• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании1608
      • Показать ещё
      Разное566
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы362
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации30
      • Показать ещё
      Формат19
      Люди65
      • Показать ещё
      Издания65
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели37
      • Показать ещё
Southwest Airlines
17 января, 16:39

Is a Beat in Store for Hawaiian Holdings (HA) in Q4 Earnings?

Hawaiian Holdings Inc., (HA) the parent company of Hawaiian Airlines, is scheduled to report fourth-quarter 2016 results on Jan 24, after the market closes.

16 января, 16:42

Установлены причина возгораний Galaxy Note 7 и размер убытков Samsung

В южнокорейской компании пришли к выводу, что источником возгораний смартфона Galaxy Note 7 является аккумулятор. Официально итоги внутреннего расследования корпорации будут объявлены 23 января, а пока в СМИ попала информация от источника, знакомого с результатами проверки. Как сообщается, из-за остановки производства смартфона, Samsung потеряет более 19 млрд долларов, в том числе более 2 миллиардов придется потратить на компенсационные выплаты клиентам (в среднем 850 долларов каждому). В компании хотят поскорее сгладить негативное впечатление с помощью выпуска нового флагманского смартфона Galaxy S8. Напомним, в начале сентября Samsung Electronics была вынуждена отозвать с рынка большую часть смартфонов Galaxy Note 7, а также приостановить их продажу в связи с обнаружившимся проблемами с аккумуляторами.  В начале октября Galaxy Note 7 задымился на борту лайнера Southwest Airlines в аэропорту штата Кентукки. Из самолета эвакуировали пассажиров и сотрудников авиакомпании. В результате инцидента никто не пострадал. В связи с инцидентом власти США запретили провоз смартфонов Galaxy Note 7, как в салоне, так и в багаже. Также провоз смартфона запрещен и на воздушных судах в Японии.

14 января, 04:59

Avoid a Layoff: 25 Best Employers for Job Security

Hoping to avoid a layoff? Try finding a job with one of these organizations, the best employers in the U.S. for job security, according to Indeed.com.

11 января, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Hawaiian Holdings, Delta Air Lines, Allegiant Travel, JetBlue Airways and Alaska Air Group

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Hawaiian Holdings, Delta Air Lines, Allegiant Travel, JetBlue Airways and Alaska Air Group

11 января, 16:38

Southwest Airlines (LUV) December Traffic Grows; Stock Up

Low-cost carrier Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) gained 2.07% by close of business on Jan 10 after the company announced impressive traffic numbers for Dec 2016.

Выбор редакции
10 января, 21:40

Gary Kelly Defies Gravity at Southwest Airlines: Meet a CEO with a stellar personal brand

