• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди78
      • Показать ещё
      Компании82
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы26
      • Показать ещё
      Издания13
      • Показать ещё
      Разное31
      • Показать ещё
      Формат5
      Международные организации7
      Показатели7
      • Показать ещё
Стивен Шварцман
04 мая, 02:13

Globalization in the Crosshairs: Trade, Jobs, Inequality, Globalization, Robots II

**Milken Institute**: _Globalization in the Crosshairs_: Tuesday, May 2, 2017 / 2:30 pm-3:30 pm: Beverly Hills Ballroom ---- * Moderator: Gillian Tett, U.S. Managing Editor, Financial Times * Steven Ciobo, Minister for Trade, Tourism, and Investment, Australia * J. Bradford DeLong, Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley; Weblogger, Washington Center for Equitable Growth * John Hagel, Managing Director, Deloitte Consulting LLP; Co-Chairman, Center for the Edge * Alejandro Ramirez Magaña, CEO, Cinépolis * Stephen Schwarzman, Chairman, CEO and Co-Founder, Blackstone >In the 20 years leading up to the financial crisis, international trade grew at twice the rate of global output. Since then, trade has struggled to recover. Recent data is more worrying still, suggesting that trade's share of global GDP is falling. With mainstream political support for multilateral trade deals diminishing and populist movements on the rise in the U.S. and Europe, it is time to examine the future of globalization. Panelists will consider the following questions: >1. Has international trade—and globalization more broadly—entered a period of stagnation or even reversal? >2. Once unleashed, can globalization ever reverse or are we just seeing a slowdown in a normal cycle? >3. What are the implications for the global economy and the international...

21 апреля, 12:13

13 groups that could muck up tax reform

Think health care was hard? Wait until Trump meets the factions fighting over taxes.

20 апреля, 22:45

Private Equity Sets Its Sites On A New Funding Victim: Mom-And-Pop 401(k)s

After laying ruin to the defined-benefit pension plans of public and private employees over the past several decades, Wall Street has its sites set on its next victim: mom-and-pop 401(k)s.  Sure, because as our recent headlines confirm, wall street money managers have worked wonders for public/private pension funds: Are Collapsing Pensions "About To Bring Hell To America"? How Chicago's Largest Pension May Run Out Of Cash In As Little As 4 Years NY Teamsters Pension Becomes First To Run Out Of Money As Expert Warns "Pension Tsunami" Is Coming Dallas Police Pension On Verge Of Collapse As Record Number Of Cops Seek Full Withdrawals Alas, with companies increasingly opting for defined-contribution retirement plans (401k's) in-lieu of defined benefit plans, combined with the trillions of dollars of losses that wall street has racked up for the nation's largest pensions, it's no wonder that 'millionaire, billionaire, private jet owners', like Stephen Schwarzman of Blackstone, are looking to get their 'fair share' of fees from America's $4.8 trillion in 401(k) assets. As Schwarzman told Bloomberg, "you have to have a dream," and his dream is to apparently lay waste to a whole new pocket of American retirement wealth. Today most mom-and-pop investors still don’t have that option. But a shift in how people are saving in their 401(k)s may give private equity a new way in -- keeping firms like Carlyle, Blackstone Group LP and KKR & Co. eyeing the $4.8 trillion that U.S. workers have saved in their 401(k)s.   “In life you have to have a dream,” Steve Schwarzman, Blackstone’s chief executive officer, said on a call with analysts in January. “And one of the dreams is our desire -- and the market’s need -- to have more access” between alternative-investment funds and ordinary savers. It was a bold and telling statement coming from the helm of the world’s largest private equity firm.   Offering private equity to individuals has been a challenge because the investments are often hard to convert to cash quickly and they charge fees higher than those of traditional mutual funds that populate 401(k)s. Such retirement plans value assets on a daily basis, presenting a challenge for private equity firms that hold dozens of years-long investments. While private equity’s pitch is that it offers greater returns than traditional mutual funds, it may be hard to ensure each plan participant gets the best of what the asset class has to offer.   Inflows into private-sector 401(k)s have outpaced those into corporate pensions every year since 1987, according to 2014 figures, the latest available from Department of Labor data tabulated by the Investment Company Institute. Americans and their employers put $349 billion into 401(k)s in 2014, more than 3.5 times the volume that flowed into pensions, the data show. And while private equity has largely been shunned by smaller investors due to illiquidity and high fees, a lesson that many so-called 'sophisticated' institutional investors could afford to learn, we have no doubt that they will ultimately find a way to plunder such a highly-coveted asset. Some firms including New York-based KKR are hoping to score retirement money through an effort started by Pantheon Ventures, a London-based private equity firm that’s trying to get companies with 401(k)s more comfortable with the asset class. Companies are afraid of adding private equity because they can be sued by employees for offering complex products that charge higher fees.   To address the fear, Pantheon offers performance-based pricing on its fund-of-funds strategy: The firm earns a fee when performance exceeds the S&P 500 and returns money if it lags. Pantheon will mix private equity investments managed by KKR and other firms with cash and shares of an S&P 500 exchange-traded fund to offset liquidity concerns. It’s also developed a model to help value assets on a daily basis.   “Fundraising is all about knocking down barriers,” said Kevin Albert, Pantheon’s global head of business development. “They say they don’t want to invest with you because of one reason, so you fix it and keep reiterating.” "Dream big," Steve Schwarzman...how else are you going to be able to afford that new Lambo for the Hamptons house?

13 апреля, 12:06

Trump turns to CEOs amid White House turmoil

Business leaders are making a push for moderation — and meeting with some success.

12 апреля, 16:57

Лагард: США не следует называть Китай манипулятором

Директор-распорядитель Международного валютного фонда (МВФ) Кристин Лагард предостерегла США от вмешательства в валютную политику отдельных стран, поскольку президент США Дональд Трамп обещал назвать Китай валютным манипулятором.

12 апреля, 10:31

Ответ Китая на действия ФРС обвалит рынок акций

Намерения ФРС повышать ставку дальше уже нашли отклик в реакции Китая. И если ситуация будет развиваться, это вызовет новое падение на глобальном рынке акций.

