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23 февраля, 15:30

Jeremy Lee: a cook and his books

Cookbooks are a dime a dozen nowadays, but Elizabeth David’s works, and those of her contemporaries, have timeless appeal. Chef Jeremy Lee celebrates the writers that still lure him into the kitchenMy parents liked to read, cook and eat, quite liked their brood and made efforts to have us all at the table every day. In the kitchen, a small pile of cookery books (pulled from laden shelves), with a pad and a pencil for notes, awaited my mother’s interest.To this day this is how I love to read a book: at home, surrounded by piles of this, that and the other. I sometimes find my finger, as my mother’s did, tap-tap-tapping at a recipe on a page. Continue reading...

23 февраля, 09:42

Ghosn steps aside as Nissan CEO, to focus on larger alliance

Carlos Ghosn, who leads the Nissan-Renault-Mitsubishi alliance, is handing over the helm at Nissan to Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, but Ghosn is staying on as chairman.

23 февраля, 06:08

Scott Taylor’s secret formula for a chaos-free town hall

MELFA, Va. — Rep. Scott Taylor walked into a town hall teeming with constituents ready to confront him Wednesday for supporting Obamacare repeal and President Donald Trump’s agenda. When he walked out, he received lengthy applause and hung around to mingle with his critics, some of whom expressed grudging respect for the man they had planned to protest. For most of event, the room was quiet enough to hear a pin drop. The freshman Republican and former Navy Seal used a calm demeanor and produced a case study on how to defuse tensions at a town hall — a method he hopes his GOP colleagues on Capitol Hill can apply during their own events, which have at times been overrun by protests and frustrated constituents. “Listen, calm’s contagious, especially in events. So is crazy emotions,” he told POLITICO after the town hall, his third in three days across his northeastern Virginia district. “I think it’s important to be calm. My demeanor should always be calm.” Not all of Taylor’s experience, of course, is replicable. “I’ve dealt with a lot of crowds before … I mean, literally with AK 47s with people pissed off in the Arabian desert,” he said, alluding to his service in Iraq and Yemen. “You understand very quickly how to read body language.” But he said there are “mechanisms” to reduce the likelihood of disruption and confrontation. For example, Taylor said he’d counsel his colleague to wait silently whenever their room breaks out into sustained applause or jeers — rather than attempt to talk over protests. But if a “rabble rouser” seems intent on disrupting, he’s got another strategy: “you isolate them” until they’re shamed into silence. Taylor also noted that he detailed his own difficult childhood — raised by a single mother and already on a dangerous path in life at 11 years old. It was partly to introduce himself to constituents who may not know him, he said, but also to emphasize that not all members of Congress are from “elite” backgrounds living charmed lives. It was a story, he said, that helped put the crowd at ease At times, the crowd did seem to test Taylor’s patience, if fleetingly. In response to a question about how he could justify taking taxpayer-funded health care coverage while voting to repeal Obamacare, Taylor noted that he declined to accept coverage afforded to members of Congress. But when he added that he gets his coverage through the Veterans Administration, the crowd groaned. “You guys have a problem with me being treated by the VA because I was injured in Iraq for you?” an incredulous Taylor shot back. But there were few other moments of obvious tension. And Taylor, self-deprecating at times and at others highlighting his differences with GOP orthodoxy and President Donald Trump, kept the crowd off balance, unable to generate sustained opposition. He also noted, part way through, that his four-year-old son was on hand for the meeting. Taylor also had a home field advantage Thursday — he grew up just 70 miles away on a farm in tiny Hebron, Md. and he quickly tapped into the Eastern Shore’s low-key vibe to defuse any tension at the outset of his visit. “I know your mamas didn’t teach you to shout if you’re from the Eastern Shore,” he admonished the crowd. “If you’re shouting, you’re probably not from here.” In the end, constituents walked away satisfied that they’d been heard, even if they strongly disagreed with his positions. “His demeanor is very good,” said John Harlow, an Air Force veteran and longtime Eastern Shore resident who said Taylor acquitted himself well at the 80-minute event.“And,” added Harlow’s wife Mary, with a laugh, “he’s not bad to look at.”

23 февраля, 04:00

Japanese Nissan executive tapped to replace Ghosn as CEO

Carlos Ghosn, who leads Nissan and Renault, has tapped Hiroto Saikawa, a veteran Japanese executive at Nissan, to replace him as chief executive at the Japanese automaker, although Ghosn will stay on as chairman.

