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Terra Industries
05 августа 2015, 22:25

CF Industries Closes Acquisition of 50% Stake in GrowHow - Analyst Blog

CF Industries (CF) has completed the acquisition of the remaining 50% equity interest in GrowHow UK Limited from Yara International.

02 июля 2015, 18:40

CF Industries to Acquire Remaining 50% Stake in GrowHow - Analyst Blog

CF Industries (CF) has agreed to acquire the remaining 50% equity interest in GrowHow UK Limited from Yara International

19 марта 2013, 07:57

ЛЕНДЛИЗ: Полный список товаров и материалов полученных Россией

Lend Lease to Russia From Major Jordan' Diaries (NY: Harcourt, Brace, 1952) Chapter Nine ITEM Quantity Cost in Dollars ATOMIC MATERIALS Beryllium metals 9,681 lbs. $ 10,874. Cadmium alloys 72,535 lbs. 70,029. Cadmium metals 834,989 lbs. 781,466. Cobalt ore & concentrate 33,600 lbs. 49,782. Cobalt metal & Cobalt bearing scrap 806,941 lbs. 1,190,774. Uranium metal 2.2 lbs. --- Aluminun tubes (for reactors) 13,766,472 lbs. 13,041,152. Graphite, nat., flake, lump or chip 7,384,282 lbs. 812,437. Beryllium salts & compounds 228 lbs. 775. Cadmium oxide 2,100 lbs. 3,080. Cadmium salts & compounds, n.e.s. * 2 lbs. 19. Cadmium sulfate 2,170 lbs. 1,374. Cadmium sulfide 16,823 lbs. 17,380. Cobalt nitrate 51 lbs. 48. Cobalt oxide 17,800 lbs. 34,832. Cobalt salts & compounds, n.e.s. 11,475 lbs. 7,112. Cobaltic and cobaltous sulfate 22 lbs. 25. Deuterium oxide (heavy water) 1,100 grs. --- * n.e.s. stands for "not especially specified". Page one ITEM Quantity Cost in Dollars Thorium salts and compounds 25,352 $ 32,570 Brass & bronze blanks 32,760,542 lbs. $ 6,270,740. Uranium nitrate 500 lbs. --- Brass & bronze plates & sheets 536,632,390 lbs. 99,376,514. Uranium nitrate (U02) 220 lbs. --- Brass & bronze pipes & tubes l6,642,267 lbs. 5,126,324. Uranium oxide 500 lbs. --- Copper alloys 660 lbs. 396. Uranium, urano-uranic oxide (U308) 200 lbs. --- Insulated copper wire, n.e.s. 399,556,720 lbs. 97,637,534. Copper maaufactures, n.e.s. --- 278,336. METALS & METAL MANUFACTURES Copper rods 2,875,916 lbs. 553,042. Aluminum & alloys, ingots, slabs, etc. 366,73S,204 lbs. 53,884,473. Copper wire, bare 28,235,738 lbs. 5,261,483. Aluminum rods & bars 13,744,709 lbs. 3,285,014. Copper wire, rubber-covered 16,521,612 lbs. 3,965,050. Aluminum plates, sheets, strips 124,052,618 lbs. 45,408,111. Copper wire, weather-proof 4,848,312 lbs. 1,261,789. Aluminum foil 409,556 lbs. 205,231. Copper munitions, excl. rotat. bands 1,598,723 lbs. 2,102,024. Aluminum kitchen, hospital utensils 310 lbs. 1,428. Copper refined ingots, bars, etc. 75,663,895 lbs. 9,041,122. Aluminum powders & paste 219,736 lbs. 91,915. Copper pipes & tubes 38,913,403 lbs. 22,728,592. Aluminum contr. valves 980 lbs. 10,122. Copper plates & sheets 26,432,417 lbs. 5,642,774. Aluminum manufactures, n.e.s. --- 308,542. Nickel-chrome electric resistance wire 1,603,104 lbs. 2,121,121. Brass &c bronze ingots 10,214,064 lbs. 1,283,755. Nickel ore, conc. & matts l55,604 lbs. 116,571. Brass & bronze bars, rods, etc. 66,329,462 lbs. 12,502,080. Nickel alloys & scrap 1,944,796 lbs. 812,3ll. Brass & bronze pipe fittings 14,097 lbs. 30,931. Nickel ingots, bars, rods, etc. 15,669,441 lbs. 6,560,7l9. Brass & bronze valves, 4-in. & over 204,288 lbs. 189,623. Nickel manufactures, n.e.s. --- 2,216,294. Brass goods, plumbers 8,598 lbs. 5,828. Tin & tin mfrs, tin foil 82,583 lbs. 44,353. Brass or bronze wire l6,139,702 lbs. 3,734,169. Tin ingots, pigs, bars, etc. 30,620 lbs. 16,079. Brass wood scrcws l,2l8 gross 453. Tin manufactures, n.e.s. --- 2. Brass or bronze hardware --- 13,465. Lead foil and tin foil 26,880 lbs. 15,546. Brass & bronze die stocks, etc. 8,739 lbs. 9,180. Lead, pigs & bars 801,234 lbs. l,913,769. Brass & bronze munitions 21,824,376 lbs. 4,253,987. Lead sheets & pipes ?4,555 lbs, 6,720. Brass & bronze window strips 65,924 lbs. 28,567. Lead, solder 378 Ibs. 76. Brass & bronze, forgings 218 lbs. 249. Lead, cable 1,681,081 lbs. 314,308. Brass & bronze circles 933,110 lbs. 194,447. Lead, plate or battery plate 1,122 lbs. 475. Brass & bronze manufactures, n.e.s. --- 233,843. Lead, shot l8l,506 lbs. 17,646. Page two Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars METALS & METAL MANUFACTURES, continued METALS & METAL MANUFACTURES, continued Vises 4,398 $ 68,521. Lead, castings, circles, etc. 124,645 lbs. $ 40,569. Lead manufactures, n.e.s. --- 105,421. Automotive wrenches & parts --- 25,736. Carbonyl iron powder 27,050 lbs. 42,436. Wrenches & parts, excl. automotive --- 163,179. Ferrochrome 7,820,3l3 lbs. 1,285,175. Drills, etc., metal cutting, power-driven 7,822,2l6 8,863,820. Ferromolybdenum 5,357,500 lbs. 3,210,590. Drills, etc., excl. power-driven --- 9,062,215. Ferrovanadium 1,074,190 lbs. 2,034,830. Hand-operated taps, etc., metal-working Ferrophosphorus l9,229 lbs. 710. machines 593,278 1,091,423. Ferrosilicon 16,187,318 lbs. 941,985. Hand-operated taps, etc., excL metal- working machines --- 4,224,303. Ferrotungsten 3,027,188 lbs. 4,715,335. Hand-operattd dies, etc., metal-work- Ferro alloys, n.e.s. 88,900 lbs. 137,695. Babbitt metal 604,569 lbs. 265,179. ing machines 35,538 32,346. Quicksilver or mercury 10,590 lbs. 28,736. Hand-operated dies, etc., excl. metal- Tungsten metal, etc. & alloy 279,449 lbs. 4,268,890. working machines --- 258,766. Cerite or cerium ore 2,651 lbs. 8,978. Hand-operated metalcutting tools, n.e.s. --- 786,914. Zirconium ore & concentrate 220 lbs. 2,420. Pliers, pincers, nippers, etc. 3,463 doz. 33,700. Cesium metals & alloys 30,299 lbs. 78,61l. Drill pries, bit braces, etc. --- 217,288. Chromium metal alloy scrap 23,924 lbs. 6,992. Planes, chisels & other cutting tools --- 121,833. Manganese metal & alloys 359,006 lbs. ?9,259. Gauges for precision measure 38,348 1,562,938. Molybdenum ore & concentrates 20,145,302 lbs. 10,841,501. Mechanic' hand tools, n.e.s. --- 5,272,573. Magnesium metal primary form 17,798,206 lbs. 3,640,716. Tools with industrial diamonds 15 11l. Molybdenum metal alloys, acrap 913,480 lbs. 466,602. Tool grinders, emery wheel dressers 15,650 lbs. 85,106. Tantalum metal & alloys 6,513 lbs. 136,665. Hand tools & parts, n.e.a, --- 4,211,507. Zirconium metal and alloy 193,450 lbs. 94,654. Padlock' of iron, steel, brass & bronze 146 521. Magnesium powder 66 lbs. 75. Door locke of iron, steel, brass Magnesium metal, n.e.s. 983,467 lbs. 208,475. bronze 5 doz. 55. Molybdenum wire 396,527 lbs. 1,030,833. Wire bale ties 2,196,796 lbs. 103,900. Ferromanganese 6,600 lbs. 1,272. Welding rods & wire, excl. electric 8,088,498 lbs. 1,487,802. Vanadium ore & concentrate 5,395 lbs. 33,835. Wire on spools or coils, not cards 2,710,624 lbs. 270,830. Metals & metal manufactures, n.e.s. --- 2,727,754. Wire, twisted 1,585 lbs. 536. Page three Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Wire & manufactures, n.e.s. 23,236,266 lbs. $ 5,226,916. Zinc slabs, plates, blocs, n.e.s. 40,966,658 lbs. $ 3,750,736. Wire nails 32,789,488 lbs. 1,214,356. Zinc wire 155,177 lbs. 38,767. Tacks 900,422 Ibs. 133,604. Zinc manufactures, n.e.s. 202,324 lbs. 18,855. Nails & staples, n.e.s. 8,105,218 lbs. 369,640. Bauxite concentrate, incl. alumina 11 tons 657. Bolts, machine screws, nuts, etc. 13,370,637 lbs. 1,373,695. Plate, n.e.s. no alloy, excl. fabricated 17,951,792 lbs. 475,944. Metal containers, filled, value 20% 68,650 lbs. 87,928. Armor plate, no alloy, not fabricated 39,283,679 lbs. 1,585,548. Metal containers, unfilled 2,095,541 lbs. 352,525. Tin cans, finished or unfinished 667,603 lbs. 106,855. Metal containers, unfilled, n.e.s. --- 616,795. Metal file cases, not insulated 3,547 165,004. Pipestocks, etc., hand operated & parts --- 233,275. Metal File cases, insulated 13 2,860. Screw plates, etc., hand-operated Metal furniture a parts, n.e.s. --- 49,360. parts --- 639,746. Stoves, ranges, heaters, gas 84 9,296. Machine knives, except metal cut 1,95l 41,218. Cooking, heating equipment, domestic Safety razors 237 doz. 2,383. n.e.s. --- ?32,893. Safety razor blades 857 c. 1,290. Parts, gas, kerosene, etc., stoves --- 16,617. Cutlery, butchers & kitchens 34 doz. 500. Radiators house heating 1,426 1,315. Cutlery, knives, shears 3,648 39,343. Oil burners & boilers industrial 126 59,605. Cutlery & parts, n.e.s. --- 68,295. Parts oil burners & boilers, domestic --- 406,107. Power transmission chains 92,675 lbs. 76,989. Cooking stoves, kerosene, excl. electric 27 1,332. Chains, exc,. power transmission 13,971,287 lbs. 230,010. Room & water heaters, kerosene 1,088 13,059. Enamelware, table, household, hospi- Stoves, room water heaters, gasoline 1,6ll 17,366. tal, etc. 209,365 lbs. 43,492. Axes, broad & hand 12,608 doz. 22,769. Boat propellers, blades 143,890 lbs. 8,042. Hacksaw blades, power machines 16,063 gross 346,272. Metals & alloys, n.e.s. 791,073 lbs. 141,894. Hacksaw blades, excl. power machinery 32,172 gross 406,067. Bauxite and other aluminum ores 56 tons 12,197. Circular saws, excl. diamond 36,175 1,079,630. Zinc photo engraving sheets 220 lbs. 57. Circular saws, diamond 5,840 14,933. Zinc sheets, n.e.s. & strips 2,000 lbs. 400. Saws, steel band, pit, drag & mill 7,l33 35,910. Zinc slabs etc., special high grade 4,159,512 lbs. 397,266. Saws & parts, n.e.s. --- 1,551,889. Zinc slabs, etc., high grade 26,757,974 lbs. 2,461,815. Augers, bits, gimlets, etc. 1,723 doz. 20,004. Zinc slabs, etc, intermediate grade 4,253,496 lbs. 368,244. Files & rasps, under 7-in. 98,514 doz. 251,836. Page four Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars METALS & METAL MANUFACTURES, continued IRON, STEEL & ALLIED PRODUCTS Files & rasps, 7-in. & over 95,811 doz. $ 330,827. Pig iron 7,644 tons $ 207,017. Hammers & hatcbeta 24,757 doz. 92,890. Iron & sad scrap, n.e.s. 55 tons 35,989. Shovels, spades, scoops, etc. 8,305 doz. 85,799. Tin plate cirles, strips, etc. 668 tons 84,490. Scales & balances, n.e.s. 959 336,850. Iron & steel billets, no alloy 39,195 tons 8,522,389. Scales, automatic, excl. bathroom 79,554 226,000. Iron & steel blooms, no alloy 1,064 tons 195,517. Scales, precision 6,079 89,124. Iron & steel alloy billets 58,807 tons 16,327,932. Hardware, car & Marine --- 249,162. Iron & steel alloy blooms 1,918 tons 356,652. Hardware, n.e.s. --- 93,684. Iron & steel alloy slabs l ton 200. Railway car wheels, excl. locomotive 44,532,719 lbs. 2,351,678. Steel alloy & tin plated bars 290 tons 32,51l. Railway car tire & locomotive wheels 46,138,050 lbs. 3,169,777. Steel bars, cold finished 425,331,742 tons 39,360,892. Railway car axles, without wheels 69,818,310 lbs. 2,520,778. Iron bars 994,557 lbs. 242,3l6. Railway car axles, with wheels 45,900,258 lbs. 2,392,165. Concrete reinforcement steel bars 8,456,863 lbs. 441,350. Railway locomotive car axles with- Iron & steel & tin plate bars, no out wheels 1,632,615 lbs. 90,453. alloy 461 tons 27,136. Railway locomotive car axles with Steel bars, no alloy, n.e.s. 209,312,002 lbs. 14,668,525. wheels 2,190,959 lbs. 120,937. Stainless steel bars, n.e.s. 1,848,673 lbs. 632,12l. Rail joints, splice bars, etc. 314,535,452 lbs. 9,427,137. Steel bars, alloy, n.e.s 368,427,121 lbs. 56,374,249. R.R. switches, frogs, crossings l68,566,652 lbs. 10,946,307. Wire rods 3,648,579 lbs. 383,541. Railroad spikes 56,999,319 lbs. 1,888,997. Roller plate, armor type 779,677 lbs. 17,891. Railroad bolts, nuts, nut locks etc. 9,159,460 lbs. 630,947. Steel armor plate, alloy 5,801,465 lbs. 280,706. Tie stock unfabricated whether or Steel plate, excl. armor alloy 20,820,647 lbs. 1,034,729. not sheared to length 63,375 lbs. 3,840. Sciler plate, excl. armor type 37,614,885 lbs. 1,084,043. Rails, 60 lbs. & over per yd. 170,025 lbs. 3,198,998. Plate alloy not fab. excl. armor 1l7,391,826 lbs. 6,497,713. Rails, lese than 60 lbs. per yd, 2,144 tons 103,961. Stainless steel