12 апреля, 10:31

Ответ Китая на действия ФРС обвалит рынок акций

Намерения ФРС повышать ставку дальше уже нашли отклик в реакции Китая. И если ситуация будет развиваться, это вызовет новое падение на глобальном рынке акций.

10 апреля, 18:10

Без заголовка

**Live from the Human Race Long-Term Planning Bureau: Milken Institute**: Global Conference 2017: Globalization in the Crosshairs : "May 2: 2:00-3:30 PM: In the 20 years leading up to the financial crisis, international trade grew at twice the rate of global output... >...Since then, trade has struggled to recover. Recent data is more worrying still, suggesting that trade's share of global GDP is falling. With mainstream political support for multilateral trade deals diminishing and populist movements on the rise in the U.S. and Europe, it is time to examine the future of globalization. Panelists will consider the following questions: >* Has international trade -- and globalization more broadly -- entered a period of stagnation or even reversal? >* Once unleashed, can globalization ever reverse or are we just seeing a slowdown in a normal cycle? >* What are the implications for the global economy and the international economic order? ---- **Moderator**: Gillian Tett, U.S. Managing Editor, Financial Times **Speakers**: * Steven Ciobo, Minister for Trade, Tourism, and Investment, Australia * J. Bradford DeLong, Professor of Economics, U.C. Berkeley; Weblogger, Washington Center for Equitable Growth * John Hagel, Managing Director, Deloitte Consulting LLP; Co-Chairman, Center for the Edge * Alejandro Ramirez...

04 апреля, 19:09

Remarks by President Trump and Vice President Pence at CEO Town Hall on Unleashing American Business