23 февраля, 01:37

Donald Trump's Assault On Clean Water Laws Has Already Begun

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); It hasn’t taken long for President Donald Trump to follow through on his campaign promise to dismantle regulations ― even when they protect the safety of America’s drinking water supply. Last week, Trump signed a resolution that voided the Stream Protection Rule, a Department of the Interior regulation finalized during the Obama administration. The rule would have required coal mining companies to avoid practices that pollute streams and threaten drinking water supplies, monitor and report any pollution, and return waterways to their previous condition after mining operations are completed. Both the Senate and House voted in favor of it. On the heels of the confirmation of new Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt, Trump is now expected to take executive action this week to undo the EPA’s Clean Water Rule. The rule is aimed at protecting the nation’s rivers, streams and wetlands from pollution by placing them under the purview of the federal Clean Water Act. Both Pruitt and Trump have negatively characterized the rule as an example of federal overreach that will hurt farmers and other businesses, and many state attorneys general agree ― 31 states have joined together to sue over the rule, which has been tied up in the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s a travesty. We should be able to depend on making progress toward cleaner air and cleaner water. Deborah Murray, Southern Environmental Law Center Yet Trump’s dismantling of environmental protections like these could have a devastating impact on the drinking water sources of millions of Americans, advocates say. “It’s a travesty,” Deborah Murray, a senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center, told The Huffington Post. “We should be able to depend on making progress toward cleaner air and cleaner water.” Murray noted that the stream protection rule covered 6,000 miles of streams and 52,000 acres of forest. Its repeal means that more streams in the coal-heavy Appalachian region will almost certainly be threatened. “It’s so disturbing,” Murray said. “None of the provisions in the regulation were particularly onerous. They’re common-sense measures trying to have the coal-mining companies be accountable for devastation and pollution, rather than just business as usual.” Trump dismantled the Stream Protection Rule last week through a 1996 law known as the Congressional Review Act. The language of the act essentially prevents future administrations from resurrecting rules that Trump has undone if they are deemed “substantially similar” -- which means the damage could be permanent. Republicans who pushed for the rule’s demise presented a “false choice” between protecting the environment and protecting the economy, said Amy Kober, a spokeswoman for the river conservation nonprofit American Rivers. The coal industry, which has been struggling with declining production for more than a decade, has claimed the rule would cause the loss of up to 280,000 jobs because the regulations would be so expensive to implement. The industry has also claimed the rule would produce “no discernible environmental benefits.” Federal estimates dramatically contradict those claims. A Congressional Research Service analysis estimated that the rule would have created almost as many jobs as it would have cost. Another analysis, from the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, found the rule would have resulted in the annual loss of about 260 mining jobs, a negligible number compared to the 30,000 jobs the industry has lost since 2009. The OSMRE analysis also found that the rule would improve water quality in 292 miles of impacted streams each year and reduce the public’s exposure to drinking water contaminants. On the campaign trail, Trump said he would make “crystal clear, clean water” a priority as president. But the Trump administration’s moves to undo the Stream Protection Rule and the seemingly imminent rollback of the Clean Water Rule bring that promise into question, said Michael Kelly, spokesman for the national environmental group Clean Water Action. “The administration is going to err on the side of the polluters and the regulated community, not the public or clean water and public health,” Kelly said by email. “That’s all you need to know about protections for clean water under President Trump and Scott Pruitt.” For her part, Kober is hopeful that the administration’s actions on water protections could rally voters — regardless of their political ideology — to push back against further erosions of environmental laws. “I don’t think this is what people voted for,” Kober said. “This is the water that flows through our communities and through our taps. This water flows through the veins of our children. We have to believe that, at some point, rivers and clean water will be what brings people together.” ― Joseph Erbentraut covers promising innovations and challenges in the areas of food, water, agriculture and our climate. Follow Erbentraut on Twitter at @robojojo. Tips? Email [email protected] type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58a7776ae4b045cd34c1a44c,584875c7e4b0f9723cfff87e,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 февраля, 01:37

