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09 декабря, 07:07

Australia v New Zealand: third ODI – live!

Live updates from the final match of the series at the MCGEmail: [email protected] | Tweet: @GeoffLemonSport 9.25am GMT Head gets his own back, as Hazlewood bangs in short, de Grandhomme bangs away with the pull shot, and Head bangs into the ground as he runs in from deep square leg. The umpires check the replay to make sur the ball didn’t slip through his fingers and touch grass, but they decide the’re happy with the way things look, and the batsman is on his way. 9.24am GMT 24th over: New Zealand 113-5 (Munro 10, de Grandhomme 11)That’s one way to approach it! Colin de Grandhomme take a de grand step down the pitch and launches a de grand shot over the de grand sightscreen. He sent that ball all the way de grand home. A few singles and Head’s over goes for 10. Continue reading...

09 декабря, 06:46

12 Most Exciting Gadgets You Can Give as a Present This Year

There are plenty of practical gadgets to gift your loved ones (or yourself) for the holidays. But we're excited about these more extravagant gadgets, too.

09 декабря, 06:46

Fashion Blogger Flubs: 5 Trends That Never Took Off

If you are an avid reader of fashion blogs you may have noticed that some looks take off, and others, well, don't. Here's a look at the rejected trends.

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09 декабря, 03:30

China's cross-border capital flow stable: SAFE

China's cross-border capital flow has remained stable with no surges in foreign exchange (forex) purchases, the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) said, responding to rising concerns about capital flight after a sharp fall in the government's forex reserves.

09 декабря, 02:39

Republicans jockey to replace McMorris Rodgers if she takes administration job

A handful of House Republicans are quietly laying the groundwork to run for House GOP Conference chair amid rumors that the current holder of the job — Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers — will be named interior secretary, multiple sources told POLITICO. Reps. Mimi Walters (R-Calif.), Susan Brooks (R-Ind.), Mia Love (R-Utah) and Doug Collins (R-Ga.) are exploring bids for the No. 4 position in House leadership currently filled by the Washington Republican. Some, including Walters, are already making phone calls to gauge support, the sources said. “Should [McMorris Rodgers] be appointed to serve in the Administration, I will absolutely run for conference chair to build on the successes House Republicans have seen in the 114th Congress,” Walters said in a statement for this story. “I am humbled by the support I have received in preliminary conversations, and I look forward to speaking with all the members of our Conference.” Collins, recently elected conference vice chairman, also confirmed his interest to POLITICO if McMorris Rodgers steps aside: “While I would consider the opportunity that comes with an open seat, I remain humbled by my recent and resounding election to Vice Chair of Conference and look forward to working with Republican leadership to serve every American.”A source familiar with the thinking of Brooks, the incoming House Ethics Committee Chair, confirmed to POLITICO she’d be interested in the post. Love’s spokesman Richard Piatt pushed back on the notion that Love was making calls to anyone but did not say if she was considering the post. The early positioning comes as the rumor mill on Capitol Hill swirls that President-elect Donald Trump will pick McMorris Rodgers — the most senior female Republican in Congress — to run the Interior Department. Insiders predict that GOP leadership will be searching for another woman to replace her given the dearth of female Republican lawmakers in senior roles in Congress. Walters, a 54-year-old affable freshman and former state senator, is a rising star in the conference. Love, 41, the ex-mayor of Saratoga Springs, was the first female Black Republican in Congress. As a former federal prosecutor, who also made headlines for her astute questioning on the Benghazi investigative panel, 56-year-old Brooks is seen by her colleagues as sharp. She briefly ran for governor when Trump tapped then-Hoosier State Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate.Collins, a 50-year-old former minister for the Air Force troops, just defeated Rep. Bill Flores for his current leadership position. If he runs for conference chair, his vice chair position would open.