South Court Auditorium 10:41 A.M. EDT THE VICE PRESIDENT:  It's a great privilege to be able to welcome you to the White House.  Thank you so much.  I want to thank everyone involved in the Partnership for New York City -- Michael Corbat, Stephen Schwarzman.  It's an honor to have the leaders that are gathered in the room here with us today.  I know the President is on his way over, and it's my great privilege this morning to share a few thoughts, in the midst of this important conversation on the topics that you're covering before I introduce my friend and the 45th President of the United States. But let me say first and foremost, though, the companies represented in the Partnership for New York City are all American success stories.  You have our admiration.  You have our appreciation.  Your businesses account for more than 7 million jobs and you add over $1 trillion to our economy each and every year. What’s more important is the people behind the numbers, and the topics that you’ve covered today are all about creating more jobs and more opportunities for Americans who are anxious to climb the ladder of success in the organizations that you represent and in companies all across this country. So, first and foremost, on behalf of the President and the whole team that you’ve heard from this morning, and distinguished members of our Cabinet, thank you.  Thank you for what you do.  Thank you for your leadership.   I think as you will hear this morning in the dialogue that is about to commence that America has elected a businessman as President of the United States, and he is committed to being the best friend business has ever had in the White House.  (Applause.)   We've already seen the results.  Since literally when the election was called at -- I think it was about 4 a.m. in the morning, wasn’t it, Ivanka, that we were all together -- literally we've seen renewed energy and dynamism in the American economy.  The first two jobs reports, as I'm sure you are aware, thanks in no small part to the leadership represented in businesses here in the room today, the first two jobs report show that under President Trump, nearly 500,000 new jobs have been created in the first two months of this year. Businesses and consumers haven't been this optimistic in decades.  In fact, we just learned from the National Association of Manufacturers that in their historic quarterly report, 93 percent of manufacturers are optimistic about the future.  That represented almost a 40-point increase in optimism since the last report.  (Applause.)   We think that is evidence of a vote of confidence in our new President and in his vision to get this economy moving again by putting common-sense principles into practice.  From the very outset of this administration, the President has been energetically working to roll back excessive regulation and red tape.  Leaders in Congress -- and I see Leader McCarthy, who is with us today -- have been producing under what’s known as the Congressional Review Act, legislation to roll back onerous regulations that emerged in the waning days of the Obama administration.  And in the coming days, President Trump will be signing even more bills into law, rolling back that avalanche of red tape. The President has also taken decisive executive action on expanding American energy -- the Keystone pipeline and the Dakota pipeline.  We continue to work earnestly with Congress for a new future on healthcare reform.  The President and I remain confident that working with the Congress we will repeal and replace Obamacare with healthcare reform that will work for the American people and work for the American economy.  And of course, in the offing before we reached the end of the year, the President is determined to roll his sleeves up, work with the Congress and pass the largest tax reform in a generation. Business -- as I said in those numbers about optimism -- business has clearly gotten the message.  But today’s conversation is all about learning from job creators represented in this room how we can continue to build on the momentum in this economy, particularly focusing on infrastructure, government modernization and workforce. I can tell you that the subject that I came in at the end of and I know was much a topic today with Ivanka and with Wilbur, having to do with improving the quality of our workforce, expanding opportunities for what is known as career and technical education -- what we back in Indiana call vocational education -- is a real passion for our new President.  And we look forward to partnering with you in ways that we can continue to encourage investment and create opportunities for expanded career and vocational education. So today is all about really giving you an opportunity to share your thoughts.  It's part of an ongoing conversation this administration has commenced since the very first day the President took office -- listening to business leaders, listening to everyday Americans about ways that we can bring about his agenda to make America Great Again and to have our economy growing and expanding in a way that is consistent with the most powerful economy in the history of the world. I think the President is in the side chamber, so let me say to all of you, the opportunity you have today is to hear from a man who I have a chance to sit with every day.  What you're going to see firsthand is what I see each and every day, and that is not only just a businessman made President, but you're going to see a leader, informed, focused, decisive, and absolutely committed to Make America Great Again. It is my high honor and distinct privilege to introduce to all of you my friend, the 45th President of the United States of America, President Donald Trump.  (Applause.)        THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you, Mike.  Good morning.  Hello, Ivanka. MR. CORDISH:  I know you know a few of the people in this room. THE PRESIDENT:  I do.  I do.  All the killers from New York -- I'm looking at all those competitive -- those great, great talents, great builders.   MR. CORDISH:  I have to give you a heads-up that Ivanka chaired one of the sessions before this -- tough act to follow. THE PRESIDENT:  Oh, she’s tough.  Very tough. MR. CORDISH:  Vice President Pence listed some of the amazing accomplishments that have taken place since your election and your 75 days in office.  The stock market has had almost unprecedented sustained growth, unprecedented confidence from our manufacturing sector and other business sectors, leading to massive private sector investment in job growth.  You have gotten rid of regulations that were unnecessary and were job-stifling.  You have strengthened our borders and strengthened our military. You’ve nominated a great -- superb Supreme Court justice, amongst many other things.  How does all that feel? THE PRESIDENT:  And we’re getting unbelievable credit for what we’ve done, other than the mainstream media, which just gives us no credit whatsoever.  But we are getting tremendous credit.  And if you look at the real estate industry, the mining industry, the farming industry -- if you look at any of the major industries you see what’s going. In fact, even today I was very happy as I read this morning early that our trade deficit with others has gone down very considerably in the last short period of time.  It’s having a big impact.   And, as you know, I’m meeting with the President of China on Thursday and Friday in Palm Beach, Florida, and I think we’re going to have a very interesting talk.  We’re having -- have a lot of respect for him.  I’ve spoken to him numerous times.  But we have to do better, because our deficit with China, as you know, $504 billion.  That’s a year.  That’s enough for a lifetime.  Even Steve would say that.  But that’s a year. So we’re going to have a great meeting, I’m sure we’re going to have a fantastic meeting.  And we’re going to talk about a lot of things, including, of course, North Korea, a problem.  And that’s really a humanity problem.  So we’re going to be talking about that also.   MR. CORDISH:  You have made it a driving force in this administration to bring in the best minds we can from the private sector, to listen intently to them and to take decisive action.  How important is that, and how important is it to reform government to bridge the gap between the private and public sectors? THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I did, I brought you, I brought Gary Cohn, I brought a lot of very great people -- my friend, Steve, is helping us out.  We have a superstar committee of 22 people. And every time somebody calls me I say, Steve, put them on -- no, we want to keep it at this level.  The heads of the biggest companies, they all want to be on our committee, right, Stephen? But Steve likes to keep it very small.  But they will go off and they’ll disappear and we’ll put others on.  But we’ve had some great meetings and we’ve all learned a lot.   One thing that did come up, and it came up yesterday, was Gary Cohn -- where’s Gary?  Is he here?  Could you bring that chart, please?  Do you mind?  Let me see that chart.  So this was just something -- this is sort of incredible.  That’s so beautiful.  Yeah, no, you’re not quite -- this is to build a highway in the United States -- now, this was just done yesterday.  I saw it for the first time.  I said, I’m speaking to some of my friends who are builders, really great builders, and they’ve gone through the process -- we’ve all gone through it in New York -- we call it the zoning process in New York. But you start up here and this is anywhere from a 10 to 20-year process.  You have -- is it 17 agencies.  