Donald Trump's Assault On Clean Water Laws Has Already Begun

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); It hasn’t taken long for President Donald Trump to follow through on his campaign promise to dismantle regulations ― even when they protect the safety of America’s drinking water supply. Last week, Trump signed a resolution that voided the Stream Protection Rule, a Department of the Interior regulation finalized during the Obama administration. The rule would have required coal mining companies to avoid practices that pollute streams and threaten drinking water supplies, monitor and report any pollution, and return waterways to their previous condition after mining operations are completed. Both the Senate and House voted in favor of it. On the heels of the confirmation of new Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt, Trump is now expected to take executive action this week to undo the EPA’s Clean Water Rule. The rule is aimed at protecting the nation’s rivers, streams and wetlands from pollution by placing them under the purview of the federal Clean Water Act. Both Pruitt and Trump have negatively characterized the rule as an example of federal overreach that will hurt farmers and other businesses, and many state attorneys general agree ― 31 states have joined together to sue over the rule, which has been tied up in the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. It’s a travesty. We should be able to depend on making progress toward cleaner air and cleaner water. Deborah Murray, Southern Environmental Law Center Yet Trump’s dismantling of environmental protections like these could have a devastating impact on the drinking water sources of millions of Americans, advocates say. “It’s a travesty,” Deborah Murray, a senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center, told The Huffington Post. “We should be able to depend on making progress toward cleaner air and cleaner water.” Murray noted that the stream protection rule covered 6,000 miles of streams and 52,000 acres of forest. Its repeal means that more streams in the coal-heavy Appalachian region will almost certainly be threatened. “It’s so disturbing,” Murray said. “None of the provisions in the regulation were particularly onerous. They’re common-sense measures trying to have the coal-mining companies be accountable for devastation and pollution, rather than just business as usual.” Trump dismantled the Stream Protection Rule last week through a 1996 law known as the Congressional Review Act. The language of the act essentially prevents future administrations from resurrecting rules that Trump has undone if they are deemed “substantially similar” -- which means the damage could be permanent. Republicans who pushed for the rule’s demise presented a “false choice” between protecting the environment and protecting the economy, said Amy Kober, a spokeswoman for the river conservation nonprofit American Rivers. The coal industry, which has been struggling with declining production for more than a decade, has claimed the rule would cause the loss of up to 280,000 jobs because the regulations would be so expensive to implement. The industry has also claimed the rule would produce “no discernible environmental benefits.” Federal estimates dramatically contradict those claims. A Congressional Research Service analysis estimated that the rule would have created almost as many jobs as it would have cost. Another analysis, from the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, found the rule would have resulted in the annual loss of about 260 mining jobs, a negligible number compared to the 30,000 jobs the industry has lost since 2009. The OSMRE analysis also found that the rule would improve water quality in 292 miles of impacted streams each year and reduce the public’s exposure to drinking water contaminants. On the campaign trail, Trump said he would make “crystal clear, clean water” a priority as president. But the Trump administration’s moves to undo the Stream Protection Rule and the seemingly imminent rollback of the Clean Water Rule bring that promise into question, said Michael Kelly, spokesman for the national environmental group Clean Water Action. “The administration is going to err on the side of the polluters and the regulated community, not the public or clean water and public health,” Kelly said by email. “That’s all you need to know about protections for clean water under President Trump and Scott Pruitt.” For her part, Kober is hopeful that the administration’s actions on water protections could rally voters — regardless of their political ideology — to push back against further erosions of environmental laws. “I don’t think this is what people voted for,” Kober said. “This is the water that flows through our communities and through our taps. This water flows through the veins of our children. We have to believe that, at some point, rivers and clean water will be what brings people together.” ― Joseph Erbentraut covers promising innovations and challenges in the areas of food, water, agriculture and our climate. Follow Erbentraut on Twitter at @robojojo. Tips? Email [email protected] type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58a7776ae4b045cd34c1a44c,584875c7e4b0f9723cfff87e,58ac7e76e4b0c4d51057164f -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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22 февраля, 21:35

From Paris With Love, Carine Roitfeld On CR Fashion Book's 10th Issue

The iconic French editor taps Paris Jackson and Halima Aden as cover stars for the magazine's latest issue, dedicated to her home city.

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22 февраля, 20:26

Altar in Mexico town hides illegal fuel tap

Altars to the Virgin of Guadalupe are ubiquitous at businesses across Mexico. Now federal police say one has even been used in a gasoline smuggling racket in the central state of Puebla.

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22 февраля, 20:00

Can Oil ETFs Rebound on Possibility of More OPEC Cuts?

Talks of more OPEC output cut are in the air. If investors find it possible can play the hope with the ETFs.