09 декабря, 01:36

There's Too Much to Lose from U.S.-Russia Conflict

Alexandra Vacroux Security, Eurasia Russia must come to believe that it is safe from an imminent invasion, and that all sides have too much to lose in a war. Editor’s Note: The following is part of a multi-part symposium commissioned by the National Interest and Carnegie Corporation of New York. We asked some of the world’s leading experts about the future of U.S.-Russia relations under President-elect Donald Trump. You can find all of their answers here. You are coming into office at a moment when U.S.-Russia relations are at their worst in over fifty years. The fact that you are not associated with President Obama’s Russia team and their policies means you have an opportunity to restart the bilateral relationship. Although some of our tensions have been both personal and personalized, beneath poor U.S.-Russia relations lie sharp differences in our nations’ interests. Given his desire to assert Russia’s position on the world stage, Putin is likely to test you in the first year of your administration, in order to gauge your resolve. Do not be blinded by personalizing harmony or discord. You have made it clear that you are a deal maker. The bilateral relationship can be framed as an ongoing negotiation that could generate productive deals. What do we want out of negotiations with Russia? We want cooperation on issues that are important to our national interests: issues like fighting terrorism, managing nuclear risk and coordinating the response to global epidemics. We don’t want Russia to encourage countries that pose a serious risk to us (e.g., Iran or North Korea). What does Russia want from us? That we respect and acknowledge its perceived interests as legitimate—even when they differ from ours. We can reestablish our bilateral relationship by taking Russia’s role on the world stage seriously, and by making it clear that we will work with Russia as a partner. To build a positive relationship, it is critical that we not treat Russia condescendingly, as we often have. Read full article

09 декабря, 00:50

Continued Rise in Opioid Overdose Deaths in 2015 Shows Urgent Need for Treatment

Congress Acts on President’s Call for $1 Billion for Treatment Washington, D.C. – Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new data that show that overdose deaths associated with prescription and illicit opioids increased to 33,091 in 2015 (see data summary below). The increase in deaths was driven in large part by continued sharp increases in deaths involving heroin and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl. As in 2014, overdose deaths involving prescription opioids (excluding the category of synthetic opioids that includes fentanyl) rose only slightly, suggesting that efforts in recent years to reduce the misuse of these drugs may be having an impact. “The prescription opioid and heroin epidemic continues to devastate communities and families across the country—in large part because too many people still do not get effective substance use disorder treatment,” said Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy. “That is why the President has called since February for $1 billion in new funding to expand access to treatment. This week Congress finally acted on the President's request. The Administration will work to get this new funding out to States as quickly as possible to make sure that every American who wants treatment for an opioid use disorder is able to get it.” "The epidemic of deaths involving opioids continues to worsen," said CDC Director Tom Frieden, M.D., M.P.H. "Prescription opioid misuse and use of heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl are intertwined and deeply troubling problems. We need to drastically improve both the treatment of pain and the treatment of opioid use disorders and increase the use of naloxone to reverse opioid overdose. We must also work collaboratively with our public safety partners to further reduce access to illicit opioids." The data released today are for 2015; since then the Administration has taken significant new actions to address the epidemic, including: Issuing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain – the Agency’s first-ever recommendations for primary care clinicians on prescribing opioids. Subsequently, more than 60 medical schools, nearly 200 nursing schools and more than 50 pharmacy schools have committed to prescriber training. Establishing enhanced measures in conjunction with the Chinese government to combat the supply of fentanyl and its analogues coming to the United States. Providing new funding to 271 Community Health Centers across the country to increase substance use disorder treatment services, with a specific focus on expanding medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorders in underserved communities. Increasing the patient limit from 100 to 275 for practitioners prescribing buprenorphine to treat opioid use disorders. Since August 2016, more than 2,000 practitioners have applied for and been granted waivers to prescribe at the increased limit—improving access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT). Increasing funding by nearly $100 million to improve opioid prescribing, increase access to naloxone, build MAT treatment capacity to address the epidemic, and improve state surveillance efforts. This week, Congress passed the 21st Century Cures Act, which provides $1 billion in new funding that the President requested to combat the epidemic, primarily by increasing access to substance use disorder treatment. Summary of 2015 Drug Overdose Data According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids rose from 28,647 in 2014 to 33,091 in 2015. Heroin overdose deaths rose from 10,574 in 2014 to 12,990 in 2015, an increase of 23 percent. Overdose deaths involving synthetic opioids other than methadone rose from 5,544 in 2014 to 9,580 in 2015, an increase of 73 percent. This category of opioids is dominated by fentanyl-related overdoses, and recent research indicates the fentanyl involved in these deaths is illicitly manufactured, not from medications containing fentanyl.  Taken together, 19,885 Americans lost their lives in 2015 to deaths involving primarily illicit opioids: heroin, synthetic opioids other than methadone (e.g., fentanyl), or a mixture of the two. Overdose deaths involving prescription opioids, excluding the category predominated by illicit fentanyl, rose only slightly from 16,941 in 2014 to 17,536 in 2015, a 4% increase. NOTE: A portion of the overdose deaths involved both illicit opioids and prescription opioids. These data are compiled from the CDC’s WONDER database: https://wonder.cdc.gov/ Additional information on Administration efforts to address the prescription opioid and heroin epidemic is here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2016/11/30/fact-sheet-obama-administration-marks-progress-substance-use-disorder More information about the Office of National Drug Control Policy is here: http://www.whitehouse.gov/ondcp   ###