You have hundreds and hundreds of permits.  Many of them are statutory, where you can’t even apply for the second permit until six months go by.  So this is to build a highway.  This is a simple highway.  And these are the agencies -- so it’s 17 agencies.  How many different steps is it?   Q:  Sixteen different approvals. THE PRESIDENT:  Sixteen. Q:  Twenty-nine different statutes.  Five different executive orders that all apply to this process.  This is indicative, so this is not a specific project, but this is the type of process that a government -- this is a state government  -- would have to go through to permit a highway federally.  This is just federal, not state regulations. THE PRESIDENT:  So it can take anywhere from 10 -- if you’re really good, 10 years to 20 years.  And then they vote, and you lose.  They don’t want it.  (Laughter.)  And it costs sometimes hundreds of millions of dollars just to go through the process.   Thank you very much.  That was a great job you did.  Be careful, don’t fall.  I don’t want to have you fall.  You’ll be a big story in the paper if you go down.  (Laughter.)   So I just saw that yesterday.  Gary Cohn walked in and he showed it to me, and -- for no reason.  I said, you have to do me a favor.  But a lot of you, you’re such pros, some of the best pros in the world sitting in this room, you understand it.  It’s a process. Now, I’ve always liked it because it gave people that could go through that process an advantage, like Jerry, but it gave us an advantage if you could get through the process.  But getting a building approved in New York is a horrible, horrible thing.  And that’s nothing compared to when you get into the highways and the dams -- they don’t even talk about dams anymore.  Hydropower is a great, great, form of power -- we don’t even talk about it, because to get the environmental permits are virtually impossible.  It’s one of the best things you can do -- hydro.  But we don’t talk about it anymore. So we’ve come to a halt.  We have a tremendous person that we put in charge of EPA, Scott Pruitt, who is an environmental person.  He wants clean air, he wants clean water, but he doesn’t thing it takes you 26 years to get a permit to build a building and to have jobs, at which time those companies are usually gone, out of business, et cetera. So we’re really speeding up the process.  We’re going to try and take that process from a minimum of 10 years down to one year.  I said can’t we make it four months?  Can’t we do it in four months?  And there is a certain logic to that, but we’ll be satisfied with the year -- but it won’t be any more than a year.   So we have to build roads.  We have to build highways.  We’re talking about a very major infrastructure bill of a trillion dollars -- perhaps even more.  And when we have to do -- our jobs -- I mean, if we say, we’re giving to New York City hundreds of millions of dollars to build a road someplace, it doesn’t help if they can’t start because it’s going to take seven and a half years to get the permits.  Even to redo a road takes years to get the permits.  You know, you have a road that’s there and you want to redo it, and you have to get new permits for the kind of asphalt you’re using, the kind of concrete you may want to use. And if we’re going to give all of this money -- you know, there was very large infrastructure bill that was approved during the Obama administration -- a trillion dollars -- nobody ever saw anything being built.  I mean, to this day, I haven’t heard of anything that’s been built.  They used most of that money -- it went, and they used it on social programs.  And we want this to be on infrastructure. I’m working with Steve Roth and with Richard LeFrak -- two friends of mine that are very good builders.  They’re great builders.  And they know to get things done.  They know how to cut red tape.  We’re going to give them the advantage of having what we have.  I see Elaine is here, so important, who is doing an incredible job, by the way -- Secretary of Transportation.  And Elaine will be working.  But we’re going to set up a committee headed by Steve and Richard, and we’re going to cut a lot of red tape. But we don’t want to send a billion dollars to New York and find out, five years later, the money was never spent, because we’re going to be very strong that it has to be spent on shovels, not on other programs.  And in the last case, a lot of it was spent on other programs.  But we’re going to say, if you don’t spend the money -- if you don’t start -- if you have a job that you can’t start within 90 days, we’re not going to give you the money for it.  Because it doesn’t help -- doesn’t help us.  And we’re going to be very strong on that.  They have to be able to start within 90 days. MR. CORDISH:  Mr. President, we have some of the great business leaders in the country here.  If okay with you, they have a few questions, if that’s -- THE PRESIDENT:  Sure. MR. CORDISH:  Great.  THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Jerry. (Laughter.)  MR. SPEYER:  Hi, Mr. President.  (Laughter.)   THE PRESIDENT:  He didn’t have to say his name.  He was ready to say his name -- we know.  Jerry Speyer, everybody. MR. SPEYER:  Mr. President, you’re doing a great job, and we’re all really grateful to you for the sacrifices you’re making.  Hope you heard that. THE PRESIDENT:  That sounds much better. MR. SPEYER:  I think from New York’s point of view we send a lot of money into the economy.  As a number of people have said, it’s over a trillion dollars.  We’re worried we’re going to have a problem with Congress. THE PRESIDENT:  With the deductions, right? MR. SPEYER:  Well, that, too.  That, too.  But we’re worried about various programs that help the city.  The city is doing fine right now -- even the Yankees are doing fine.  But what we’re really concerned about is the future.  Do you have any advice for us? THE PRESIDENT:  Look, I love New York.  And in some ways we’re all lucky that I’m from New York,, because New York has unique problems.  So does Los Angeles, so does Chicago.  There are places that have unique problems.  One of the problems that you have is debt and deductibility.  That’s a big one, because a lot of the states that don’t have debt or have very little debt  --like in the case of Mike Pence, where he did such a good job in Indiana, and it’s a AAA-rated bond, one of the strongest in the country, and deductibility is not that big of a deal because they don’t have that much to deduct.   And over here, in New York, when you look at what’s going on with us, we don’t know in terms of the municipality and in terms of the state, we don’t know if it can even make it if you don’t have that.  Are people going to buy?  So it’s a very big problem. And the problem I have is that there are many places throughout the country that are in the exact opposite position.  And they consider that a gift to the state and a gift to the people.  And we know New York does things that a lot of people don’t read about.  You look at what -- the money they contribute to our economy, to our country, and people don’t know about that. They don’t maybe want to know about that.  So you do have -- I call it a tale of two cities.  You have different interests.   But I am watching over everybody, Jerry.  You’re in good hands, okay?  You’re in good hands, believe me.  You can tell the people of New York.  Even though I didn’t win New York State.  I should have won New York State, but I didn’t.  (Laughter and applause.)   MS. ENGELBERT:  Mr. President, Cathy Engelbert with Deloitte.  I want to return to a conversation we just had with Ivanka, Dina and Wilbur on jobs, the workforce of the future.  And so as we think about that and we think about our skillsets, in New York City alone our high school -- public high school graduation rate is at 70 percent, but the readiness of our students for college and careers is only 37 -- it’s assessed at 37 percent.   So as we look at the pace of change, we look at the digital transformation we all see in business and the marketplace, and we look at the skills that -- this disconnect between what employers need and what our students coming into our workforces are prepared to deliver.  It would be great to get your thoughts on the priorities of the administration around education, around, again, what I like to call not the future of work but the work of the future.  Because the future of work sounds a little ominous, but the work of the future actually sounds pretty visionary.  So if you could give us those priorities -- THE PRESIDENT:  Okay, so before you sit, so you’re giving me numbers from New York.  You’re a proud New Yorker, but you’re giving me numbers -- why is it doing so badly?  Tell me.  Why are the numbers so horrific in terms of education?  And what happens when somebody goes through school and then they can’t read after -- they graduate from high school and they can barely read.  So what’s the answer? MS. ENGELBERT:  Yes.  So, first, I would say that as we look at New York, New York has made enormous progress in a decade.  By the way, that 70 percent was 50 percent, so a 40 percent increase.  So we’re making enormous progress in making an impact on -- THE PRESIDENT:  See how quickly she’s changing?  See that?  (Laughter.)   MS. ENGELBERT:  Making enormous progress, but we’re not done.  We have a lot of work to do.  And I think -- we talked earlier about public/private partnerships, apprenticeship models, which -- we have a beautiful apprenticeship model that works and brings them our next generation of leaders.  So I do think there’s a lot we can do through relooking at funding programs.  We talked earlier about consolidating the many programs that are out there.  