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17 января, 22:01

Trump transition weighing Utah attorney general for FTC

President-elect Donald Trump is considering tapping Sean Reyes, the attorney general of Utah, as the next chairman of the FTC, according to two sources with knowledge of the matter.If selected, it would put Reyes, 45, — a rising Republican star — in charge of a Washington agency that has a role in reviewing major mergers and scrutinizing tech giants like Facebook and Google for their privacy and antitrust practices. It could spell a new headache for Google, in particular, as Reyes joined other state attorneys general last year in asking the FTC to consider re-opening its antitrust probe of the search giant. A spokesman for Reyes declined to comment. A spokesperson for the Trump transition didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.As attorney general, Reyes frequently joined with his Republican colleagues in suing the Obama administration in a variety of areas — from its use of federal lands to its position on transgender rights. At the state level, Reyes has been active on issues like white-collar crime and human trafficking, and one of his earliest moves was to head to court to preserve Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage. Despite his positions, some tech giants have tried to cozy up to Reyes. Facebook, for example, wrote a $10,000 check for the attorney general in October, according to Utah campaign finance data. Microsoft wrote a $1,000 check that month. Before becoming attorney general in 2013, Reyes served as general counsel for eTAGZ, a local media and technology company. His resume includes time spent as a partner at Accelerate Ventures, where he focused on legal issues facing the investment community. The FTC’s current leader, Democratic Chairwoman Edith Ramirez, has said she plans to resign on Feb. 10. After her departure, the agency will have three vacancies: two Republican slots, and one Democratic opening.

17 января, 20:47

Donald Trump Taps Richard LeFrak, Steven Roth To Lead New Infrastructure Council

Bisnow Richard LeFrak and Steve Roth, two of the wealthiest men in real estateand longtime associates of President-elect Donald Trump, have been tapped to head "a council of builders and engineers" who will oversee Donald Trump's plan to invest $1 trillion in U.S. infrastructure, the Wall Street Journal reports. Trump's infrastructure promises [...]

17 января, 19:01

Baidu picks exec to tap new tech

BAIDU has hired former Microsoft executive and artificial intelligence expert Lu Qi as president and chief operating officer to help the Chinese search engine tap emerging technologies. The heads of

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17 января, 17:37

Meural: Tapping The World's Art Galleries From Your Wall

Remember those digital picture frames that were all the rage five or six years ago? Well, they’ve been modified for the 2017 crowd. In some cases, they connect way beyond your family photos. Meural brings the world's artwork to your wall. One that really makes my head turn is Meural. It’s a [...]

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17 января, 17:07

Diageo (DEO) Poised to Grow in 2017: Should You Hold?

Leading brewer Diageo plc. (DEO) seems to be a good choice for investors to hold onto seeking growth in 2017.

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17 января, 16:19

Davos 2017 - Press Conference How Are Leading Social Enterprises Creating Impact at Scale

"Access to education and employment are fundamental human rights. In countries around the world, 168 million children are engaged in exploitative labor. And even those in the formal schooling system, millions more from low-income families face almost insurmountable barriers to higher education while informal workers in India and elsewhere struggle with job security and fair wages. Join this press conference to learn about: - How Geekie is partnering with the Brazilian Ministry of Education to scale their technology education platform to 4.5 million low-income high school students - How GoodWeave is partnering with major retailers to launch Sourcing Freedom, a portfolio of programs that tap proven tools to help companies eliminate child labor from their supply chains in several new industries - How Nidan has enrolled more than 2 million street vendors in India in digital payment systems in the past two months alone, ensuring they stay competitive and earn a living wage." http://www.weforum.org/

17 января, 12:00

Democrats Are Unprepared for the Trump Era

After an unexpected loss in November, Democrats are nowhere near ready to take on the president-elect.

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16 января, 20:45

Trump pick for NSC post Crowley to step down: transition official

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Monica Crowley, the foreign policy adviser tapped for a White House job under President-elect Donald Trump, will relinquish the post, a transition official told Reuters on Monday.