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09 декабря, 00:26

UN refugee agency reshapes protection ‘toolkit’ for a world on the move

The United Nations refugee agency has updated its ‘toolkit’ for protecting vulnerable people on the move, in response to a sharp increase in global flows of both refugees and migrants in the decade since it was published.

08 декабря, 23:49

Obama Administration To Open Temporary Shelters In Texas For Surge Of Immigrant Families

Customs and Border Protection will open a new temporary shelter on Friday in Donna, Texas, to handle a sharp increase in the number Central American families and unaccompanied children crossing into the United States, the agency announced Thursday.   U.S. authorities have struggled since the summer of 2014 to accommodate an influx of Central American families and children, who often arrive seeking asylum or other humanitarian relief. After rising and falling over two years, the numbers jumped sharply this fall.   The set of tents and showers at Donna comes in addition to a similar facility that CBP opened last month in the West Texas town of Tornillo, outside El Paso. Each facility can hold up to 500 detainees. “It got to the point where we simply could not handle the amount of people who were coming here and requesting asylum,” said David Higgerson, Laredo field operations director, according to KENS5 Eyewitness News. Each of the shelters cost about $3.8 million to establish, KENS5 reports. The number of apprehensions at the border has surged this year, with 46,195 people crossing into the United States without authorization in October ― a figure that includes people who request asylum or other humanitarian relief. That number marks a 41 percent increase compared to the same month last year. Unaccompanied minors and mothers traveling with their children accounted for more than 19,000 of the new arrivals. “This effort is designed to minimize the impact to border security operations while fulfilling our humanitarian efforts,” Manuel Padilla Jr., commander of the Joint Task Force-West South Texas Corridor, said in a press statement. “We will work closely with all our partner agencies to maintain efficient operations.” Those passing through the shelters are supposed to remain in custody for three days or less. The development comes as the Obama administration faces legal setbacks to its family detention policy and criticism from a Department of Homeland Security-fielded panel of experts over its reliance on for-profit prison contractors to run immigrant detention centers. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 декабря, 21:21

What John Kelly could really do at DHS

His top job: Implementing Trump's immigration policy.

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08 декабря, 20:38

10 LEGO Cars That Will Make You the Coolest Relative This Christmas

If giving LEGO kits wins you cool points, then we suggest looking at these ten car-focused kits in order to retain your role as favorite relative.

