Let’s be clear, his ‘plan’ would add dramatically to the national deficit to fund a massive tax giveaway to corporations and millionaires.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 апреля, 18:49

Canada's Housing Bubble Explodes As Its Biggest Mortgage Lender Crashes Most In History

Call it Canada's "New Century" moment. We first introduced readers to the company we said was the "tip of the iceberg in Canada's magnificent housing bubble" nearly two years ago, in July 2015 when we exposed a major problem that we predicted would haunt Home Capital Group, Canada's largest non-bank mortgage lender: liar loans in particular, and a generally overzealous lending business model with little regard for fundamentals. In the interim period, many other voices - most prominently noted short-seller Marc Cohodes - would constantly remind traders and investors about the threat posed by HCG. Today, all those warnings came true, when the stock of Home Capital Group cratered by over 60%, its biggest drop on record, after the company disclosed that it struck an emergency liquidity arrangement for a C$2 billion ($1.5 billion) credit line to counter evaporating deposits at terms that will leave the alternative mortgage lender unable to meet financial targets, and worse, may leave it insolvent in very short notice. As part of this inevitable outcome, one which presages the company's eventual disintegration and likely liquidation, Bloomberg reports that the non-binding rescue loan with an unnamed counterparty will be secured by a portfolio of mortgage loans originated by Home Trust, the Toronto-based firm said in a statement Wednesday. Home Capital shares dropped by 61% in Toronto to the lowest since 2003, dragging down other home lenders. Equitable Group Inc. fell 17 percent, Street Capital Group Inc. fell 13 percent, while First National Financial Corp. declined 7.6 percent. In short, the Canadian mortgage bubble has finally burst. Some more details on HCG's emergency source of funding: Home Capital will pay 10% interest on outstanding balances and a non-refundable commitment fee of C$100 million, while standby fee on undrawn funds is 2.5%. The initial draw must be C$1 billion. The loan has an effective - and very much distressed - interest rate of 22.5% on the first C$1 billion, declining to 15% if fully utilized, according to a note from Jaeme Gloyn, an analyst at National Bank of Canada. Home Capital said the credit line is intended to “mitigate” a sharp drop in Home Trust’s high-interest savings account balances, which sank by $591 million from March 28 to April 24, at which point the total balance was $1.4 billion. Home Capital warned on Wednesday that further outflows are anticipated. Translated: what until last night was a depositor bank jog just became a sprint. The loan will provide Home Capital with more than C$3.5 billion in total funding, more than twice the C$1.5 billion in liquid assets it held as at April 24. It also has C$200 million in securities available for sale, and high interest savings account balances fell about 25% to C$1.4 billion over the past month. Home Capital relies on deposits to fund their mortgage loans; following today's announcement the company's liquidity is certain to get even worse as all non-distressed sources of cash are pulled. Cited by Bloomberg, Andrew Torres, founding partner and chief investment officer at Toronto-based Lawrence Park Asset Management said that "The company is facing a bit of a liquidity crunch and they felt they needed to resolve it quickly." He said the "steep" commitment fee and the interest rate on the loan "are surprising numbers for a company that was ostensibly investment-grade." Well, it was only investment grade because as usual the rating agencies never did their homework. For a real hint into the company's rating, look at the 22.5% interest rate, suggesting the company's days outside of bankruptcy are numbered. Home Capital Group's sudden collapse was actually visible from a distance. While in the summer of 2015, the termination of HCG was still debate, in recent months the company’s woes stemmed from allegations by the Ontario Securities Commission that Home Capital misled investors and broke securities laws. In other words engaged in those "liar loans" which we first warned about back in the summer of 2015. Meanwhile, founder Gerald Soloway will step down from the board when a replacement is named and Robert Blowes will assume the role of interim chief financial officer, the company said Monday. "The company anticipates that further declines will occur, and that the credit line would also mitigate the impact of those," Home Capital said. Amusingly, it was just two months ago when the company set new performance goals after reporting quarterly results, targeting revenue growth of 5% or greater, diluted earnings-per-share of 7% or greater and a return on equity of 15 percent or more over the long term, according to Bloomberg. It should add one more "performance goal" - stay out of bankruptcy for at least 3 months. "They did what appears to be to us a very expensive deal," said David Baskin, president and founder of Baskin Wealth Management in Toronto, a former investor in Home Capital stock. "Basically they blew up the income statement in order to save the balance sheet, which I guess if you’re facing an existential crisis is what you have to do." The Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI) told Canada's BNN it does not comment on specific institutions it supervises, but that it maintains ongoing relationships with those institutions and is monitoring the Home Capital situation "closely." Canada's entire mortgage lending market is tumbling.

Выбор редакции
26 апреля, 18:44

White House Proposes Slashing Tax Rates, Significantly Aiding Wealthy

President Trump on Wednesday proposed sharp reductions in both individual and corporate income tax rates, and also called for the elimination of most itemized tax deductions.

Выбор редакции
26 апреля, 18:23

Twitter cheers investors with sharp rise in users

Social network buoyed by increased interest in political accounts

26 апреля, 15:47

Spirit Airlines (SAVE) Q1 Earnings: A Beat in the Cards?

Florida-based Spirit Airlines (SAVE) is scheduled to report first-quarter 2017 results on Apr 28, before the opening bell.

Выбор редакции
26 апреля, 15:42

Quotation of the Day…

(Don Boudreaux) Tweet… is from pages 82-83 of Wilfred Beckerman’s great and ahead-of-its-time 1974 book, Two Cheers for the Affluent Society (footnote deleted; link added): As Anthony Crosland [like Hayek] has pointed out, it is impossible to draw a sharp dividing line between those of our needs that are innate and natural and those that have been […]

26 апреля, 15:22

19 Kitchen Appliances That Are a Waste of Your Money

Want to avoid wasting your money on kitchen appliances that you'll never actually use? Avoid picking up these appliances at your local cooking supply store.

Выбор редакции