Whether you're CEO of a mega-brand or owner of a doggy daycare start-up, investing in your personal brand is always a sound investment in your company. When the individual at the helm has the right image and reputation, they impact everything from boosting the company brand to forging emotional connections with employees, investors, customers, and media. When done right, personal branding builds mind and market share alike and influences the bottom line. Done wrong, it can sap a company's image and financials. This is especially important to remember today, when a CEO's every value, opinion, comment, and characteristic is up for public review. So, how do you get it right? Look to an exemplar: Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly. Gary has been indispensable in propelling Southwest as the world's largest low-cost carrier. He's also helped secure it as a mainstay on Fortune magazine's list of the most admired companies in the world. (It ranked seventh in 2016.) A 30-year Southwest veteran, Gary began his career as Controller, moving up the ranks as Chief Financial Officer, V.P. Finance, Executive V.P. and CFO, and finally CEO and Vice Chairman in July 2004. In 2008, he added "Chairman" and "President" to his resume. This is his story -- and brand. Setting the Tone Not too long ago, CEOs were sequestered in their ivory towers, far from the spotlight. But today, the CEO is the face of the company. They must be visible internally, externally, and virtually. "The CEO is in a high-profile role and sets an example," Gary told me during a recent interview. "I try to aspire to set a good one, and model the behaviors that we value and expect at Southwest Airlines." Gary sees part of his duty as rallying employees around an inclusive culture. There has never been a single layoff or furlough at Southwest, and employees are well-compensated -- two traits Gary takes special pride in. "We still believe that we are in the people business, and it's our people that make the culture so strong," he explained. "Southwest has done a great job taking care of people over a long period of time." Gary's leadership style can best be described as collaborative. "I really enjoy the team aspect of what we do here at Southwest," he said. "No one person can know or do it all. And the more we can collaborate and work together as a team, the better product we will have." Gary and Southwest also place a premium on fun, even if that's simply bringing people together to celebrate birthdays, share stories, or reward good work. "We always encourage employees to be themselves -- sharing a song, a joke," he said. "It's the little things that make the culture very rich and make the experience of Southwest very different." One of those "little things"? Halloween, when employees get decked out in costume. Gary has gone as George Washington and Gene Simmons in years past. Gary rocks it as Gene Simmons of Kiss at annual Halloween event. Photo courtesy Southwest Airlines The Power of 'We' Gary knows he alone cannot be Southwest's brand ambassador. At the airline, all employees (more than 53,000) are encouraged to embrace the company's mission: taking care of customers. This philosophy is built into everything from internal emails to advertising and social media. Recruiting the right people is also paramount. Gary believes in "hiring for attitude and training for skill" to perpetuate an already-strong culture. It's not easy. There's a tremendous amount of competition in the airline industry. That's why outstanding services -- and not just attractive pricing -- is key. "More today than ever, [our] service aspect or our people really set us apart," he said. "When I describe service, I'm not talking about first class or frills and amenities. Our people serve our customers as if they were guests in their own home." Many studies reveal employees with high job satisfaction are generally more productive, engaged, and loyal to their companies. There's proof of this at Southwest, where several employees are 40-plus year veterans. Gary notes many of these workers started in entry-level positions and worked their way up to leadership. On the workplace review website Glassdoor, Southwest is rated one of the top places to work in the U.S. Excerpts from employees include: "Every leader I've met has always made me feel like my work was appreciated and made a difference." "This is my first airline job and I feel I hit the jackpot by choosing Southwest as my last place of employment. I'm 28 and plan to stay until I retire!" "I've never had a CEO of a company walk down the hall and know my name." Broadcasting That Personal Brand Modern CEOs are expected to have an active social media presence. They understand that social media increases transparency and accessibility and instills confidence. They're also expected to project a personal brand that aligns with the company brand. Gary and Southwest excel at this, maintaining a fun, cohesive voice across all communication channels. It works. The Southwest fan page has more fans than any other airline: 5.3 million. The experts agree with Gary's approach. According to Allison Kluger, a management professor at Stanford and former producer for The View, "These days, the CEO wants to be visible, serve as the embodiment of the brand and understands that the culture reflects his or her values in a very outward facing manner. Today's CEOs want their values to permeate the company brand." Southwest welcomes Customers at the José Martí International Airport in Havana, Cuba. Photography by Ashlee Duncan/Southwest Airlines Transformation and Growth As with any major company, there have been challenges. Still, Southwest has managed to grow spectacularly regardless of spiking energy prices, fierce competition, and recessions. The company is always innovating. Consider its new, just-launched reservation system. And late last month, the airline added Havana as its 100th destination. Gary is confident that there is potential to add 50 more North American destinations. He believes there's even more ahead: "We have huge opportunities to grow the airline over the next five years. I think Southwest airlines is one of the top companies in the world, not just the top airline." He adds: "The focus on the reliability and hospitality will be very important to sustain that." My takeaway from chatting with Gary: CEO reputation is the new currency, and will no doubt increase in value in the years to come. In an increasingly connected and transparent world, keeping a low profile is no longer an option. There is a huge opportunity in which CEOs can share their company story and join the conversation. Here's to defying gravity. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 21:05

5 Airline Stocks Likely to Beat Q4 Earnings Estimates

Airline stocks seem to be back in favor once again.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
10 января, 19:13

Southwest Airlines' stock jumps 2.9% toward record close after Dec. operations update

This is a Real-time headline. These are breaking news, delivered the minute it happens, delivered ticker-tape style. Visit www.marketwatch.com or the quote page for more information about this breaking news.

10 января, 16:21

Hawaiian Holdings (HA) Gains on Impressive Traffic Results

Hawaiian Holdings, Inc. (HA) saw a 1.98% increase in its stock price at close of business on Jan 9 due to impressive traffic results.

05 января, 17:23

JetBlue Corp. (JBLU) Inks Agreement with Premier Aviation

JetBlue Airways Corporation (JBLU) and Premier Aviation have announced that the companies have entered into a five-year agreement for heavy maintenance and painting of Embraer 190 aircrafts.

05 января, 16:51

Southwest to Begin Nonstop Flights from LaGuardia to Tampa

Per media reports, Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) will soon launch nonstop flights operating daily between the Tampa International Airport (TIA) and LaGuardia Airport.

02 января, 15:10

Southwest Airlines' Technicians' Tentative Deal Rejected

Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) announced that the company's facilities maintenance technicians have voted against the tentative deal, which was outlined in Oct 2016.