We’re all trying to make our individual impact and we can make a huge impact together. THE PRESIDENT:  Sure.  I know you work very hard on it and you have made progress.  Charter schools are another thing that people are talking about a lot, and some of the charter schools in New York have been amazing.  They’ve done incredibly well.  People can’t get in.  I mean, you can’t get in.  I don’t call it an experiment anymore, it’s far beyond an experiment. If you look at so many elements of education, and it’s so sad to see what’s coming -- what’s happening in the country.  Even the numbers, as good -- you say we’re doing better, but the numbers in New York, the numbers in Chicago are very rough.  The numbers in Los Angeles, the cities, it’s a very rough situation. Common Core -- I mean, we have to bring education more local.  We can’t be managing education from Washington.   When I go out to Iowa, when I go out to the different states and I talk, they want to run their school programs locally, and they’ll do a much better job than somebody -- and look, these are some very good people in Washington, but you also have bureaucrats that make a lot of money and don’t really care that much about what they’re doing or about the community that they have never seen and they’ll never meet, and they never will see.   And I like the fact of getting rid of -- Common Core to me is -- we have to end it.  We have to bring education local.  To me, I’ve always said it, I’ve been saying it during the campaign. And we’re doing it.  Betsy DeVos is -- she’s doing a terrific job, highly respected, tremendous track record.  But she’s got one of the toughest jobs of any of our secretaries, to me.  She’s got one of the toughest jobs.  There’s some pretty tough jobs out there, but she’s got one of the toughest jobs. We’re going to spend a lot of money and a lot of expertise. We’re going to have great talent having to do with education, because there’s nothing more important than education.  And we’ve got to get those numbers in New York better, and I think they will be better.  And a lot of people -- a lot of the greatest people I know in New York, they’re totally involved, including Ivanka and Jared, they’re so much involved, and it’s so important to them, the word “education.”  And it’s happening, and I see it happening in New York very much.   But it’s happening elsewhere, too.  I think we’re going to have a great four years. MR. CORDISH:  Mr. President, I know you have -- THE PRESIDENT:  Prior to running again. MR. CORDISH:  -- a pressing issue to deal with.  Steve and Mike I think just wanted to thank you for attending today, and maybe make a final comment on behalf of --  MR. SCHWARZMAN:  Well, thanks a lot for being here.  And thanks for everybody for being here.  It's been a really interesting day, and you've had everybody of importance at the event.  I think it's terrific in terms of the stuff you're trying to do to modernize the government, educate, and so forth.  And I think we have to keep a focus on that, because the outside world doesn’t always get the message that that's really what's going on -- because you're doing profound things, taking on enormous embedded issues.   And I think with the kind of effort that can be marshaled, you can do amazing things.  And that's on behalf of Mike Corbat and myself who chaired the Partnership -- it's sort of trust, and gets rotated from person to person every two years. I want to wish you really good luck with the Chinese.  That's an important thing, as we all know.  And I think there's a real opportunity to make progress with them.  And you should have a good time in Florida.  I hope the weather is good. THE PRESIDENT:  Yeah, the weather will be beautiful.  Thank you, Steve. I just want to finish by saying that we are absolutely destroying these horrible regulations that have been placed on your heads over not eight years, over the last 20 and 25 years.  You have regulations that are horrendous.  Dodd-Frank is an example of what we're working on, and we're working on it right now.  We're going to be coming out with some very strong -- far beyond recommendations -- we're going to be doing things that are going to be very good for the banking industry so that the banks can loan money to people that need it. I speak to people all the time.  They used to borrow money from banks to open up -- there's one in Nevada -- to open up a pizza shop here, three shops -- he had a bank, and he said, you know -- at that time he called me "Mr. Trump" because I hadn’t won yet -- but he said, "Mr. Trump, I can't open up anything; I can't do anything.  The banks don’t even -- I had a bank for 20 years; now they don’t even take my phone call.  And I was always a very good customer.  So I haven’t been able to do what I do."  They can't do it.  I mean, the banks got so restricted.   And I've always said -- and some people get insulted -- but, you know, it's not necessarily the man that's making a lot of money that's running the bank.  You look at the folks from government that are running all over the banks, they're running the banks.  And the people that are really the head people, they're petrified of the regulators.  They're petrified.  They can't move.  The regulators are running the banks.   So we're going to do a very major haircut on Dodd-Frank.  We want strong restrictions, we want strong regulation, but not regulation that makes it impossible for the banks to loan to people that are going to create jobs.  But we're doing -- that's just one example.  We're doing so many cuts on regulations.  And we have a book on regulations, and if you add them all up, it goes up to the ceiling three times over.  It's just one after another after another.  It's just like that chart.  I thought that chart was so descriptive.  And every industry is just like that chart, and that's to build a simple roadway or highway that's what you have to go through.  And we're going to be able to get rid of 90, 95 percent of that and still have the same kind of protection. And we want safety and we want environmental -- we want environmental protection.  I've won awards on environmental protection.  I'm a big believer, believe it or not.  But we want that kind of protection.  We want clean air and we want clean water, but we shouldn’t have to get the approvals from 16 different agencies for almost the same thing.  So we have a country with tremendous potential.  We have the greatest people on Earth, but we have to use that potential and we have to let those people do their thing.   And with that, I just want to thank you all.  I think you're going to see a very much different environment than you've been used to over the last, again, 20, 25 years.  We're going to unleash the country.  And I'm willing to take the heat, and that's okay.  I've been taking the heat my whole life.  But in the end, I know it's the right thing to do.   And we're going to create a lot of jobs.  We have 100 million people, if you look -- the real number is not 4.6 percent.  They told me I had 4.6 percent last month, I'm doing great.  I said, yeah, but what about the 100 million people.  A lot of those people came out and voted for me.  I call them the forgotten man, the forgotten woman.  But a lot of those people, a good percentage of them, would like to have jobs, and they don’t.   One of the statistics that to me is just ridiculous -- so the 4.6 sounds good, but when you look for a job, you can't find it and you give up -- you are now considered statistically employed.  But I don’t consider those people employed.  If you look at what's happened with Ford and with General Motors and with Fiat-Chrysler and so many other car companies, you see what they're doing back in Michigan and Ohio -- they were leaving.  They were going to Mexico and many other places.  They're now staying here. Now, I did say -- Reed knows this very well, because you've seen me say it many times to the big auto companies at meetings  -- it's okay, enjoy your new plant; please send me a picture, I'm sure it's going to be lovely.  But when you make your car or when you make your air conditioner, and you think you're going to fire all of our workers and open up a new place in another country, and you're going to come through what will be a very strong border, which is already -- you see what's happened; 61 percent down now in terms of illegal people coming in.  Way, way down in terms of drugs pouring into our country and poisoning our youth. Way down.  General Kelly has done a great job.  But when you think you're going to sell that car or that air conditioner through our border, it's not going to happen.  You're going to have a tax.  And the tax may be 35 percent.   And you know what, every single major company that I've had that conversation with has said, you know, we've decided to stay in the United States.  It's amazing.  And you would have thought they would have said this, frankly, for years.  But nobody has ever said it.  And we've lost close to 70,000 factories over a relatively short period of time -- 70,000.  You wouldn’t believe it's possible, Reed, to lose 70,000 factories -- 70,000.  You know, you look at a map of the United States -- how many factories can you lose?  We lost almost 70,000 factories. And I will tell you, that's not happening, because now they're staying here and they're all expanding here.  Ford announced last week a massive expansion of three of its plants.  That was not going to happen, believe me, if I didn’t win. So, good luck, everybody.  Enjoy yourselves.  You're my friends.  You're amazing people.  And we're going to put you to work.  Thank you.  (Applause.)   END  11:12 A.M. EDT