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08 декабря, 20:27

Racists Break In, Vandalize NFL Player's Home With Swastikas, Epithets

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Burglars smashed their way into the home of New York Giants player Nikita Whitlock on Tuesday night, then covered it with hateful graffiti and expletives. The intruders scrawled racist slurs and phrases like “Go back to Africa” and “KKK” on the walls of the New Jersey apartment Whitlock shares with his wife and two children. Graffiti on one wall reads “Trump.” Whitlock told CBS New York he had to cover up a swastika so his 6-year-old son wouldn’t see it.  “Racism is real and instead of close to home this time they came inside,” Whitlock wrote in an Instagram post that shows some of the slurs. “My family is safe but we are saddened by the hate. Thanks to the Moonachie Police Department for all of your help!”   Oppression, racism, hatred, violence, there’s no need for that. NFL fullback Nikita Whitlock The robbers also made off with some jewelry and electronics, but curiously left other valuables behind, the fullback’s wife, Ashley Whitlock, noted. This is the second time someone has broken into the family’s home in the last couple of weeks, and police are investigating both incidents. Whitlock’s agent told ESPN that their previous residence had also been burglarized.  There’s been a sharp rise in racist incidents and hate crimes since president-elect Donald Trump’s victory early last month.  “It’s about to be 2017,” Whitlock told CBS New York. “Oppression, racism, hatred, violence, there’s no need for that.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 декабря, 20:17

Zorya Luhansk v Manchester United: Europa League – as it happened

United dominated on a difficult pitch Bailly made an impressive return from injury 7.53pm GMT United cruise into the next around of the Europa League thanks to a dominant performance crowned by two fine goals. 7.51pm GMT 90 min: Fosu-Mensah exchanges passes with Ibrahimovic in the box and then has a crack at goal from a difficult angle. Levchenko blocks his low shot at the near post with his feet. The ensuing corner yields nothing. Continue reading...