27 декабря 2016, 22:57

'Don't Speak Arabic Here'

"Don't speak Arabic here." That was one of the first pieces of advice I recieved when I moved back to the United States after spending years in the Middle East, and it's a sentence that tends to ring in my ear very often. I did not hear it from an angry passer-by following the rhetoric of famous politicians. I did not hear it from the barista at the coffee shop I tend to frequent. I heard it from a person whose second language is Arabic, and I would lie to you if I told you that did not make me think twice about carrying around an Arabic novel to sit and read out in the public. I would also lie to you if I told you that didn't make me look around and see if anyone was looking at me suspiciously when I spoke Arabic in public. I felt like the person who warned me to not speak Arabic in America was telling me to betray my Arabic tongue and everyone who taught me it. However, I also felt like someone was trying to lock up part of my identity. I felt like the person who warned me to not speak Arabic in America was telling me to betray my Arabic tongue and everyone who taught me it. Don't speak Arabic here? It's gotten to this? I find myself thinking again. On December 18th of this year was the fourth anniversary for the World Arabic Language Day presented by the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). On the morning of December 21st, a YouTube star, Adam Saleh, recorded his being kicked off a Delta flight for speaking Arabic. Although some were quick to call this a "prank" as Saleh's videos are known for such, the fact that such incidents take place cannot be ignored. Early in April of this year, a University of California, Berkeley student was escorted off Southwest Airlines when a woman became uncomfortable after hearing him speak in Arabic over the phone. In March of 2015, Pine Bush High School received various criticisms - and even issued an apology- after having a student recite the Pledge of Allegiance in Arabic during national Foreign Language Week. In 2009, a travelling student was interrogated at the airport for carrying Arabic flashcards because, he was told, "Arabic was the language of Osama Bin Laden." Many will attribute the recent rise of the discrimination "incidents" and hate crimes against Arabs and Muslims, specifically, to 'Trump's America.' Is that why Arabic, my language and the language of millions around the world, frightens many? Many will attribute the recent rise of the discrimination "incidents" and hate crimes against Arabs and Muslims, specifically, to "Trump's America." However, with organizations that have been around since the 1980s, such as English First that lobbies for English becoming the official language of the United States and for issues like decreasing "healthcare costs by using English only and removing the translator mandate", it is clear that the soon-to-be president Trump is not the root cause. He is simply part of the equation that paved the way for this sort of blunt and appalling discrimination to surface once again. On a particular night a few months ago, my brother and I were walking in downtown New Orleans speaking Arabic. A group of women holding daiquiris were walking behind us. They seemed to be having a good time, laughing and speaking loudly, until one of them called to my brother and I. "Hey, you. What language are you speaking?" My brother and I turned around and said, "Arabic." "What are you saying?" She continued to probe. At the moment, I was discussing how the sky looked like it was about to rain, so I told her. "Girl, speak English. Speak English!" She commented and strolled past us with her group of friends. Oddly enough -- or perhaps, understandably enough - her question "what are you saying?" is something I wish people around the world that think Arabic is scary and the language of terrorism asked more often. If it were asked to myself, I would speak of the beauty of Arabic. I would narrate the many times I searched for the word "Salamtik" in English when someone who doesn't speak Arabic tells me they were sick or the time I searched for the words "Ya'teek el 'afia" in English to tell the conductor of the streetcar I frequent when he dropped me off at my destination. I can tell you that the first word means "May God give you peace" and the second word means "May God give you wellness", but the sincerity of the words said in Arabic is lost in translation. I would greet and bid farewell with one of the most beautiful greetings in Arabic: "Assalamu 'Alaikum" ("Peace be upon you"). I still will speak Arabic, and I invite anyone bothered by this to ask me: 'What are you saying?' I would be more than grateful to tell you. In 2015 alone, over one million individuals obtained lawful permanent resident status. This only points to the fact that more people are coming into and settling in the United States - people who speak different languages, including Arabic. The fact is not a single person can tell another to leave their language back home without going against the Amendments and Civil Rights law, often quoted but seldom followed. "Speaking a different language used to be considered a unique and impressive skill. I remember making friends in elementary school over their interest in how to write their name in Arabic. Now to think that people are viewed as "Others" because of a skill, a unique attribute, leaves me speechless," Manar Mohammad, a Palestinian-American friend, posted earlier today on social media. That's what America was to individuals like Manar and myself. We happily told our fellow Americans where we were from and what language we spoke. We showed them how their names were written in Arabic. I still will not think twice about including "Fluent Arabic" under the "Skills" section in my resume. I still will speak Arabic, and I invite anyone bothered by this to ask me: "What are you saying?" I would be more than grateful to tell you. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

27 декабря 2016, 22:44

Job Search? These 5 Companies Have Policies That Prevent Layoffs

Preparing for a job search? You might want to check out these companies, where workers have never experienced layoffs or surprising firings.

22 декабря 2016, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alaska Air Group, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, American Airlines Group and Sabre

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alaska Air Group, Delta Air Lines, Southwest Airlines, American Airlines Group and Sabre

22 декабря 2016, 01:38

Airline Stock Roundup: Alaska Air Buys Virgin America, Delta's Bullish Investor Day & More

The past week saw the creation of the fifth-largest airline in the U.S.

21 декабря 2016, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: AbbVie, Union Pacific, U.S. Bancorp, Baker Hughes and Southwest Airlines

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: AbbVie, Union Pacific, U.S. Bancorp, Baker Hughes and Southwest Airlines

21 декабря 2016, 17:07

6 ETFs Breezing Past Dow Jones This Quarter

Inside the ETFs that have offered three times or more returns than Dow Jones has so far this quarter.