23 марта, 12:05

Trump's early policy moves benefit the industries he knows best — his own

Trump has been especially good news for the fields in which he has a personal interest.

24 февраля, 13:00

Trump and the forgotten workers: 'We want to be treated fairly' – video

Strikers at Momentive, a New York chemical plant partially owned by Donald Trump’s billionaire ‘jobs czar’ Stephen Schwarzman, had been hoping for a better deal under Trump. But after 105 days of industrial reaction, they are returning to an uncertain future, one shared by many blue collar workers in the US Continue reading...

13 февраля, 03:55

Trump reviews top White House staff after tumultuous start

Michael Flynn is under fire, but he’s not the only one about whom Trump is voicing his doubts.

04 февраля, 02:15

From Atop The Government, Trump Takes Care Of 'Friends'

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump was fond of telling anecdotes about anonymous “friends” of his to help illustrate his policy positions. There were his farmer friends, for example, struggling under the burden of regulations. And his manufacturer friends, who didn’t like paying corporate taxes. At the time, Trump’s stated desire to help these friends seemed to serve as a metaphor for his desire to help America at large. But on Friday, Trump got more specific, telling a group of CEOs at the White House how ― now that he’s president ― he is, in fact, using his authority to help his friends. “We expect to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine, that have nice businesses and they can’t borrow money,” Trump said. “They just can’t get any money, because the banks just won’t let them borrow, because of the rules and regulations in Dodd-Frank.” The landmark consumer protection bill known as the Dodd-Frank Act was passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis. It requires the nation’s biggest banks to submit to greater scrutiny, and to keep enough capital on hand to make sure taxpayers never again have to cover the institutions’ losses. Banks have complained for years that the new capital requirements and stress tests make it impossible for them to lend as much money as they’d like to. Trump was speaking at a meeting of the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, a group of 18 business leaders who have agreed to advise the president on economic issues. The group is chaired by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, and includes chief executives from many of the nation’s largest companies, among them Walmart, Boeing, IBM and PepsiCo. After brief remarks from Schwarzman, Trump told an extraordinary story about how he’d tried to get spots for his friends on the prestigious forum, but Schwarzman told the president that his friends were, essentially, too sleazy to appoint to the group. “So many people who are friends of mine, in big business, they wanted to be on the committee. And I’d call Steve and say, ‘Steve, can we get so-and-so [on the committee]?’” Trump said. “’Nope, we’ve got enough,’” the president said Schwarzman would tell him. “Every once in a while, I’d call and say, ‘How about this one?’” Trump went on. “[And Schwarzman would say,] ‘No, Donald, he’s a corporate raider. These people don’t want to be sitting [on the president’s committee] with corporate raiders.’” The group laughed nervously. “Five raiders that wanted to come on here,” Trump boasted, before pointing to Schwarzman. “But he’s been very, very selective.” With that, the group began introducing themselves around the table. The anecdote was fascinating in that it offered a window on two different aspects of Trump’s presidency. The first is the former real estate developer’s willingness, as president of the United States, to do favors for his friends, and his apparent lack of qualms about appointing his “corporate raider” buddies to a presidential commission. The other interesting element of Trump’s story was that Schwarzman evidently overruled him by arguing that Trump’s commission would lose prestige if the president named people to it who’d made their fortunes in controversial ways. Schwarzman was right, but Trump is known to have very little patience for people who tell him “no.” However, it seems that when Schwarzman framed it as a question of prestige, Trump acquiesced. Mind you, Schwarzman didn’t say that the advice Trump would receive from the CEOs would be any less valuable if there were a junk bond king sitting on the panel. Or even that the press might ask questions about why someone with a questionable business background, and a close friendship with Trump, was sitting next to the CEO of Walmart. No, it was all about how such a move would look to the kind of people Trump hoped to have on his panel. As Trump continues to seek out qualified people for his administration, his friends are likely to stay on the front burner. Chances are, it will be up to his staff, and informal advisers like Schwarzman, to draw the line for the president. Earlier this week, Miami real estate tycoon Jorge Perez recounted how Trump recently sent him an email with plans for the administration’s notorious border wall with Mexico. Perez has worked with Trump to build Trump-branded towers in Florida for years. Now the president was asking Perez if he’d like to be part of the official effort to build the wall. Perez declined the offer, telling Bloomberg News, “The wall is the most idiotic thing I’ve ever seen or heard in my life.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 февраля, 02:15

From Atop The Government, Trump Takes Care Of 'Friends'