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22 февраля, 13:26

Европейская комиссия выделит более 14 млн евро для TAP

Баку.  Европейская комиссия выделит свыше 14,018 миллиона евро для проекта строительства  (TAP), предназначенного для транспортировки азербайджанского газа в Европу.  Эти средства будут использованы для археологических ...

22 февраля, 13:07

Cabinet picks clash with White House over hiring

The Trump administration’s Cabinet picks are finding themselves in a staffing tug-of-war with White House aides.

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22 февраля, 08:19

These 3 Healthcare Startups Are Tapping Into India's Soon-To-Be Booming IoT Market

IoT will become mass adoption when consumers see a real value in them. Case in point is the healthcare sector.

22 февраля, 05:05

Sean Spicer Dodges Question About Anti-Muslim Hate Groups

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer dodged a question Tuesday about the rise in American anti-Muslim hate groups, many of which have close ties to high-level officials in the Trump administration, and instead opted to talk about terrorism committed by Muslims.  A report released last week from the Southern Poverty Law Center found that the number of anti-Muslim hate groups in the U.S. tripled in 2016. The SPLC argued the rise was due partly to the presidential campaign of Donald Trump, who routinely vilified, scapegoated and disparaged Muslims.  “Southern Poverty Law Center said that the number of anti-Muslim groups in the U.S. has tripled between 2015 and 2016, during the time of the campaign,” a reporter asked during Tuesday’s press conference. “Is this message within the administration ― anti-Semitism is not allowed, xenophobia is not allowed ― anti-Muslim sentiment within the administration, has the president been forceful about that particular issue?” Spicer then issued a largely non-sensical response, talking vaguely about “radical Islamic terrorism,” and not addressing the SPLC report whatsoever.  “I think that the president, in terms of his desire to combat radical Islamic terrorism, he understands that people who want to express a peaceful position have every right in our Constitution,” Spicer said. “But if you come here or want to express views that seek to do our country, or our people, harm, he is going fight it aggressively, whether it’s domestic acts that are going on here or attempts through people abroad to come into this country.” “So there is a big difference between preventing attacks and making sure that we keep this country safe, so there is no loss of life and allowing people to express themselves in accordance with our First Amendment. Those are two very, very different, different different things.” It was certainly an awkward connection for Spicer to field. The Trump administration, after all, is awash in people with deep ties to some of the country’s most extreme anti-Muslim groups.  In December, the founder of the SPLC-listed hate group Act for America bragged in a fundraising email of having a “direct line” to the White House.  Mike Pompeo, the congressman Trump tapped to head up the CIA, has deep ties to Act for America, regularly speaking at its events and once even sponsoring a legislative briefing on Capitol Hill for the group. In 2016, Pompeo accepted Act for America’s National Security Eagle Award. Michael Flynn, who last week resigned as Trump’s national security adviser, was on Act for America’s board of advisers.  Jeff Sessions, Trump’s recently confirmed attorney general, is closely affiliated with a SPLC-listed hate group called the David Horowitz Freedom Center. Sessions once accepted an award from the organization, and regularly speaks at its events.  Steve Bannon, Trump’s chief strategist and a member of the National Security Council, routinely praised anti-Muslim hate group leaders as experts on Islam during when they were guests on his Breitbart News radio show. He also promoted the paranoid conspiracy theories of Frank Gaffney, who heads the SPLC-listed hate group, the Center for Security Policy.   And White House counselor Kellyanne Conway conducted a deeply flawed poll for the Center for Security Policy, which Trump cited in his campaign proposal to ban Muslims from entering the U.S.  These anti-Muslim groups believe Islam is an inherently evil and violent political ideology, and that all Muslims are thus potential terrorists. They also believe in thoroughly debunked conspiracy theories alleging Muslims in America have organized a massive, subversive plot to destroy America from within, replacing the U.S. Constitution with a brutal interpretation of Sharia, or Islamic law.  During the press conference Tuesday, Spicer dodged another question about the Trump administration’s reported plan to focus the Department of Homeland Security’s Countering Violent Extremism program solely on Muslims, and not on white supremacists or other potential terrorists.  “There’s nothing to announce on that front,” Spicer said.  Last week, at a meeting in North Carolina of right-wing groups, including Act for America, a man openly talked about wanting to kill Muslims. The FBI told The Huffington Post it’s looking into the incident.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 февраля, 03:12