08 декабря, 19:55

Donald Trump To Choose Fast-Food CEO To Be His Labor Secretary

In a rebuke to President Barack Obama’s work on the labor front, President-elect Donald Trump is expected to choose a fast-food executive to be the nation’s next labor secretary, tasked with enforcing workplace safety and wage laws on behalf of U.S. workers. Andrew Puzder, who advised Trump during his presidential campaign, is the chief executive of CKE Restaurants, which includes the burger chains Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. among its brands. He’s largely credited with turning around Hardee’s after taking over the company in 1997. The Wall Street Journal and New York Times reported the Puzder pick on Thursday, citing anonymous transition officials. Just as with his cabinet picks for health and education, Trump’s choice of Puzder for the labor post suggests an eagerness to dismantle much of Obama’s legacy and govern as a firm conservative. Puzder was a sharp critic of Obama’s labor policies, lambasting him for expanding overtime pay for workers and for trying to raise the minimum wage. While Obama aligned himself with fast-food workers who’ve gone on strike to raise wages, Trump is instead naming one of their bosses to be the country’s top workplace watchdog. Puzder has made his philosophy of governing fairly clear through his op-eds, television appearances and personal blog. Like Trump, he argues that the federal government has made regulations too burdensome on businesses, stifling job growth. Two of the major regulations he has criticized ― the minimum wage and overtime ― are ones he would be tasked with enforcing. Earlier this year, the Obama administration overhauled the nation’s overtime rules, trying to make them more generous to workers. Under the changes, which are now blocked in court and may never see the light of day, 4.2 million more salaried workers would be guaranteed time-and-a-half pay when they work over 40 hours in a week. The overtime changes would be the most significant labor reform of the Obama era. Puzder is not a fan of them. Writing in The Wall Street Journal in 2014, he said the rules would hurt the workers they were intended to help, like the fast-food managers who work for Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. Many of those managers would be newly entitled to overtime. “Overtime pay has to come from somewhere, most likely from reduced hours, reduced salaries or reduced bonuses,” Puzder wrote. In an interview earlier this year, Puzder also made clear that he didn’t want to see a major hike to the federal minimum wage, which is currently $7.25 per hour and was last raised in 2009. Raising the wage floor significantly, he said, would compel businesses to look into replacing workers with machines. “With government driving up the cost of labor, it’s driving down the number of jobs,” he said. “You’re going to see automation not just in airports and grocery stores, but in restaurants.” Puzder told the L.A. Times that he isn’t opposed to a minimum wage in principle, and doesn’t mind an occasional bump. He also told the paper he’d be open to indexing the wage floor, so that it rises gradually over time.  In an op-ed he wrote for The Hill, Puzder argued that safety net programs like food stamps discourage poor people from working and need to be reined in. Acknowledging that some employees in his own chains would earn wages low enough to qualify for public assistance, Puzder said some workers don’t want to earn more money because they would lose their benefits. “Consider that some of our crew members are declining promotions to shift leader positions because the increase in income would disqualify them for food, housing, medical or other government benefits,” he wrote.  Puzder helmed Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. at a time the chains became famous for their controversial TV ads. They showed the likes of Paris Hilton and Kate Upton, scantily clad, eating cheeseburgers in a surprisingly sexualized manner. Puzder defended the spots, saying they worked well for the young male demographic his company targets. He even said women eating burgers in bikinis is “very American.” In addition to advising Trump, Puzder was also an adviser to the 2012 campaign of GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney. This election cycle, Puzder and his wife gave $150,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, the joint fundraising committee between Trump and the Republican National Committee, according to campaign finance records. Puzder himself gave another $10,000 to Rebuilding America Now, a political action committee supporting Trump.  No one can say Puzder is unfamiliar with the Labor Department’s work. Like other fast-food chains, Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. restaurants are often investigated for possible minimum wage and overtime infractions. A recent analysis from Bloomberg found that officials discovered violations in roughly 60 percent of their investigations of those chain’s locations. Most Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. locations are operated by franchisees, rather than by CKE Restaurants itself, meaning the company itself is typically not considered responsible under the law. Obama used the power of the executive pen to institute many labor reforms, particularly in the last three years of his tenure, and Trump’s nomination of Puzder does not bode well for them. Aside from the overtime changes, Obama signed executive orders raising the minimum wage for federal contractors and guaranteeing them paid sick days, as well as an order that would take contracts away from firms that break labor laws. It’s ultimately up to Trump whether he wants to reverse those executive orders, or write new rules that completely undo the ones instituted by Obama. (A good example would be the Labor Department’s fiduciary rule, which basically cracks down on 401(k) fees and is tied up in court.) In Puzder, Trump would have a cabinet official who’s advocated for loosening the very types of regulations that the Obama administration championed. One area where Puzder appears moderate is immigration. In an interview with The Hill last year, Puzder said the party needs to have empathy for undocumented immigrants. (Fast-food restaurants employ a disproportionate amount of immigrant workers, including many who are undocumented.) “People vote with their hearts... Our values indicate we should be the party of immigration reform,” Puzder said. “[Many undocumented immigrants] live in fear of being deported, losing what they’ve built and being separated from their families.” The pro-business Competitive Enterprise Institute hailed Trump’s choice of Puzder, saying he “understands that the key to economic growth and rising wages is empowering business to increase productivity, not artificial, government-imposed wage and hour mandates.” One group that isn’t pleased with the Puzder selection is the Fight for $15, the union-backed campaign that has agitated for higher minimum wages and collective bargaining rights. In a statement, Mary Kay Henry, the president of the Service Employees International Union, which has coordinated the campaign, said that Trump’s choice shows “how out of touch he is with what working Americans need.”  “Working families, including those who elected him, issued a mandate for economic change because they are sick and tired of working longer and harder than ever but still struggling to build a better future for their families,” Henry said. “Puzder has proven he doesn’t support working people.” Paul Blumenthal contributed reporting. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 декабря, 19:55