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); During his presidential campaign, Donald Trump was fond of telling anecdotes about anonymous “friends” of his to help illustrate his policy positions. There were his farmer friends, for example, struggling under the burden of regulations. And his manufacturer friends, who didn’t like paying corporate taxes. At the time, Trump’s stated desire to help these friends seemed to serve as a metaphor for his desire to help America at large. But on Friday, Trump got more specific, telling a group of CEOs at the White House how ― now that he’s president ― he is, in fact, using his authority to help his friends. “We expect to be cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank, because frankly, I have so many people, friends of mine, that have nice businesses and they can’t borrow money,” Trump said. “They just can’t get any money, because the banks just won’t let them borrow, because of the rules and regulations in Dodd-Frank.” The landmark consumer protection bill known as the Dodd-Frank Act was passed in response to the 2008 financial crisis. It requires the nation’s biggest banks to submit to greater scrutiny, and to keep enough capital on hand to make sure taxpayers never again have to cover the institutions’ losses. Banks have complained for years that the new capital requirements and stress tests make it impossible for them to lend as much money as they’d like to. Trump was speaking at a meeting of the President’s Strategic and Policy Forum, a group of 18 business leaders who have agreed to advise the president on economic issues. The group is chaired by Blackstone CEO Stephen Schwarzman, and includes chief executives from many of the nation’s largest companies, among them Walmart, Boeing, IBM and PepsiCo. After brief remarks from Schwarzman, Trump told an extraordinary story about how he’d tried to get spots for his friends on the prestigious forum, but Schwarzman told the president that his friends were, essentially, too sleazy to appoint to the group. “So many people who are friends of mine, in big business, they wanted to be on the committee. And I’d call Steve and say, ‘Steve, can we get so-and-so [on the committee]?’” Trump said. “’Nope, we’ve got enough,’” the president said Schwarzman would tell him. “Every once in a while, I’d call and say, ‘How about this one?’” Trump went on. “[And Schwarzman would say,] ‘No, Donald, he’s a corporate raider. These people don’t want to be sitting [on the president’s committee] with corporate raiders.’” The group laughed nervously. “Five raiders that wanted to come on here,” Trump boasted, before pointing to Schwarzman. “But he’s been very, very selective.” With that, the group began introducing themselves around the table. The anecdote was fascinating in that it offered a window on two different aspects of Trump’s presidency. The first is the former real estate developer’s willingness, as president of the United States, to do favors for his friends, and his apparent lack of qualms about appointing his “corporate raider” buddies to a presidential commission. The other interesting element of Trump’s story was that Schwarzman evidently overruled him by arguing that Trump’s commission would lose prestige if the president named people to it who’d made their fortunes in controversial ways. Schwarzman was right, but Trump is known to have very little patience for people who tell him “no.” However, it seems that when Schwarzman framed it as a question of prestige, Trump acquiesced. Mind you, Schwarzman didn’t say that the advice Trump would receive from the CEOs would be any less valuable if there were a junk bond king sitting on the panel. Or even that the press might ask questions about why someone with a questionable business background, and a close friendship with Trump, was sitting next to the CEO of Walmart. No, it was all about how such a move would look to the kind of people Trump hoped to have on his panel. As Trump continues to seek out qualified people for his administration, his friends are likely to stay on the front burner. Chances are, it will be up to his staff, and informal advisers like Schwarzman, to draw the line for the president. Earlier this week, Miami real estate tycoon Jorge Perez recounted how Trump recently sent him an email with plans for the administration’s notorious border wall with Mexico. Perez has worked with Trump to build Trump-branded towers in Florida for years. Now the president was asking Perez if he’d like to be part of the official effort to build the wall. Perez declined the offer, telling Bloomberg News, “The wall is the most idiotic thing I’ve ever seen or heard in my life.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

03 февраля, 19:19

Trump convenes business leaders as immigration fight looms

Flanked by business executives wary of his recent actions on immigration, President Donald Trump Friday opened a meeting with companies including IBM and SpaceX by pledging “a tax bill very soon” while taking credit for reports that show 227,000 jobs were created last month.At the inaugural meeting of his so-called Strategic and Policy Forum, Trump said the group would “discuss all the things you think we can do to bring back our jobs.” He ticked off other items, like “cutting a lot out of Dodd-Frank,” a reform of the country’s banking system, as well as revising other regulations.Absent from the president’s opening remarks, however, was any mention of his immigration order — a ban on refugees from many Muslim-majority countries and other restrictions on travel from those nations that has executives in the tech industry and other sectors of the economy reeling.But Stephen Schwarzman, the president of private equity firm Blackstone, which helped organize the forum, acknowledged the order is on the agenda."We're going to cover some of the immigration things, we're going to cover regulatory relief, we're going to cover tax and trade, women in the workplace, infrastructure, education,” Schwarzman said before the meeting began. “Each of these areas, we're going to have suggestions, ways to make things happen, happen faster."Many of the forum’s members — and broad swaths of the business community — have vocally opposed the president’s immigration order, signed last week, and some tech giants have signed onto legal efforts to challenge it. Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX and Tesla, is attending and pledged he would press Trump on it heading into the Friday gathering.Uber CEO Travis Kalanick initially had planned to do the same — but Kalanick, facing an immense backlash for joining in the group, announced hours before the meeting that he was withdrawing from Trump’s panel. In an email to employees Thursday, the Uber executive said his decision to participate was “not meant to be an endorsement of the President or his agenda but unfortunately it has been misinterpreted to be exactly that.”

16 декабря 2016, 01:11

Donald Trump Could Double The Wealth Of Private Equity Billionaires And Change Wall Street Forever

Tax reform could create the biggest change in the private equity industry since firms like Blackstone and Apollo listed their shares, doubling the wealth of billionaires like Stephen Schwarzman and Leon Black.

15 декабря 2016, 01:02

Трамп назначил Илона Маска советником по экономике

Избранный президент США Дональд Трамп назначил трех новых советников по экономике: основателя компании SpaceX Илона Маска, главу Uber Трэвиса Каланика и главу Pepsi Индру Нуйи. Об этом сообщается на сайте штаба Трампа. Фото: Илон Маск/ Droider.ru Фото: Трэвис Каланик/Хабрахабр Фото: Alwaysbusymama Бизнесмены войдут в состав форума по стратегии и политике в числе 16 самых успешных американских предпринимателей страны. С их помощью Трамп собирается реализовать свою экономическую программу. Председателем станет Стивен Шварцман, председатель, генеральный директор и соучредитель Blackstone. Позднее 14 декабря Трамп должен встретиться с Маском и топ-менеджерами Apple, Facebook и Google, чтобы обсудить, как политика Белого дома отразится на работе технологических компаний. Во время избирательной кампании Трампа Илон Маск выступал с резкой критикой кандидата от республиканцев. В частности, за четыре дня до выборов он заявил: «Трамп — неправильный парень. Он не обладает теми качествами, которые нужны сейчас Штатам». Читайте также: Ирландец подарил дочери на Рождество увеличение груди>> Крупный пожар в Алматы>> Русская художница бюстом нарисовала портрет Роналду>> 92-летний президент Зимбабве собрался на новый срок>> Похоронная процессия на 10 часов застряла в снежном заторе в Караганде>> Рискуя жизнью, пожарный спас двух детей из горящей квартиры в Алматы (фото)>>

14 декабря 2016, 21:20

Трамп назначил Илона Маска советником по экономике

Дональд Трамп заявил, что основатель компании SpaceX Илон Маск войдет в число его советников по экономике. Об этом сообщается на сайте штаба избранного президента. Маск присоединится к Президентскому форуму по стратегии и политике — группе из 16 наиболее успешных и уважаемых предпринимателей США, которые будут консультировать Трампа по вопросам, связанным с экономическим ростом, созданием новых рабочих мест и повышением производительности труда.