16 января, 20:31

8 Reasons To Worry About Rick Perry Running The Department Of Energy

President-elect Donald Trump’s announcement that he had picked former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to head the Department of Energy was met with both mirth and alarm. During the 2011 presidential primaries, Perry not only declared that he would abolish the department if he got the opportunity, but he ― in a memorable gaffe ― forgot the department’s name.  Perry’s disdain for the department he’s been tapped to run is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to reasons why critics say he’s a poor choice for the job. His supporters argue that Perry, who governed Texas for 14 years, is a solid pick because of his experience managing a massive annual budget and heading up a sizable bureaucracy with thousands of employees. But Perry has also demonstrated a dangerous lack of scientific knowledge, including rigid climate skepticism, as well as eyebrow-raising ties to the fossil fuel industry and a reputation for cronyism and “pay-for-play.” Perry has to fundamentally change the way he approaches science and science policy if he is indeed confirmed to lead the DOE, Rob Cowin of the Union of Concerned Scientists said in a blog post last week. “Governor Perry can certainly make a credible case that he’s a good manager, and he even has some experience with spent nuclear fuel policy in Texas. But he’s also made numerous inaccurate and misleading scientific statements, and rejects the scientific consensus on things like climate change,” Cowin wrote. “If Rick Perry is truly ‘very intent on doing a good job’ [as energy secretary], he’ll need to hit the reset button on his approach to science and science policy, start talking to the experts, and stop making irresponsible statements.” The Senate is prepared hold a hearing on Thursday to evaluate Perry’s fitness for the role. Here are eight reasons senators should be wary: ______ Dominique Mosbergen is a reporter at The Huffington Post covering climate change, extreme weather and extinction. Send tips or feedback to [email protected] or follow her on Twitter.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=5847dd05e4b08c82e888db36,57c4ef71e4b0cdfc5ac8fdca,585416d3e4b0630a25423213,5834ae60e4b09068d3a39c25,585d4870e4b0d9a5945809ee,55b5604de4b0a13f9d18e3eb function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 января, 20:31

8 Reasons To Worry About Rick Perry Running The Department Of Energy

President-elect Donald Trump’s announcement that he had picked former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to head the Department of Energy was met with both mirth and alarm. During the 2011 presidential primaries, Perry not only declared that he would abolish the department if he got the opportunity, but he ― in a memorable gaffe ― forgot the department’s name.  Perry’s disdain for the department he’s been tapped to run is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to reasons why critics say he’s a poor choice for the job. His supporters argue that Perry, who governed Texas for 14 years, is a solid pick because of his experience managing a massive annual budget and heading up a sizable bureaucracy with thousands of employees. But Perry has also demonstrated a dangerous lack of scientific knowledge, including rigid climate skepticism, as well as eyebrow-raising ties to the fossil fuel industry and a reputation for cronyism and “pay-for-play.” Perry has to fundamentally change the way he approaches science and science policy if he is indeed confirmed to lead the DOE, Rob Cowin of the Union of Concerned Scientists said in a blog post last week. “Governor Perry can certainly make a credible case that he’s a good manager, and he even has some experience with spent nuclear fuel policy in Texas. But he’s also made numerous inaccurate and misleading scientific statements, and rejects the scientific consensus on things like climate change,” Cowin wrote. “If Rick Perry is truly ‘very intent on doing a good job’ [as energy secretary], he’ll need to hit the reset button on his approach to science and science policy, start talking to the experts, and stop making irresponsible statements.” The Senate is prepared hold a hearing on Thursday to evaluate Perry’s fitness for the role. Here are eight reasons senators should be wary: ______ Dominique Mosbergen is a reporter at The Huffington Post covering climate change, extreme weather and extinction. Send tips or feedback to [email protected] or follow her on Twitter.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=5847dd05e4b08c82e888db36,57c4ef71e4b0cdfc5ac8fdca,585416d3e4b0630a25423213,5834ae60e4b09068d3a39c25,585d4870e4b0d9a5945809ee,55b5604de4b0a13f9d18e3eb function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 января, 18:56

Obama Declared An Emergency In Flint One Year Ago. The Crisis Isn't Over.