plate, not fab. 1,016,496 lbs. 339,468. Rails, 60 lbs. & over per yd. 232,499 lbs. 10,009,983. Iron & steel structural shapes, not Rails, under 60 lbs. 1,9l9 lbs. 81,965. fabricated 29,870 tons 1,871,436. Sewing-machine needles 57,133 (M) 318,530. Iron & steel plates, fabricated, Needles, excl. sewing-machine l4,447 (M) 183,503. punched, etc. l93,593,054 lbs. 12,623,581. Iron & steel strip, cold-rolled,stainless 3,757,605 lbs. 803,546. Page five Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Iron & steel hot-rolled, stainless 2,543,563 lbs. $ 476.262. Water, oil, gas, etc.., storage tanks 11,399,056 lbs. $ 832,539. Iron & steel strip, cold-rolled, Seamless black pipe, n.e.s. 38,530,836 lbs. 2,932,023. no alloy 192,816,458 lbs. 16,4ll,022. Iron or steel wood screws 5,496,440 gross 1,066,615. Iron & Steel strip, hot-rolled Iron or steel tool bit blanks 4,403 lbs. 58,077. no alloy 45,843,85l lbs. 1,903,017. Steel tank lines 2,386,98l lbs. 622,568. Iron & steel & scroll, alloy, excl. Iron & steel manufacturers, n.e.s. --- 754,527. stainless 1,196 lbs. 347. Iron & steel coated wire, n.e.s 17,803,17l lbs. 4,365,942. Iron & steel band scroll, cold-rolled, Malleable iron castings 88,380 lbs. 40,828. no alloy 2,281,415 lbs. 115,778. Gray iron castings 272,822 lbs. 32,235. Iron & steel band scroll, hot-rolled, Steel casings, alloy, incl. stainless 63,289 lbs. 11,836. no alloy 54,925 lbs. 2,054. Iron & steel grinding balls, no alloy, 3,948,946 lbs. 380,908. Iron & steel skelp, excl. semi-fin. 22,400 lbs. 638. Iron & steel forgings, n.e.s. no alloy, 9,597,970 lbs. 1,676,349. Iron sheets, galvanized 1,366,305 lbs. 50,761. Iron & steel grinding balls, alloy 3,978,051 lbs. 212,943. Iron sheets, black 238,165 lbs. 6,665. Iron & Steel forgings, n.e.s., alloy 3,246,658 lbs. 615,391. Steel sheets, galvanized 86,045,044 lbs. 3,363,966. Iron & steel forginga, n.e.s., alloy Steel sheets, black, ungalvanized 432,663,290 lbs. 15,083,824. incl., stainless 13,429,686 lbs. 1,189,298. Steel sheets, black, ungalvanized, Iron & steel hoop band, etc., cold- stainless 8,452,653 lbs. 3,621,230. rolled, atainless l91,690 lbs. 5,544. Steel sheets, ungalvanized, alloy 20,614,468 lbs. 2,244,755. Steel hoop, cold-rolled, no alloy 1,727,369 lbs. 52,443. lron & steel hoop band, etc., cold- Steel strip, cold-rolled, alloy 28,487,139 lbs. 5,508,009. rolled, alloy 1,169 lbs. 1,405. Steel strip, hot-rolled, alloy 49,836,331 lbs. 7,982,848. Iron & steel hoop band, etc., hot- Steel hoop, hot-rolled, alloy 497,701 lbs. 59,956. rolled. no alloy 1,460,590 lbs. 45,466. Steel hoop, hot-rolled, no alloy 5,251,874 lbs. 162,656. Iron & steel hoop band, etc., hot- Steel hoop, cold-rolled, alloy 107,504 lbs. 3,062. rolled, stainless 53,600 lbs. 1,402. Tin plate & taggers' tin 339,131,813 lbs. 18,812,407. Steel casings, no alloy 675,033 lbs. 84,835. Terneplate, incl. long ternes 21,928,318 lbs. 950,325. Boiler tubes, seemless 157,231,260 lbs. 17,,322,754. Structural iron & steel shapes, fabri- 5,488 lbs. 1,063,865. Boiler tubes, welded 5,573,133 lbs. 613,956. cated Pipe casing & oil-line, seamless 232,440,545 lbs. 11,164,969. Pipe casing & oil-line, welded 50,165.68l lbs. 2,608,178. Page six Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars IRON, STEEL & ALLIED PRODUCTS, continued MACHINES, MACHINE TOOLS & PARTS, continued Malleable iron screwed pipefittings 999,d94 lbs. $ l80,756. Engine, incL tool-room lathes 3,340 $23,371,672. Cast iron pressure pipe 7,439,539 lbs. 231,256. Balancing machines 3l 155,484. Cast iron pressure pipe-fittings 325,288 lbs. 31,891. Shapers, metal power-driven 624 3,231,785. Cast iron soil pipe 3,458,599 lbs. 114,717. Planers, metal power-driven 487 15,238,453. Cast iron soil pipe-fittings 659,248 lbs. 40,79l. Grinding-surface, internal, external 6,608 54,759,178. Welded black pipe, steel 13,618,029 lbs. 887,868. Precision boring machines, n.e.s. 880 14,804,678. Welded black pipe, wrought iron 80,646,845 lbs. 3,644,605. Tapping & threading machines 456 1,704,241. Welded galvanized pipe steel 1,835,969 lbs. l02,5l4. Auto screw bar type 1,926 23,440,971. Iron & steel pipe, n.e.s. 67,763,737 lbs. 13,768,322. Knee & column milling 1,651 11,789,505. Welded galvanized pipe, wrought Milling machines, n.e.s. 3,507 28,021,650. iron 13,575,094 lbs. 691,250. Gear cutting 978 7,408,674. Iron & steel pipe-fittings, n.e.s. 7,900,447 lbs. 2,900,1l7. Machine drilling sensitive, excl. bench 3l2 1,1l5,999. Iron & steel wire, uncoated 86,937,329 lbs. 12,119,586. Radial drilling 759 6,181,009. Iron & steel sash & frames 17,400 lbs. 1,583. Drilling machines, n.e.s. 1,352 5,301,663. Iron & steel sheet piling 35,388,919 lbs. 952,275. All type breaching machines 281 2,678,790. Galvanized wire 107,105,217 lbs. 7,246,6l4. Horizontal boring drill, etc. 845 19,552,825. Barbed wire 81,459,023 lbs. 4,099,632. Gear honing finishing, n.e.s. 95 617,100. Woven wire fencing 2,269,999 lbs. 186,761. Blower, ventilate machines & parts -- 4,682,945. Cast-iron screwed pipe-fittings 7,383,537 lbs. 220;590. Canning machinery -- 210,083. Woven wire screen cloth, insect 48,068 lbs. 18,890. Dairy equipment, commercial, n.e.s. 1,313 644,900. Woven wire screen cloth, excl.insect 2,532,725 lbs. 2,179,358. Dyeing & finishing machinces & parts -- 68,?17. Wire rope & cable, not insulated 101,891,796 lbs. 25,089,532. Flour grist mill machinery & parts -- 11,827. Wire strand 36,474 lbs. 2,182. Forging machinery & parts -- 53,856,07l. Electric welding rods & wire 24,264,316 lbs. 2,411,053. lce-making equipment & parts -- 261,547. Refrigerating equipment & parts -- 439,904. MACHINES, MACHINE TOOLS & PARTS Knitting machine parts, n.e.s. -- 67,804. Lathes 2,644 28,373,506. Sewing machines & parts 362 127,085. Turret lathes 3,073 25,574,695. Paper converting machinery & parts -- 1l0,793. Engine lathes & bench type 999 5,770,713. Sawmill machinery & parts -- 166,221. Page seven Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost In Dollars MACHINES, MACHINE TOOLS & PARTS, continued ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, continued Water wheels, turbines & parts -- S 522,845. Electric railway motors 8 $ 16,250. Textile machinery & parts, n.e.s. -- 93,838. Electric locamotives railway mining 87 750,154. Wood planers, matchers, etc. 1,571 344,854. Electric station warehouse & factory Wire drawing machines & parts -- 2,508,079. trucks 1,229 4,587,780. Blast cleaning, tumbling machines 6 37,224. Electric industrial trucks & tractors, Chucks for machine tools 128,551 3,068,7ll. n.e.s. 424 1,204,401. Foundry equipment parts, n.e.s. -- 3,896,873. Starting, etc. equipment for indus- Die-casting equipment -- 918,455. trial motors -- 4,389,290. Power metal working machine tools, n.e.s. 5,773 6,461,539. Starting, etc. equipment for electrlc Rolling mill machinery & parts, n.e.s. -- 19,316,915. motors -- 730,015. Power machines, tools & parts, n.e.s. -- 60,313,833. Accessories & parts for motors, n.e.s. -- 947,366. Portable electric tools, power-driven 1,297 123,433. Portable electric tools, n.e.s. ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Electric fans 3 33. Switchboard panels & parts, excl. tele- Electric incandescent lamps 930,860 135,515. phone -- 6,407.509. Searchlights & airpot beacons 953 4,189,708. Oil circuit breakers & switches 7,318 1,593,675. Floodlights 457 13,593. Power switches, circuit breakers, over Electric domestic vacuum cleaners 204 6,752. 10 amp. -- 2,281,137. Domestic heating or cooking devices, Fuse plugs cont. mica 24,908 6,414. -- 50,203. Fuses, n.e.s. 151,051 39,720. Watt hour & other measuring meters 21,901 473,285. Electric indicating instruments, n.e.s. 7,779 315,962. Electric melting furnaces & parts -- 10,466,162. Electric recording instruments 1,610 157,717. Heat treating furances & parts -- 17,949,385. Electric testing apparatus & parts, Industrial heatiag devices & parts -- 1,088,925. n.e.s. -- 2,696,617. X-ray tubes 1,260 188,594. Electric testing machines 4,367 334,064. X-ray apparatus & parts n.e.s. -- 2,628,349. Lighting arresters, etc. -- 547,579. Therapeutic apparatus, n.e.s. -- 1,088,925. Motors 13,463 6,102,370. Electric refrigerators, household 20 3,258. Armatures for motors -- 35,408. Electric refrigerators, commercial un- der one ton 30 9,674. Page eight Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT, continued CANVAS ARTICLES, WOOLEN GOODS, CLOTHING, ETC. Electric refrigerator parts -- $ l5l,438. continued Radio receiving set components, n.e.s. -- 7,051,328. Canvas articles -- $ 7,239,229. Loud speakers 133 1,833. Numbered biscuit & naught duct 1,009,120 sq. yd. 934,150. Radio receiving set accessories, n.e.s. -- 2,082,247. Kapok life saving appliances -- 21,975. Telegraph apparatus & parts -- 3,603,037. Fabric coated or impreg., n.e.s. 652,366 sq. yd. 446,797. Telephone instruments 386,530 16,558,894. Textile manufactures, n.e.s. -- 141,l34. Telephone equipment & parts, n.e.s. -- 15,739,286. Other cordage 2,500 lbs. 2,264. Bells, buyers, enunciators & alarms -- 492,174. Istle or tampico manufanured 6 tons 2,640. Starting, lighting, etc., equipment -- 264,9l8. Twine, binder, excl. cotton or jute 16,613,012 lbs. 1,903,578. Electric insulating material l,586,378 lbs. 698,310. Flax, hemp, ramie manufactures, Electric conduit iron or steel 1,548,868 lbs. 116,783. n.e.s. -- 7,456. Electric conduit rigid metal, n.e.s, 221 948 lbs. 23,896. Hemp, ramie twine & cordage 319,649 lbs. 32,839. Electric conduit metal, n.e.s., etc. -- 260,082. Pyroxlin coated impreg. fabric 17,693 sq. yd. 38,084. Sockets, outlets, etc., & parts -- 391,867. Elastic webbing, not over 1 1/2 in. 1,009,500 yds. 57,226. Electric interior lighting fixtures, Cotton moss & hair matresses 30 368. fluorescent -- 10,442. Synthetic cut fibers & waste, n.e.s. 87,8l5 lbs. 32,249. Electric interior lighting fixtures, Synthetic knit fabric in the pc. 3,000 lbs. 3,737. n.e.s. -- 109,774. Woven synthetic yarn fabric, n.e.s. 22,663 lbs. 23,219. Electric exterior lighting fixtures -- 226,878. Rayon waste & staple fiber 500,069 lbs. 141,668. Electric curl. irons -- 8. Woven yarn fabric print cv. synth. 