Donald Trump To Choose Fast-Food CEO To Be His Labor Secretary

In a rebuke to President Barack Obama’s work on the labor front, President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday is expected to choose a fast-food executive to be the nation’s next labor secretary, tasked with enforcing workplace safety and wage laws on behalf of U.S. workers. Andrew Puzder, who advised Trump during his presidential campaign, is the chief executive of CKE Restaurants, which includes the burger chains Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. among its brands. He’s largely credited with turning around Hardee’s after taking over the company in 1997. The Wall Street Journal and New York Times reported the Puzder pick on Thursday, citing anonymous transition officials. Just as with his cabinet picks for health and education, Trump’s choice of Puzder for the labor post suggests an eagerness to dismantle much of Obama’s legacy and govern as a firm conservative. Puzder was a sharp critic of Obama’s labor policies, lambasting him for expanding overtime pay for workers and for trying to raise the minimum wage. While Obama aligned himself with fast-food workers who’ve gone on strike to raise wages, Trump is instead naming one of their bosses to be the country’s top workplace watchdog. Puzder has made his philosophy of governing fairly clear through his op-eds, television appearances and personal blog. Like Trump, he argues that the federal government has made regulations too burdensome on businesses, stifling job growth. Two of the major regulations he has criticized ― the minimum wage and overtime ― are ones he would be tasked with enforcing. Earlier this year, the Obama administration overhauled the nation’s overtime rules, trying to make them more generous to workers. Under the changes, which are now blocked in court and may never see the light of day, 4.2 million more salaried workers would be guaranteed time-and-a-half pay when they work over 40 hours in a week. The overtime changes would be the most significant labor reform of the Obama era. Puzder is not a fan of them. Writing in The Wall Street Journal in 2014, he said the rules would hurt the workers they were intended to help, like the fast-food managers who work for Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. Many of those managers would be newly entitled to overtime. “Overtime pay has to come from somewhere, most likely from reduced hours, reduced salaries or reduced bonuses,” Puzder wrote. In an interview earlier this year, Puzder also made clear that he didn’t want to see a major hike to the federal minimum wage, which is currently $7.25 per hour and was last raised in 2009. Raising the wage floor significantly, he said, would compel businesses to look into replacing workers with machines. “With government driving up the cost of labor, it’s driving down the number of jobs,” he said. “You’re going to see automation not just in airports and grocery stores, but in restaurants.” Puzder told the L.A. Times that he isn’t opposed to a minimum wage in principle, and doesn’t mind an occasional bump. He also told the paper he’d be open to indexing the wage floor, so that it rises gradually over time.  In addition to advising Trump, Puzder was also an adviser to the 2012 campaign of GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney. This election cycle, Puzder and his wife gave $150,000 to the Trump Victory Fund, the joint fundraising committee between Trump and the Republican National Committee, according to campaign finance records. Puzder himself gave another $10,000 to Rebuilding America Now, a political action committee supporting Trump.  No one can say Puzder is unfamiliar with the Labor Department’s work. Like other fast-food chains, Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. restaurants are often investigated for possible minimum wage and overtime infractions. A recent analysis from Bloomberg found that officials discovered violations in roughly 60 percent of their investigations of those chain’s locations. Most Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. locations are operated by franchisees, rather than by CKE Restaurants itself, meaning the company itself is typically not considered responsible under the law. Obama used the power of the executive pen to institute many labor reforms, particularly in the last three years of his tenure, and Trump’s nomination of Puzder does not bode well for them. Aside from the overtime changes, Obama signed executive orders raising the minimum wage for federal contractors and guaranteeing them paid sick days, as well as an order that would take contracts away from firms that break labor laws. It’s ultimately up to Trump whether he wants to reverse those executive orders, or write new rules that completely undo the ones instituted by Obama. (A good example would be the Labor Department’s fiduciary rule, which basically cracks down on 401(k) fees and is tied up in court.) In Puzder, Trump would have a cabinet official who’s advocated for loosening the very types of regulations that the Obama administration championed. One area where Puzder appears moderate is immigration. In an interview with The Hill last year, Puzder said the party needs to have empathy for undocumented immigrants. (Fast-food restaurants employ a disproportionate amount of immigrant workers, including many who are undocumented.) “People vote with their hearts... Our values indicate we should be the party of immigration reform,” Puzder said. “[Many undocumented immigrants] live in fear of being deported, losing what they’ve built and being separated from their families.” The pro-business Competitive Enterprise Institute hailed Trump’s choice of Puzder, saying he “understands that the key to economic growth and rising wages is empowering business to increase productivity, not artificial, government-imposed wage and hour mandates.” Paul Blumenthal contributed reporting. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 декабря, 19:50