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); One year after President Barack Obama declared a federal emergency in Flint, Michigan, over the lead poisoning crisis, experts say the city’s water system has significantly improved ― but residents still can’t drink the water from their taps, and there’s no clear end in sight. On Wednesday, researchers and public officials hosted a town hall meeting in Flint to share the latest water quality data, following a private U.S. Environmental Protection Agency summit in Chicago the previous day. They focused on progress: lead levels in water samples are easily below the threshold to comply with the federal safe drinking water standard, and have been for several rounds of testing. Other issues with water quality have improved, officials said, citing the ongoing replacement of lead pipe service lines and maintenance of chlorine residuals, a disinfectant used to kill bacteria and other pathogens.     The city’s lead pipes were corroded by Flint River water, which caused leaching and the subsequent contamination of the water supply, resulting in an ongoing public health crisis. City, state and federal groups have banded together to respond to the immediate crisis, fund long-term health and education initiatives, and eventually overhaul the city’s water system.   However, residents still need to use filtered or bottled water with no set end date and were warned that the water system wouldn’t be completely fixed for years.   We’re angry, and we’re scared, and we’re anxious, and we’re confused, and we sure don’t trust. Flint Mayor Karen Weaver “Our water is not safe until all of the lead in all of our plumbing is gone,” said Mona Hanna-Attisha, the pediatrician whose research showing increased lead levels in Flint children brought attention to the crisis.  The city’s treatment plant needs more than $100 million to be up and running by late 2019 or early 2020.   An ambitious project to replace lead service lines is underway, but only a small percentage has been completed ― since March, officials have replaced the lines at 780 homes, of an estimated 20,000, said retired National Guard Brigadier General Michael McDaniel, who heads Flint’s Fast Action and Sustainability Team. McDaniel said they plan to finish almost all construction by the end of 2019, but they still don’t have all the funding needed to finish the project. Flint’s replacement efforts could be a model for other cities, he said.   “No other city … has replaced lead service lines at this rate,” he said. “We will be like we were once in the 1950s, we will be at the forefront again.” Even though lead levels meet federal standards, Hanna-Attisha said there’s a need for caution because the major infrastructure work to replace lead service lines causes disruptions that can increase the risk of lead in the water. Flint’s crisis thrust lead poisoning into the national spotlight, bringing attention to other cities dealing with aging lead plumbing and paint. In December, a Reuters report found nearly 3,000 areas around the country that had recent lead poisoning rates at least double those in Flint at the peak of the crisis. Any amount of lead is dangerous, and is a particular concern for young children, for whom lead exposure can cause developmental delays. Hanna-Attisha said the fact that Flint is not alone when it comes to lead poisoning underscores the failure of federal regulations. “The Lead and Copper Rule is weak nationally,” she said. “Children are drinking lead in their water everywhere ― nothing like what happened in Flint ― but we know that the rules in the book are not strong enough. So until the lead is gone from all of our plumbing, people need to be using filters.” The water crisis began in April of 2014, when the city stopped buying pretreated Lake Huron water from Detroit and began drawing from Flint River water, which was more corrosive. At the state’s direction, the city failed to properly treat the water. Residents began complaining almost immediately about discolored and bad-smelling water, which they blamed for health problems, but the state refused to acknowledge their concerns for over a year, and the EPA ignored early warnings. In the fall of 2015, the state told residents to stop drinking the water and the city switched back to Detroit water. Gov. Rick Snyder (R) declared a state of emergency in Flint and Genesee County on Jan. 5, 2016, and the federal emergency was announced on Jan. 16. In the meantime, lead had been found in the water and in children’s blood at elevated levels, and the county experienced an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease, a respiratory illness that caused 12 deaths.     Residents were eventually given filters for their taps and still have access to free bottled water, though the state is fighting a court order to deliver water to all households that need it. Schools still only use bottled water “out of an abundance of caution,” one presenter said Wednesday. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=57030bcce4b0a06d5806b787,58595fbfe4b0b3ddfd8eddda Though officials touted successes and expressed optimism at Wednesday’s meeting, some residents voiced disapproval, routinely interrupting the panel by loudly crushing plastic water bottles. “I’ve got kids that are sick. My teeth are falling out,” one protester shouted. “You have no solution to this problem.”  Flint Mayor Karen Weaver responded with empathy, saying residents needed space to express their feelings.   “We’re angry, and we’re scared, and we’re anxious, and we’re confused, and we sure don’t trust,” Weaver said. “I’m tired of bottles, and I’m tired of filters.” She added that she wanted to let the panelists speak so they could be held accountable. “A lot of things happened when we didn’t have a voice,” she said, “and we do have a voice now.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 января, 18:13

