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Southwest Airlines
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28 апреля, 19:49

Southwest Will Stop Overbooking Its Flights Altogether

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Southwest Airlines said on Thursday it would stop overbooking its flights, a decision that comes in the wake of a worldwide backlash against larger rival United Airlines for dragging a passenger out of the plane earlier this month. “Soon, we will no longer book a flight over capacity as part of the selling process,” a Southwest spokesman told Reuters. Southwest, the No.4 airline by passenger traffic, had the highest forced bumping rate among large U.S. carriers, taking nearly 15,000 passengers off flights last year, or 9.9 per 100,000 passengers, down slightly from 2015. The carrier paid an average of $874 per bumped passenger, according to Transportation Department data. In comparison, United was in the middle of the pack in terms of the rate at which it forces people to give up seats. It bumped 4.3 out of every 100,000 passengers, and paid an average of $559 each per bumped passenger. Chief Executive Gary Kelly told CNBC that the airline would be discontinuing the practice “very shortly”. Regarding policy change announced today--we will no longer book flights over capacity. @SouthwestAir will have more details in coming weeks.— Gary Kelly (@gary_kelly) April 27, 2017 “I have made the decision, the company’s made the decision, that we will cease to overbook going forward. We’ve been taking steps over the last several years to prepare ourselves anyway,” Kelly told CNBC. (Reporting by Arunima Banerjee and Ankit Ajmera in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur and Saumyadeb Chakrabarty) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
28 апреля, 19:49

Southwest Will Stop Overbooking Its Flights Altogether

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Southwest Airlines said on Thursday it would stop overbooking its flights, a decision that comes in the wake of a worldwide backlash against larger rival United Airlines for dragging a passenger out of the plane earlier this month. “Soon, we will no longer book a flight over capacity as part of the selling process,” a Southwest spokesman told Reuters. Southwest, the No.4 airline by passenger traffic, had the highest forced bumping rate among large U.S. carriers, taking nearly 15,000 passengers off flights last year, or 9.9 per 100,000 passengers, down slightly from 2015. The carrier paid an average of $874 per bumped passenger, according to Transportation Department data. In comparison, United was in the middle of the pack in terms of the rate at which it forces people to give up seats. It bumped 4.3 out of every 100,000 passengers, and paid an average of $559 each per bumped passenger. Chief Executive Gary Kelly told CNBC that the airline would be discontinuing the practice “very shortly”. Regarding policy change announced today--we will no longer book flights over capacity. @SouthwestAir will have more details in coming weeks.— Gary Kelly (@gary_kelly) April 27, 2017 “I have made the decision, the company’s made the decision, that we will cease to overbook going forward. We’ve been taking steps over the last several years to prepare ourselves anyway,” Kelly told CNBC. (Reporting by Arunima Banerjee and Ankit Ajmera in Bengaluru; Editing by Arun Koyyur and Saumyadeb Chakrabarty) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 17:09

Company News for April 28, 2017

Companies in the News are: F,LUV,UNP,BMY

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27 апреля, 20:24

Southwest Airlines: We won't overbook anymore

Read full story for latest details.

27 апреля, 18:28

Southwest Airlines (LUV) Stock Down on Q1 Earnings Miss

Southwest Airlines Co. (LUV) reported lower-than-expected earnings and revenues in the first quarter of 2017.

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27 апреля, 14:40

Southwest Airlines (LUV) Misses on Q1 Earnings

Southwest Airlines' (LUV) reported lower than expected earnings in the quarter.

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26 апреля, 05:09

10 Best Tips for Using Your Travel Rewards Points This Summer

Many travelers rely on travel rewards points to turn their vacation dreams into reality. Here's how to get the most from your miles.

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25 апреля, 18:28

Planes And Airlines Earnings Preview: Boeing, American Airlines And Southwest Airlines

Find out what might be expected when Boeing Co., American Airlines, and Southwest Airlines report first-quarter earnings results this week.

24 апреля, 15:08

What's in Store for Alaska Air (ALK) this Earnings Season?

Alaska Air Group (ALK) is slated to report its first-quarter 2017 results on Apr 26, before the market opens.