1,248 lbs. 1,785. Flashlight cases 104,630 93,254. Synthetic hosiery, excl. nylons Wmn's & childrea 1 doz. pr. 12. CANVAS ARTICLES, WOOLEN GOODS, CLOTHlNG, ETC. Synthetic textile manufactures -- 1,617. Clothing, aviation -- 1,017559. Oakum 5,130 lbs. 969. Clothing, military & air, n.e.s. -- 283,367. Kapok cushions upholstery pads 12 30. Clothing, military, personal & or- Cordage, n.e.s. 32,466 lbs. 5,468. ganizational -- 21,701,189. Veg. fibre straw grass manufac- Clothing navel 26,788. tures, n.e.s. -- 2,175. Clothing military, cold weather -- 5,220,572. Mohair cloth 1,572,382 lbs. 2,670,321. . l5QIQIa ..comm. Page nine Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CANVAS ARTICLES, WOOLEN GOODS, CLOTHING, ETC, RUBBER COMMODITIES continued Erasers & bands 61,539 lbs. $ 21,802. Wool noile & waste 100 lbs. $ 29. Piecegoods & hospital sheeting, Wool felts woven for machine l46 lbs. 315. n.e.s. l,745,3l3 sq. yd, 1,523,472. Wool carpets & rugs 364 sq. yd. 348. Boots, shoes & heels 1,046,667 pr. 1,794,735. Book cloth pyroxlin coated 5,328 sq. yd. 4,819. Clothing, gloves & mittens 179,163 doz. 1,437,294. Synthetic braids, fringe, etc. -- 6,816. Druggist rubber sundries 1,188,146 513,434. Viscose & cupr. cent. fil. yarn, etc. 40,126 lbs 22,577. Rubber manufactures: friction Acetate rayon yarn 292,272 lbs. 184,283. tape, fan belts, auto & balata Spun rayon yarn 84,07l lbs. 52,168. belting, hose & tubing, pack- Nylon yarn 4 lbs. 33. ing, mats, flooring, etc. 65,472,339 lbs. 28,887,600. Wool cloth & dress goods 95,384,022 lbs. 192,642,856. Rubber manufactures, n.e.s. -- 1,672,246. Wool blankets 5,242,637 lbs. 7,472,329. Synthetic rubber 362,839 lbs. 125,943. Wool knit apparel, n.e.s. 203 lbs. 450,304. Latex & other forms of rubber Hair & felt manufactures, n.e.s. 18,432 lbs. 2,750. compounded for mfr. l,117,278 lbs. 366,413. Wool or mohair manufactures, Hard rubber electrical goods, n.e.s -- 208,013. n.e.s. 680,653 lbs. 803,345. Wool men'a overcoats, suits & Truck & bus casings 3,502,736 92,466,132. pants 188,611 3,169,329. Solid tires for automobiles & Fur felt hats, men's & boys' 50 3l4. trucks l3,574 lbs. 378,643. Wool fabrics, n.e.s. 408,827 lbs. 679,076. Tire sundries & repair materials, Linoleum 121,019 sq. yd. 64,152. excl. camelback 2,020,571 lbs. 1,635,739. Clothing, nurses -- ll,78l. Casings & tubes excl. automobile 749,056 7,595,759. Clothing, gas protective -- 4,102. automobile casings, excl. truck & Felt base floor coverings 114,797 sq. yd. 58,45l. bus 2,701,081 lbs. 6,659,880. Oilcloth, shelf, table & wall 1,015,886 sq. yd. 352,319. automobile inner tubes 2,693,162 6,485,611. Waterproof outer garments 176,962 7l0,l29. Camelback 206,472 lbs. 52,290. Cements 7l8,894 lbs. l,016,937. Page ten Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars COTTONS COTTONS, continued Cotton gauze & sterile bandage Cotton heavy filter, hose, belting absorbent cotton 428,391 lbs. $ 330,025. duck 70,229 sq. yd. $ 52,072. Blankets 23l,905 723,463. Cotton ounce duck l5,944,996 sq. yd. 9,634,702. Cotton fabric napped, excl. flannel 277,218 sq. yd. l30,803. Cotton sewing thread 3,282,633 lbs. 4,304,611. Cotton denims 8,536,926 sq. yd. 2,240,504. Cotton carded yarn, gray 165,389 lbs. 91,041. Cotton drill, twill, etc. 70,290,453 sq. yd. 35,769,818. Cotton aheets & pillow cases 154,072 doz. 1,796,315. Cotton sheeting 11,748,l89 sq. yd. 2,299,442. Cotton rags, excl. paper stock 3,506 lbs. 192. Cotton fabric apparel women Cotton chscl. & gauze blch. dyed 156,637 sq. yd. 22,036. children, n.e.s. 73,l85 lbs. 74,091. Curtain draperies & cotton house Cotton goods, combed, carded, furnishings, n.e.s. -- 210,853. n.e.s. 52,362 sq. yd. 6,137. Huck damask plain twils. twling. -- 176,893. Bags of jute 5,538 lbs. 1,416. Cotton msnufactures, n.e.s. -- 2,891,764. Sisal, sunn, etc., twine & cordage l0,879,108 lbs. 1,887,935. Cotton printcloth, bleached 1,67,468 sq. yd. 295,757. Manila cordage 15,454 lbs. 5,364. Cotton soft wastes, n.e.s. 4,410 lbs. 336. Cotton underwear, men's 101,302 doz. 844,092. Cut card yarn blch. col. nov. 77,288 lbs. 45,985. Cotton flannels, blch. or col. 4,504,083 sq. yd. 765,934. Cotton hard waste yarn thread 32,407 lbs. 3,877. Cotton work gloves, mittens, Cotton table damask, in the pc. 111,470 sq. yd. 5,089. gauntlets & hosiery 34,526 doz. pr. l28,589. Cotton sweatera, pullovers, etc., Cotton men'a jackets & wind- men's 1,500 2,520. breakers 18,0l7 96,244. Cotton print cl. yarn fab. over Cotton cloth, gray 289,688 sq. yd. 45,068. 36x32 ct. 737,219 sq. yd. 100,370. Cotton twine, rope & cordage, Cotton remnants, n.e.s. 17,550 lbs. 9,803. excl. tire 1,355,256 lbs. 706,488. Cotton pile fabrics, n.e.s. 500 sq. yd. 425. Cotton fabrics, col. yarn, n.e.s. 3,759,396 sq. yd. 858,647. Cotton knit fabrics, in the pc. 573,757 lbs. 616,04l. Cotton duck & awning materials 3,837,445 sq. yd. 3,810,789. Cotton narrow fabrics, n.e.s. -- 231,525. Cotton men's work clothing, n.e.s. 61,247 doz. 967,457. Cotton woven belting for machines 396,038 lbs. l87,474. Cotton men's clothing of woven Cotton braids, bindings,etc. -- 7,006,954. fabrics, n.e.s. 8,887 doz. 255,660. Cotton bags, new 365,359 lbs. 182,892. Page eleven Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars WOOD & WOOD PRODUCTS WOOD & WOOD PRODUCTS, continued Boards, doug. fir, dress, scantlings 39 M bd.ft. $20,625. Filing folders, cards & other office Furniture, chief value wood, n.e.s. -- 8,486. forms 37,500 lbs. $ 10,619. Handles for striking tools 4,762 doz. 9,457. Writing paper 18,603,029 lbs. 3,128,385. Millwork house fixtures, n.e.s. -- 1,139. Vulcanized fiber sheets, etc. 10,044,901 lbs. 2,454,153. Oars & paddles, boat 20,934 32,75l. Papeteries 2,675 lbs. 296. Wood manufactures, n.e.s. -- 248,609. Paper & paper products, n.e.s. -- 385,871. Wood lath 39 M 4,220. Paper bags, excl. heavy shipping 210 lbs. l9. Art cork, block, gaskets, etc. 869 lbs. l,964. Paper cash-register, adding machine 227,145 lbs. 61,657. Cork balls, bobbers, buoys, etc. 1,129 lbs. 602. Paper boxes & cartons, n.e.s. 1,236 lbs. 373. Natural cork manufactures, n.e.s. 4,726 lbs. 7,870. Cork, wood or bark, unmfrd. 38,544 lbs. 6,225. CHEMICALS Paper, newsprint 27,439 lbs. 907. Acetic acid 132,934 lbs. 27,505. Furniture, wood, n.e.s, cov. upholstery -- 82. acetone 26,834,746 lbs. 2,275,677. Paper, book, not coated 1,093,888 lbs. l70,581. Acetophenetindine 26,815 21,074. Paper, wrapping, excl. Kraft 793,154 lbs. l19,873. Acetylsadicylic acid (aspirin) Paper, cover 72,242 lbs. 7,458. tablet -- 475. Paper, greaseproof, waterproof 8,373,322 lbs. l,333,992. Acetylsalicylic acid in bulks 44,578 lbs. l49,358. Paper, surface coated, n.e.s. 250,060 lbs. 109,101. Acrylonitrile 2,345 lbs. 1,055. Cigarette paper, cigarette books, Alchohols, n.e.s. 701,408,317 lbs. 94,941,346. cover 2,043,178 lbs. 1,070,771. Alcohol, denatured, solidified 1,822,55l lbs. 188,032. Tissue paper & crepe, n.e.s. 571,796 lbs. 421,841. Aluminum compounds, n.e.s. 1,082 lbs. 62l. Bristols & bristol board 68,864 lbs. 7,939. Aluminum chloride, anhydrous 158,661 lbs. 14,845. Paper, Kraft wrapping 343,982 lbs. 39,383. Ammonium compounds, n.e.s. -- 105,775. Paper, toilet 92 lbs. 1l. Amonia, anhydrous 459,811 lbs. 95,911. Paper, board, n.e.s. l80,9l4 lbs. 18,695. Ammonia, aqua 3,998 lbs. 3l8. Fiber insulation board 248,891 sq. ft. 53,666, Ammonium bicarbonate 100 lbs. 13. Paper sheathing & building 327,000 lbs. 7,909. Ammonium carbonate 2,58l lbs. 1,250. Box board, n.e.s. 147,157 lbs. 6,094. Ammonium chloride 302,100 lbs. 15,507. Blotting paper 10,868 lbs. 6,835. Ammonium nitrate 4,113,567 lbs. 492,096. Page twelve A Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CHEMICALS, continued Amyl acetate 56,890 lbs. $ 8,543. aniline oil 7,009,316 lbs. 962,718. Antimony salts & compounds, n.e.s. 122 lbs. 530. Acetic anhydride 438,720 lbs. 40,749. Acids & anhydrides, n.e.s. 1,026,661 lbs. 123,126. acids & anhydrides, inorganic, n.e.s. 659,134 lbs. 126,406. Arsenious oxide 50,824 lbs. 50,814. Baking powder 54 lbs. 12. Benzocaine, benzoate, etc. 25,453 lbs. 129,038. Benzoic acid tech. & med. gr. 9,803 lbs. 4,284. Benzol or benzene 1,634 gal. 878. Bleaching powder 30,730 lbs. 2,131. Boric acid 1,838,257 lbs. 94,953. Bromine, bromide, bromates, nes 169,101 lbs. 76,784. Buna, S 17,967,832 lbs. 6,426,372. Butanol 14,384,133 lbs. 3,039,314. Butyl acetate 11,193,203 lbs. 2,147,276. Calcium nitrate 4,940 lbs. 1,745. Caesium salts & compounds 22 lbs. 2,300. Caffein 82,422 lbs. 212,018. Caffein salts & compounds 52,225 lbs. 194,129. Calcium carbide 1,696,791 lbs. 93,114. Calcium chloride 1,747,249 lbs. 21,981. Campher, natural, synthetic 3,224,821 lbs. 1,373,382. Carbon, black or gas black 5,065,003 lbs. 312,866. Carbon tetrachloride 109,788 lbs. 8,445. Carbons, animal charcoal, n.e.s. 27,234 lbs. 3,312. Part B Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CHEMICALS, continued Casein 148,364 lbs. 54,230. Castor oil 240 gals. 458. Cellulose-acetate flake, etc, 5,117 lbs. 2,123. Cellulose acetate sheets, etc. 285,270 lbs. 245,676. Cellulose plastic mold comp, 1,359 lbs. 812. Cellulose plastic film support 225,992 lbs. 249,480. Cementing preparations, n.e.s. 312,081 lbs. 22,750. Chemical specialty compouads, n.e.s. -- 2,315,756. Chemical pigments, n.e.s 92,583 lbs. 34,817. Cements for sealing cans 224,775 lbs. 40,807. Chlorine 2,000 lbs. 400. Chrome pigments 51,426 lbs. 11,746. Chromic acid 50,989 lbs. 8,759. Chromium salts & compounds n.e.s. 150,000 lbs. 34,805. Citric acid 2,138,555 lbs. 715,641. Cleaning & washing compounds specialty 39,729 lbs. 6,495. Coaltar acids, n.e.s. 101,428 lbs. 31,211. Coaltar colors, dyes, stains & color lakes 2,627,410 lbs. 1,108,534. Coaltar dyes, n.e.s. 407,184 lbs. 489,258. Coaltar, crude 17,203,267 lbs. 694,768. Coaltar intermediates, n.e.s. 6,703,480 lbs. 1,938,035. Coaltar products, finished, 1,790,573 lbs. 1,498,912. Color lakes and toners 23,147 lbs. 17,719. Copper salts & compounds, n.e.s. 42,875 lbs. 32,659. Copper sulphate 230,140 lbs. 12,557. Creslyc acid & creols 340,677 lbs. 53,108. Page thirteen A Item Quantity CHEMICALS, continued Cupric oxide 4,194 lbs. $ 1,105. Dental creams 78 lbs. 68. Dextrine or British gum 18,100 lbs. 989. Dibutyl & diethylphtalate, etc. 12,497,577 lbs. 2,755,992. Dimethylaniline 4,350,417 lbs. 957,918. Diphenylamine 3,130,720 lbs. 690,908. Disinfectants, household & Indus- trial, etc. 603,451 lbs. 132,895. Dyeing, tanning extracts, n.e.s. 9,672 lbs. 7,648. Elixirs, liquid solutions, n.e.s. ---- 6,758. Ester gums 60,000 lbs. 14,127. Ethyl acetate 12,419,432 lbs. 1,632,875. Ethyl ether 2,288 lbs. 502. Ethyl fluid 558,766 gals. 2,055,864. Ethylene chlorhydrene 301,860 gals. 63,465. Ethylene dibromide 3,734,900 gals. 720,128. Ethylene glycol 43,319,367 gals 5,124,760. Ethylene glycol 3,174,020 gals. 343,554. Fish oils & concentrates 744,200 gals. 3,372,847. Flavoring extracts, natural 1,162 gals. 17,127. Flavoring extracts, synthetic 4,865 gals. 29,075. Flavor & perfume mat., synthetic, n.e.s. 280,750 lbs. 290,587. Floor wax & polishes for wood furn. 151 gals. 48. Formaldehyde, 40% solution 192 gals. 27. Frierfsyl phosphate 26,248 gals. 6,693. Gaseous refrigerants, n.e.s. 20,849 gals. 5,802. Gases, liquefied & solid. n.e.s. 412,381 gals. 297,233. Part B Quantity Cost in dollars Item CHEMICALS, continued Gases, lung irritant, n.e.s 5,190 lbs. 8,261. Gases, screening smoke 110,215 lbs. 7,930. Glandular products, etc. --- 944,747. Glycerin 4,794,752 lbs. 1,001,189. Glycerin, 100% glyerol basis 25,976,878 lbs. 4,639,518. Helius gas 56,640 cu.ft. 948. Hexamethylene tetramine 25,447,742 lbs. 5,364,296. Hydrochloric acid 192,505 lbs. 12,499. lndustrial chemicals, n.e.s. --- 2,810,455. Insecticides, etc., household & in- dustrial 12 lbs. 2. Iodine, n.e.s. 15 lbs. 32. Iridium salts & compounds 1 lbs. 124. Indigo, synthetic 4,489 lbs. 3,453. Kalsomine o.c.w. paints, dry 34,236 lbs. 11,786. Lacquers, nitrocell clear 13,598 lbs. 27,050. Lacquers, nitrocell pigmented 2,276 lbs. 3,335. Lampblack 89,753 lbs. 8,434. Licorice extract & mass ---- lbs. 12. Litharge 9,704 lbs. 1,567. Liquid gum inhibitors --- 87,002. Logwood extract 42,620 lbs. 9,211. Manganese chloride 11 lbs. 8. Manganese salts & compounds, 10 lbs. 13. n.e.s. Medical chemicals, bousehbold, ln small pkgs., liquids 449. Medicinal chemicals, household, in small pkgs, solids ---- 7,008. Page fourteen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CHEMICALS, continued CHEMICALS, continued Medicinal chemicals for Prescrip- Ocher, umber & iron oxide, n.e.s. l22,557 lbs. $ 5,366. tion use n.e.s. -- $ 7,763,950. Organic chemicals, n.e.s. 8,100,468 lbs. 4,197,742. Mercuric chloride 465 lbs. l,l62. Oxalic acid 23,450 2,726. Mercury salts & compounds, n.e.s. 570 lbs. 1,308. Paints, bitimious liquid plastic -- 188,2?4. Metal working compounds l,357,724 lbs. 189,152. Paints, colors, paste, oil, n.e.s. 2,341,892 lbs. 279,679. Methanol 4,830,148 gal. 1,526,629. Paints, etc., ready mixed, n.e.s. 176,211 gal. 298,321. Methanol l,256,097 lbs. 59l,856. Phenol, carbolic acid 17,906,825 lbs. 9,755,822. Methyl ethyl ketone 70 lbs. 27. Phenolformaldehyde fab. mold 26,635 lbs. 24,369. Methylmethacrylt forms, not laminated749,503 lbs. 709,899. Phenolformaldehyde forms, lam. 1,690 lbs. 7,162. Methyl methacrylate molded 24,858 lbs. 23,930. Phenolformaldehyde resins 999,930 lbs. 151,800. Methyl methacrylatc not molded 71,3l0 lbs. 59,682. Phosphoric acid 248,655 lbs. 63,446. Methyl methacrylate, unfabricated 107,823 lbs. l01,825. Phosphorous, elemental 1,174,524 