Ivory Coast 0-0 Togo: Afcon 2017 – as it happened

The defending champions were held to a goalless draw by Togo in a cautious opening match 5.57pm GMT The first rule of tournament football is you shall not talk about tourn lose the first game, and that fear dominated a poor game. We shouldn’t underestimate how good a result that is for Togo, however. Thanks for your company, night! 5.51pm GMT 90 min Added minutes there will be three. Continue reading...

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16 января, 17:18

12 Warning Signs That You Need to Replace Your Smartphone

Have you been holding on to your smartphone for years? These warning signs indicate that it's time to think about replacing the device before it dies.

16 января, 16:08

On MLK Day, Progress or Nostalgia?

You don't need me to remind you of the bitter irony. Today we mark the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. At the end of the week we say goodbye to the first African American president and watch him be replaced with the most avowedly bigoted candidate since George Wallace ran for the presidency in 1968, the very year King was assassinated. So on this Martin Luther King Day we might look to King not so much for inspiration but for solace, and to be reminded of King's confident assertion that "the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice." It's a prediction and a promise and we can all take some hope from it. But as much as King looked to the future in that statement, he drew his faith in the future by looking at the past. That statement encapsulates a central narrative about American history - the narrative of progress. It expresses the abiding belief Americans have always had that today is better than yesterday and tomorrow will be an improvement on today. It is a belief that goes back to our founding and is inherent in a political experiment designed, someday, to achieve "a more perfect union." Pause over that phrase for a moment. Perfection not as an end unto itself, but as a process; a nation that can always be made more perfect. Talk about the audacity of hope! And it's important to remember that the story of forward-marching progress appealed to 3 million more American voters in November than the gloomy invocations of decline. Trump, by contrast, offered a relentlessly negative view of America. But his narrative is another version of the American past and one with even deeper historical roots. His intoning to "make America great again" is a classical "declension" narrative - a story of American decline - and this narrative traces all the way back to the 17th century Puritans: We were once favored by God, now we have sinned and are loathsome in his eyes. Repent! otherwise be damned! The Puritans relied on this formula so often that those sermons became their own genre: the jeremiad. Variations of it fueled the religious revival known as the Great Awakening in the mid-18th century and the Second Great Awakening in the early 19th. Trump may have scrubbed the jeremiad of its religious overtones - and of any sense of Christian humility and social obligation - but he has tapped into the same sky-is-falling emotions. The point is not that these two narratives contradict one another. Rather they exist side-by-side and in tension with each other. We still aren't perfect, after all, and so for some Americans, having failed to achieve perfection, we must be in decline. Even more, the story of declension helps some people make sense of a world changing faster than they can keep up with or in ways they find threatening. In other words, declension is a story that helps soften the otherwise vertiginous progress we are simultaneously celebrating. But in the main Americans have always preferred the story of progress, because by any meaningful indicator life has indeed gotten better and better, however much a corrosive nostalgia for the "good ol' days" appeals to certain people at certain moments. And African Americans in particular have a vested interest in the promise of progress. King was born in 1929 at the end of a decade in which roughly 300 people were lynched. For African Americans (and one might add gays, women and lots of other Americans) there never really was a good ol' days. The litany of social, scientific and technological progress is almost endless, and you'd be hard pressed to find a Trump voter who thinks making America great again means going back to a time without cell phones, antibiotics, or indoor plumbing. But take one (semi) specific reference Trump has made to previous greatness that must be restored: coal. When the coal industry was at its peak, early in the 20th century - actually it has been in decline since the 1930s - children worked in mines, and between 1870-1970 31,000 miners died in coal mine disasters in Pennsylvania alone. That's an average of one miner killed on the job every day for 100 years. No one - except perhaps Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey - wants to put kids back in coal mines. King predicted the American future with his metaphor about the universe because he looked at the American past and then at the present and measured the distance between the two. Americans are periodically prone to spasms of nostalgia, but that too will be overcome. And on this Martin Luther King Day it's worth remembering the next thing King said in that sermon at Temple Israel on February 26, 1965. Quoting the English philosopher Thomas Carlyle, King reminded the congregation: "No lie can live forever." Trumpistas, consider yourselves put on notice. Steven Conn is the W. E. Smith Professor of History at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio and the author most recently of "Americans Against the City: Anti-Urbanism in the 20th Century." -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 января, 15:54