14 декабря 2016, 20:58

Трамп сделал Илона Маска своим советником

Избранный президент США Дональд Трамп назначил трех новых советников по экономике, среди них основатель компании SpaceX Илон Макс, сообщает штаб будущего главы государства. Он войдет в состав президентского форума по стратегии и политике в числе 16 самых успешных предпринимателей страны, сообщается на сайте штаба. Отмечается, что с помощью форума Трамп намерен реализовать свою экономическую программу. Председателем станет Стивен Шварцман, председатель, генеральный директор и соучредитель Blackstone. Республиканец Дональд Трамп одержал победу на выборах и избран 45-м президентом США. Он обошел на выборах кандидата от Демократической партии, экс-госсекретаря США Хиллари Клинтон. Новая администрация США во главе с Трампом вступит в полномочия после его инаугурации 20 января 2017 года.

09 декабря 2016, 03:38

Billionaires, Big Oil Flooded Mitch McConnell's Super PAC In Campaign's Final Weeks

WASHINGTON ― Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC run by former aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, raised an astonishing $39 million in the three weeks before the 2016 election, according to a report filed on Thursday. The huge injection of money helped backstop Senate Republicans and protect their majority on Election Day. The gigantic fundraising surge for the super PAC pushed its total above $100 million, making it one of the best-funded super PACs of the 2016 election cycle. The late contributions from usual suspects among Republican donors paid for advertisements that helped protect incumbent Sens. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Marco Rubio (R-Fla.) and Richard Burr (R-N.C.) and elect newcomer Todd Young in Indiana. Many of those donors will have key interests in front of the next legislative session. Sheldon Adelson and his wife Miriam combined to give $15 million ― the largest donation to McConnell’s group. Adelson, the billionaire casino operator, has long pushed for Congress to ban online gambling. Republicans have introduced legislation in the past two sessions to do this. The second-biggest donor to the super PAC is unknown, because it came in the form of a $9.2 million contribution from One Nation, a dark-money nonprofit run by the same people as Senate Leadership Fund. The group ran millions of dollars in advertisements early in the campaign season attacking Democratic Senate candidates. Stephen Schwarzman, chairman of the private equity titan Blackstone Group, contributed $2.2 million. Schwarzman is an avowed opponent of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law passed in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. He supports radically reducing regulations for financial firms and cutting taxes, or keeping them as low as they already are, for billionaires like himself. “We’re so overregulated as a country that we just crushed our productivity,” Schwarzman said in the past. “That’s temporary because it’s reversible if anybody politically chooses to reverse it. If they wanna accelerate it, good luck.” After President Barack Obama called for raising the tax rate on carried interest, which is how private equity investors make their money, Schwarzman said, “It’s like when Hitler invaded Poland in 1939.” Blackstone Group spent more than $2 million on lobbying through September on issues ranging from tax reform, financial regulation, support for the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal and housing. The private equity company owns Hilton Worldwide, a hotel competitor of President-elect Donald Trump. Blackstone bought up at least 50,000 foreclosed homes in the wake of the financial crisis and ensuing bank-led fraud that immiserated millions by wrongly evicting them from their own homes. Blackstone is now taking its home-rental business public. Paul Singer, a billionaire hedge fund manager known for investing in distressed foreign debt, gave $2 million to Senate Leadership Fund. Singer and other hedge fund and private equity managers recently created a new industry lobbying group called CIRCA to advocate for policies favorable to billionaire investors like themselves. Collectively, members of the billionaire DeVos family of Michigan contributed $1.2 million. These contributions came from 11 members of the family. Their wealth derives from Richard DeVos Sr., who founded the multi-level marketing company Amway. His son, Richard DeVos Jr., is married to Betsy DeVos, picked by Trump to be the next education secretary. The Senate will vote on her nomination. Petrodome Energy, an oil and gas company owned by investor W. Ed Bosarge, gave $1 million. This contribution, however, does not relate to the energy industry, but rather to another business run by Bosarge. The multi-millionaire owns stem-cell company Bosarge Life Sciences that has been lobbying Congress to pass legislation that would speed Food and Drug Administration approval of medications and medical devices by bypassing final regulatory scrutiny of whether the products actually work. Legislative language very similar to this was included in the just-passed 21st Century Cures Act. The provision was denounced by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) as a “special deal” for a “major Republican donor.” There also was a contribution to Senate Leadership Fund from an oil and gas company still interested in energy policy. Polar Tankers Inc., a subsidiary of ConocoPhillips, gave $1 million. The oil giant has been lobbying on issues related on natural gas pipelines and Alaska oil exploration. Republican senators also chipped in money from their own leadership PACs to Senate Leadership Fund to help colleagues win tough races. Sen. Orrin Hatch’s (R-Utah) OrrinPAC gave $500,000. Sen. Mike Crapo (R-Idaho) gave $250,000 from his Freedom Fund PAC. McConnell’s own Bluegrass Committee gave $150,000. Sen. John Cornyn’s (R-Texas) Alamo PAC also gave $150,000. Sen. Tim Scott’s (R-S.C.) Tomorrow is Meaningful gave $100,000, as did Sen. John Thune’s (R-S.D.) Heartland Values PAC and Sen. John Barrasso’s (R-Wyo.) Common Values PAC. Other leadership PAC contributions came from Sens. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), Rob Portman (R-Ohio) and Jerry Moran (R-Kan.). Hatch will be able to count on support from Senate Leadership Fund if he faces a primary in the 2018 election. In a statement issued on Thursday, the super PAC’s head, Steven Law, said, “Senator Orrin Hatch has been an invaluable ally to SenateLeadership Fund and a conservative champion for Utah, and should he decide to run for reelection, we will have his back in both the primary and the general election.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.