22 апреля, 01:28

Earnings Growth Accelerates in Q1

Earnings Growth Accelerates in Q1

16 апреля, 19:44

Using The United Fiasco To Flourish In The Future

How many “experts” does it take to offer commentary and advice on a customer service catastrophe? The apparent answer is, “All of them.” This post, however, isn’t about what United Airlines did right or wrong on flight 3411. It is about the lessons you should learn and changes you need to make today to avoid alienating your current and potential customers in the future. Why You Should Care This was an incident no one wanted to happen. That reality should scare everyone who leads a business or team. You can’t write off the entire incident as a few bad apples. The staff and crew working United 3411 didn’t wake up on Sunday, April 8 thinking, “Let’s make the world hate us because of our bad service.” Likewise, the airport security officers weren’t looking for someone to injure. The passenger involved certainly wasn’t thinking, “My trip will be complete if I can be dragged off my flight and need reconstructive surgery.” Lessons You Should Learn Your business is an unfortunate turn of events on a slow news day from being the next viral sensation. Here are five lessons to take away from what happened on United 3411: 1. How you do things is important. Airlines have involuntarily bumped passengers from flights since at least the 1950s. In 2016, the numbers are less than 1 in every 10,000 passengers. United Airlines removed passengers at a rate of 0.43 times per 10,000 passengers. American and Southwest Airlines both had higher bump numbers and higher customer satisfaction ratings last year than United. When it comes to managing the customer experience, how you do it is crucial. 2. You can follow the rules and still be wrong. United CEO Oscar Munoz probably earned points with his staff when he supported them for following procedures. Unfortunately, he made things worse with the public. In this case, the problem wasn’t that people didn’t follow the rules. It was that the rules were out of touch with what it takes to create a compelling customer experience. 3. Your reputation matters. United’s current blunder is amplified by its past. The company refused to allow two teenage girls to fly on a non-revenue employee/family pass less than a month before this incident. Even though United was within its rights, public reaction was brutal. In 2009, singer Dave Carroll posted a song on YouTube titled, “United Breaks Guitars.” To date, it has logged over 17 million views and spawned two additional videos with over 2 million and 900 thousand respective views. Dave Carroll has even written a book and speaks around the world on the customer service lessons from his experience. Every screw up is magnified when you have a questionable reputation. 4. Your true culture is revealed in the tough times. Munoz has taken responsibility for system failures that prevented front-line leaders from exercising common sense. His acknowledgements reflect a deeper problem – a culture where the company’s leaders believe that rules take precedence over common sense and compassion. Every company can show a positive culture when things go right. Your response when things go wrong is the true test. 5. If your name is on it, you own it. None of the flight staff, crew, or security officers involved in this event were actually United employees. The flight was operated by Republic Airlines, a regional partner. The security officers worked for the Chicago Department of Aviation. It doesn’t matter. United Airlines is on the side of the airplane. They own every piece of the interaction. It’s the same with your company. It is still your responsibility if there is something wrong with your product or service ... even if it was someone else’s error. What To Do Now The first thing you should do is to say a private “thank you” that your company has not spent the past week feeling the public’s wrath. After that, here are three ideas: 1. Rethink what’s important. Results still rule, but the days of blind devotion to profit at any cost are gone. Flawless execution is the minimum to be in the game. Continuously improving the status quo will keep your product and service relevant, but even that is not enough. Every consideration of what’s important must include valuing people – all people including your customers, team members, and the whole of society. 2. Refine every process and system. Process and system create habits, and your habits define your culture. Reexamine every area of your operation to ensure that it consistently and flawlessly turns your intention about what’s important into action. 3. Refocus on leadership at every level. Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper famously said, “You manage things. You lead people.” The challenges you face to flourish in the future require more leadership than management. Now is the time to double down on your commitment to growing and empowering leaders to do what’s right. The present should be guided more by the future than the past. You can learn from the United’s recent missteps to flourish. Isn’t it time to begin? Randy Pennington is an award-winning author, speaker, and leading authority on helping organizations achieve positive results in a world of accelerating change. To bring Randy to your organization or event, visit www.penningtongroup.com , email [email protected], or call 972.980.9857. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
14 апреля, 01:50

This Helps Explain Why United’s PR Response Was Such A Disaster

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When United Airlines first responded this week to a video showing a passenger being violently dragged from one of its planes, the company apparently didn’t understand ― or know how to deal with ― the level of public rage it was facing. One crucial factor contributing to that failure is that the company’s head of corporate communications reports to its head of human resources and labor relations. This set-up puts the company at a disadvantage when it has to respond quickly and effectively to a public crisis, said Jeffrey Schneider, a corporate communications veteran and founder of The Lead PR.  “You don’t want to have layers of bureaucracy or management in between the top communications person and the CEO,” Schneider told The Huffington Post. And crucially, Schneider said, this arrangement can keep the CEO from hearing advice directly from the person most qualified to give it. He advises having the head of PR report directly to the CEO. United’s unwieldy communications chain is particularly striking considering that airlines can be at the center of a number of PR nightmares, from routine weather delays that strand passengers to catastrophic accidents, at any given time. “You would imagine that a company that has the potential for these kinds of crises would house their communications team with as direct a line to the CEO as possible,” Schneider said.  American Airlines, JetBlue and Southwest Airlines have organizations that mirror this advice, but Delta’s executive arrangement is similar to that of United. United’s first statement after the video began going viral reflected the priorities of its communications chain: a heavily lawyered proclamation of victim-blaming that used euphemisms (“re-accommodate”) to avoid blame, supported employees’ unsupportable decisions, and failed to offer an unqualified apology. In short, it made no sense as a public relations move.  United “was talking to employees” with that message, Justin Bachman, an aviation reporter at Bloomberg, told NPR’s “On Point.” “They wanted the employee base to know that ‘Hey, we’re with you and we’re not going to throw anybody under the bus that works for United,’” he said. “That might have made sense internally, but it completely fell flat in the public arena.”  A spokeswoman for United Airlines declined to comment. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
14 апреля, 01:50