After School: Where Art Meets Technology - Rebel Education

At TUMO, technology and art merge to provide teens with a competitive edge in a digital world. With access to state-of-the-art technology and some of the world's leading professionals in web design, robotics, animation, film, music and much more, TUMO teens are encouraged to tap into their entrepreneurial intuitions to create and expand the boundaries of today's cutting-edge industries. The film follows teachers and students to find out how the learning offered by TUMO compares to Armenia's very traditional state school education system. We meet teachers and students, as well as a former student of TUMO who is now using the skills and experience gained at the centre. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

16 января, 15:41

Biogen (BIIB) Presents Positive Phase III Data on Spinraza

Biogen Inc. (BIIB) presented positive data from the phase III ENDEAR study evaluating Spinraza (nusinersen) for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

16 января, 15:00

How Mindfulness Helped a Workplace Diversity Exercise

A couple of years ago I was invited to facilitate an offsite training for the diversity committee of a Fortune 500 company. In an era in which “diversity” has become a buzzword in the business world, the firm’s interest in the topic was both admirable and understandable. Research shows that having an inclusive and diverse workforce is associated with creativity and innovation, and exposure to racial diversity has been linked to greater problem-solving skills and expanded perspective. The diversity committee, which had been meeting for about six months, seemed interested in trying something new. I was told that they invited me to lead the session precisely because I wasn’t a “diversity trainer.” Yet I was reluctant to accept the invitation. As a corporate psychologist with training in mindfulness, I have worked with many CEOs and senior executives to cultivate positive organizational culture, but the subject of diversity trainings is a tricky one. According to the sociologists Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev, who have studied the effects of such trainings in approximately 830 U.S. companies over more than a decade, companies implementing compulsory training for managers actually showed a decline in employee minority representation. Moreover, one of my most memorable experiences with diversity training had occurred in graduate school, when I was the only person of color in my class. You might think that people training to be psychologists would be open to examining their own biases, looking within, and having authentic discussions. Much to my surprise, I was the only person in the room willing to acknowledge that I had any privilege (I was working toward a PhD and came from an educated family, both of which seemed to count). The discomfort among my peers was palpable, and we ended up having to scrap most of the exercises because of people’s inability (or, more likely, unwillingness) to dig deeper into the topics. Nonetheless, I ultimately accepted the diversity committee’s offer. Diversity initiatives are important, and discussions about sensitive topics like race, gender, and ethnicity need to occur. The training session could serve as a sort of pilot study: What if mindfulness could be a tool for helping employees tolerate the sort of discomfort my grad school peers weren’t able to handle? As I soon discovered, it could. In thinking through how to facilitate the meeting, I reflected on the context one of the group leaders had given me. Prior meetings had exhibited a consistent pattern: The same few people had dominated the discussions, the majority of the white men had stayed quiet and seemed disengaged, and after the sessions many of the people of color and women had expressed frustration among themselves about how the meeting had gone. One of the group leaders had also mentioned that she wanted the people in the room who usually didn’t speak to feel “uncomfortable.” My sense was that she perceived the quiet disengagement by some of her colleagues as comfort. My own assessment, however, was that they were probably shutting down because they were unable to tolerate the discomfort and their behaviors were actually their best efforts to cope with those feelings. Therefore, I knew that at the meeting it would be important to create the sort of environment in which people not only knew that they could talk but were expected to talk. I also knew that for an authentic conversation to occur, people would need to tap less into their analytical sides (which might have created a “polite” but less vulnerable conversation) and more into their emotions. So, in the meeting, after a quick review of the importance of diversity, I had the team agree to some mindfulness-based guidelines for the discussion to follow. For example, we explored the idea of coming to the discussion with a sense of openness. We talked about the importance of staying engaged and guarding against shutting down. I reviewed coping strategies such as deep breathing, taking