John Wiley & Sons (JW.A) Beats on Q2 Earnings, Revenues

After commencing fiscal 2017 on a soft note, John Wiley & Sons Inc.'s (JW.A) made a sharp come back by delivering a positive earnings surprise in the second quarter.

08 декабря, 19:39

DOW ETFs: More Rally Ahead or Have You Missed the Boat?

How long will the sharp rally in Dow ETFs last?

08 декабря, 19:02

Will the U.S. Economy Boom Over the Next Four Years?

The very sharp Ken Rogoff predicts a boom over the next four years: "The biggest missing piece... is business investment, and if it starts kicking in... output and productivity could begin to rise very sharply.... You don’t have to be a nice guy to get the economy going.... It is...

08 декабря, 18:15

Europe has a massive and growing trade surplus, and is hemorrhaging manufacturing jobs, by Scott Sumner

Noah Smith linked to the following recent paper in the AER, by Justin R Pierce and Peter K. Shott. : Abstract: This paper links the sharp drop in US manufacturing employment after 2000 to a change in US trade policy that eliminated potential tariff increases on Chinese imports. Industries more exposed to the change experience greater employment loss, increased imports from China, and higher entry by US importers and foreign-owned Chinese exporters. At the plant level, shifts toward less labor-intensive production and exposure to the policy via input-output linkages also contribute to the decline in employment. Results are robust to other potential explanations of employment loss, and there is no similar reaction in the European Union, where policy did not change. It's very possible that using cross sectional data, job loss in America is more closely linked to China trade than job loss in Europe. But that doesn't tell us anything about the macroeconomic factors driving the overall loss in jobs. In fact, Europe has lost jobs in manufacturing just as fast as America: It's a bit hard to see all the lines, but the decline in the US has been similar to the decline in Europe. Germany has seen the second sharpest decline (after the UK), while Italy has seen the smallest loss of manufacturing jobs. Interestingly, Germany and the UK have two of Europe's healthiest overall job markets, and Italy has by far the worst employment situation of the countries on this graph. Manufacturing jobs don't equate to a healthy job market. It's true that the data only goes up to 2008, but this graph shows that Europe suffered a massive job loss in the Great Recession, just like the US (down roughly 12% in Europe, roughly 13% in the US). As I pointed out in my Chinese rust belt post, manufacturing jobs are declining almost everywhere; it's a global phenomenon that has little or nothing to do with trade deficits. Indeed Europe's current account surplus is well over $300 billion, larger than any other single country, including China. If even a massive trade surplus doesn't prevent US-style job losses in manufacturing, then Trump's plan has essentially zero chance of success. I'll say it again, the argument that job loss in manufacturing is due to trade deficits rather than automation is simply innumeracy. HT: Nathan Taylor (8 COMMENTS)

08 декабря, 18:08

2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport Review: Bigger Isn’t Always Better

By overhauling 25% of the entire vehicle, Hyundai looks to make the Ultimate version of the 2017 Santa Fe Sport a rock star. Here is how it won our vote.