This Helps Explain Why United’s PR Response Was Such A Disaster

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); When United Airlines first responded this week to a video showing a passenger being violently dragged from one of its planes, the company apparently didn’t understand ― or know how to deal with ― the level of public rage it was facing. One crucial factor contributing to that failure is that the company’s head of corporate communications reports to its head of human resources and labor relations. This set-up puts the company at a disadvantage when it has to respond quickly and effectively to a public crisis, said Jeffrey Schneider, a corporate communications veteran and founder of The Lead PR.  “You don’t want to have layers of bureaucracy or management in between the top communications person and the CEO,” Schneider told The Huffington Post. And crucially, Schneider said, this arrangement can keep the CEO from hearing advice directly from the person most qualified to give it. He advises having the head of PR report directly to the CEO. United’s unwieldy communications chain is particularly striking considering that airlines can be at the center of a number of PR nightmares, from routine weather delays that strand passengers to catastrophic accidents, at any given time. “You would imagine that a company that has the potential for these kinds of crises would house their communications team with as direct a line to the CEO as possible,” Schneider said.  American Airlines, JetBlue and Southwest Airlines have organizations that mirror this advice, but Delta’s executive arrangement is similar to that of United. United’s first statement after the video began going viral reflected the priorities of its communications chain: a heavily lawyered proclamation of victim-blaming that used euphemisms (“re-accommodate”) to avoid blame, supported employees’ unsupportable decisions, and failed to offer an unqualified apology. In short, it made no sense as a public relations move.  United “was talking to employees” with that message, Justin Bachman, an aviation reporter at Bloomberg, told NPR’s “On Point.” “They wanted the employee base to know that ‘Hey, we’re with you and we’re not going to throw anybody under the bus that works for United,’” he said. “That might have made sense internally, but it completely fell flat in the public arena.”  A spokeswoman for United Airlines declined to comment. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 апреля, 22:10

College Kid Trolls Southwest Airlines And Their Response Is Perfect

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); United Airlines is being rightfully condemned for having a customer dragged off a flight, but some airlines do know how to provide customer service ― even when they’re being trolled. One Twitter user recently decided it would be funny to complain to Southwest Airlines about a flight attendant. The prankster is a 19-year-old male college student in Chicago named Juan, who tweets as @xadoringpaige. Juan reached out to the airline and saved the entire exchange via screenshots. Then he weaved an intricate trolling web by playing on a customer service rep’s worst fears. Then Juan sprung his trap. Just when it seemed as if Juan had won, the Southwest Airlines rep managed to convert the trolling into an epic save. One so good that even the troller had to tip his hat to her. Juan told HuffPost he decided to troll Southwest Airlines strictly out of humanitarian purposes. “What inspired me to make it is that there has been a lot of airline drama and I wanted to lighten up the mood,” he told HuffPost by email. “Of course, I wasn’t intending of shifting the focus away from what happened with United, but I wanted to make people smile and laugh. And I am happy I was able to do that.” Screenshots of the exchange have since gone viral and have been retweeted more than 54,000 times and liked more than 83,000 times. Southwest Airlines sent HuffPost this statement about the exchange: “We take every inquiry seriously, but try not to take ourselves too seriously. This was an excellent example of one of our Representatives taking great care to investigate a potential issue, and pivoting when the user revealed it was a joke.” The joke continues to be on Juan. He suggested to Southwest that they give him a free trip to thank him for all the positive viral attention they’ve received because of his trolling, but they have yet to respond. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 апреля, 12:11

When Companies Serve Their Customers Too Well, Nobody Wins. But You Can.