a step back from your thought process, and questioning your perceptions if your find yourself disengaging. We talked about avoiding judgments (about each other and about themselves) and striving to accept each person’s perceptions as their truth. We discussed the importance of having empathy for every single member of the group, even when they expressed an opinion that differed from other people’s. I suggested that there was a high likelihood that each person might feel uncomfortable at some point and normalized that, encouraging the group to be supportive of others in their efforts to broach uncomfortable topics or try out unfamiliar behaviors. As we finished our review of the guidelines, one of the white males in the group laughed nervously and said, “This sounds like it’s going to be pretty scary.” Instead of moving past the quip, the group processed it — in a supportive way, with others also admitting their anxiety. It helped them to recognize their shared vulnerability while reinforcing their need to move through the discomfort so that they could be advocates for diversity in the organization. Going through this discussion took time, but I knew it was the only way we could lay the groundwork for the depth of conversation we needed to accomplish our goals. Related Video Why the Most Common Diversity Programs Don't Work And what to do instead. Save Share See More Videos > See More Videos > The ensuing discussion was meaty and productive. Some people of color talked about their frustrations and challenges — not only in the organization but also as people of color in the world. Some white males disclosed that they never really talk about these topics because they feel ill-equipped to handle them well and are afraid they will say the wrong thing or be perceived poorly. The key to making diversity training worth anyone’s time, it was clear, was to create an environment in which people could tolerate the discomfort that accompanies dealing with sensitive topics and the self-judgment that can go along with taking a hard, honest look at themselves, warts and all, so that they could eventually let down their guard. That mindfulness helped with this process probably shouldn’t come as a surprise, given the many studies that show how it can help us become aware of our biases and reduce them. Research by Adam Lueke and Bryan Gibson of Central Michigan University, for instance, has shown that people who listened to a 10-minute recording encouraging them to focus on their bodily sensations and thoughts without judgment showed less implicit bias based on race and age on a subsequent implicit associations task. Mindfulness can also decrease linguistic intergroup bias, which is essentially our tendency to expect people in the in-group (people of our own group) to behave more positively than those in the out-group. Then there are the emotional and interpersonal advantages associated with practicing mindfulness, which may help it play a role in diversity trainings. One study using fMRI showed that after a short mindfulness intervention, participants showed reduced activation in brain regions associated with emotional processing (the amygdala and the parahippocampal gyrus). In other words, the participants who practiced mindfulness were able to better regulate their emotions in response to negative stimuli. We also know that connecting with others of equal status with common goals in cooperative situations enables us to see more similarities with members of the group. I argue that mindfulness can make this more likely to happen in diversity seminars, because if you are more open to the experience, there is greater opportunity to listen without judgment, feel empathy for others, recognize commonalities, and build those deeper connections. Diversity initiatives shouldn’t be done away with — they just need to be reimagined. During our session we were able to talk about how everyone has biases, and many participants were willing to make themselves vulnerable by disclosing theirs. People of all races shared how their upbringing shaped some of their views and recognized that they have to be careful of how their perceptions affect their interactions with others. In short, they were able to be “real” with one another, a critical step for being able to learn from each other and truly experience the benefits that diverse opinions, ideas, and backgrounds have to offer.

16 января, 14:13

Naujametinės pagirios baigėsi Lietuvoje paranojos paaštrėjimu

Naujuosius metus Lietuva pradeda kovodama prieš stambiausio šalyje duomenų centro statybą, įtardama, jog jis turi ryšių su Rusijos šnipinėjimo centru.

16 января, 12:32

Should we rely on economic forecasts? The wisdom of the crowds and the consensus forecast

Brian Dowd, FocusEconomics Laurence J. Peter, a Canadian educator and author, is often referenced as saying, “an economist is an expert who will know tomorrow why the things he predicted yesterday didn’t happen today.” Economics and especially economic forecasting are often given a bad rap. Many people think of forecasting as akin to licking a […]