lbs. 180,796. Mineral oil, white 15,050 gal. 5,289. Phthalic anhydride 134,400 lbs. 18,145. Molybdenum trioxide 300 lbs. 529. Petroleum oil sprays, agricultural 832 ga1s. 986. Nanillin, all types 2,300 lbs. 4,986. Picric acid 3,309,490 lbs. 715,942. Naphthalene 22 lbs. 6. Pigments, mineral earth, n.e.s. 2,160 lbs. 39. Napthol & flakes, beta 275,840 lbs. 64,246. Plasters n.e.s. -- 90,325. Nickel salts & compounds, n.e.s. 100,100 lbs. 35,036. Polyisobutylene 118,600 lbs. 48,386. Nickel chloride 660 lbs. 660. Polymers, etc, fabricated & un- Nickel oxide 1,100 lbs. 386. fabricated 3,046,893 948,982. Nickel sulfate 22,000 lbs. 2,970. Polymers of styrene, etc. 135,949 lbs. 95,996. Nicotine sulfate l68 bls. 140. Polishes, automobile 480 lbs. 75. Nitric acid 52,117 lbs. 7,433. metal and stove 4,650 lbs. 500. Nitrocell solution not over 12% nit. 51,215 lbs. 37,143. Potassium compounds, n.e.s. 696,938 lbs. 183,666. Nitrocell solution, over 12% nit. 93,791 lbs. 24,189. Potassium bicarbonate & mix. 81,817 lbs. 8,182. Nitro derivatives of benzene, etc. 760,330 lbs. 109,083. Potassiun bichromate chromate 2,084,471 lbs. 257,7l7. Nitrogen, chemical materials, nes. 1,191,757 lbs. 38,887. Potassium bitartrate & mix. 4 lbs. 3. Nylon 250 lbs. 138. Potassium bromine 85,583 lbs. 22,515. Potassium bromide 369,702 lbs. 80,817. Page fifteen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CHEMlCALS, continued Potassium carbonate & mix. 1,568,116 lbs. $ 104,550. CHEMICALS, continued Potassium chlorate & mix. 2,013,317 lbs. 213,665. Resins, urea 50,001 lbs. $ 21,525. Potassium chromium sulfate 150,000 lbs. 19,454. Potassium cyanide & mix. 18,640 1bs. 11,001. Rhodium salts & compounds l lbs. 165. Potassium hydroxide 471,082 1bs. 67,985. Rochelle salts 400 lbs. 290. Potassium nitrate pp May 1, 1937 1,302,462 lbs. 88,369. Rubber compound agents, n.e.s. 845,885 lbs. 371,990. Potassium nitrate, n.e.s. 3,778,284 lbs. 254,842. Rubber compounding agents 998,237 lbs. 437,886. Potassium permanganate & mix. 228,864 lbs. 43,907. Salicylic acid tech. & med. 215,800 lbs. 57,395. Potassium sulfate 290,125 lbs. 40,496. Salves, ointments, burns, etc. -- 44,463. Proprietary medicinal prepara- Serums, antitoxins, human use -- 2,109,323. tions, n.e.s. -- 802,922. Scouring bricks, paste, etc. 74,060 lbs. 13,605. Pyroxylin plastic film support 383,628 lbs. 300,881. Soda lime 7 lbs. 3. Pyroxylin sheets, rods, etc. 439,095 lbs. 321,928. Sodium benzoate tech & med. 4,523 lbs. 2,095. Photographic chem. coaltar 5,235 lbs. 7,448. Sodium bicarbonate 31,008 lbs. 2,151. Phenolphthalein 326 lbs. 347. Sodium bichromate & chromate 3,173,204 lbs. 233,509. Quinine salts, n.e.s. 17,750 oz. 15,946. Sodium bromide 1,050,l12 lbs. 281,530. Quinine salts, compounds, n.e.s. 185 oz. 817. Sodium carbonate calcined 4,380,285 lbs. 87,292. Reagent chemicals for laboratory use -- 143,513. Sodium chlorate 600 lbs. 450. Reagents, synthetic collecting 6,870,336 lbs. 1,370,859. Remedies, malaria, etc., n.e.s. -- 117,276. Sodium compounds, n.e.s. 2,754,447 lbs. 272,651. Red lead, dry 253,000 lbs. 23,813. Sodium cyanide 1,960,250 lbs. 198,119. Red lead, in oil 440,682 lbs. 46,430. Sodium hydrosulphite & compounds 391,650 lbs. 9,401. Resins, alkyd 1,458 lbs. 427. Sodium hydroxide 195,405,715 lbs. 4,024,739. Resins, gums, synthetics, n.e.s. 335,903 lbs. 89,056. Sodium nitrate ll May l, l937 52,700 lbs. 3,531. Resins, synthetic, n.e.s, forms Sodium phosphate 50,125 lbs. 3,294. laminated 68,367 lbs. 59,602. Sodium silicate 35,104 lbs. l,3l3. Resins, synthetic, n.e.s., forms, Sodium tetraborate 52,393 lbs. 4,182. non-laminated 185,968 lbs. 180,555. Starch 48 lbs. 4. Resins, tar-acid, n.e.s. 580,014 lbs. 156,086. Strontium nitrate 23,275 lbs. 6,793. Strontium oxylate 14,000 lbs. 9,892. Strychnine & salts thereof 950 oz. 953. Sulfanilamide 27,195 lbs. 28,303. Page sixteen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars CHEMICALS, contined CHEMlCALS, continued Sulfathiazole & derivatives 4,300 lbs. $ 30,272. Whiterite l1,200 lbs. $ 336. Sulfadiazine & derivatives 7,971 lbs. 92,065. Xylene, xylol 5,737 lbs. 1,600. Sulfonamide drugs, n.e.s. l19 lbs. 510. Zinc oxide 32,629 lbs. 3,305. Sulphuric acid, fuming 2l8,488 lbs. 19,392. Zinc salts & compunds, n.e.s. 7,705 lbs. 6,683. Sulphuric acids, n.e.s. 900,908 lbs. 62,197. Zinc sulfate 28 lbs. 8. Tablets, powders, ointments, n.e.s. -- l,777,286. Tantalum salts & compounds 550 lbs. 901. LEATHER GOODS Tartaric acid 246 lbs. 201. Wearing apparel 1,333 3,235,486. Textile specialty compounds, n.e.s. 11,343 lbs. 5,632. Boots & shoes, men's 5,396,651 pr. 22,773,758. Theobromine & salts & compounds 59,122 lbs. 132,317. Shoes, infants, children 45,373 pr. 50,781. Theophylline salts thereof 64 oz. 28. Boots & shoes, youths & boys, Thickol 2,022 lbs. 1.001. women & misses 150,297 pr. 499,020. Thinners for nitrocell lacquer 7,042 gal. 7,466. Footwear, leather sole & upper 1,356,395 pr. 5,687,539. Tin chloride 77 lbs. 95. Leather, calf & Kid skin 5,381,631 sq.ft.1,645,944. Tin oxide 1,000 lbs. 520. Leacher, upper, n.e.s. 21,272,175 sq.ft.6,6l3,801. Titanium dioxide & pigments 20 lbs. 2. Leather, for soles 51,918,361 lbs. 23,507,190. Toluene, toluol l9,986,672 lbs. 12,116,708. Sole leather, beads,back&sides l6,848,339 lbs. 7,841,336. Tungsten acid 2,250 lbs. 6,886. Leather, for soles, outer 5,736,567 dozpr23,003,594. Urea 21,000 lbs. 916. Leather, cut stock, excl. outer sole -- 5,705,334. Vaccines, human use 13,035 lbs. 800,497. Discontinued models old styles & Vanadium oxide -- 21,197. second-hand shoes -- l28,472. Vanadium salts & compounds, n.e.s 4,944 lbs. 24,743. Leader case bag & strap 345,147 sq. ft. 152,767. Vanadium sulfide 1 lb. 10. Leacher belting, new 361,902 lbs. 438,042 Vanillin 28,352 lbs. 64,331. Belting leather, n.e.s. l18,562 lbs. 66,135. Varnishes 52,327 gal. 82,314. Belts to be worn, leather -- 1,595,893. Vitamins & vitasterols, n.e.s. 2,285,641 lbs. 22,454,053. Sole & belting leather offal, shldr. Water softeners, etc. 2,630,l5l lbs. 277,264. neck, belly 2,802,385 lbs. 1,080,089. White lead dry 34,823 lbs. 3,527. Leather, cattle side 10,096,372sq.ft 3,021,723. White lead, in oil 1,568,542 lbs. 135,947. Coat & kid, excl. bl. 428,870 sq.ft. 132,942. Page seventeen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars LEATHER GOODS. continued FOODSTUFFS, continued Leather lining, ex. sh. & lamb 125 $ 94. Milk & cream condensed 60,019,643 lbs. $ 9,027,160. Leather & tanned skins, n.e. s. -- 491,068. Milk & cream evaporated 8,942,706 lbs. 4,905,667. Leather manufactures, n.e.s. -- 14,866. Milk, dried whole skimmed 159,921,528 lbs. 30,804,571. Luggage 82 858. Butter 217,660,666 lbs. 103,673,250. Fur manufactures, n.e.s. -- 4,75O. Butter oil, & butter spreads 7,1ll,737 lbs. 4,168,845. Oleo oil, edible, oleo stock, edible POODSTUFFS tallow, edible, lard, incl. neutral, Meat, canned, n.e.s. 72,000 lbs. 25,762. oleomargarine 791,822,417 lbs. 124,387,146. Poultry, live 6,300 lbs. 7,384. Beef & veal, fresh or frozen 89,238 lbs. 13,786. Cheese, processed blended spreads, Beef & veal, pickled or cured 32,400 lbs. 6,383. cheese, n.e.s. 79,926,896 lbs. 2,904,957. Pork, pickled, salted, fresh, Gelatin, edible 18,690 lbs. 16,653. frozen 529,814,747 lbs. 77,010,566. Meat extract & bouillon cubes 685 lbs. 1,185. Ham & shoulders, cured 27,355,903 lbs. 8,794,783. Other edible animal products, n.e.s. -- 222,593. Bacon 70,531,571 lbs. 11,790,369. infants' foods, malted milk, etc. 115,663 lbs. 21,022. Cumber1and & Willshlre sides 40,000 lbs. 10,400. Barley 477,30l bu. 707,672. Sausage, bologna, etc., not canned 1,301,439 lbs. 477,075. buckwheat 5,744 bu. 17,446. Sausage ingredients, cured 573,031 lbs. 82,876. Corn 30,429 bu. 194,230. Meats, n.e.s. includ. snoked Hominy & corn grits 1,645,02l bu. 45,600. poultry 33,610,181 lbs. 16,130,915. Kafir & milo 142 bu. 870. Beef, canned 16,710,448 lbs. 4,735,745. Oats 120,830 bu. 91,231. Pork, canned 297,186,838 lbs. 123,784,465. Oatmeal groats & rolled oats in Sausage, bologna, etc., canned 583,479,422 lbs. 204,150,308. bulk, in packages 50,539,897 lbs. 2,220,748. Chicken, canned 109,793 lbs. 46,879. Cornstarch & corn flour 478,692 lbs. 36,663. Other canned meats, excl. chicken 2,405,696,825 lbs. 180,764,722. Paddy or rough rice 9,089,681 lbs. 478,984. Tushenka, canned 166,650,966 lbs. 70,335,231. Milled rice, incl. browa rice, Fish, canned 291,227 lbs. 41,882. broken, etc. 126,387,202 1bs. 7,893,998. Eggs dried 242,459,249 lbs. 280,800,963. Rye 10,268 bu. 36,300. Eggs in the shell 1,883 doz. 4,038. Wheat 1,512,973 bu. 2,119,872. Wheat floar, n.e.s. 26,929 bar. l47,509. Page eightteen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars FOODSTUFFS, continued FOODSTUFFS, continued Wheat flour, wholly of U.S. wheat 7,806,589 bar. $34,527,968. Oranges, tangerines, & grapefruit 810 boxes $ 4,884. Marcaroni, spaghetti, etc. 353,224 lbs. 53,103. Pears, fresh or frozen 750 boxes 75. Wheat cereal foods, ready to eat 171,734 lbs. 19,088. Sugar 1,019,602,323 boxes 59,128,817. Wheat cereal foods, to be cooked 1,496,043 lbs. 100,795. Honey 29,693 lbs. 10,770. Wheat semolina 57,869,814 lbs. 2,514,115. Molasses 18 gals. 14. Cereal foods, n.e.s. 15,613,037 lbs. 1,462,l45. Glucose, dry 35,1l0 lbs. 3,686. Grains & preparations, n.e.s. -- 4,199,246. Coffee, roasted 1,055,552 lbs. 354,612. Feeds, n.e.s. 11,053 tons 7l4,120. Coffee extracts & substitutes 15,782 lbs. 4,9l9. Beans, dry, ripe 492,521,079 lbs. 30,353,423. Cbocolate candy, candy excl. choco- Beans, seed 11,974,704 lbs. 2,353,676. late, confections, n.e.s. 946,464 lbs. l96,927. Peas, dry, ripe 59,116,953 lbs. 3,423,782. Chocolate & cocoa 62,696 lbs. 16,121. Peas, seed 16,324,197 lbs. 1,863,607. Cinnamon, clovca, uaground spices, Chickpeas 80,000 lbs. 6,557. pepper 596,861 lbs. l30,824. Onions, fresh 661,932 lbs. 43,157. Fruit juices 724,234 gals. 1,537,036. Tomatoes, fresh 126 lbs. 12. Canned fruits 92,454 lbs. 10,839. Potatoes, fresh white 4,919,062 lbs. 227,601. Fruit preparations, n.e.s. l2,060,382 lbs. 342,861. Vegetables, fresh, n.e.s. 169,212. Preserved fruits, jelles & jams 6,858,277 lbs. 392,757. Canned vegetables & juices 33,339,138 lbs. 3,491,283. Dried & evaporated fruits 4,372,578 lbs. 780,880. Pickles, cucumber 136,021 lbs. 27,174. Vegetables, dehydrated-other Tomato table sauces 636 lbs. 133. preparations 43,590,879 lbs. 28,79l,213. Mayonnaise & salad-dressings, Nuts & preparations, n.e.s. 6,056,758 lbs. l,0l5,846. sauces 52,261 lbs. 10,333. Biscuits & crackers 89 lbs. 30. Olives 71 lbs. 33. Corn cereal food, ready to eat 83 lbs. 22. Vinegar 128,890 gals. 112,459. Farinaceous substances 30 lbs. 8. Yeast l,590,587 lbs. 504,036. Edible oils & cooking fats 235,115,716 lbs. 37,996,411. Pineapples 26 boxes 2l1. Soya flour, edible 103,772,226 lbs. 1,718,512. Vanilla beans 730 boxes 7,102. Wheat flour, wholly of U.S. wheat 2,050,6l3 cwt. 8,276,256. Apples 3,653 boxes 15,423. Beverages, syrup & flavors 286 gals. 433. Lemmons & limes 595 boxes 4,969. Banana, fresh 40,136 lbs. 2,571. Page nineteen Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars FOODSTUFFS, continued OILS, RESINS, ETC., continued Sunflower seed, oil, edible 11,685,500 lbs. $ 1,909,663. Oil of citronella 1,000 lbs. $ 3,750. Tea 311,913 lbs. 229,716. Oils, natural, essential & distilled, n.e.s 7,268 lbs. 46,767. Coffee, green 6,598,709 lbs. 94l,969. Oils, blended, etc. perfume flav. 9,600 lbs. 52,500. Qusbracbo extract 32,033 lbs. 2,979. SEEDS Crude drugs, herbs, etc, n.e.s. 153,198 lbs. 90,369. Grass & field, n.e.s. 12,154,637 lbs. 2,085,546. Fish oils, inedible 446,021 lbs. 95,594. Timothy 4,l27,285 lbs. 396,567. Oleic acid or red oil 1,400 lbs. 136. Alfalfa 459,851 lbs. 190,945. Hog grease & wool grease l45,387 lbs. 40,679. Red clover 1,298,906 lbs. 372,281. Animal greases, fats, inedible, n.e.s. 718,474 lbs. 