Is it possible for a company to be too good? Can a business outperform its competitors, spoil its customers, dominate the competition so much that it harms an entire industry -- including, ultimately, its own customers? Maybe. But there's a way you can benefit from it. Take Tesla, for example. "Their service is absolutely incredible," says Dan Nainan, a comedian from New York. "Everything from their phone support, to their willingness to come pick up the car if there's a problem, to their service centers, which look more like luxuriously appointed offices with food, flat-panel TV, and Wi-Fi, rather than some grubby waiting room." The other car manufacturers are a joke, he says. They don't stand behind their products, their service centers are rundown and unwelcoming, and the overall service levels are disappointing. Sure, their products often cost half the price of a Tesla, but that doesn't seem to bother Nainan and the 186,000 other Tesla owners. And with the company now offering a new $35,000 model this year, many more motorists may start to see things Nainan's way. A company like Tesla makes many other car manufacturers look incompetent, but it's not alone. In the airline industry, there's Southwest Airlines and Singapore Air. The hotel industry has Ritz-Carlton. In computers, it's Apple, and in fast food, it's Chick-fil-A. I know what you're thinking. Is there a list? Sure. The American Customer Service Index (ACSI) benchmarks all of its indexed companies by score. Here are the top performers for 2016. 1. Lincoln (Ford) (87) 2. Chick-fil-A (87) 3. Dole (86) 4. Dr Pepper Snapple (86) 5. Honda (86) 6. Dial (85) 7. BMW (85) 8 Toyota (85) 9. LG (85) 10. Bosch (85) Note: The ACSI doesn't cover every company, so Tesla isn't on the list. Ritz-Carlton is part of Marriott. But you get the idea. Another great source is Fortune's "most admired" list: 1. Apple 2. Amazon 3. Starbucks 4. Berkshire Hathaway 5. Disney 6. Alphabet (Google) 7. General Electric 8. Southwest Airlines 9. Facebook 10. Microsoft Quality sells. Some, but not all, of these companies have customers service built into their DNA. "It's inseparable from the company itself," says Benjamin Glaser, an editor for DealNews, a bargain website. "Who could think of Amazon without a speedy credit for a late package, or Apple without helpful Apple Store Geniuses, or Starbucks without consistent baristas no matter what store you walk into? Certainly, a lesson here is that customers stick with dependable, pleasant experiences." In other words, go for quality. That's always helpful advice. What good is a low price if you're getting a shoddy product or service? But there's a more interesting question, which is: Can one really good company make an entire industry look bad, thanks to its awesomeness? Can it over-serve its customers -- even spoil them? Let's take a reality check for a moment. Companies are like people; they are not perfect. Eventually, even the top performers will disappoint you. Also, remember that you don't always have a meaningful choice. In some industries (notably subscription TV services, internet search engines and social media) there's almost no competition, which is to say the businesses are de facto monopolies. There, being great doesn't really matter because who else are you going to do business with? But there are the Teslas, Starbucks and Apples of the world that arguably have competition and still shine. What's their effect on the rest of their industry? For rivals, it must be demoralizing to see the same competitor recognized year after year for being a favored business by consumers, if not also by Wall Street. Tesla's stock price must drive the other car manufacturers mad, for example. But for consumers, doing business with one of these overachievers also has its downside. Because you can quickly get spoiled. I like my Café Americano done with no room for cream and two cubes of ice to cool it down. And you know those Starbucks baristas get it right, whether they're in Dallas or Dubai. I like that. But at any other coffee shops, you just can't be sure. I know people who refuse to try new coffee shops because they love Starbucks' quality and consistency. Yes, it's possible to be too good. That's a bad thing, because it creates a barrier to entry that's difficult to break through and frankly, it makes the rest not try as hard to compete. In the airline industry, for example, even JetBlue seems to have stopped trying to compete with Southwest on service; the other legacy carriers quit a long time ago. Only the luxury car manufacturers come close to Tesla in the service department. It's as if the others don't care. Perhaps our standards need to be more flexible. For example, I might find a better Americano at a no-name corner cafe. Why not give them a chance? There may also be better computer than my old Apple MacBook, a more reliable car than my Honda Pilot. If I remain blindly brand-loyal, am I just making things worse? Customers should not have to play these games, of course. All companies should deliver acceptable service. But until they do, you'll have to shop more strategically, and set your expectations more realistically. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 апреля, 20:51

Top Research Reports for April 11: AAPL, WFC, T

Top Research Reports for April 11: AAPL, WFC, T

11 апреля, 19:01

Outrage as passenger forced off United flight

SEVERAL minutes after a passenger recorded a video watched around the world that showed security officers dragging another passenger off an overbooked United Express flight at Chicago’s O’Hare International

Выбор редакции
10 апреля, 17:42

Company News for April 10, 2017

Companies in the News are: LUV,RYI,GVA,UA

10 апреля, 17:38

Stock Market News for April 10, 2017

Benchmarks declined only marginally on Friday, dragged down by weaker-than-expected March jobs data and President Trump???s surprise attack against an airbase near Homs, Syria