Dick Cheney will intro Pence at Republican Jewish Coalition event

Former Vice President Dick Cheney is slated introduce the current vice president, Mike Pence, at the Republican Jewish Coalition’s meeting in Las Vegas this week. The two are scheduled to speak on Friday evening. An RJC spokesman, Fred Brown, confirmed the plans. The annual gathering, which begins on Thursday evening and goes through the weekend, will bring together many prominent Jewish Republicans, including casino mogul Sheldon Adelson, a major funder of the RJC and a prolific GOP donor. The event will be held at Adelson’s posh Venetian hotel. The meeting comes at a sensitive time for the pro-Israel community, with some raising questions about President Donald Trump’s Middle East agenda. Some Republican Jews voiced loud concerns after the White House neglected to refer to Jews in its statement commemorating Holocaust Memorial Day. On Thursday evening, Adelson will host a private dinner at his home that will be attended by many of the organization’s board members and top donors. The dinner will also be attended by fellow Las Vegas billionaire Steve Wynn, a Trump ally who recently was tapped to be the Republican National Committee’s finance director. Others expected to attend the meeting include South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, National Republican Senatorial Committee Chairman Cory Gardner, and Cheney’s daughter, Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney.

22 февраля, 02:26

Ionis (IONS) Q4 Earnings: What's in the Cards for the Stock?

Ionis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (IONS) is scheduled to report fourth-quarter 2016 results on Feb 28.

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21 февраля, 21:41

МОЖЕТ БЫТЬ, ДАЖЕ НОГАМИ...

Trump taps Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster as his new national security adviser...Любопытно дополнение к информации о назначении м-ра Макмастера...В принципе, ничего особо нового, но есть нюансы, заслуживающие внимания. Например: Peter Feaver, a scholar on civil-military ties at Duke University, said he expected McMaster to take a skeptical view of Russia, seeing Moscow as a dubious partner and major potential threat to U.S. security,то есть, по мнению эксперта, знающего нового national security adviser давно и лично, Умник будет придерживаться "скептического взгляда на Россию, рассматривая Москву как сомнительного партнера и главную потенциальную угрозу для безопасности США".Учитывая специфику WP, ставшую при м-ре Трампе уже не просто рупором "слонов", но de facto "неформальным официозом" Белого Дома, можно не сомневаться, что озвучен подход президента, полностью одобренный военными, очень довольными, что "Маттис и Макмастер в палатке",и эта линия будет продолжаться, какие бы жесты доброй воли Москва ни делала.  Но, с другой стороны, мы-то с вами знаем, что это всего лишь хитрый план доброго Трампа, чтобы обмануть ястребов...

21 февраля, 19:01

Progressive and stable reform eyed

CHINA’S top leadership yesterday pledged to stick to the basic tone of “seeking progress while maintaining stability” in 2017, aiming for more progress from supply-side structural reform. The pledge

21 февраля, 18:05

Conway: Recess appointments 'on the table'

The White House is open to making recess appointments to fill some administration positions, according to Kellyanne Conway, counselor to President Donald Trump.Conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, speaking to Conway for his show on Tuesday, suggested that the White House consider the maneuver to fill out some political posts, citing obstruction from Senate Democrats, and Conway responded that “everything’s on the table.”“I think if you nominate the deputy secretary of state, the deputy secretary of defense, the undersecretary for policy at DOD ... a solicitor general, perhaps, that might be of particular interest to you, they can all be recess appointment[s] on March 22,” Hewitt proposed. “Have you talked about that? Would you push that, because we’ve got to stand up this government, and Senate Democrats are not going to do anything to assist us in getting going.”“Everything’s on the table. All of that is being discussed, Hugh,” Conway said. “And you make some excellent points. You’re right about the Democrats.”“I mean, to see sort of congenital, presumptive obstruction and negativity is very concerning,” she continued, “because it just means that the government can’t function fully, and that they’re obstructing regardless of who the individual is that’s being considered, regardless of the post that needs to be filled. And it’s very frustrating.”Senate Democrats have been slow to confirm many of Trump's nominees to the Cabinet, at times resorting to procedural tactics like boycotting hearings to keep the process from moving along. The president has yet to fill many other posts that require confirmation, too. Conway’s husband, lawyer George Conway III, has been floated as a possible solicitor general, but she told Hewitt that she doubts that he’ll ultimately be tapped for the job.