93,968. Clover, excl. red 1,094,148 lbs. 269,287. Glue, animal, excl. casein 18,069 lbs. 1,650. Red top 277,0l3 lbs. 123,282. Cascien glue & inedible 2,905,592 lbs. 611,693. Kentucky blue grass 475,438 lbs. 197,765. Pine, oil pine, oil prod., etc. 92,080 lbs. 101,082. Carrot 1,985,485 lbs. 2,030,066. Tar & pitch of wood 500 lbs. 3l. Vegetable, n.e.s. l1,651,470 lbs. 11,665,584. Expressed oils & fats, inedible, n.e.s. 82,036,224 lbs. l1,173,362. Sugar beet 90,506 lbs. 53,322. Wood rosin bbl. 500 lbs. gr. wht. 18 lbs. 1. Digitalis 22,135 lbs. 14,164. Rosin, n.e.s. 200 lbs. 18. Soy Beans 669,841 lbs. 65,823. Gums & resons, n.e.s. 44,132 lbs. 14,430. Reeds, hemp, perilla, poppy,etc l,094,976 lbs. 319,004. Resins, natural, refined or modified 35,342 lbs. 19,768. Nursery greenhouse stock, n.e.s. 7,867. Shellac bleached & unbleached 4,998 lbs. 3,037. Animal products, indible, n.e.s. -- 810,978. OILS, RESINS, ETC, linseed oil, crude 530,771,576 lbs. 78,2l3,761. GENERATlNG EQUIPMENT Cottonseed oil, crude 2,524,536 lbs. 413,457. Batteries 1,755,640 4,278,997. Tung oil 75 lbs. 7l. Batteries, storage, flashlight, dry mul- Soybean oil, crude 8,260,581 lbs. 1,084,986. tiple cell 3,7l1,893 cel. 4,957,434. Caster oil, commercial 1,483 lbs. 257. Battery chargers, complete non-rotating 2,748 335,296. Vegetable oil, excl. olive 1,346,195 lbs. 175,057. Capacitors 1/2 kva & over 2,269 185,216. Coconut oil, crude 75 lbs. l5. Condensers, heaters, acc. & parts -- l2,924,077. Citrus oils 93,200 lbs. 139,485. Electric generateing sets, Diesel engines 6,285 62,538,679. Page twenty Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars GENERATING EQUIPMENT, continued PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES, continued Generators 6,214 $ 222,020,760. Parts for printing, etc. -- S 5,279. Generator accessories & parts, n.e.s. -- l1,728,204. Film, sensitized, 35 mm pos. -- 178,001. Self-contained lighting outfits, n.e.s. l,862 1,192,713. Film, sensitized, 35 mm neg. 2,811,545 lin.ft. 59,007. Power transformers, over 500 kva 696 6,161,470. Film, sensitized, 16 mm pos. l,103,000 lin.ft. l0,755. Distribution tranaformers, not over Film, sensitized, 16 mm neg. 335,464 lin.ft. 4,715. 500 kva 1,297 l,094,50l. Film, sensitized, 8 mm neg. 6,500 lin.ft. 260. Instrument transformers 753 70.965. Motion picture sound reproduction Transformers, n.e.s. 24,248 1,182,489. equipment -- 24,156. Mercury power rectifiers 484 438,774. Motion picture rolls, sensitized 67,560 927,370. Rotating converters 13,784 l8,178,498. Motion picture sound track, ex- Steam turbine generator sets 991 63,860,334. posed neg. 8,000 lin.ft. 80. Welding sets 4,689 7,309,158. Motion picture sound track, ex- posed pos. 8,274 lin.ft. 165. PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES Dry plates 1,462 doz. 6,273. Cameras, motion picture, 35 mm 4 7,656. Motion picture features, 34 mm. ex Cameras, aerial, excl. aircraft 28 38,366. posed 84,566 lin.ft. 40,010. Cameras, aerial, aircraft 20 6,931. Motion picture features, 16 mm 20,836 lin.ft. 20,836. Cameras, prof. scientific, etc. 55 35,527. positive Cameras, gun 3 1,700. Notion picture sbort subjects, Cameras, excl. motion picture, n.e.s. 178 4,651. 35 mm 336,000 lin.ft. $ 2,5O0. Parts of cameras, excl. lenses -- l49,476. Motion picture sbort subjects Motion picture sound recording 16 mm 27,328 lin.ft. 3,028. equipment -- 112,443. Motion picture short subjects Projectors, motion picture, 33 mm. 15 5,058. 35 mm 429,300 lin.ft. 5,466. Projectors, motion picture, 16 mm Motion picture trailers 256 lin.ft. 29. silent 8 2,400. Film X-ray, sensitized 30,874 l82,988. Projectors, motion picture, l6 mm Film X-ray, packs of sheets 370 sound 8 4,973. Photographic paper 752,752 lbs. 557,936. Screens, motion picture -- 24,762. Photographic supplies -- 3,735,191. Page twenty-one Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLIES, continued MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS, continued Carbon brushes & stock 150,144 lbs. $ 451,777. Neon tubes electrode sections -- $ 1,547. Carbon electrodes, n.e.s. -- 69,879. Diamonds for industrial use Cement, white, nonstain & other 576 bbl. 5,298. (carat) 168 1,284. Diamond grinding wheels 285 lbs. 55,780. Electric apparatus & parts, n.e.s. -- 5,981.840. ITEMS LISTED AS "MISCELLANEOUS" BY RUSSIANS, WITH Electric measuring machines 220 64,107. AND WITHOUT QUANTITlES Parts of elec. p.d portable tools -- 141,391. Radio sets & equipment -- 52,072,805. Testing machines, tension, etc. 414 309,786. Pottery and glass, n.e.s. 1,268,530. Parts of elec. welding sets -- 88,009. Salt 4,413,836 lbs. 149,104. Coal, bituminous & anthracite 25,574 tons 344,686. Fire brick, silica, n.e.s. 791,905. Typewriters & parts 273 41,133. Binoculara, microscopes, & ac- Vehicles & parte, n.e.s. -- 127,445. cessories 1,531,652. Winders & parts 8,470. asbestos products 642,970. Wheelbarrows, push carts & Carbon or graphite products 4,968,423. trucks 19,746. Graphite, ceylon amorphous 50,108 lbs. 10,831. Roofing materials 31,349. Graphite electrodes for furnace asphalt & bitumen manufac- or electrolytic 21,131,124 lbs. 2,980,89l. tutes, n.e.s. Graphite electrodes, n.e.s. 138,676. Emery powder 328,350 lbs. 32,818. 94. Lavatory sinks, fixtures, n.e.s. 6,352. Quartz piezo el freq cont. units 210. Marine engines, detachable 1,191 294,524. Nonmetallic mineral products, Marine engines, n.e.s. 2,234 11,420,239. excl. precious -- 377,441. Cars, railway, freight, over 10 Cryolite natural 23,500 lbs. 3,148. ton 9,029 31,429,043. Magnesite brick & shapes 107,966 lbs. 4,223. Lighting devices, battery, elec. 110,398. Mineral wax excl. paraffin 4,156,631 lbs. 545,104. Fire-fighting equipment excl. Mica manufactures or manufac- automotive 534,490. tures of, n.e.s. -- 93,027. Battery, electrical 5,383. Magnesia & manufactures 177,410 lbs. 18,743. Electric wiring supplies, etc. Mineral insulating materials -- 118,879. n.e.s. 519,570. Page twenty-two Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS, continued MICELLANEOUS ITEMS, continued Military items, n.e.s. -- $ l,789,005,783. Cement refractories 1,023,012 lbs $ 191,569. Radio ground equipment, aircraft -- 4,541,082. Chromite refractories l2,800 lbs. 759. Wheels, turbines & parts, water -- 472,245. Sterilizers l6,188 lbs. 2,107,350. Internalcombustion engine, ac- Surgical & medical instruments -- 7,015,192. cessories & parts -- 13,336,863. Surgical appliances -- 497,998. Internal-combustion engines l3,191 77,610,696. Fire clay 42 tons 14,469. Stationary motors 40,924 11,179,433. Abrasives, natural & artificial, Terra cotta manufactures, roof-tile -- 24,798. n.e.s. -- 17,053,409. Stone manufactures, n.e.s. -- l1,432. Surveying equipment & levels 803 191,125. Grindstones l27,748 lbs. 48,290. Optical lenses, not fitted to in- Equipment (R.R.) & parte, rail- struments 209 11,977. way car -- 7,391. Excavator & construction equipment 48,569,181. Railway parts -- 780,864. Mining & smelting equipment 66,159,901. Railway signals -- 9,914,560. Pumps & spare parts 12,459,744. Cars, railway, freight, not over Asbestos textiles, automotive 16,812. 10 tons 565 134,116. Merchant vessels 121 123,803,879. Cars, railway motor maint. etc. -- 20,992. Motor trucks, buses & chassis 508,367,622. Steam locomotives & engines 1,168 101,075,116. Tractors & parts 23,998,280. Locomotives 117 2,624,182. Locomotive parts & accessories -- 2,175,075. ITEMS LISTED BY RUSSIANS AS "MISCELLANEOUS" FOR 1945 Locomotive frames, cradles, etc. -- 577,427. ONLY, WITH AND WITHOUT QUANTITIES Steam engines 66 1,532,166. Polymers of styrene, etc. 66 lbs. 50. Steam engines, n.e.s., & parts -- 486,124. Electric wiring supplies apparatus Steam boilers, fire, water tube 475,251 sq. ft. 1,175,338. & parts, n.e.s. 1,979,407. Condensers, heaters, accessories Steam engines, mech. & turb. loco- & parts -- 4,963,417. motives, parts, frames, cradles, Tube boiler gauge glass 60 194. etc. 79,427,657. Steam specialties & parts -- 5,077,762. Pumps, centrifugal, rotary etc. & parts 6,417,175. Concrete and cement manufactures -- 27,051. Page twenty-three Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars MISCELLANEOUS FOR l945 ONLY, continued MISCELLANEOUS FOR 1945 ONLY, continued Woodworking machinery & parts $ 280,128. Explosives, sim. blast gelatine 34,000 lbs. $ 7,480. Ball bearings, parts, except balls 206,481. Trinitrotoluene (TNT) 31,831,984 lbs. 2,653,679. Ball bearings, parts, rollers 6,055,945. Explosives, n.e.s. 2,793,977 lbs. 446,212. Air compressors, sta. & port. 4,139,033. Safety fuses 66,590,000 lin.ft. 650,632. Paint spraying equipment & parts 938. Blasting caps 10,800,500 272,875. Industrial instruments, n.e.s. 679,157. Bombers, medium, 2 engine 163 29,634,139. Water meters & parts, n.e.s. 16,369. Bombers, light, 2 engine 97 10,854,705. Iron & steel pipe valves, bodies, n.e.s. 6,274,655. Bombers, U.S. patrol, 2 engine 54 9,646,885. Machines, measuring, precision, fur- Fighters, pursuit, 1 engine l,70l 101,219,909. naces, metal-working, industrial, Transports, heavy, 2 engine 1 265,783. parts, n.e.s. 9,200,001. Transports, medium, 2 engine 287 28,319,277. Guns, ground tnk mach. 50 caL 1,986. Trainers, advanced, 1 engine 54 1,260,954. Automatic arms, parts 3 178,216. Parts, accessories for bridge building 195,913. Parts, accessories for inf. weapons 1,294. Equipment kit mess field baking 1,389. Parts, accessories for fld. art. 66,777. Equipage military, n.e.s. 253,338. Guns AA, 99 mm 21 3,544,847. Small arms equipment 7,275. Anti-aircraft parts, accessories 1,139,654. Rifle parts & accessories 7,386. Guns, airc. 20 mm, HSMl 50 45,100. Parts, fittings, parachute, n.e.s. 39,512. Guns, airc. 37 mm, M4 63 144,562. Eng. radl. not over 1,830 pd. 154 1,156,427. Parts, aircraft armament 599,187. Eng. radl. over 1,830 in pd. 100 2,153,461. Parts, tank armament 207,446. Eng. not over 1,340 in pd. 19 418,000. Parts, naval guns 181,393. Eng. not over 1,830 in pd. 537 8,504,554. Tracers, 50 cal. 96,600 rnd. 22,702. Carb. cowls, valves, etc., aircraft 623,672. Armor-piercing cart. 50 cal. l91,800 rnd. 33,086. Parts, aircraft engine, n.e.s. 7,092,001. Incendiary, cart. 50 cal. 191,800 rnd. 33,086. Automatic pilots for aircraft 5 2,250. Components for small arms, tank Aircraft gyro instr. 3 3,150. guns, shells, etc. 6,970,174. Aircraft navig. instr. 4,402 483,354. powder, smokeless 22,075,681 lbs. 4,757,604. Directors, n.e.s. 4 62,000. Dynamite l0,781,450 lbs. 1,049,469. Parts for directors 95,150. Page twenty-four Item Quantity Cost in Dollars Item Quantity Cost in Dollars MlSCELLANEOUS FOR 1945 ONLY, continued MISCELLANEOUS FOR 1945 ONLY, continued Sights, artillery 500 $447,001. Lacquers, nitrocell pigmented 396 gals. $ 851. Sights, n.e.s. 2 243. Varnishes, oil spir. nat. syn 8,387 gala 10,99l. Parts telescope, periscope, sights 11,711. Sodium nitrate, n.e.s. 1,049,200 lbs. 72,804. Equipment, fire control, n.e.s. 176,673. Equipment, dairy farm -- cu1tivators, Radio ground equipment, aircraft 6,183,340. planters, mowers, harvesters, Navigational instruments, n.e.s. 1,638 267,743. binders, threshers, etc. 25,778. Quadrants gunners & range 180 4,725. Machine parts, agricultural, except 34,549. Compass magnetic gyroscopic 1,015 95,878. tractor Listening devices, sub 52,25l. Machinery & implements, agriculture Tachometers, excl. aircraft 464 31,012. -- 4,002. Trainers, aircraft pilot 1 23,160. Passenger cars, & chassis 34 77,786. Parts, military semi-trailers 106,948. Airc. radio trans. & rec. sets 1,094 1,163,680. Mobile communications units 134 4,807,982. Airc. radio trans. & rec. set pts. 4,399,394. Tanks, light, n.e.s. 4 212,501. Directors, range finders, airc. 19,150. Tanks, heavy, over 40 tons 1 96,886. Trans. etc. self-synchron., airc, 29,175. Trans-rec. tank radio sets 20 25,898. Instruments & parts, airc., n.e.s. 264,

05 марта 2013, 12:56

Ричард Сандерс назначен неисполнительным директором в совете директоров "ЕвроХима"

Ричард Сандерс назначен на пост неисполнительного директора в составе совета директоров компании "ЕвроХим", говорится в сообщении компании. Сандерс обладает более чем 30-летним опытом в отрасли по производству минеральных удобрений в Северной Америке, занимал руководящие должности в CF Industries и Terra Industries. Данное решение было принято на внеочередном общем собрании акционеров. Помимо этого участники избрали членов совета директоров. В новый состав совета директоров также вошли следующие представители: 1.Андрей Мельниченко, неисполнительный директор 2.Андреа Вайн, независимый неисполнительный директор 3.Кит Джексон, независимый неисполнительный директор 4.Николай Николаевич Пилипенко, неисполнительный директор 5.Владимир Викторович Столин, независимый неисполнительный директор 6.Дмитрий Степанович Стрежнев, исполнительный директор 7.Ричард Шис, не

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04 марта 2013, 05:41

Daniel Rolle: The Art of Failure

When Andrew Mason, the former CEO of Groupon, sat down at his desk last Friday morning he probably only half guessed the impact that the resignation note he posted online would make beyond the social tech industry. A far cry from the gushingly corporate full-page, open-letters published in many a global newspaper of late, his resignation and open admission of underperformance -- and ultimately failure -- was a refreshing interjection of modesty and humanity in an age where corporate communications are so frequently defined by consultant-speak, half-truths and distortion. It reminded us that, when properly articulated, "failure" need not be the clarion call of a carefully honed communications strategy, but can the precondition to communicating a new story about a (seemingly new) organisation, outlining a new way of operating, encouraging external and internal audiences to reframe perceptions. And an admirable combination of clarity, charm and humanity has provided Groupon -- whose reputation has been admittedly dogged by a toxic combination of hype, hope and hysteria, and early, unmediated, speculative investor confidence in the possibilities of social-led, digital enterprise -- with a platform from which to rebuild external (and internal) perceptions. "I'm OK with having failed at this part of the journey," Andrew Mason wrote in his open memo, posted on the Groupon external blog. "If Groupon was Battletoads," he wrote, "it would be like I made it all the way to the Terra Tubes without dying on my first ever play through." [Admittedly this foray into geekdom is a little obscure for my liking, but a quick Google will inform you that what Mason is trying to say is that his taking Groupon all the way from startup to IPO was either a colossal feat of genius or a haphazard miracle, depending on how charitably you want to interpret the metaphor.] Such candour is rare in an age where shareholder or stakeholder expectation fuels an ubiquitously inhumane, robotic approach to corporate communication; CEOs fuse almost indelibly with drab Investor Relations brochures; they coincide with the corporate grey pantone that laces every last watermarked 'personalised' note inside the Christmas hamper, promising 'relentless focus on results in the coming four quarters' in much the same way as the Terminator might interact with a hostile interlocutor. And one trait that too many corporates, and no more so that then their communicators, seem to share is the fear perpetuated by failure. Failure haunts the corporate communicator, spiralling into nightmarish, absurdist scenes involving a call late on Friday night from a pack of investigative journalists, a flurry of tweets, a demeaning hashtag, a red-eyed, red-faced appearance on the Today Show, an untimely, ashamed and grovelling apology aired ad-nauseum on rolling news channels and an auto-tuned, mocking YouTube video which becomes an instant meme and is re-blogged around the world. This fear is exhausting and completely unsustainable. In order to retain a sense of proportion (and a shred of sanity), corporate communicators must overhaul this paranoid, hysteric model in favour of a measured and compassionate one that accepts failure as an inevitable part of any human endeavour. This is rendered even more necessary given the series of recent monumental failures that have impacted the legacy of the entire capital-led system, and the modes of corporate and political story telling that communicators have traditionally lent on in times good and bad. From Lehman to Libor, we have seen the demise of traditional narratives framed by a teleological view of history -- that is, an historical narrative that seeks to identify effects framed by causes, dependent on predictable finalities and recognisable outputs justified by complex algorithms. And this outmoded understanding of history has thrown traditional readings of reputation out of joint with those normally articulated by the communications industry. We are in the midst of a reputation crisis; in a digital age, corporate, political -- even personal -- identities are fragile, constantly evolving, prone to destruction in seconds. The reputation crisis has been fuelled by an over investment -- literally and figuratively -- in a framework within which an organisation's corporate or political story can be defined by pre-identifable 'benchmarks,' 'touchpoints' or 'deliverables.' Organisations have been hoisted by their own petard, articulating corporate stories that centre on narrative trajectories based on 'key performance indicators' or outputs and models that attempts to frame a future shaped almost solely by the lexis of success, completion, consistency. Such positions belie an almost fanatic idolatry of scientific and mathematical certainties, absolute truths defined by back-office financial algorithms and "professional rigour" over the inevitable invasion of humanity and its propensity for error. It is in this sense that Andrew Mason's call to sanity and embrace of failure reframes the way in which organizations ought to deal with their inevitable deviation from unsustainable success-driven models of corporate behaviour. "Fail, fail again, fail better," wrote the poet, novelist and playwright Samuel Beckett. Against the rising tide of paranoid communicators and their 'relentlessly focused', ashen-faced leaders, nimble, innovative organisations will turn failures, mishaps and accidents into communications assets -- an opportunity to turn themselves inside out, welcome crowd-sourced and expert scrutiny, start afresh with new and innovative thinking. And through this redemptive process, they and their leaders will find a surprisingly progressive public sphere accepting of those that assume responsibility and lead through action, intervention and transparency. Everyone knows, after all, that very, very few ever make it all the way to the Terra Tubes without dying on their first ever play through.

Выбор редакции
02 марта 2013, 19:00

Tom Zeller Jr.: Can Humans Really Break The Planet?

If you're the sort of person who woke up Friday morning worrying not just about the potential for sudden economic chaos following the sequester, but also the potential for human population growth and industrial activity to spur sudden ecosystem collapse on a planetary scale, take heart (and perhaps a Xanax). Some reassuring words are percolating on both fronts -- though as it concerns the planet's health in particular, the accuracy of those reassurances is in question. On the first point: the sequester's impacts on the wider economy, while almost certainly painful in the long-run, will likely be uneven and gradual. This being an environmental column, I'll leave a fuller dispensation of these ideas to my far more qualified colleagues in the Business section, and you'll also find meditations on the topic here, and here and here. As for Planet Earth, a paper published Thursday in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution suggests that while human society does a very thorough job of modifying and, often enough, permanently and abruptly changing the dynamics of local and regional ecosystems, the collective impact of all this on a planetary scale is too often overstated. Dire warnings that our localized impacts could trigger global-scale "tipping points," after which the spinning cogs and gears that underpin our entire terrestrial biosphere are thrown abruptly and permanently out of whack, have no scientific basis, the authors argue. Global-scale changes, such that they are, come about smoothly and slowly, they say. "This is good news because it says that we might avoid the doom-and-gloom scenario of abrupt, irreversible change," Professor Barry Brook, lead author of the paper and director of Climate Science at the University of Adelaide in Australia, said in a statement accompanying the study's release. "A focus on planetary tipping points may both distract from the vast ecological transformations that have already occurred, and lead to unjustified fatalism about the catastrophic effects of tipping points." "An emphasis on a point of no return is not particularly helpful for bringing about the conservation action we need," Brook added. "We must continue to seek to reduce our impacts on the global ecology without undue attention on trying to avoid arbitrary thresholds." This, of course, flies directly in the face of a growing body of research over the last several years -- much of it suggesting that there are very real planetary boundaries beyond which the entire terra machina starts to break down. This was the core of an extensive exploration published in the journal Nature in 2009. In an email message, James E. Hansen, who heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and is an adjunct professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute, said that tipping points may unfold more smoothly than people generally understand, but that they represent points of no return nonetheless. He also suggested that dismissing the notion of global tipping points out of hand was a mistake. "Tipping points are real, albeit misunderstood by some people," he said. Last June, in another paper published in Nature, a team of "biologists, ecologists, complex-systems theoreticians, geologists and paleontologists, from the United States, Canada, South America and Europe," according the University of California, Berkeley, which spearheaded the study, argued that "population growth, widespread destruction of natural ecosystems, and climate change may be driving Earth toward an irreversible change in the biosphere, a planet-wide tipping point that would have destructive consequences absent adequate preparation and mitigation." The authors of Thursday's study suggest this is nonsense. To prove their point, the team of Australian, American and British scientists looked at the impacts of four fundamental ecosystem influencers: Climate change; land-use changes (turning forest to agricultural land, for example, or native grasslands to pasture); the fragmentation of various habitats; and overall reductions in the richness and diversity of species. There is little doubt that humans have a hand in all of these, and there is also little doubt they contribute to fundamental and quite often permanent changes in the way local and regional ecosystems work. As a very simple example, think of the fast-growing and aggressive plant kudzu -- artificially introduced to the U.S. by way of Japan in the late 19th century and now, well, everywhere. Amid a fertile stand of trees and scrub and their dependent wildlife, kudzu can easily take over, strangling the local native vegetation, stripping resident critters of their accustomed food sources, and, at some juncture, causing the interdependent system that had grown up in that spot to collapse, with little practical ability to bounce back. Sure, a new system is in place, but the "regime" has been changed. The authors of Thursday's study, however, suggest that the local impacts of any stressor -- be it kudzu, or even rising temperatures due to human-driven global warming -- are vastly different in disparate parts of the globe. This heterogeneity of responses suggests that, on the whole, the planetary system would remain pretty stable -- or at the very least, global-scale changes will tend to be very gradual, rather than abrupt and catastrophic. Reached as he was boarding a plane Friday morning, Anthony Barnosky, a professor of integrative biology at Berkeley and the lead author last summer's tipping-point study, suggested politely that the new analysis, which he had reviewed, was missing a fundamental point. "Bottom line, they seem to not be taking into account that humans now connect all the ecosystems they are regarding as unconnected," said Barnosky, who argued that while local and regional ecosystems have always had, and still maintain, some variation in how they respond to similar environmental stressors, humans have come along and linked those ecosystems in novel ways. Erle C. Ellis, an associate professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a co-author of Thursday's study, acknowledged those new connections. But in an email message he suggested that the impacts remain varied from place to place: Humans do move matter, energy and species across the planet, interconnecting ecosystems and populations like never before, and this does affect the biosphere. However, even when we move highly successful dominant species around -- like corn (maize) or kudzu (and other domesticates and other exotics), we find no evidence that this causes the entire biosphere to shift into a new state. Our effects on the biosphere are different everywhere (kudzu is not happy in the tundra, corn can't reproduce itself; we cut down trees in one region, they are regrowing in another, different areas respond differently to global climate change, acid rain, etc.) -- there is simply no evidence that these new global connectivities are causing a coherent or synergistic global response like a global tipping point. Even global climate change does not have uniform effects on the terrestrial biosphere, Ellis said, and ecosystems respond differently to the same changes in climate. He pointed to "wetlands and deserts responding to increased rainfall, [or] tundra and forest responding to increased temperatures." "There is no solid evidence that the entire biosphere is subject to a coherent tipping point interaction with the climate system," Ellis said. Not everyone buys this. Michael E. Mann, the climatologist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, called the new paper "thoroughly unconvincing and implausible." "We are not talking about random uncorrelated changes around the globe," Mann said, pointing by way of example to human-induced climate change. "We are talking about dramatic, coherent changes in climate around the world, in the form of unprecedented rates of warming, increased continental drought, extreme flooding and wildfires. Moreover, these are not simply additive, but interactive, with a whole array of other stresses on ecosystems around the world due to urbanization and habitat destruction, deforestation and environmental pollution." The totality of these stressors, Mann argued, is greater than the sum of its parts. "It's part of why scientists are predicting a collapse of coral reef ecosystems around the world in a matter of decades -- the combined result of ocean acidification, global warming, coastal pollution, and other factors," he said. "I suppose the authors would deny that this represents a global environmental tipping point." His skepticism was echoed by Paul R. Ehrlich, a professor of population studies in the department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University and president of the school's Center for Conservation Biology. Ehrlich, perhaps best known for sounding the alarm on the consequences of human population growth in the 1960s, said that while many of the finer points of the recent tipping-point paper were well-taken, the assertion that humans aren't likely to cause bedrock changes in the planetary system may be shortsighted. "The ecosystems of different continents are intimately interconnected by climate, fugitive dust, toxins, and human activities and health -- think epidemics, resource wars (possibly turning nuclear) and so forth, and thresholds are typical of all of them," Ehrlich said. "I think one of the major failures of our communication with the public has been not to emphasize that in Earth's history, transitions have often been quite rapid." If all this seems a bit academic, well, it is. But as both sides suggest, the debate bears significant implications for everyone, as the ledger of human impacts on the environment -- whether it's razing forests or killing off species or pumping planet-warming gases into the atmosphere -- continues to grow. Should there be a global tipping point out there, some line after which the whole planet breaks and loses the ability to sustain life as we know it, we'd surely not want to meet it. "No one, of course, thinks it's a binary thing -- that you're fine one day and screwed the next," said environmental activist and climate action provacateur Bill McKibben. "But the evidence suggests that if big things happen, they can trigger other big things: The temperature warms enough and then you get a lot of methane and carbon released from the far north, for instance." "One always hopes," McKibben said, "that the optimists will be proven right." This post has been updated to add comment from James E. Hansen and additional comment from Erle C. Ellis.

Выбор редакции
02 марта 2013, 19:00

Tom Zeller Jr.: Can Humans Really Break The Planet?

If you're the sort of person who woke up Friday morning worrying not just about the potential for sudden economic chaos following the sequester, but also the potential for human population growth and industrial activity to spur sudden ecosystem collapse on a planetary scale, take heart (and perhaps a Xanax). Some reassuring words are percolating on both fronts -- though as it concerns the planet's health in particular, the accuracy of those reassurances is in question. On the first point: the sequester's impacts on the wider economy, while almost certainly painful in the long-run, will likely be uneven and gradual. This being an environmental column, I'll leave a fuller dispensation of these ideas to my far more qualified colleagues in the Business section, and you'll also find meditations on the topic here, and here and here. As for Planet Earth, a paper published Thursday in the journal Trends in Ecology and Evolution suggests that while human society does a very thorough job of modifying and, often enough, permanently and abruptly changing the dynamics of local and regional ecosystems, the collective impact of all this on a planetary scale is too often overstated. Dire warnings that our localized impacts could trigger global-scale "tipping points," after which the spinning cogs and gears that underpin our entire terrestrial biosphere are thrown abruptly and permanently out of whack, have no scientific basis, the authors argue. Global-scale changes, such that they are, come about smoothly and slowly, they say. "This is good news because it says that we might avoid the doom-and-gloom scenario of abrupt, irreversible change," Professor Barry Brook, lead author of the paper and director of Climate Science at the University of Adelaide in Australia, said in a statement accompanying the study's release. "A focus on planetary tipping points may both distract from the vast ecological transformations that have already occurred, and lead to unjustified fatalism about the catastrophic effects of tipping points." "An emphasis on a point of no return is not particularly helpful for bringing about the conservation action we need," Brook added. "We must continue to seek to reduce our impacts on the global ecology without undue attention on trying to avoid arbitrary thresholds." This, of course, flies directly in the face of a growing body of research over the last several years -- much of it suggesting that there are very real planetary boundaries beyond which the entire terra machina starts to break down. This was the core of an extensive exploration published in the journal Nature in 2009. In an email message, James E. Hansen, who heads the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and is an adjunct professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute, said that tipping points may unfold more smoothly than people generally understand, but that they represent points of no return nonetheless. He also suggested that dismissing the notion of global tipping points out of hand was a mistake. "Tipping points are real, albeit misunderstood by some people," he said. Last June, in another paper published in Nature, a team of "biologists, ecologists, complex-systems theoreticians, geologists and paleontologists, from the United States, Canada, South America and Europe," according the University of California, Berkeley, which spearheaded the study, argued that "population growth, widespread destruction of natural ecosystems, and climate change may be driving Earth toward an irreversible change in the biosphere, a planet-wide tipping point that would have destructive consequences absent adequate preparation and mitigation." The authors of Thursday's study suggest this is nonsense. To prove their point, the team of Australian, American and British scientists looked at the impacts of four fundamental ecosystem influencers: Climate change; land-use changes (turning forest to agricultural land, for example, or native grasslands to pasture); the fragmentation of various habitats; and overall reductions in the richness and diversity of species. There is little doubt that humans have a hand in all of these, and there is also little doubt they contribute to fundamental and quite often permanent changes in the way local and regional ecosystems work. As a very simple example, think of the fast-growing and aggressive plant kudzu -- artificially introduced to the U.S. by way of Japan in the late 19th century and now, well, everywhere. Amid a fertile stand of trees and scrub and their dependent wildlife, kudzu can easily take over, strangling the local native vegetation, stripping resident critters of their accustomed food sources, and, at some juncture, causing the interdependent system that had grown up in that spot to collapse, with little practical ability to bounce back. Sure, a new system is in place, but the "regime" has been changed. The authors of Thursday's study, however, suggest that the local impacts of any stressor -- be it kudzu, or even rising temperatures due to human-driven global warming -- are vastly different in disparate parts of the globe. This heterogeneity of responses suggests that, on the whole, the planetary system would remain pretty stable -- or at the very least, global-scale changes will tend to be very gradual, rather than abrupt and catastrophic. Reached as he was boarding a plane Friday morning, Anthony Barnosky, a professor of integrative biology at Berkeley and the lead author last summer's tipping-point study, suggested politely that the new analysis, which he had reviewed, was missing a fundamental point. "Bottom line, they seem to not be taking into account that humans now connect all the ecosystems they are regarding as unconnected," said Barnosky, who argued that while local and regional ecosystems have always had, and still maintain, some variation in how they respond to similar environmental stressors, humans have come along and linked those ecosystems in novel ways. Erle C. Ellis, an associate professor in the Department of Geography and Environmental Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and a co-author of Thursday's study, acknowledged those new connections. But in an email message he suggested that the impacts remain varied from place to place: Humans do move matter, energy and species across the planet, interconnecting ecosystems and populations like never before, and this does affect the biosphere. However, even when we move highly successful dominant species around -- like corn (maize) or kudzu (and other domesticates and other exotics), we find no evidence that this causes the entire biosphere to shift into a new state. Our effects on the biosphere are different everywhere (kudzu is not happy in the tundra, corn can't reproduce itself; we cut down trees in one region, they are regrowing in another, different areas respond differently to global climate change, acid rain, etc.) -- there is simply no evidence that these new global connectivities are causing a coherent or synergistic global response like a global tipping point. Even global climate change does not have uniform effects on the terrestrial biosphere, Ellis said, and ecosystems respond differently to the same changes in climate. He pointed to "wetlands and deserts responding to increased rainfall, [or] tundra and forest responding to increased temperatures." "There is no solid evidence that the entire biosphere is subject to a coherent tipping point interaction with the climate system," Ellis said. Not everyone buys this. Michael E. Mann, the climatologist and director of the Earth System Science Center at Pennsylvania State University, called the new paper "thoroughly unconvincing and implausible." "We are not talking about random uncorrelated changes around the globe," Mann said, pointing by way of example to human-induced climate change. "We are talking about dramatic, coherent changes in climate around the world, in the form of unprecedented rates of warming, increased continental drought, extreme flooding and wildfires. Moreover, these are not simply additive, but interactive, with a whole array of other stresses on ecosystems around the world due to urbanization and habitat destruction, deforestation and environmental pollution." The totality of these stressors, Mann argued, is greater than the sum of its parts. "It's part of why scientists are predicting a collapse of coral reef ecosystems around the world in a matter of decades -- the combined result of ocean acidification, global warming, coastal pollution, and other factors," he said. "I suppose the authors would deny that this represents a global environmental tipping point." His skepticism was echoed by Paul R. Ehrlich, a professor of population studies in the department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University and president of the school's Center for Conservation Biology. Ehrlich, perhaps best known for sounding the alarm on the consequences of human population growth in the 1960s, said that while many of the finer points of the recent tipping-point paper were well-taken, the assertion that humans aren't likely to cause bedrock changes in the planetary system may be shortsighted. "The ecosystems of different continents are intimately interconnected by climate, fugitive dust, toxins, and human activities and health -- think epidemics, resource wars (possibly turning nuclear) and so forth, and thresholds are typical of all of them," Ehrlich said. "I think one of the major failures of our communication with the public has been not to emphasize that in Earth's history, transitions have often been quite rapid." If all this seems a bit academic, well, it is. But as both sides suggest, the debate bears significant implications for everyone, as the ledger of human impacts on the environment -- whether it's razing forests or killing off species or pumping planet-warming gases into the atmosphere -- continues to grow. Should there be a global tipping point out there, some line after which the whole planet breaks and loses the ability to sustain life as we know it, we'd surely not want to meet it. "No one, of course, thinks it's a binary thing -- that you're fine one day and screwed the next," said environmental activist and climate action provacateur Bill McKibben. "But the evidence suggests that if big things happen, they can trigger other big things: The temperature warms enough and then you get a lot of methane and carbon released from the far north, for instance." "One always hopes," McKibben said, "that the optimists will be proven right." This post has been updated to add comment from James E. Hansen and additional comment from Erle C. Ellis.

28 января 2013, 16:39

Frontrunning: January 28

CAT beats ex-Chinese fraud: $1.91, Exp. $1.70; Warns 2013 could be a "tough year"; sees 2013 EPS in $7.00-$9.00 range, Exp. $8.54, sees Q1 sales well below Q1, 2012 Yi Warns on Currency Wars as Yuan Close to ‘Equilibrium’ (BBG) Monte Paschi seeks new investor as scandal deepens (Reuters) Assault Weapons Ban Lacks Democratic Votes to Pass Senate (BBG) Toyota Again World's Largest Auto Maker (WSJ) Curious why all those Geneva Libor manipulators moved to Singapore? Bank probes find manipulation in Singapore's offshore FX market  (Reuters) Japan eased safety standards ahead of Boeing 787 rollout (Reuters) - so like Fukushima? Goldman is about to be un charge: Osborne cools on changing inflation target (Telegraph) Abe Predicts Bump in Revenue as Japan Emerges From Recession (BBG) - actually, "hopes" is the correct verb here Toxic Smog in Beijing Fueling Auto Sales for GM, VW (BBG) Fed waits for job market to perk up (Reuters) ... any minute now that S&P to BLS trickle down will hit, promise BofA shifts derivatives to UK (FT)   Overnight Media Digest WSJ * Shortly after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration issued safety rules in 2007 for using lithium-ion batteries on Boeing Co's 787 Dreamliner jets, an industry standards-setting group called for stricter testing to prevent battery fires on aircraft. But Boeing and FAA officials decided that since design and testing of the plane was so far along, mandating the tougher standards would disrupt years of joint safety work and unfairly delay production of the cutting-edge Dreamliners, said people familiar with the details. * At least 232 people died in a fire that swept through a crowded nightclub in the southern Brazilian city of Santa Maria early Sunday, local government officials said. * Barnes & Noble Inc expects to close as many as a third of its retail stores over the next decade, the bookseller's top store executive said, offering the most detailed picture yet of the company's plans for the outlets. * Nexen Inc, the Canadian oil-sands operator that Chinese state energy giant CNOOC Ltd has agreed to buy, said the two extended the deadline for the closing of that $15.1 billion proposed deal by 30 days, as they await U.S. government approval. * The head of foreign-exchange sales at Citigroup has created an alter ego, "Berniman," as part of an effort to generate votes in Euromoney's annual ranking of foreign-exchange firms. * Fisker Automotive Inc, the struggling maker of battery-powered sports cars, is in talks with several potential bidders as it accelerates a search for buyers and investors so it can keep operating, according to people familiar with the discussions. * EasyJet said Michael Rake is stepping down as chairman of the low-cost airline later this year.   FT FED WARNS ON LACK OF UNITY BY REGULATORS: Regulators in the United States are warning banks not to assume that countries will cooperate to stop the failure of a big financial group such as Lehman Brothers. OSBORNE COOLS ON CHANGING INFLATION TARGET: Britain's Finance Minister George Osborne is cooling to the idea of changing the Bank of England's inflation target to one focused on the amount of spending according to unnamed officials at the Treasury. BARCLAYS AND CREDIT SUISSE SET TO TEST WATER WITH NEW CLOs: In the first such move since new regulations, both the banks are preparing collateralised loan obligations, bundles of corporate loans which boomed until the 2008 subprime crisis in the United States, according to unidentified sources close to the deal. US FACES FRESH FINANCIAL SHOCK: Spending cuts of $1.2 trillion are likely to go ahead as Republicans in Congress push for reductions in spending at the Pentagon and on government programmes in the face of Obama's objections. STRONG CAR EXPORTS TO SLASH TRADE DEFICIT: Increased car production in the UK is expected to result in a trade deficit on automobiles of £150 million in 2012, the smallest since 1975. COMPUTER PATENTS HIT NEW PEAK: Over 14,000 patents were registered in 2012 via the International Patent Co-operation Treaty, up more than 20 percent compared to 2011.() TERRA FIRMA: HANDS TO 'MOVE ON' WITH 3 BILLION EURO FUNDRAISER The founder of the private equity company Terra Firma is to push ahead with a 3 billion euro fund to buy green energy infrastructure assets, according to people familiar with the matter.   NYT * America's top trade negotiator said President Obama was committed to reaching an agreement to smooth trade with the European Union, but only if it was written in a way that would overcome objections from farm groups and that could win congressional approval. * As U.S. federal authorities continue to press an insider trading investigation, SAC Capital Advisors, owned by Steven Cohen, is working to retain clients and staff members. * JPMorgan Chase & Co, the nation's largest bank, said its chief risk officer, John Hogan, would take a sabbatical. His departure follows a shake-up this week, when Martha Gallo was replaced as head of global compliance and regulatory management. * A bipartisan group of U.S. senators has agreed on a set of principles for a sweeping overhaul of the immigration system, including a pathway to American citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants that would hinge on progress in securing the borders and ensuring that foreigners leave the country when their visas expire. * Egypt President Mohamed Mursi declared a state of emergency and a curfew in three major cities on Sunday, as escalating violence in the streets threatened his government and Egypt's democracy.   Canada THE GLOBE AND MAIL * Kathleen Wynne won the Ontario Liberal leadership race and is set to become the first female premier in the province's history and the sixth female premier currently in office in Canada. * Canadian Finance Minister Jim Flaherty said the government is not happy with the work of the Parliamentary budget watchdog, the clearest indication yet that Ottawa is rethinking the post as the government's first Parliamentary Budget Officer, Kevin Page, prepares to leave. Reports in the business section: * CNOOC Ltd and Nexen Inc have extended a deadline to complete the $15.1 billion takeover of the Canadian oil and gas company by 30 days as they await U.S. regulatory approval. The deal, the largest Chinese overseas takeover in history, has already cleared regulatory hurdles in Canada, the United Kingdom, the EU and China. NATIONAL POST * After days of waiting for harsh Antarctica winds and snow to ease, searchers reached the wreckage of a downed Canadian plane only to discover the blast of winter had dealt another cruel blow. The front end of the Twin Otter aircraft was so embedded in ice and snow, rescuers decided the aircraft was too difficult and dangerous to breach. The bodies of the three Canadians aboard, who are believed to have perished on impact, will remain inside their icy cockpit on a steep mountain peak - near the summit of Mount Elizabeth - until October. * Canada's economy could benefit from an influx of toking tourists if weed is legalized, the Liberal Party of Canada said in a new analysis that backs the party's 2012 policy convention resolution.   China CHINA SECURITIES JOURNAL --China would take a long time to boost its shale gas output due to technical and pipeline issues, former top energy official Zhang Guobao said. SHANGHAI SECURITIES NEWS --The Chinese Academy of Sciences forecast China's economic growth would rise about 8.4 percent this year, up 0.6 percentage points from last year. --Shanghai plans to set up a free trade zone in the city this year and has targeted a 7.5-percent economic growth, acting mayor Yang Xiong said at an internal meeting. CHINA DAILY (www.chinadaily.com.cn) --China's new leadership should consider setting up an agency to oversee reform and redefine the function of government to make it more focused on maintaining growth, Fan Gang, director of the National Economics Research Institute of the China Reform Foundation, told the paper at the World Economic Forum. --Shanghai is expected to attract 150 more foreign multinationals to set up their regional headquarters in the city by 2020, bringing the total to 553. SHANGHAI DAILY --China's traditional toy makers are feeling pinch of a dramatic decline in exports and the increasing popularity of electronic toys and devices. PEOPLE'S DAILY --China has published its 2012 government white paper both in Chinese and English versions, which includes topics on rare earths, the Diaoyu island, China's judicial reforms, energy policy and medical sector. --There is no decision yet on expanding the property tax to more Chinese cities after two major cities --Shanghai and Chongqing--launched a pilot scheme for two years.     Fly On The Wall 7:00 AM Market Snapshot ANALYST RESEARCH Upgrades ASML (ASML) upgraded to Buy from Neutral at CitigroupBest Buy (BBY) upgraded to Buy from Hold at BB&TFacebook (FB) upgraded to Outperform from Market Perform at Raymond JamesNetApp (NTAP) upgraded to Overweight from Equal Weight at BarclaysNews Corp. 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(NE) downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at StephensPetSmart (PETM) downgraded to Reduce from Neutral at NomuraPlains All American (PAA) downgraded to Market Perform from Outperform at Wells FargoSouFun (SFUN) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at GoldmanSouthern Copper (SCCO) downgraded to Underweight from Hold at BB&TSouthern Copper (SCCO) downgraded to Neutral from Overweight at JPMorganState Street (STT) downgraded to Market Perform from Outperform at Keefe BruyetteWeyerhaeuser (WY) downgraded to Sector Perform from Outperform at RBC Capital Initiations Akorn (AKRX) initiated with a Sector Perform at RBC CapitalDaVita (DVA) initiated with a Market Perform at BernsteinPerrigo (PRGO) initiated with a Sector Perform at RBC CapitalYouku Tudou (YOKU) initiated with a Buy at Deutsche Bank HOT STOCKS Daimler (DDAIF), Nissan (NSANY), Ford (F) sign deal on fuel cell carsJohnson & Johnson (JNJ) to explore sale of women's products business, DJ reports Dole Food (DOLE) announced resolution of class action lawsuitBGI-Shenzhen extended tender offer for Complete Genomics (GNOM)salesforce.com (CRM) to seek 4-for-1 stock split at shareholder meetingJoS. 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29 октября 2012, 19:53

Minister who criticised Ken Livingstone over tax is linked to tax break scheme

Stephen Hammond says Harwood Film Partnership scheme is legal and he does not have to declare his involvementA government minister who criticised Labour mayoral candidate Ken Livingstone for avoiding tax is an investor in a firm that also uses tax breaks, and has failed to declare it to parliament.Stephen Hammond, the transport minister, is a partner in Harwood Film Partnership, which has deferred tax for its partners. His involvement has not been declared in the parliamentary register of members' interests.Hammond's partnership may well come as an embarrassment to the Tories. This spring George Osborne described those involved in aggressive tax avoidance as "morally repugnant".Hammond was at the forefront of Tory attacks on Ken Livingstone in March for using a tax loophole to pay 20% tax on his outside earnings. He said to Nick Clegg in the House of Commons: "Last weekend you spoke about the need for a tycoon tax. Can you say whether you would tailor that to include individuals who claim they want to raise tax on the rich and yet set up companies so they only pay 20%, such as Ken Livingstone?"Harwood was set up in 2005, the year the then chancellor, Gordon Brown, established tax breaks to allow the funding of the British film industry. Hammond became an investor that year after being introduced to the partnership by David Rangeley, a financial adviser who uses the pseudonym "rdrtaxwizard" online.From company documents it appears that the company borrowed £13.1m from the Bank of Ireland and has spent £2.3m on expenses.Although his name appears in Companies House documents as a partner in the firm, Hammond has failed to disclose his involvement in the partnership in the MPs' register. The MPs' code of conduct states that "it is the responsibility of members to notify changes in their registrable interests within four weeks of each change occurring".In a written response to queries, Hammond said there had been a deferral of tax but he believed the scheme complied with tax laws. "I asked and was reassured that the scheme was both entirely legal and HMRC [HM Revenue & Customs] compliant," he said.Hammond said he had no idea that he was listed as an "associated director" to the company until he was contacted by the Guardian. "This is, of course, incorrect as, by definition and by its legal entity, a partnership has no directors," he said.He said he believed he was not required to record his partnership in the register of members' interests because he was an investor and not a director, but said he was seeking assurances from "appropriate sources" about whether his assumption was correct."As the scheme was a sale and leaseback, by its very nature there was a deferral of tax but there was always a tax liability, which I now declare and pay every year. Therefore as HMRC have never raised a query with me I have always assumed that the advice that the scheme was entirely legal and HMRC compliant to be correct," he wrote. "I have today spoken to Mr Rangeley who has confirmed the HMRC do not believe this to be an aggressive scheme and he will be happy to furnish you with the details of the films Harwood financed."The minister did not respond to questions about how much and in which films he had invested. Rangeley did not respond to emails.Hammond has declared a number of other interests in the register including a non-declarable equity stake in Agua Terra, a development company based in the offshore haven of the British Virgin Isles, and shareholdings in Peal Gas, based in the low-tax jurisdiction of Delaware.Two other Harwood partners have told the Guardian that when they joined the scheme they did so primarily for the tax advantages. One said: "It has allowed me to defer tax, and that has been useful. When it was sold to me by Rangeley he did not mention the films it was going to invest in and I don't know if it ever has."Simon Danczuk, the Labour MP for Rochdale, has written to the parliamentary commissioner for standards, Sir John Lyons, asking him to investigate whether Hammond has broken the rules."The Conservatives talk tough about tax evasion, but it's just lip service. At a time when everyone should be paying their fair share of tax it is morally wrong that Hammond is involved in a scheme that helps the wealthy to avoid paying their share," he said.Film partnerships became popular as a means of avoiding tax after Brown set up tax breaks for the industry in 2005. Tax officials have launched a push to close film schemes in the belief that some have stepped over the line into aggressive tax avoidance.In April a tax tribunal ruled that the film partnership Eclipse 35 was an aggressive avoidance scheme. Investors including the football managers Sir Alex Ferguson and Sven-Goran Eriksson were told that investors were not entitled to tax reliefs the scheme had been intended to provide.Hammond has recently asked a number of written parliamentary questions about tax avoidance and evasion. In September 2011 he asked George Osborne for the estimated monetary rate of tax avoidance and tax planning schemes in force in 2000 and each year since 2005, the year in which he became an investor in Harwood.A spokesman for HMRC said: "Film schemes are working well as a means of supporting and financing the film industry. But we are cracking down on those schemes that abused the rules."ConservativesTax and spendingTax avoidanceRajeev Syalguardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds