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13 октября, 15:16

Азиатские фондовые индексы снизились в четверг

Фондовые индексы Азиатско-Тихоокеанского региона (АТР) снизились в четверг пятую сессию подряд на данных о неожиданном сокращении китайского экспорта в сентябре.

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02 августа, 22:47

Thai Oil lets contract for Sriracha refinery

Thai Oil PCL has let a contract to Amec Foster Wheeler PLC to provide services for a project that will expand crude oil processing capacity and improve fuel production at the 275,000-b/sd Sriracha refinery, near Laem Chabang Port in Chonburi, Thailand.

02 июня 2014, 06:40

Thai oil tanker recovered, cargo taken by hijackers: authorities

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - A Thai oil tanker reported missing two days ago has been recovered with all of its crew members safe but pirates who hijacked the tanker took its cargo and damaged communications gear, the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) said on Monday.

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31 мая 2014, 08:53

Thai oil tanker may have been hijacked: authorities

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - A Thai diesel oil tanker with 14 crew members en route from Singapore to Indonesia is believed to have been hijacked, the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) said on Saturday, the second major case in months on one of the world's busiest waterways.    

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31 мая 2014, 08:53

Thai oil tanker may have been hijacked: authorities

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) - A Thai diesel oil tanker with 14 crew members en route from Singapore to Indonesia is believed to have been hijacked, the International Maritime Bureau (IMB) said on Saturday, the second major case in months on one of the world's busiest waterways.

03 января 2014, 16:03

Snow Day Market Summary

In a day that will be remembered for the first major snowstorm to hit New York in 2014 and test the clean up capabilities and resolve of the city's new populist mayor (not starting on a good note following reports that JFK airport will be closed at least until 8:30 am Eastern), it was only fitting that there was virtually no overnight news aside for the Chinese non-manufacturing PMI which dropped from 56.0 to 54.6, a new 4 month low. Still, following yesterday's ugly start to the new year, stocks in Europe traded higher this morning, in part driven by value related flows following the sell-off yesterday. Retailers led the move higher, with Next shares in London up as much as 11% which is the most since January 2009 and to its highest level since 1988 after the company lifted profit forecast after strong Christmas trading performance. Other UK based retailers with likes of AB Foods and M&S also advanced around 2%. Looking elsewhere, peripheral bonds continued to outperform their core counterparts, with IT/GE 10y spread below 200bps mark for the first time since July 2011 and SP/GE 10y spread below 200bps mark for the first time since May 2011. The recent flow into peripheral bonds said to have driven by domestic accounts, together with international real money accounts putting on new trades for 2014. A combination of a sharp drop in EONIA fixing, together with the release of better than expected UK macroeconomic data meant that GBP/USD outperformed EUR/USD. On that note, analysts have noted that sharp decline in EONIA fixing leaves EUR/USD vulnerable to the downside. In summary, the Italian and Dutch markets are the best-performing larger bourses, Swiss the worst. The euro is weaker against the dollar. Portuguese 10yr bond yields fall; Spanish yields decline. Commodities little changed, with zinc, nickel underperforming and silver outperforming. New York ISM, U.S. vehicle sales data released later. Looking at the day ahead, it will likely be a quiet end to the week with little on the data docket to note and inclement weather on the US east coast possibly preventing some market participants from returning to their desks. Today’s European data include Euroarea money supply and Spanish/Italian CPI readings. December auto sales is the main data release in the US. Bernanke, Lacker, Plosser and Stein are scheduled to speak at the American Economic Association annual meeting in Philadelphia although some may not make it due to the weather. Recap: S&P 500 futures down 0% to 1827.3 Stoxx 600 up 3% to 326.7 US 10Yr yield down 1bps to 2.98% German 10Yr yield down 1bps to 1.94% MSCI Asia Pacific down 0.4% to 140.3 Gold spot up 0.5% to $1231/oz EUROPE 17 out of 19 Stoxx 600 sectors rise; retail, real estate outperform, insurance, basic resources underperform 67.5% of Stoxx 600 members gain, 29.8% decline Top Stoxx 600 gainers: Next PLC  +8.6%, Banco Espirito Santo SA  +5.1%, Dixons Retail PLC  +4.9%, Telecom Italia SpA +4.7%, Valiant Holding AG  +4.2%, Marks & Spencer Group PLC +4%, Debenhams PLC  +3.5%, Eutelsat Communications SA +3.5%, Hays PLC  +2.9%, Azimut Holding SpA  +2.9% Top Stoxx 600 decliners: International Personal Finance -2.7%, Swiss Re AG -2.7%, DKSH Holding AG -2.3%, Remy Cointreau SA -2.3%, Lonmin PLC -2.2%, Commerzbank AG -1.6%, Rexam PLC -1.3%, Rotork PLC -1.2%, Pearson PLC -1.2%, Coca- Cola HBC AG -1.2% ASIA Asian stocks fall with the Hang Seng underperforming. MSCI Asia Pacific down 0.4% to 140.3 Nikkei 225 closed, Hang Seng down 2.2%, Kospi down 1.1%,  Shanghai Composite down 1.2%, ASX down 0.3%, Sensex down 0.3% 2 out of 10 sectors rise with health care, consumer outperforming and energy, tech underperforming Gainers: ANTA Sports Products Ltd  +8.7%, Celltrion Inc +6.1%, Chongqing Changan Automobile C  +5.8%, Advanced Info Service PCL  +4.8%, Kasikornbank PCL   +4.7%, Kasikornbank PCL  +3.8%, Ranbaxy Laboratories Ltd  +3.5%, OCI Co Ltd +3.4%, United Spirits Ltd  +3.3% Decliners: Thai Oil PCL -6.9%, China Taiping Insurance Holdin -6%, Eclat Textile Co Ltd -5.8%, Banpu PCL -5.4%, Belle International Holdings L -5.1%, Astra Agro Lestari Tbk PT -4.9%, First Pacific Co Ltd/Hong Kong -4.9%, Adaro Energy Tbk PT -4.7%, CITIC Securities Co Ltd -4.7%, E-Mart Co Ltd -4.4% Overnight headline bulletin fromRanSquawk European stocks trade higher following yesterday's sell-off, with the peripheral markets outperforming as Italian and Spanish spreads continue yesterday's tightening. UK Mortgage Approvals came in at the highest since January 2008, with UK Nationwide House Prices showing the biggest rise since August 2009. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest EIA Nat Gas Storage report, DoE data and US vehicle sales. Asian Headlines Chinese Non-Manufacturing PMI (Dec) M/M 54.6 (Prev. 56.0); 4-month low South Korean finance minister Hyun stated a need to closely monitor JPY's movements, adding that they may need to strengthen support measures for smaller companies following the weak JPY and that Japan may face international pressure on currency. EU & UK Headlines UK Mortgage Approvals (Nov) M/M 70.8K vs. Exp. 69.7K (Prev. 67.7K, Rev. to 68.0K) - highest since January 2008 - UK November net lending to non-financial businesses at GBP -4.656bln vs October GBP -1.121bln, biggest fall since series began in May 2011. UK PMI Construction (Dec) M/M 62.1 vs Exp. 62.0 (Prev. 62.6) UK Nationwide House PX (Dec) M/M 1.4% vs Exp. 0.7% (Prev. 0.6%, Rev. 0.7%) - Biggest rise since August 2009 - Nationwide House PX NSA (Dec) Y/Y 8.4% vs Exp. 7.1% (Prev. 6.5%) Spanish Unemployment Net ('000s) (Dec) M/M -107.6 (Prev. -2.5) Swiss PMI Manufacturing (Dec) M/M 53.9 vs 56.3 (Prev. 56.5) Analysts at UBS believe that any BoE rate increases may be as small as 5bps. Saying that the withdrawal will be cautious if inflation and wage growth remain subdued, suggests 5bps rate rises to emphasize that any more will be incremental and hesitant. German government will not increase taxes, according to draft of annual economic report of German government. No major Tier 1 data from the US data, with focus on the energy markets as today sees the release of the DoE Inventories and EIA Natural Gas Storage Change. US volumes today may be impeded by adverse weather conditions. According to the National Weather Service, a combination of storms will impact areas from the southern Appalachians into New England into Friday. Heaviest snow will fall from central New York to the Massachusetts coast. Blizzard conditions are possible for eastern Long Island and the Massachusetts coast. Bitter cold will move into the Midwest and East following the storm. Equities Following yesterday's sell-off in European equities, stocks have managed to trade with gains this morning, with Next in the UK being the notable outperformer. This follows the Co.'s pre-market update, with Q4 sales coming in significantly higher than expected. This news for Next has seen other UK stocks including AB foods and M&S trade higher for the session. Elsewhere, the periphery is leading the way across Europe, with Telecom Italia supporting the FTSE MIB after pre-market reports that Telefonica are to review the feasibility of Telecom Italia Brazil unit breakup next week. FX In FX markets overnight, the South Korean Finance Minister said that they need to closely monitor JPY's movements and that Japan may face international pressure on currency with USD/JPY then running through stops at 104.50 to the downside. Following the release of a better than expected UK PMI Construction, GBP/USD has outperformed EUR/USD, with EUR also under pressure from JPY strength. There is also market talk of real money accounts selling in EUR/GBP. Analysts at Credit Suisse say that any setbacks in GBP/USD towards 1.6320/00 offers a chance to re-establish long positions as med-term outlook remains bullish Commodities Nomura forecasts Brent oil average price at USD 100/bbl in 2014 and forecasts WTI crude average price at USD 90/bbl in 2014. Iraq starts fixing oil pipeline that was damaged by a bomb yesterday evening. There is no definite date to complete repairs as there was extensive damage according to North Oil. China's November copper products output rises 25% on year to 1.5 mil mt. * * * Finally, here is the complete overnight recap from DB's Jim Reid DM equities had a soft start to 2014 with both the S&P500 (-0.89%) and Stoxx600 (-0.74%) recording their worst opening day performances since 2008. S&P500 volumes were on the low-side, even for a first trading day of the year, and it may drop further today after winter storm Hercules hit the US north east late on Thursday prompting a state of emergency to be declared in New York State and New Jersey. There are reports of flight cancellations, highway closures and reduced transport services in major cities in the north east, while NYC is expected to receive up to 9 inches of snow on Thursday night/Friday morning accompanied by a sharp drop in temperatures. Coming back to markets, yesterday saw a partial reversal of one of the major themes of 2013, being that of stronger DM equities and subdued fixed income performance. All ten industry sectors in the S&P500 and Stoxx600 closed in the red yesterday, with utilities, financials and resources bearing the brunt of the selloff. On the fixed income side, peripheral European bonds had an impressive day with both Spain and Italian 10 year yields closing below the 4% mark. US treasury yields reached an early high 3.05% before rallying to close at 2.989% (-4bp on the day) - partially reversing some of the losses from the last trading day of 2013. The weaker-than-expected ISM data (more below) helped sentiment in USTs as did the weakness in US equities which opened lower and stayed low for the entire session. The USD had a strong start to the year (USD index +0.65%) while emerging market assets experienced the opposite as worries permeated across Turkey, Thailand and LATAM. The MSCI EM index fell 1.2% for its largest drop in more than a month and the TRY, BRL and MXN all struggled against the USD. Reviewing the data flow, the latest round of ISM/PMI surveys showed that manufacturing activity ended 2013 on a mixed note. The US manufacturing ISM for December fell 0.3pt from November’s levels to 57.0 but this was still slightly above the Bloomberg consensus estimate of 56.8. DB’s economists noted that this was a similar performance to the Chicago PMI which was released earlier in the week, but they also noted some positives in ISM report including the fact that both the new orders (64.2 vs. 63.6 previous) and employment components (56.9 vs. 56.5 previous) made new multi-year highs. The ISM data had minimal effect on markets though 10yr yields dropped a couple of basis points following its release. Across the Atlantic, the Euro-area manufacturing PMI for December came out in line with the flash estimate at 52.7 but the surprise was in the strength of the numbers in Spain (50.8 vs 49.8 forecast) and Italy (53.3 vs 51.7 forecast). Meanwhile in the core, the divergence between Germany and France continued to widen (+1.1 to 52.7 for & -1.4 to 47.0 respectively). Outside of the manufacturing data, US initial  jobless claims for the last full week of 2013 dropped -2k to 339k though the week-to-week numbers have been impacted by seasonal factors of late. Looking at overnight markets, Asian equities are taking the lead of the US and Europe with losses paced by the Hang Seng (-1.9%) and KOSPI (-1.1%). USDJPY remains under some pressure, dropping 0.6% early today while Japanese stock markets remain closed for New Year holidays. All eyes remain on the wobbles in EM and the latest data flow from China hasn’t helped sentiment there either. The official Chinese December services PMI (released overnight) came in at 54.6 which is a four-month low and is 1.4 pts lower than November’s reading. This follows the weaker-than-expected official manufacturing PMI (51.0 vs 51.2 expected) released earlier this week. Thailand’s SET equity index is faring better today (-0.7%) following yesterday’s 5.2% fall which brought the index to an 18-month low. Asian EM credit spreads are about 3-4bp wider in general. Chinese bank funding pressures remain of some concern but the 7-day repo rate has eased around 15bp this morning. Amid the recent worries about debt levels at Chinese local governments, there is talk that a number of local governments may tap onshore Chinese USD funding markets after Shanghai Chengtou Corp issued the first onshore USD-denominated bond by a local-government financing vehicle in China as yuan borrowing costs surge (Bloomberg). Returning to DM, 2013 will be partly remembered for being a robust year for M&A, leveraged financings and IPOs particularly in North America – and there are signs that 2014 will be another healthy year for corporate activity. The buyouts of Verizon Wireless, Heinz and Dell were amongst the standout buyout deals of 2013, and the first out of the gates this year is auto-maker Fiat who announced on New Year’s Day a $4.4bn deal to acquire the remaining 41% portion of Chrysler. The fully-merged Fiat-Chrysler group is aiming to list in New York within the year according to the Financial Times. Speaking of buyouts, it will be also interesting to track the LBO pipeline with the  improving optimism in that market evident in the latest buyout stats from Reuters that show that the median EBITDA multiple in US LBOs jumped to 9.8x in 2013 from 8.3x in 2012, citing data from market research firm Preqin. Thomson Reuters also notes that the US leveraged bank lending posted a record $510bn in volumes in 2013 (up 55% over 2012) and the average LBO debt levels crept up to 6.2x in 2013. So valuations and leverage levels crept upwards in 2013, supported by accommodative debt and equity funding markets - whether this can be sustained in 2014 is the big question. On a related note, following a gain of more than 30% in 2013, the S&P500 is predicted to gain around 5.5% in 2014 according to the average of 20 analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg. That outlook is the lowest forecast since 31 Dec 2004. Looking at the day ahead, it will likely be a quiet end to the week with little on the data docket to note and inclement weather on the US east coast possibly preventing some market participants from returning to their desks. Today’s European data include Euroarea money supply and Spanish/Italian CPI readings. December auto sales is the main data release in the US. Bernanke, Lacker, Plosser and Stein are scheduled to speak at the American Economic Association annual meeting in Philadelphia.        

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30 июля 2013, 20:48

Thai oil spill spreads on tourist island

WORKERS in white suits used buckets to scoop up globs of crude oil blackening the once white sands and emerald waters of a tourist island in Thailand's eastern sea yesterday, as the oil slick continued to spread three days after leaking from a nearby pipeline.

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30 июля 2013, 12:00

Thai oil spill having "extreme" impact on tourism - minister

BANGKOK (Reuters) - An oil spill that has blackened beaches at a Thai holiday island was having an extreme impact on tourism and could spread to the coast of the mainland and affect the fishing industry, officials and an environmental group said on Tuesday.

25 марта 2013, 21:23

CONFIRMED: US Shipping Weapons to Syria - Al Nusra's "Mystery" Sponsors Revealed

Tony CartalucciActivist Post While US President Barack Obama and the Western media lied in concert to the world regarding America's role in supporting terrorists operating in Syria, it is now revealed that the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has been shipping weapons to Syria via NATO-member Turkey and Jordan since at least early 2012. The New York Times in their article titled, "Arms Airlift to Syria Rebels Expands, With C.I.A. Aid," admits that: With help from the C.I.A., Arab governments and Turkey have sharply increased their military aid to Syria’s opposition fighters in recent months, expanding a secret airlift of arms and equipment for the uprising against President Bashar al-Assad, according to air traffic data, interviews with officials in several countries and the accounts of rebel commanders. The airlift, which began on a small scale in early 2012 and continued intermittently through last fall, expanded into a steady and much heavier flow late last year, the data shows. It has grown to include more than 160 military cargo flights by Jordanian, Saudi and Qatari military-style cargo planes landing at Esenboga Airport near Ankara, and, to a lesser degree, at other Turkish and Jordanian airports. The New York Times piece attempts to spin America's role in arming militants in Syria.The Times continues by stating:  The American government became involved, the former American official said, in part because there was a sense that other states would arm the rebels anyhow. The C.I.A. role in facilitating the shipments, he said, gave the United States a degree of influence over the process, including trying to steer weapons away from Islamist groups and persuading donors to withhold portable antiaircraft missiles that might be used in future terrorist attacks on civilian aircraft.  This is categorically false. google_ad_client = "pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 6/30/10 */ google_ad_slot = "8230781418"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; Already, in 2007, US officials had divulged plans to destroy Syria by arming sectarian extremists, using Saudi Arabia and other regional actors as proxies to launder US and Israel support through - maintaining a degree of credibility amongst the terrorist receiving the aid, as well as a degree of plausible deniabiliy for Washington and Tel Aviv politically. In Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh's 2007 New Yorker article,  "The Redirection: Is the Administration’s new policy benefiting our enemies in the war on terrorism?" the strategy was described as follows: To undermine Iran, which is predominantly Shiite, the Bush Administration has decided, in effect, to reconfigure its priorities in the Middle East. In Lebanon, the Administration has cooperated with Saudi Arabia’s government, which is Sunni, in clandestine operations that are intended to weaken Hezbollah, the Shiite organization that is backed by Iran. The U.S. has also taken part in clandestine operations aimed at Iran and its ally Syria. A by-product of these activities has been the bolstering of Sunni extremist groups that espouse a militant vision of Islam and are hostile to America and sympathetic to Al Qaeda. Perhaps more importantly, the report would also state:  Some of the core tactics of the redirection are not public, however. The clandestine operations have been kept secret, in some cases, by leaving the execution or the funding to the Saudis, or by finding other ways to work around the normal congressional appropriations process, current and former officials close to the Administration said. Clearly, that "sense that other states would arm the rebels anyhow" was gleaned from premeditated conspiracies long-ago hatched between Washington, Tel Aviv, and Riyadh. And as the terrible consequences of this conspiracy come to fruition with tens of thousands dead, the West is eager to disclaim any and all responsibility, hoping sincerely that the public hasn't the collective memory or intelligence to pick up a newspaper from 2007 and read what they had already admitted to planning. "Mystery" of Al Qaeda's al-Nusra Sponsorship Revealed    The confirmed admission implicates NATO directly in militarily intervening in Syria's ongoing conflict and reveals the source of arms and cash that have ended up primarily in the hands of Al Qaeda's Syrian franchise, US designated terror front, Jabhat al-Nusra. (see here for other examples of US arming listed terror organizations) The CIA, Western media, and Western politicians insist that they have taken every precaution to ensure the now admitted torrent of cash and weapons that have been flowing into Syria to compound and perpetuate the bloodbath, did not end up in the hands of terrorists. However, no plausible explanation has been given as to where al-Nusra is getting its cash and weapons from, or how it has managed to eclipse the extensively Western-backed "moderates," to become the premier front in the fight against the Syrian people. Indeed, the New York Times' article "Syrian Rebels Tied to Al Qaeda Play Key Role in War," states:The lone Syrian rebel group with an explicit stamp of approval from Al Qaeda has become one of the uprising’s most effective fighting forces, posing a stark challenge to the United States and other countries that want to support the rebels but not Islamic extremists.Money flows to the group, the Nusra Front, from like-minded donors abroad. Its fighters, a small minority of the rebels, have the boldness and skill to storm fortified positions and lead other battalions to capture military bases and oil fields. As their successes mount, they gather more weapons and attract more fighters.  The group is a direct offshoot of Al Qaeda in Iraq, Iraqi officials and former Iraqi insurgents say, which has contributed veteran fighters and weapons. While the London Telegraph reports in their article, "Syria: how jihadist group Jabhat al-Nusra is taking over Syria's revolution," that: And in recent weeks it is Jabhat al-Nusra, a radical jihadist group blacklisted by the US as terrorists and a group that wants Syria to be an uncompromising Islamic state governed by sharia, that is holding sway. The group is well funded – probably through established global jihadist networks – in comparison to moderates. Meanwhile pro-democracy rebel group commanders say money from foreign governments has all but dried up because of fears over radical Islamists. The effect is changing the face of the Syrian revolution."The group is well funded – probably through established global jihadist networks – in comparison to moderates." Could the London Telegraph be capable of such incomplete or incompetent reporting regarding what it seems to allude to as an unsolvable "mystery" regarding al-Nusra's sponsors? In October of 2012, the Land Destroyer Report published, "NATO Using Al Qaeda Rat Lines to Flood Syria With Foreign Terrorists," which traced the logistical network now admitted to by the New York Times. This logistical network was then overlaid with Al Qaeda's regional networks, documented extensively during the US occupation of Iraq by the US Army's own West Point Combating Terrorism Center. The very regions along the Turkish-Syrian border, the Jordanian-Syrian border, and the Iraqi-Syrian border which served as recruiting and staging grounds for Al Qaeda terrorists during the Iraq War, now serve as the primary logistical hubs admittedly overseen by the CIA. Image: (Left) West Point's Combating Terrorism Center's 2007 report, "Al-Qa'ida's Foreign Fighters in Iraq" indicated which areas in Syria Al Qaeda fighters filtering into Iraq came from. The overwhelming majority of them came from Dayr Al-Zawr in Syria's southeast, Idlib in the north near the Turkish-Syrian border, and Dar'a in the south near the Jordanian-Syrian border. (Right) A map indicating the epicenters of violence in Syria indicate that the exact same hotbeds for Al Qaeda in 2007, now serve as the epicenters of so-called "pro-democracy fighters." It is now admitted that thousands of tons of weapons have been smuggled into Syria by the US and its regional allies. While the Western media has attempted in the past to feign ignorance as to where Al Qaeda's al-Nusra was getting their weapons from, it is now abundantly clear - al-Nusra's power has expanded across Syria in tandem with the CIA's ever-expanding operations along the nation's borders. If the US is working directly with Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and Turkey, to arm militants, who else could possibly be working to arm and fund al-Nusra on a greater scale if not this axis itself? google_ad_client = "ca-pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 7/28/12 */ google_ad_slot = "9833874419"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; This criminal conspiracy appears to have escaped the UN's competence and capabilities, requiring that states around the world mobilize an expedient response to the dangerous, unhinged and genocidal campaign being waged by the West against Syria. If the West refuses to end its direct fueling of the Syrian crisis or answer for how their weapons have ended up almost exclusively in al-Nusra's hands, Syria's allies must begin contemplating open and extensive aid to help the nation defend itself against overt international terrorism. Reports indicate that it was al-Nusra who used chemical weapons in Syria's northern city of Aleppo, according to the London Telegraph. An Al Qaeda terror front wielding WMDs, we are told, is the sum of all fears and the ultimate impetus driving the unending "War on Terror." Through direct, intentional actions by the West itself, this nightmare has become a reality - one that must be addressed, lest the world descend into global anarchy or worse.Tony Cartalucci's articles have appeared on many alternative media websites, including his own at Land Destroyer Report, Alternative Thai News Network and LocalOrg. Read other contributed articles by Tony Cartalucci here. var linkwithin_site_id = 557381; linkwithin_text='Related Articles:' Enter Your Email To Receive Our Daily Newsletter Close var fnames = new Array();var ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';fnames[1]='FNAME';ftypes[1]='text';fnames[2]='LNAME';ftypes[2]='text';var err_style = ''; try{ err_style = mc_custom_error_style; } catch(e){ err_style = 'margin: 1em 0 0 0; padding: 1em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; background: FFEEEE none repeat scroll 0% 0%; font- weight: bold; float: left; z-index: 1; width: 80%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz- initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; color: FF0000;'; } var mce_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(); mce_jQuery(document).ready( function($) { var options = { errorClass: 'mce_inline_error', errorElement: 'div', errorStyle: err_style, onkeyup: function(){}, onfocusout:function(){}, onblur:function(){} }; var mce_validator = mce_jQuery("#mc-embedded-subscribe-form").validate(options); options = { url: 'http://activistpost.us1.list-manage.com/subscribe/post-json? u=3ac8bebe085f73ea3503bbda3&id=b0c7fb76bd&c=?', type: 'GET', dataType: 'json', contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", beforeSubmit: function(){ mce_jQuery('#mce_tmp_error_msg').remove(); mce_jQuery('.datefield','#mc_embed_signup').each( function(){ var txt = 'filled'; var fields = new Array(); var i = 0; mce_jQuery(':text', this).each( function(){ fields[i] = this; i++; }); mce_jQuery(':hidden', this).each( function(){ if ( fields[0].value=='MM' && fields[1].value=='DD' && fields[2].value=='YYYY' ){ this.value = ''; } else if ( fields[0].value=='' && fields [1].value=='' && fields[2].value=='' ){ this.value = ''; } else { this.value = fields[0].value+'/'+fields[1].value+'/'+fields[2].value; } }); }); return mce_validator.form(); }, success: mce_success_cb }; mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').ajaxForm(options); }); function mce_success_cb(resp){ mce_jQuery('#mce-success-response').hide(); mce_jQuery('#mce-error-response').hide(); if (resp.result=="success"){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(resp.msg); mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').each(function(){ this.reset(); }); } else { var index = -1; var msg; try { var parts = resp.msg.split(' - ',2); if (parts[1]==undefined){ msg = resp.msg; } else { i = parseInt(parts[0]); if (i.toString() == parts[0]){ index = parts[0]; msg = parts[1]; } else { index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } } } catch(e){ index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } try{ if (index== -1){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } else { err_id = 'mce_tmp_error_msg'; html = ' '+msg+''; var input_id = '#mc_embed_signup'; var f = mce_jQuery(input_id); if (ftypes[index]=='address'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-addr1'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else if (ftypes[index]=='date'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-month'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else { input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]; f = mce_jQuery().parent(input_id).get(0); } if (f){ mce_jQuery(f).append(html); mce_jQuery(input_id).focus(); } else { mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } catch(e){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } BE THE CHANGE! 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25 марта 2013, 08:01

Таиланд: Обзор энергетики и экономики

According to Oil & Gas Journal,Thailand held proven oil reserves of 453 million barrels in January 2013, an increase of 11 million barrels from the prior year. In 2011, Thailand produced an estimated 393,000 barrels per day (bbl/d) of total oil liquids, of which 140,000 bbl/d was crude oil, 84,000 bbl/d was lease condensate, 154,000 bbl/d was natural gas liquids, and the remainder was refinery gains. Thailand consumed an estimated 1 million bbl/d of oil in 2011, leaving total net imports of 627,000 bbl/d, and making the country the second largest net oil importer in Southeast Asia.About 80 percent of the country's crude oil production comes from offshore fields in the Gulf of Thailand. Chevron is the largest oil producer in Thailand, accounting for nearly 70 percent of the country's crude oil and condensate production in 2011. The largest oilfield is Chevron's Benjamas located in the north Pattani Trough. The field's production peaked in 2006 and declined to less than 30,000 bbl/d in 2010. Chevron is developing satellite fields to sustain production around Benjamas. PTTEP's Sirikit field is another significant crude oil producer supplying 22,000 bbl/d of oil in 2010. Small independent companies, Salamander Energy and Coastal Energy, began exploring onshore and shallow water fields including Bualuang, Songkhla, and Bua Ban that came online in 2009.Thailand holds large proven reserves of natural gas, and natural gas production has increased substantially over the last few years. However, the country still remains dependent on imports of natural gas to meet growing domestic demand for the fuel.According to OGJ, Thailand held 10.1 Trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of proven natural gas reserves as of January 2013, and reserves have experienced a general decline over the last few years. Almost all of the country's natural gas fields are located offshore in the Gulf of Thailand. Natural gas production has risen steadily in the past decade, although not enough to keep up with the growth in domestic consumption. The Thai government is concerned that domestic production will peak and decline in several years, placing pressure on the country's energy security. The Energy Ministry expects gas production to peak in 2017 and deplete by 2030 at current production levels and with no reserve additions.Thailand produced 1,306 billion cubic feet (Bcf) and consumed 1,645 Bcf of natural gas in 2011, resulting in net imports of nearly 340 Bcf. These imports came from offshore fields in Burma sent via pipeline. Both production and consumption have doubled since 2000, and each grew more than 15 percent between 2009 and 2010. Thailand produced and consumed natural gas at a slower rate in 2011 following disruptions from an offshore gas pipeline leak and massive flooding that began in mid-2011. These disruptions affected primarily the power sector and manufacturing activities, and annual growth slowed to 2 percent for gas production and around 3 percent for consumption in 2011. As production declines in older fields, Thailand could depend more heavily on imports if no significant discoveries are made over the next decade.- - - -BP Statistical Review of World Energy June 2012Нефть R/P ratio = 3.5 годаДобыча началась в 1981 г., с 1996 г. более 100 тыс. барр./деньГаз R/P ratio = 7.6 летДобыча началась в 1981 г., с 1994 г. более 10 млрд. м3 в год- - - -Экономика стран Юго-Восточной Азии- - - -The total population in Thailand was last recorded at 69.5 million people in 2011 from 27.6 million in 1960, changing 151 percent during the last 50 years. Fertility rate; total (births per woman)Current Account to GDP Balance of Trade USDTHB spot exchange- - - - -Current Account и Balance of Trade стали положительными после девальвациии, вызванной азиаатским кризисом 1997 г. и увеличения добычи нефти и газа до значимых количествGovernment Debt To GDPGovernment BudgetEnergy imports; net (% of energy use)- - - - -Импорт энергии несмотря на близость пика добычи нефти и газа снизился мало The Energy use (kg of oil equivalent) per dollar1;000 GDP (constant 2005 PPP)- - - - -Значимых улучшений нет

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01 марта 2013, 20:10

China divided on TV 'execution parade': judicial resolve or crude voyeurism

Two-hour broadcast showed four foreign prisoners being led to their deaths after being charged with murder of Chinese sailorsNaw Kham's wry smile belied his macabre circumstances. "I haven't been able to sleep for two days. I have been thinking too much. I miss my mum. I don't want my children to be like me," the 44-year-old Burmese druglord, chained to a chair, told a Chinese TV interviewer.On Friday – two days after the interview – the Burmese freshwater pirate was executed for allegedly murdering a crew of Chinese sailors on the Mekong river in October, 2011. His last moments were aired on state television.In the two-hour live broadcast, black-clad police officers hauled Naw Kham from a detention centre in southern China, bound him with ropes and chains, and bundled him on to a bus bound for the execution site. Three of his alleged henchmen followed in similar fashion. They were each killed – off camera – by lethal injection.The broadcast elicited a polarised response in China. Some saw it as a reassuring show of judicial resolve; others compared the TV special to a Mao-era "execution parade" – an unjustifiable transformation of somebody's last moments into a crude propagandistic lesson.Experts said the broadcast, which juxtaposed Naw Kham's final march with bold displays of Chinese judicial force – armed Chinese patrol boats on the Mekong, rows of Swat police– was intended to convey an unambiguous message."I think [the broadcast] is compatible with what the government wants– to show the Chinese people that the government is serious about protecting them within the country and outside," said Shi Yinhong, a professor of international relations at Renmin University in Beijing.According to official accounts, the Chinese sailors were transporting fuel oil, apples and garlic along the busy Mekong shipping route in two cargo ships, the Hua Ping and the Yu Xing 8,when they were ambushed near the Golden Triangle, a notoriously lawless area bordering Thailand, Burma and Laos.When Thai authorities reached the murder scene, they found 12 dead sailors – one on the boat, and 11 by a nearby port – some of whom had apparently been blindfolded, gagged with duct tape and shot in the head at close range. One had her neck broken. Another was missing. Nearly one million methamphetamine pills were found on board.Chinese web users reacted to the news with horror and Chinese authorities sent gunboats down the Mekong, causing some to question China's long-standing foreign policy of non-interference in other countries' domestic affairs. Shipping on the river briefly came to a halt.Naw Kahm soon emerged as a prime suspect. China's official media portrayed the manhunt to find him – a cross-border effort involving 200 people – as similar to the US search for Osama bin Laden. The state-run Global Times reported last month that China's drug enforcement authorities considered using an unprecedented drone strike to bomb him out of his mountain hideaway in north-eastern Burma. He was captured in Laos last spring and promptly extradited.State media identified Naw Kham's three henchmen as Hsang Kham from Thailand, Zha Xika from Laos and Yi Lai of "unknown origin". The four prisoners were sentenced to death last autumn for intentional homicide, drug trafficking, kidnapping and hijacking.A high provincial court rejected their appeals, yet a Reuters investigation in early 2012 cast doubt on the allegations and raised the possibility that a nine-man anti-narcotics unit within the Thai military was responsible for the massacre.On China's most popular microblogging site, Sina Weibo, response to the execution were firmly divided. Some users praised the government's hard line on crimes against Chinese citizens abroad; others decried the live broadcast as unnecessarily cruel and voyeuristic.Lawyer Tao Jiamei called it an infringement of China's own criminal procedure law, which dictates that executions "should be announced, but should not be publicly exposed".Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based senior researcher for Human Rights Watch, said public executions were fairly common in China until the early to mid-1990s. They were formally banned in 1979. "Sometimes, in the early days, people were executed right away in stadiums," he said. "Then the practice actually shifted to taking these people away, generally on a truck, to be executed elsewhere."Human rights groups say China executes up to 8,000 people per year. The exact number is considered a state secret.ChinaAsia PacificBurmaSouth and Central AsiaThailandLaosCapital punishmentJonathan Kaimanguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

26 февраля 2013, 18:56

US State Department's "Syriasly" Campaign Reaches New Level of Absurdity

Tony CartalucciActivist Post While the West and its Arab partners, the brutally autocratic regimes of Saudi Arabia and Qatar, are now admittedly funneling heavy weapons to Al Qaeda's stronghold in Daraa, southern Syria, the US State Department and its extensive network of faux NGOs funded by the same corporate-financier interests that write its policy, have rolled-out a front organization they call "Syriasly."Image: This fuax-human rights organization already screams biased, pro-Western propaganda with its Al Qaeda/French colonial green, red, and black logo, aping the so-called "Free Syrian Army's" flag. That it is a campaign of "STAND" confirms without a doubt that it is manufactured propaganda, directly funded by the special interests who designed and are currently executing the assault on Syria. Syriasly describes itself as:#Syriasly is a campaign of STAND, the student-led movement to end mass atrocities. Born out of the fight to stop genocide in Darfur, Sudan, STAND is devoted to creating a sustainable student network that actively fights genocide and mass atrocities wherever they may occur. We envision a world in which the international community protects civilians from mass atrocities.Sporting the French colonial colors that flew over Syria during its Western subjugation, and echoing the nowdefunct fraud that is the "Responsibility to Protect (R2P)" (and here) which lead to, not prevented, mass nationwide genocide in Libya in the wake of NATO's brutal bombardment of the North African nation in 2011, "Syriasly" attempts to pose as "student-led." google_ad_client = "pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 6/30/10 */ google_ad_slot = "8230781418"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; However, "Syriasly," which claims to be a campaign of STAND, is merely a carbon-copy of other US State Department, corporate special interest fronts masquerading as human rights crusaders to manufacture consent for long-planned wars of profit and domination. Syria's destruction was admittedly conspired by the US, Saudi Arabia, and Israel as far back as 2007. And if "Syriasly" sounds as hammy as the now disgraced "Invisible Children" front, which was promptly exposed as a Wall Street, AFRICOM propaganda campaign after is "viral" Kony 2012 film, but before its front man Jason Russell melted down in public while performing lewd acts, stark naked, that's because STAND's Syriasly campaign and Invisible Children both fall under yet another corporate special interest-run shell organization, "Resolve." Resolve's partners include convicted criminal George Soros' Open Society-funded Human Rights Watch, the US State Department's "Enough" Sudan propaganda front, the Soros Open Society, Time Warner, Unilever, Chevron, Deutsche Bank, Marathon Oil, Unilever, UN-funded "Refugees International (.pfd), and "Humanity United." Humanity United in turn boast partnerships with the BBC World Service Trust, the National Endowment for Democracy/Open Society/US State Department-funded Benetech, criminal financier George Soros' Open Society Institute, and the NED-funded Solidarity Center which mobilized Egypt's labor unions in 2011 just as theUS-stoked unrest began to falter.In other words, every organization involved interlocks with the vast corporate/foundation-funded imperial network masquerading as individual "human rights organizations" and benign NGOs. In reality this "civil society" network seeks to supplant national governments, and interface with global "institutions" like the IMF, World Bank, and the UN, all of which have been contrived by corporate-financier oligarchs. It is a modern day empire in the making. This möbius strip of interrelated, co-funding and cross posting NGOs and "activist" movements seeks to erect a curtain of humanitarian concern behind which their corporate sponsors can carry our their criminal enterprise with absolute impunity. Syria's conflict was long-planned by corporate financier-funded think-tanks years before the term "Arab Spring" was coined. It was part of a geopolitical strategy not to endow the people of Syria with "democracy," but to topple neighboring Iran and among other goals, reclaim its rich southern oilfields for the Anglo-Americans who controlled them before the Islamic Revolution. Not only are absurd fronts like "Syriasly" an insult to the intelligence of the US State Department's target audience, the promotion of corporate underwritten faux-human rights activism undermines real struggles to end verifiable injustice. The Syrian government, by all accounts, even "Syrian opposition" leader Moaz al-Khatib, is fighting Al Qaeda terrorists, not "pro-democracy" "freedom fighters." The real genocide in Syria is the one CIA agent Robert Baer foreshadowed in 2007 in Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh's New Yorker article, "The Redirection" where he stated: We’ve got Sunni Arabs preparing for cataclysmic conflict, and we will need somebody to protect the Christians in Lebanon. It used to be the French and the United States who would do it, and now it’s going to be Nasrallah and the Shiites.Clearly the sectarian conflict Baer predicted, is now realized, and is far worse than even he imagined. And it is a conflict born out of Western, Israeli, and Saudi cash, weapons, and conspiring. If "Syriasly" wanted to make a difference, it could start by pointing out its very sponsors and associates conspired years ago to trigger this bloodbath in the first place, and that the key to stopping it is not invoking "Responsibility to Protect," already willfully abused in Libya, but exposing the truth and demanding that the West and its regional allies cease and desist from their meddling in Syria and along its peripheries. And since surely the frauds that constitute "Syriasly" will do no such thing, we must identify the corporate-financier interests driving this agenda - interests we most likely patronize on a daily basis, and both boycott and permanently replace them to erode the unwarranted influence they have used to both plan and execute this assault on Syria's people.Tony Cartalucci's articles have appeared on many alternative media websites, including his own at Land Destroyer Report, Alternative Thai News Network and LocalOrg. Read other contributed articles by Tony Cartalucci here. var linkwithin_site_id = 557381; linkwithin_text='Related Articles:' Enter Your Email To Receive Our Daily Newsletter Close var fnames = new Array();var ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';fnames[1]='FNAME';ftypes[1]='text';fnames[2]='LNAME';ftypes[2]='text';var err_style = ''; try{ err_style = mc_custom_error_style; } catch(e){ err_style = 'margin: 1em 0 0 0; padding: 1em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; background: FFEEEE none repeat scroll 0% 0%; font- weight: bold; float: left; z-index: 1; width: 80%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz- initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; color: FF0000;'; } var mce_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(); mce_jQuery(document).ready( function($) { var options = { errorClass: 'mce_inline_error', errorElement: 'div', errorStyle: err_style, onkeyup: function(){}, onfocusout:function(){}, onblur:function(){} }; var mce_validator = mce_jQuery("#mc-embedded-subscribe-form").validate(options); options = { url: 'http://activistpost.us1.list-manage.com/subscribe/post-json? u=3ac8bebe085f73ea3503bbda3&id=b0c7fb76bd&c=?', type: 'GET', dataType: 'json', contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", beforeSubmit: function(){ mce_jQuery('#mce_tmp_error_msg').remove(); mce_jQuery('.datefield','#mc_embed_signup').each( function(){ var txt = 'filled'; var fields = new Array(); var i = 0; mce_jQuery(':text', this).each( function(){ fields[i] = this; i++; }); mce_jQuery(':hidden', this).each( function(){ if ( fields[0].value=='MM' && fields[1].value=='DD' && fields[2].value=='YYYY' ){ this.value = ''; } else if ( fields[0].value=='' && fields [1].value=='' && fields[2].value=='' ){ this.value = ''; } else { this.value = fields[0].value+'/'+fields[1].value+'/'+fields[2].value; } }); }); return mce_validator.form(); }, success: mce_success_cb }; mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').ajaxForm(options); }); function mce_success_cb(resp){ mce_jQuery('#mce-success-response').hide(); mce_jQuery('#mce-error-response').hide(); if (resp.result=="success"){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(resp.msg); mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').each(function(){ this.reset(); }); } else { var index = -1; var msg; try { var parts = resp.msg.split(' - ',2); if (parts[1]==undefined){ msg = resp.msg; } else { i = parseInt(parts[0]); if (i.toString() == parts[0]){ index = parts[0]; msg = parts[1]; } else { index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } } } catch(e){ index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } try{ if (index== -1){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } else { err_id = 'mce_tmp_error_msg'; html = ' '+msg+''; var input_id = '#mc_embed_signup'; var f = mce_jQuery(input_id); if (ftypes[index]=='address'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-addr1'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else if (ftypes[index]=='date'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-month'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else { input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]; f = mce_jQuery().parent(input_id).get(0); } if (f){ mce_jQuery(f).append(html); mce_jQuery(input_id).focus(); } else { mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } catch(e){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } BE THE CHANGE! 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19 февраля 2013, 03:06

Climate Change: The Folly of "Demanding" Action

Tony CartalucciActivist Post At a recent Washington climate change rally, who is demanding action? Demanding action from whom? What action? In reality, the diminutive, corporate-media inflated rally in DC was organized by the very corporate-financier special interests that have been wreaking terrible havoc on both the human population and the environment of this planet for decades. They are demanding action from a government that already represents their interests. Their demands are policies, particularly financial tax schemes that they themselves created and are are best positioned to benefit from while making no discernible impact on the very real environmental threats we collectively face. Image (above right): Rampant CO2, high global temperatures, rising sea levels. A look into the future? No, this is Mesozoic North America 250-65 million years ago. Climate change has happened long before humanity's emergence, it will happen again, with or without us. The key to preserving what we as humans value, including not only our cities, towns, and countrysides, but also ecosystems and species - is to devise technical, pragmatic solutions to ensure no matter what the climate does, we can not only survive, but thrive.It was an exercise in manufacturing consent for policies already long-ago devised and simply waiting for piecemeal implementation. google_ad_client = "pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 6/30/10 */ google_ad_slot = "8230781418"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; Yahoo! News' report, "40,000 People Reported at Climate Change Rally," mentions 350.org as one of the rally's organizers and key representatives. Upon 350.org's "Friends & Allies" page, an extensive list of human rights and environmental racketeers can be found, all either linked, or directly connected to big-oil, big-finance, big-agri, and big-defense. The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and its "Earth Hour" for instance, includes Fortune 500 corporations (page 24, .pdf) (and here) Walmart, Unilever, Coca-Cola, draconian intellectual property racketeer Christopher Dodd representing the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) as a director, Bank of America, Google, and others. While the WWF claims having big corporations as partners is "good news" for the environment, implying that they are shifting toward environmental responsibility - in reality it is exactly the other way around. Corporations are co-opting genuine concern for the environment to further enrich themselves and to create global frameworks that eliminate indigenous competition over resources they themselves are already exploiting and plan to continue exploiting. The lack of real, pragmatic solutions, or even an honest scientific discussion on issues like climate change are particularly telling. This collection of organizations falling under the 350.org website have also been key in pushing other establishment agendas, most notably regime change and political subversion worldwide,couching a corporate-fascist warmongering agenda behind liberal concerns for "freedom," "democracy," and "human rights." Real Environmental ThreatsThe climate of Earth has always changed throughout its natural history, and many times before the existence of man, has changed so dramatically that it has caused mass extinction events. 65 million years ago, for example, Antarctica was a thriving ecosystem covered in temperate forests inhabited by dinosaurs. The global temperatures were higher, sea levels were higher, and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels were many times higher than they are today. Higher temperatures, sea levels, and CO2 levels made the planet more habitable, not less. This changed however, and to the detriment of many species that are now extinct. Before the Cretaceous period, there have been many points throughout Earth's natural history, that were we as humans to travel back, would find uninhabitable. The atmosphere has been in a state of perpetual change, the biology driven by this change has likewise continuously evolved. There is no "norm" in terms of geology, biology, or climate. The only constant is the inevitability of its constant change. The climate will change with or without us. To ensure the survival of what we value in terms of human society, history, and infrastructure, as well as ecosystems and individual species we desire to preserve, we must come up with something better than "carbon neutrality" implemented by giving bankers yet another derivative to trade, and energy companies a legal framework to maintain monopolies over powering human civilization. Part of the solution is not only leveraging technology to protect our towns, cities, and countrysides from adverse weather, flooding, and changes in temperature through innovative infrastructure projects, but undermining, decentralizing, and eventually eliminating permanently these corporate monopolies that are demonstrably destroying the environment. Strange that 350.org wasn't marching against genetically modified organisms (GMO) and Monsanto's pursuit of genetically overwriting the planet. Could a planet face a more dire threat than being overwritten genetically, its very essence mutilated by profiteering corporations? Strange that 350.org's "Friends & Allies" don't demand an end to profiteering wars around the planet that see tons of depleted uranium, with a half-life of billions of years, being dumped in both human and natural habitats the world over. Strange that 350.org, and "Friends & Allies" like WWF have in fact partnered with Fortune 500 corporations that perpetuate global monopolies, centralized manufacturing and distribution (and profits) that encourage wasteful supply chains, unhealthy socioeconomic trends, incur large amounts of garbage, and require the very petroleum and CO2 producing processes they allegedly were in Washington to oppose. Indeed, 350.org and partners like the WWF do not represent corporations joining environmentalists, but rather represent environmentalists being co-opted and manipulated by the very special interests committing real harm to this planet. Don't Demand Action - Be the Action  Waving around placards as part of a big-business rally couched behind environmentalism, demanding action from a government big-business already fully owns, simply legitimizes and manufacturers public consent for more of the same. More schemes, more waste, more fraud, more abuse, while the environment continues to unravel and a host of problems both directly and indirectly related continue to grow. Real solutions generally don't involve corporations or governments, in fact, as a necessity must exclude them. The marriage between corporate interests and government regulations should be something all of us can agree on, regardless of where we sit on the political or environmental spectrum.Real solutions involve a real education in science, technology, design, and manufacturing. This empowers people in all levels of society to accurately assess problems and apply local solutions. This, coupled with modern manufacturing technology enables more to be done on a local level, short-circuiting the petroleum intensive logistical chains WWF sponsors like Walmart couldn't live without. Organic farming on a local level coupled with local farmers' markets eliminates entirely the need for Monsanto poison, fertilizers, and genetically modified franken-crops, along with the replacement of the petroleum intensive logistical networks that distribute big-agri's products. 3D printing, computer-controlled manufacturing, and local hackerspaces that encourage local entrepreneurship accelerate technological development and solutions that allow us to live the lives we wish to lead while doing so more efficiently in terms of energy, waste, and environmental impact. In fact, when you think about it, almost all of these real solutions involve real community and local action, not placard-waving trips to Washington. These are not solutions that involve policies, taxes, and regulations, but rather technology, education, constructive, pragmatic, technical solutions that not only would make our environment more livable, but make our local economies and communities more viable and self-sufficient. The catch is, and the reason why this isn't being done, you will notice that none of these activities require WWF sponsors like Walmart, Nike, IBM, Toyota, Bank of America, Coca-Cola, HSBC, Citi, IKEA, Nokia, etc. We all desire cleaner air, healthier food, safer water, and greener parks. Waiting for a corporate-financier establishment to give it to us, when they themselves are the ones that have denied us of these essentials is the height of both naivety and futility. google_ad_client = "ca-pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 7/28/12 */ google_ad_slot = "9833874419"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; Does it make sense then, to see why real problems and their solutions have become the target of hijackers like the corporate conglomeration that is 350.org and the WWF? Does it make sense to see them offering "alternative" centralized, corporate dependent solutions that replace local activism and tangible, technological solutions? Why travel to Washington D.C. and demand non-solutions to real problems when you can organize locally and begin making this planet livable in very real, tangible, pragmatic, and measurable ways?RELATED ACTIVIST POST ARTICLE:Building Communities From the Food UpTony Cartalucci's articles have appeared on many alternative media websites, including his own at Land Destroyer Report, Alternative Thai News Network and LocalOrg. Read other contributed articles by Tony Cartalucci here. 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12 февраля 2013, 21:00

Who Will Win The Currency Wars?

As debate about potential currency wars heats up, commentators including myself have called out the likely losers, the Japanese yen and South Korean won being high on most lists. Much less discussed has been which countries will win from the currency wars. After all, the currency market is a zero-sum game - as one currency declines, another must go up. In this issue, I'm going to suggest that Singapore and to a lesser extent, Thailand and Malaysia, will be relative winners. And I'm also going to explain why some supposed currency safe havens - including Australia, China, Canada, Switzerland and Norway - are unlikely to perform as well. Now I know that some will point to gold being money and the ultimate winner of the race to the currency bottom. I too am a gold bull and suggest the metal should be a core component of any investment portfolio. Having written about gold on previous occasions though, today the focus will be on currencies. The wars are just beginning In early January I wrote the following in a newsletter called Sayonara To The Yen: "The yen could collapse. Anyone for 200, perhaps 300, yen to the dollar? ... The impact from any Japanese financial crisis will go well beyond Japan though. After all, Japan is the world's third largest economy, accounting for 8.3% of global GDP. Its banks finance a lot of business both in Asia and elsewhere. Japan is also a major exporter competing with South Korea and Taiwan on high-end electronics, auto and industrial goods. Think about the potential impact on South Korea for a moment. Exports account for 52% of GDP there ... South Korea and other countries won't allow their exporters to become totally uncompetitive against their Japanese counterparts though. They'll join the fight to trash their currencies in order to help their exporters." Since then, the yen has tanked. I had thought there'd be some short-term respite in February but that hasn't been the case. The reason is that the Bank of Japan Governor, Masaaki Shirakawa, has announced that he will resign on March 19, three weeks before this term was due to end. This means Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will be able to appoint a new Governor that is more in line with his inflationist policies. Simply put, money printing is on the way sooner than markets thought and the yen has got pummelled further. Just as important has been the reaction to yen weakening. Many countries have voiced their concerns. Those concerns are intensifying, particularly in Europe given continued euro strength. European Central Bank President Mario Draghi has signalled policymakers are worried the euro's advance could dampen inflation and hamper an economic recovery. France has been a particularly vocal critic of the rising euro. The broader issue is simple: the developed world has too much debt and to reduce this debt, they want to create inflation and depreciate the value of their currencies (thereby reducing the value of the debt). It's not going to be able to grow its way out of the debt or cut spending enough to make the debt more manageable. Which currencies won't win The losers from currency wars are relatively easy to identify, with the Japanese yen, South Korean won and British sterling being high up on the list. Less easy to identify are those currencies that will prove safe havens. There are a number of currently perceived safe havens that could prove anything but. Let's start with the commodity currencies. Depreciating currencies mean tangible assets such as commodities should perform reasonably well. Those currencies largely dependent on commodities should also outperform. On a long-term basis (five years) though, the current commodities bull market is likely to end. The safe haven status of the Australian dollar, Canadian loonie and Norwegian krone will be under threat. Let's turn to the Australian dollar or Aussie as it's commonly known. On a long-term basis, the Aussie is extremely risky. Australia has benefited from a three decade property boom and 12-year commodities boom. The problem is that the property boom is unwinding as highly indebted consumers pay down their debt and worry about job security as unemployment rises. When the commodity boom ends too, there will be nothing to fill the gap. Australia has been poorly governed over the past decade, leaving few globally competitive industries other than mining. That might be ok if the country's balance sheet was in good shape. Unfortunately though, even during boom times, Australia has consistently run budget and trade deficits. In sum, long-term investors should stay away from the Aussie. As an Australian resident, I hope I'm wrong though! The Canadian loonie suffers similar afflictions. I regularly visit Canada as my wife is Canadian. On my last visit in July 2012, I was surprised to read of an east-west divide developing in the country. The mining-intensive west was enjoying good times while the more manufacturing-exposed east was not doing as well. The reason that I was surprised was that it was exactly the same issue being faced in Australia. Like Australia, Canada too has a property bubble propelled by too-easy bank lending standards that's left people with way too much debt. The one big difference with Australia though is the significant reliance on trade with the U.S.. If you're bullish on American prospects, the loonie may hold up even with deflating mining and property bubbles. I'm not optimistic on a U.S. recovery and so the loonie could be in as much trouble as the Aussie. Many sophisticated investors have a preference for the Norwegian krone. This is understandable given Norway's rock-solid balance sheet. But I am less optimistic given the country's reliance on oil and trade with Europe. Also, it appears to this author that the currency is currently both over-owned and over-valued. Finally to a currency not commodity-exposed, the Swiss franc. Historically, the franc has proved the ultimate safe haven currency. Switzerland has had impeccable economic credentials, with high savings rates, low taxes, minimal debt and flourishing exports. But over the past four years, the country has gone mad. It's printed so much money that foreign exchange reserves having gone up 7x, now equivalent to 70% of the country's GDP. All of this to keep its exporters competitive of course. But it's likely to set the country back for decades. And the franc too. The problem with the yuan Many argue that the Chinese yuan is undervalued and will inevitably appreciate in future. Particularly as other countries seek to become more competitive by devaluing their own currencies. But I couldn't disagree more with this assessment. To understand why, let's take a step back. One of the most overlooked recent global developments has been slowing foreign exchange (forex) reserves in China. Forex reserves are simply foreign currency and bonds held by monetary authorities. Historically, China has had strong growth as there's been overwhelming demand for the yuan. To prevent rapid yuan appreciation and help its exporters, China has printed loads of money and invested that money abroad, primarily in U.S. Treasuries. Buying these Treasuries has kept U.S. rates low and American consumers have been happy to buy cheap Chinese goods. But forex reserves in China are now stalling as more people are getting their money out of the country. Many brokers claim this development is cyclical, that China has been going through a rough patch and people are being cautious by getting their money out. But what if it's structural? Perhaps the Chinese themselves see their currency and assets as overvalued, with better value found elsewhere? It's hard not to see at least an element of that. Also, without forex reserve growth, China doesn't need to print money to buy overseas assets. In fact, it may end up having to do the opposite, buying yuan to maintain the exchange rate peg to the U.S. dollar. This would be deflationary for both China and the rest of the world. The upshot is that if China's economy deteriorates and authorities are forced to choose between maintaining the exchange rate peg or foregoing it to depreciate their currency, which are they going to choose? My bet's on the latter. As for the argument that internationalising the yuan would result in yuan appreciation, it's hard to see the logic of this either. If more Chinese have the choice to get their money out of the country (which is illegal now), won't they go ahead and do it? So put me in the camp that thinks the yuan is overvalued rather than the other way around. Singapore is (already) the new Switzerland As a former Portfolio Manager and sell-side analyst, I covered the gaming sector across Asia and subsequently visited the Singapore casinos on a regular basis. What amazed me then was the meticulous planning that went into developing the casinos and tourism in Singapore more broadly. With the casino and tourism numbers, targets were exceeded on almost every count. The meticulous planning of Singapore is part of the reason why it's been a phenomenal success story over the past 55 years. You just have to look at the country that it split from, Malaysia, to realise how successful Singapore has been. Singapore is now the world's third-richest in terms of GDP (power purchasing parity) per capita. It also boasts one of the best balance sheets with a large current account surplus (exports minus imports and transfer payments), balanced fiscal budget, high savings rates and zero foreign debt. Not bad for a country with no natural resources and a small population.   One question mark has always been over the country's high public debt, at an estimated 110% of GDP in 2012. But almost all of this debt is in the form of Singapore government bonds and the main holder is the Central Provident Fund (CPF) Board. The CPF is a pension fund that's primarily used to fund public housing. It dates back to Singapore's beginnings when the country needed money, not knowing whether it would survive. In other words, it's all government money - the government owes itself and no-one else. The unique thing about Singapore is that it manages it currency against a basket of currencies. This gives it flexibility. And most importantly, Singapore has refused to engage in the stupidity of quantitative easing (QE) with which the rest of the world is currently enthralled.   All right, you're probably saying - Singapore's in a strong position but is that going to continue and will the currency rise? The short answer to both is yes. Recently, the government released a population white paper, detailing its long-term thinking on population policies (meticulous planning again). It's a critical issue given the country has one of the world's lowest birth rates. The government is projecting the population to reach 5.8-6 million by 2020 and 6.5-6.9 million by 2030, from 5.3 million. To achieve that target, it would mean slowing growth in foreign workers (close to 40% of the population), to around 2.6% per annum from close to 7% currently. With labour force growth moderating to 1-2% per year to 2020, the government is estimating an average 3-5% GDP growth through the rest of the decade. There's little doubt that the government is treading a fine line on the population issue. The local population is agitated at the growing wealth of foreigners, increasing inequality, crowded populace etc. This has been reflected at recent election polls. But the government and its people also realise they need foreign workers to maintain economic growth. Remember that GDP growth equals population growth plus by productivity growth. All of this means that you can expect a tighter labour market and higher wages going forward. And this will put upward pressure on inflation and the currency. What then are the risks? Well, Singapore is reliant on exports and if there is another global economic downturn, its economy would be impacted. Also, there's been talk that the government may seek to slow the growth in currency appreciation. That may happen though note that it doesn't mean it will pursue a policy of currency devaluation.   Other candidates For wont of space, I'll very briefly mention two other currencies poised to outperform: namely the Thai baht and Malaysian ringgit. Both are reasonably solid currencies, though not to the same extent as the Singapore dollar. I quite like the baht as a long-term bet as: Thailand is potentially emerging from a long period of stagnation. It would be a primary beneficiary of a comeback of neighbouring Myanmar. It's building a low-cost industrial base to match and perhaps beat China. The country's showing clear signs of political maturity given the peaceful transition to the latest government. Malaysia is higher risk given its commodities exposure, budget deficit and political uncertainty with elections approaching. Hopefully the next government can implement badly-needed reforms and kick-start the economy. Perhaps the recent impressive growth of Asean neighbours including the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand, will spur it into action.

11 февраля 2013, 19:28

Trillions for Wars, None For Cancer Stricken Children

Team cures cancer with innovative treatment, child-patients stuck with staggering bills.click to enlargeTony Cartalucci, ContributorActivist Post In "On the Cusp of Ending Big Pharma," a coming revolution in biology and medicine made possible by a better understanding of genetics and gene therapy was described in detail. Almost as if to validate the premise of having the public begin getting directly involved in not only understanding genetics and gene therapy, but begin building the infrastructure at a local level to pursue research and development, as well as implement eventual techniques and treatments, Philly.com has just recently published a follow up to an incredible story. Titled, "Girl's gene-therapy estimate gives Children's Hospital a shiner," the article describes a clinical trial in which gene therapy was used to treat 10 adults and 2 children suffering from cancer, most of whom have had their cancer go into remission, and the staggering bills the treatment incurred. Charities and insurance assisted at least one patient, while another, a 5-year-old Croatian girl, was left with a $837,000 bill. Medical care is expensive. It requires the absolute cutting edge in technology, skilled doctors and technicians to utilize it in the care of patients, all within an economic paradigm where demand vastly outnumbers supply. What could be done to reduce the disparity between supply and demand? And what can be done until then to ensure people get the absolute best treatment possible? Or should a 5 year old girl perish because she can't afford experimental treatment when all other options were sure to fail?Trillions for War...Soldiers fighting the fruitless decade long wars in Iraq and Afghanistan didn't need to buy their own weapons, procure their own transportation to the warzone, buy their own meals, and when they were injured, pay for their own medical treatment. Indeed, these fruitless wars built openly on categorically false premises, were subsidized by trillions of dollars from American tax payers despite the wars having no public support. Since these two fruitless wars sold upon a pack of lies, the United States has conducted combat operations in Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Uganda, inside Pakistan, Mali, and covertly in Iran. Again, subsidized by trillions of tax payer dollars.Image: US Marine Corps General Smedley Butler was a two-time Medal of Honor recipient, and anti-war. He wrote "War is a Racket." Despite the torrent of pro-war propaganda we are bombarded with, and all the pretexts and excuses used to sell endless global conflict, it is indeed a racket perpetrated by big-business interests at the rest of humanity's expense, and has been for a long time. google_ad_client = "pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 6/30/10 */ google_ad_slot = "8230781418"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; For unpopular wars fought upon false premises, sold by practiced liars across the corporate media, there seems to be an endless torrent of cash. In turn, this money doesn't simply go into a fiscal blackhole. Instead, it ends up in the profit margins of Fortune 500 corporations, from the big-defense contractors arming and supplying military operations, to big-oil and construction contractors building in the wake of these operations. It is a well-understood racket that casts a dark shadow on Western society and has very real implications for modern human civilization. Imagine if these trillions instead went somewhere else. Imagine if cancer research and treatment was subsidized with the same impetus as wars of profit. Imagine if improving education, infrastructure, and the means by which we could accelerate medical research and development and thereby reduce the disparity between supply and demand was done with the same fervor we pursue wars abroad.Our Problem, Our Challenge We could hold our breath, march with signs, and continue to vote hoping eventually someone will come to office and fix this perpetual injustice. Or instead, we can realize that our faith and investments in time, money, energy, and attention to this corrupt system is why we have this problem in the first place.There are several steps we can take now to begin tilting the balance away from the ruling class and their pet projects pursued at our expense and toward the things that really affect us, like our children dying from cancer and medical treatment that is too expensive to afford. And as we take these steps, people should continue fighting for medical care subsidies as a stop gap measure. If there is money for perpetual, unnecessary war, there is money for medical care. 1. Improve Education: Medical treatment is expensive because of immense demand for a small supply of both the technology used to treat people, and the skilled doctors and technicians that use that technology. That technology is in turn scarce, because of the lack of skilled designers and engineers working to develop it. By improving real, relevant, technical education in the fields of design, engineering, science, and medicine, and by making such an education available to all, would be one step toward increasing the supply versus demand. Online, there are vast resources available for free, from some of the most prestigious universities in the world on subjects ranging from basic math and science, to more specific topics like biology, medicine, genetics, and their applications. While there is no substitute for a proper medical school education, local organizations called DIYbio labs are springing up around the world and creating an environment where regular people can learn and practice techniques in modern biology, especially in the field of genetics. Just as hackerspaces have begun contributing to, and spinning off into small and medium businesses, while driving the advancement of technology, DIYbio labs can augment the existing medical infrastructure of a given society. Additionally, people should not abandon efforts to improve traditional education.2. Build Local Infrastructure: DIYbio labs are one way of bringing medical research and development, however small of a scale it may be on for now, into their local communities. Building up after-school and weekend programs to educate people in basic science and particularly biology, genetics, and medicine helps raise overall awareness of the issues at hand and their possible solutions. Already, high schools are beginning to participate in MIT's iGEM competition, an annual synthetic biology event where teams from around the world engineer biological components to solve a specific problem. Schools that become involved in iGem must build up both their physical infrastructure and their human capital to compete, and by doing so, lay the foundation for more permanent and relevant research and development when they return home. 3. Reclaim Our Institutions: With a well-established infrastructure developing both technology and human capital, a community is better positioned not only to understand what state and national institutions are doing in terms of medical research and clinical trials, but are able to partner with them and augment their efforts. Furthermore, a human connection is established between institutions and the people they were designed in the first place to serve. The day will come where technology makes medical care affordable for all, reducing or eliminating the need to subsidize it. Until that day comes, we must balance our pursuit for "health care policy" with developing real, pragmatic, technical health care progress. How? It starts with something as simple as getting a few people around a single table and talking. Identify who may already have an interest in the particular fields you plan on tackling. Look for the nearest local groups already doing this, either as hackerspaces or as DIYbio labs. Look for schools nearby already participating in iGEM and see what you could to to help, or expand on their work. If you are not interested in medicine, even a standard hackerspace working on a wide range of projects could help build local infrastructure that could be used to help advance DIYbio groups. Biomedical technology is grounded in the same fundamental design principles and manufacturing techniques as any other engineering discipline. Start or join an after-school program that teaches real skills and practical knowledge to students - including science, math, design, engineering, etc. Look into OpenCourseWare online and raise awareness. Start a blog collecting your favorite courses. google_ad_client = "ca-pub-1897954795849722"; /* 468x60, created 7/28/12 */ google_ad_slot = "9833874419"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 60; Taking human capital out of the coffers of the ruling class, and placing it back where it belongs, amongst the people from which it was drawn, begins the rebalancing of power, and ends paradigms where trillions can be spend on endless wars of profit, and none is left for cancer-stricken children, even when we've developed cures. The choice is ours, but unlike in faux-democracy, we will have to do more than simply cast a ballot to exercise this choice. It will be daily, patient, sometimes frustrating work to build the infrastructure and human capital we need to rebalance this equation and reclaim our destiny. Self-determination is not a spectator sport, it is something you either do, or do without. Don't wait for your child to be the one struck by cancer and your family stuck with a million-dollar medical bill - that is - if you are lucky enough to get access to the latest treatment in the first place. Start working now to fix this immense injustice.Tony Cartalucci's articles have appeared on many alternative media websites, including his own at  Land Destroyer Report, Alternative Thai News Network and LocalOrg. 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14 января 2013, 09:09

Компании Азии взяли паузу в размещении облигаций

Компании в Азии взяли передышку от долларовых размещений, после того как объем предложения на прошлой неделе вырос до четырехмесячного максимума. При этом как минимум три эмитента планируют разместить облигации в ближайшие дни.На прошлой неделе объем долларовых размещений облигаций в Азии вырос до максимума за 4 месяца Shimao Property Holdings Ltd. провела размещение долга на $6 млрд на прошлой неделе на азиатском рынке за исключением Японии, что является максимумом с сентября прошлого года. Hopson Development Holdings Ltd. продала облигации на $300 млн, которые имеют рейтинг Investors Service Moody 's на уровне Сaa1 и доходность на уровне 9,875%, что значительно ниже ожидаемых 10,5%, сообщает Bloomberg."Инвесторы уходят с рынка, для того чтобы переварить сделки, которые были довольно дорогими, - сказал аналитик Jefferies Group Брайан Лай. – Доходность по сделкам была очень низкой, но такая ситуация не сохранится".Средняя премия по облигациям, номинированным в долларах, в Азии увеличилась до 250 базисных пунктов по отношению к казначейским облигациям (treasuries) 11 января, после того как 7 января был достигнут 20-месячный минимум в 245 базисных пунктов.Yuexiu Property Co., Thai Oil Pcl и PT Indika Energy Tbk в настоящий момент рассматривают возможность размещения в ближайшее время.Кроме этого, Национальный банк Австралии, по словам источника, знакомого с ситуацией, готовится к размещению трех серий облигаций, в том числе 10-летних бондов с доходностью, превышающей доходность treasuries на 120 базисных пунктов.

09 января 2013, 16:36

Frontrunning: January 9

A Bold Dissenter at the Fed, Hoping His Doubts Are Wrong (NYT) China and Japan step up drone race as tension builds over disputed islands (Guardian) How Mario Draghi is reshaping Europe's central bank (Reuters) Merkel Economy Shows Neglect as Sick Man Concern Returns (BBG) US oil imports to fall to 25-year low (FT) China Loan Share at Record Low Shows Financing Risks (BBG) Dimon Says Some JPMorgan Execs ‘Acted Like Children’ on Loss (BBG) - children that revealed what 'excess reserves' are truly used for Fed injects new sell-off risk into Treasuries (FT) - really? So the Fed will stop monetizing the US deficit some time soon? Obama aide presses Republicans to accept more tax revenues (Reuters) Ex-SAC analyst named 20 alleged insider traders (FT) BOJ easing bets help dollar regain ground vs yen (Reuters) Goldman Sachs Said to Be Part of Fed-Led Foreclosure Settlement (BBG) Venezuela postpones inauguration for cancer-stricken Chavez (Reuters)   Overnight Media Digest WSJ * Clearwire received an unsolicited bid from Dish Network to buy the wireless broadband operator, in a broadside against Sprint Nextel's agreed-upon buyout offer. * Boeing Co's flagship Dreamliner jet, plagued by years of production delays before getting off the ground, hit fresh trouble on Tuesday as air-safety officials opened a formal probe into a fire that broke out on an empty plane, and another airline discovered wiring problems in one of its 787s. * Apple Inc is working on a lower-end iPhone, according to people briefed on the matter, a big shift in corporate strategy as its supremacy in smartphones has slipped. * Two more members of the management team that steered J.P. Morgan Chase & Co through the credit crisis have taken new jobs, as the largest U.S. bank assembles a younger set of top leaders. * The chief executive of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority said the regulator plans to shine a light on dark pools, private trading venues that allow buyers and sellers to post orders that are hidden from the market. * In a reversal of industry practice, Goldman Sachs Group Inc will begin disclosing the values of its money-market mutual funds daily rather than monthly, according to people familiar with the company's plans. Some of the changes will take effect as early as Wednesday. * The U.S. government has opened a high-level review of accidents and mishaps experienced by Royal Dutch Shell since it started the process of drilling for oil in the Arctic Ocean last year, the Interior Department said Tuesday. * Alcoa Inc swung to a profit in the fourth quarter, helped by stabilizing prices for raw aluminum, increased sales in the higher-profit aerospace business and cost-cutting efforts. * Former professional cyclist Lance Armstrong is slated to appear on Oprah Winfrey's "Next Chapter" on Jan. 17, at a time when people familiar with his thinking say he has been considering a confession of his alleged use of performance-enhancing drugs.   FT FORTRESS MOVES INTO CHINESE BAD DEBTS Overview TELECOMS LOOK AT PAN-EUROPE NETWORK Europe's top telecoms executives are discussing setting up a pan-European infrastructure network to unite the region's fragmented national markets. SCHRODERS DITCHES PWC AS AUDITOR Schroders Plc is dropping PWC as its auditor in favour of rival KPMG after more than 50 years. TOP EXECUTIVES WARN CAMERON ON EU UK business leaders have warned Prime Minister David Cameron that he risks damaging the economy by taking Britain out of the European Union if he seeks renegotiation of membership. TORIES TURN HEAT ON BETTER-OFF PENSIONERS Britain's wealthy pensioners will no longer be protected from austerity measures after the next election as politicians prepare to end their commitment to protect universal benefits. HSBC'S PING AN STAKE SALE IN DOUBT HSBC's $9.4 billion sale of its stake in China's Ping An Insurance has been left in jeopardy after Thai buyer CP Group lost funding for some of the 15.6 percent shareholding. AIG WEIGHS ACTION AGAINST US GOVERNMENT U.S. insurer AIG, which received the largest of all the government bailouts during the financial crisis, may sue the US government over the terms of the deal. STRATEGIC SHAKE-UP AT MAN GROUP Hedge fund Man Group Plc said on Tuesday it would be making changes at its GLG unit, the London-based hedge fund it bought in 2010. FORTRESS MOVES INTO CHINESE BAD DEBTS Fortress Investment Group Llc is buying a servicer of bad debts and distressed assets in China.   NYT * Dish Network made an unsolicited bid for Clearwire, the wireless network operator, a complicated offer that threatens the existing takeover deal by the company's majority owner, Sprint Nextel. * A former analyst at SAC Capital Advisors, the hedge fund owned by billionaire investor Steven Cohen, has given U.S. federal agents the names of about 20 people that he said engaged in insider trading, according to a court filing. * As the board of AIG weighs whether to join a shareholder lawsuit against the United States government, several lawmakers have warned the company not to join the lawsuit. * Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase , has left the board of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, a position that had stirred some controversy after the bank's big trading loss last year. * Alcoa said that its fourth-quarter earnings met Wall Street's expectations and that it expected slightly higher demand for aluminum this year. * Jeffrey Lacker, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond in Virginia, has warned that the central bank's efforts to stimulate growth are ineffective. * JPMorgan Chase announced on Tuesday that it had hired Timothy Ryan, a senior Wall Street lobbyist, as its new top regulatory officer.   Canada * Hope that Friday's face-to-face discussions between Prime Minister Stephen Harper and First Nations leaders will end protests and disruptions across Canada is fast disintegrating. Idle No More organizers will hold their own Friday meeting for chiefs that were not invited to the talks with Harper. * Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper ruled out any military intervention in Mali and said the country will work diplomatically with western allies and African countries to seek a solution. His comments came after a closed-door meeting with President Thomas Boni Yayi of Benin, current head of the African Union, who said that the insurgency in Mali poses a terrorist threat to the whole world. Reports in the business section: * The Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW), facing steadily declining membership at the Detroit Three auto makers, has launched a new drive to organize about 7,000 workers at two Toyota Motor Corp assembly plants in Ontario. * Sales and profit continue to rise but Canadian business leaders are surprisingly downbeat about the future. Business confidence in the fourth quarter of 2012 suffered its largest drop in more than two years, according to Deloitte Canada's "CFO Signals" index that tracks the attitudes of Canadian chief financial officers. NATIONAL POST * The Ontario government is considering asking seniors with higher incomes to chip in for their home care. A report meant to pave the way for the province's strategy on seniors care recommends exploring the possibility of an "income-based system." * Two Alberta-based First Nations said on Tuesday they were taking the Stephen Harper government to court over its budget legislation, adding another front in the actions aboriginals have taken across the country to protest Bill C-45 and C-38. FINANCIAL POST * Banks have had a long run of strong profits but the good times are about to become a little less because of the underlying issue of interest rates, Toronto-Dominion Bank Chief Executive Ed Clark said. * GMP Capital Inc, one of Canada's largest independent investment dealers, cut 15 jobs on Tuesday in an effort to reduce costs and weather difficult conditions for dealers that are not housed within big banks. The ongoing staff reductions, together with salary reductions and a "rationalization" of the firm's estate footprint, are expected to produce annual fixed cost savings of more than $5 million, GMP said.   China CHINA SECURITIES JOURNAL --China's Consumer Price Index (CPI) may have risen around 2.4 percent in December, bringing annual inflation in 2013 to about 2.7 percent, analysts and economists predicted. --Analysts forecast that China's listed banks may have posted net profit increases of between 15 and 20 percent. SHANGHAI SECURITIES NEWS --A total of 11 senior analysts expected China's economic growth could be at 7.84 percent on average and inflation could rise to 2.05 percent on average in 2013. --As China's property market showed a rebound at the end of 2012, most domestic real estate developers are optimistic that house prices would not fall sharply in 2013. But Qin Hong, head of research for the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development, said China will stick to a tighter property policy in 2013. --Thailand's CP Group may still be able to buy a $9.4 billion stake in Ping An Insurance from HSBC, using its own capital if it cannot get funding from the China Development Bank. CHINA DAILY (www.chinadaily.com.cn) -- Nearly 56 percent of organizations interviewed for a report by global human resources company Hudson said they plan to increase the number of permanent staff in the first quarter of 2013. PEOPLE'S DAILY -- The National Development and Reform Commission will cut the price of 20 kinds of medicine on the price-controlled national essential drugs list by 15 percent. Fly On The Wall 7:00 AM Market Snapshot ANALYST RESEARCH Upgrades Alliance Resource (ARLP) upgraded to Buy from Hold at Deutsche BankB&G Foods (BGS) upgraded to Overweight from Neutral at Piper JaffrayBrinker (EAT) upgraded to Overweight from Equal Weight at Morgan StanleyCitrix Systems (CTXS) upgraded to Buy from Hold at JefferiesElizabeth Arden (RDEN) upgraded to Outperform from Sector Perform at RBC CapitalExterran Partners (EXLP) upgraded to Outperform from Neutral at Credit SuisseFirstMerit (FMER) upgraded to Outperform from Perform at OppenheimerHealthcare Services (HCSG) upgraded to Buy from Hold at Benchmark Co.KeyCorp (KEY) upgraded to Outperform from Perform at OppenheimerNuVasive (NUVA) upgraded to Sector Perform from Underperform at RBC CapitalPG&E (PCG) upgraded to Buy from Hold at JefferiesRalph Lauren (RL) upgraded to Outperform from Neutral at MacquarieRed Robin (RRGB) upgraded to Equal Weight from Underweight at Morgan StanleyRoss Stores (ROST) upgraded to Buy from Hold at Deutsche BankUrban Outfitters (URBN) upgraded to Neutral from Underperform at Macquarie Downgrades AmeriGas (APU) downgraded to Underperform from Neutral at Credit SuisseApollo Group (APOL) downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at First AnalysisApollo Group (APOL) downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at Morgan StanleyBJ's Restaurants (BJRI) downgraded to Equal Weight from Overweight at Morgan StanleyBank of America (BAC) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at Credit SuisseBoardwalk Pipeline (BWP) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at Credit SuisseComerica (CMA) downgraded to Perform from Outperform at OppenheimerCommVault (CVLT) downgraded to Neutral from Buy at GoldmanCovanta (CVA) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at RW BairdDollar General (DG) downgraded to Sector Perform from Outperform at RBC CapitalFamily Dollar (FDO) downgraded to Sector Perform from Outperform at RBC CapitalFirst Financial Bancorp (FFBC) downgraded to Underweight from Equal Weight at BarclaysITT Educational (ESI) downgraded to Sell from Neutral at CitigroupKohl's (KSS) downgraded to Underperform from Neutral at MacquarieMacy's (M) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at MacquarieMetals USA (MUSA) downgraded to Hold from Buy at Deutsche BankMonsanto (MON) downgraded to Hold from Buy at Miller TabakSpectra Energy Partners (SEP) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at Credit SuisseSuburban Propane (SPH) downgraded to Neutral from Outperform at Credit SuisseWalter Energy (WLT) downgraded to Hold from Buy at Deutsche Bank Initiations Aflac (AFL) initiated with a Hold at Deutsche BankLincoln National (LNC) initiated with a Hold at Deutsche BankMetLife (MET) initiated with a Hold at Deutsche BankPrincipal Financial (PFG) initiated with a Hold at Deutsche BankPrudential (PRU) initiated with a Buy at Deutsche BankUnum Group (UNM) initiated with a Buy at Deutsche BankWestern Alliance (WAL) initiated with an Outperform at Wells Fargo HOT STOCKS Clearwire (CLWR) received unsolicited $3.30 per share offer from DISH (DISH)Apple (AAPL) working on less expensive iPhone, may come in late 2013, Dow Jones reportsWal-Mart (WMT), Straight Talk Wireless to offer iPhone on $45 no contract unlimited planGoldman Sachs (GS), Morgan Stanley (MS) in talks with regulators about foreclosure settlement, Bloomberg reportsAMR (AAMRQ) said “reasonable possibility” of value for equity holdersEli Lilly (LLY) CEO said company looking for M&A that adds revenue, not large merger, Bloomberg reportsAlcoa (AA) sees 2013 global aluminum demand growth of 7%Said Q1 aerospace and automotive demand to remain strongInterior Department launched assessment of Shell (RDS.A) Arctic drilling operations EARNINGS Companies that beat consensus earnings expectations last night and today include:AZZ Inc. (AZZ), Alcoa (AA), Global Payments (GPN), Apollo Group (APOL) Companies that missed consensus earnings expectations include:WD-40 (WDFC) Companies that matched consensus earnings expectations include:Alcoa (AA), Mistras (MG) NEWSPAPERS/WEBSITES In a change of industry practice, Goldman Sachs (GS) will begin disclosing the values of its money-market mutual funds daily rather than monthly, sources say. Some of the changes will take effect as soon as today. Experts said the move could force other firms in the $2.7T industry to follow, the Wall Street Journal reportsSony Corp. (SNE) wants to establish itself as one of the world's top-three smartphone manufacturers as part of its turnaround plan, but it doesn't see the need to acquire another handset maker to solidify its position behind Apple (AAPL) and Samsung (SSNLF), the Wall Street Journal reportsApple (AAPL) CEO Cook is meeting with partners and government officials in China on his second visit to its second-largest market in less than a year. Analysts say the company's longer-term outlook in the market may hinge on expanding its partners to include China Mobile (CHL), Reuters reportsPressured to improve the quality of its IPOs, China will tell underwriters and auditors of companies looking to list on mainland markets to review their financial statements and ensure that all is in order, sources say, Reuters reportsIrish Finance Minister Noonan said the government will sell at least half of its $1.3B of so-called contingent convertible capital notes in Bank of Ireland (IRE). Investment banks approached the ministry late last year indicating there was a “sizable investor interest,” Bloomberg reportsJPMorgan Chase & Co. (JPM) CEO Dimon said some top executives at the bank “acted like children” in handling an errant derivatives bet that cost the company more than $6.2B last year, Bloomberg reports SYNDICATE Chatham Lodging Trust (CLDT) files to sell 3.5M shares of common stockCrosstex Energy LP (XTEX) announces offering of 7.5M common unitsSummit Hotel Properties (INN) 15M share Secondary priced at $9.00Tesoro Logistics (TLLP) 8.5M share Secondary priced at $41.70

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30 ноября 2012, 10:44

PTT raises $3bn to fund overseas push

Equity offering by Thai oil and gas explorer is country’s biggest-ever and underscores Thailand’s rush for energy resources

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29 октября 2012, 14:36

Thai PTTEP shareholders approve $3.1 billion share sale

BANGKOK (Reuters) - Shareholders of PTT Exploration and Production Pcl gave the green light to a 98 billion baht ($3.1 billion) share sale, Thailand's biggest ever, that the country's top oil and...

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27 октября 2012, 01:58

My life on a plate: famous foodies' food diaries

Are Nigella's days spent scoffing chocolate cake? Does Heston blow-torch his dinner every night? And what does the Guardian's restaurant critic eat when off-duty? We asked six foodies to share their week in meals, with illuminating resultsHeston BlumenthalIt can be quite difficult to control what you eat when your schedule is all over the place. I tend to make small allowances when I can – for instance, cutting down on carbs by taking one layer of bread off a sandwich. I also exercise every day, even if it's just a short run. I'm tasting and developing dishes all the time – we can have around 500 dishes in development at any one time between the Fat Duck, Dinner, Waitrose and the two pubs, and that's not including the food for the TV work, so when I'm not filming, I'm kind of constantly eating/tasting. This has been an interesting exercise, though – I've never really analysed what I eat or drink. I guess I need to organise breakfast better, and I'm quite famous for drinking my body weight in Earl Grey tea, but the rest is just madness.SundayBreakfast Filming this morning, so just had a quick Earl Grey tea.Lunch Tuna sandwich… from a shop somewhere.Dinner Sunday lunch – well, kind of lunch/dinner by the time I got home. I think it was about 8.30pm, so that makes it officially Sunday dinner. A roast, of course! Dorset lamb this week. I always try to have a Sunday joint with all the trimmings – it's one of my favourite meals of the week.MondayBreakfast Early morning phone interview with Australia and a cup of tea (Earl Grey with skimmed milk).Lunch Lunch? Not today… : (Dinner Filming at the BBC studios for Jimmy Carr's Channel 4 show 8 Out Of 10 Cats – great night, hilarious, but was up early, then straight off to filming and hadn't eaten all day. Arrived at the BBC starving – big mistake (dried-out meatballs) washed down with a few glasses (slightly warm pinot grigio). Delicious!?TuesdayBreakfast My new TV series is out mid-November and we're still filming – cutting it neat! Had bacon butties to start the day off, cooked in the engine of a steam train – why not?Lunch Lunch was a bigger affair, but at least had packed my lunchbox. Grabbed some veg from the catering van, too.Dinner Popped into the amazing Zuma with my youngest, Joy, for her birthday. We were too full for dessert, so they just sent a little something.WednesdayBreakfast Waitrose tasting for new hot cross buns for next Easter – Earl Grey jasmine tea and orange-flower water versus ginger and acacia honey. May sound nice, but had to taste brussels sprout leaves cooked in different ways at the same time.Lunch Lunch at the lab: yoghurt and tampons. We were testing the effect of certain foods and how they coat the palate for an interactive presentation. The tampon dries the saliva out between spoonfuls, so you can identify how the tongue perceives flavour. It did work, but I wonder how it will go down. Snack Everything is getting bigger for the new programme. We supersize everything, and cook and eat it with different communities throughout the UK. Things like afternoon tea and old sweets. Not sure where the huge whisky gum came from, but I think I know someone at the lab who knows.Tea We have a lab grade centrifuge, a distillator, a rotary evaporator, vacuum centrifuge, vac packs, water baths… But no bloody kettle. A very complex cup of tea.Dinner After a full day in Bray and a brainstorm meeting that overran, ended up in the garden of the Crown for fish and chips – took the opportunity as a rare warm evening.ThursdayBreakfast Book signing back in office – finally a decent cup of tea, ahhh, found teapot.Lunch Spent most of the day at Dinner. Meeting with Ash to discuss a new project – a historic British food book – and trying to get a modern "meat fruit" shot to contrast with the historic image. Lunch was a tasting of new dishes: new terrine, autumn tart and sambonade – a goat's cheese cheesecake with elderflower and a secret centre.Dinner Stayed and had dinner with a couple of friends – obviously had a meat fruit. We're serving around 1,000 of them a week now!FridayBreakfast None at home because I was running late, but I had tea and breakfast canapés at the launch of a new Vision Express shop on Oxford Street – loads of bites, so breakfast in stages.Lunch Vision Express sushi before cutting the ribbon for the official store opening. I met another great spectacle-wearing geek, Jason Bradbury, there from The Gadget Show, so had a lot to talk about.Dinner Roast chicken at a friend's – it's the biggest joy when someone asks you to their home and cooks for you, but my mates always joke that it's such a stress. I think it's the other way round when they come to mine – it's not as if I can just cook up a steak. People are expecting to eat the cutlery at the very least.SaturdayBreakfast A quick tea and pastry on the way to the lab – more Earl Grey.Lunch Tasting two new dishes for the Duck. Nowhere near finished, but one will end up on the menu for Christmas as a kind of "partridge in a pear tree" – partridge cooked in butter at a low temperature to relax the meat, served on the breastbone with brandy butter, and chestnut and pine and mandarin (basically all the aromas and flavours we associate with Christmas). We're also looking at the leathering process from the 1800s for a turbot dish – tanning agents in early 1800s Britain were sumac, oak and mimosa bark, so we use all three. The drainage from the tanneries heated up the land, and we grew pineapples and melons on it, so we serve the fish with savoury melon and purple carrot. Oh, and frankincense and crystalised sea veg – we make our own leather from the fish skin, which you don't eat, but which will be part of the cutlery for the texture and smell. Easy, really, to balance all that?!Dinner Working late in Bray after tasting, so had a beer and some of head chef Jonny Lake's nachos with the boys after service.• Heston's Fantastical Food starts on 6 November at 9pm on Channel 4.Nigella LawsonMondayBreakfast Egg on toast, wolfed down too fast for a picture, but this is the deal (and it's often repeated): wholegrain rye toast, with a soft boiled egg schmooshed on top, with lots of Maldon salt and coarsely ground white pepper. Straight after breakfast, made batch of coffee ice-cream and chocolate nougat cookies to take to curry favour with various radio and TV interviews that I have lined up for day.Lunch I am not good when I miss meals; being hungry makes me both murderous and suicidal. So didn't feel good that I didn't manage to get back for lunch until about 4.30pm and had to leave house for the next thingy at 5pm, so all I had time for was some rye toast with hummus and coriander on top, and a far too small portion at that.Supper Roast chicken – I have all the bits with cartilage and skin, by choice, while pretending to make great sacrifices so that the children can eat the white meat – on escarole (my favourite lettuce) dressed just with Maldon, Mellow Yellow cold-pressed rapeseed oil, lemon and lots of English mustard.TuesdayBreakfast Made an egg and bacon sandwich for one of the children, but then ran too late to have breakfast myself. Not a good start to the day, made worse by the fact that I was going to a photographic shoot, which always makes me nervy.Lunch Made up for lack of breakfast by eating huge amounts of rotisserie chicken, char-grilled corn and crinkly chips from Chicken Shop in Kentish Town. Don't blame them for the poor display: I had a takeaway and didn't present the food (such was my quaking hunger) to its best advantage. From this point onwards, my life started looking up.Supper By special request, made risi e bisi, a Venetian recipe (think a soupy pea risotto) that's a favourite in my home. I am always grateful when this is what I'm asked to cook, because it's quick and easy, and as comforting for the cook as the eater.WednesdayBreakfast Rye toast with Mellow Yellow cold-pressed rapeseed oil and Vegemite. I feel a real traitor to my country choosing Vegemite over Marmite, but there it is.Lunch Since this is a day of interviews, and the meagre toast with Vegemite is wearing off to the point of panic, I order a steak and chips. True, there are only four chips on the plate (though I must tell you they were much bigger and hunkier than they look), but they've been generous with the béarnaise sauce, and I also have a tube of Colman's in my bag, so I manage to get through the afternoon.Supper By request, again, I make another of my children's favourites – penne with ham, peas and cream.Thursday Breakfast The usual rye toast and egg – and an awful lot of tea. In fact, I can never actually eat breakfast before I've had my two mugs of tea.Lunch Have a meeting at home over lunch, so roast a butterflied leg of lamb, along with a tin of sliced pink fir apple potatoes, yellow courgettes, cherry tomatoes, leeks and black olives. There is no particular design to this vegetable mixture: I was just giving my fridge a bit of a going through, and bunged everything that needed to be used up into a roasting tin.Supper Although I complied with children's wishes, making them burgers (not homemade, I must own up, but Heston's from Waitrose) with plastic cheese, potatoes cut somewhere between wedges and chips, roasted with garlic cloves and pancetta cubes, and a rather 1970s-looking salad, I needed the simple salve of an avocado, eaten with nothing more than a spritz of lemon and a snowy throw of salt.I did succumb to some Booja-Booja champagne truffles later, but I never feel bad about that.FridayBreakfast Smoked salmon, coarsely ground white pepper, lemon juice and lots of dill – for me, the best way to eat it. I am very fussy about the smoked salmon, though; it must be London-cure, which is so lusciously mild that it's more like eating wafer-thin sashimi than anything else. I get mine, as my grandmother did before me, from Panzer's in St John's Wood, despite the schlepp.Lunch A frantic day, and much as I like having proper meals and not grabbed snacks, lunch today is a toasted sandwich. Still, it's a very good toastie, buttery-crisp on the outside, lined with ham as thin and tender and pink as a kitten's tongue, and gooey with jarlsberg.Supper Going to see Michael McIntyre at the O2, so supper has to be a picnic on the way there. I have an old picnic box I bought on eBay, and make a few batches of rice noodle and prawn salad, with beansprouts, sugar snaps and a lot of ginger, chilli and soy to go inside it. Friends we're going with a supply of champagne and, given that I can get drunk on one glass, I am reeling by the time I get home. Fantastic night, though, topped off by a buttered, toasted bagel on my return, followed by crisps and chocolate.SaturdayBreakfast Get up too late for breakfast, but manage a good lunch-after-the-night-before (and pre-opening snoop) at Colbert of fried eggs with black pudding and crêpes with lemon and sugar.Supper I live very near the Chelsea Fishmonger and generally throw myself at Rex, the fishmonger, and get myself comfortingly overstocked for the weekend. Tonight's supper is part of this catch: halibut, juicily roasted and plonked on top of some treviso leaves, with broccoli cooked with garlic oil, anchovies, chilli and dry white vermouth. This is what I use whenever I want white wine taste, but without having to open a bottle. I know it sounds odd, but unless we're having friends over, it never occurs to me to open a bottle of wine.SundayBreakfast Up too late for breakfast, but I do manage a supersized cappuccino in bed with the papers.Lunch Tuna tartare with capers, lemon zest, spring onions and rocket: this takes about three minutes to make and is a virtuous reward for the lazy and greedy.Supper Ever since the children have been teenagers, the ritual of Sunday lunch has been shunted on to Sunday supper. Tonight, we're having pork belly slices – think melting meat and triumphant, bronze crackling – with soy and cumin gravy, mashed potato and broccoli. I've been experimenting with some mini versions of my cappuccino pavlova and have some bases left, as well as some coffee ice-cream from Monday, so do a housekeeping job of getting rid of the two together (that's my excuse), anointed with a sticky, gleaming drizzle of Golden Syrup which, along with Maldon and Colman's, constitute the holy trinity of Great British Foodstuffs.• Nigella Lawson's new book, Nigellissima: Instant Italian Inspiration, is published by Chatto & Windus at £26. To order a copy for £20.80, plus free UK mainland p&p, go to guardian.co.uk/bookshop, or call 0330 333 6846.Marina O'LoughlinA lunatic mishmash of fayn daynin', boozing and comfort eating with the odd, breakfast-based attempt at healthiness. When not working, I'll cheerfully eat the same things over and over. I was on holiday for much of the week, so I'm amazed there's no Indian or a Thai: I usually pine for them after monoculturalist Italy. No apologies for the datterini surfeit – I'd happily live on them. And toast.SaturdayBreakfast Tomatoes with chilli: I can't get enough of the local datterini tomatoes of joy.Lunch Risotto at Trattoria Carmello – I practically live in this restaurant in Marina di Ragusa whenever I'm in Sicily. Simple but wonderful.Dinner Satro in Scicli – new and still finding its feet. Toast, anchovy, sliver of lemon – tangy! Maccheroni with swordfish. The inevitable almondy, custardy cakes to finish.SundayBreakfast More datterini.Lunch Tuna and green peppers – usually hate green peppers, but these almost melted down into the tuna.Dinner Lobster paella – bizarre to be eating paella in Sicily, but that's what our hosts cooked for us.MondayBreakfast Berocca and banana (and one or two datterini) – healthy!Lunch A horrid little salad with tinned corn in a Modica cafe – you can get bad food in Italy.Dinner Anchovy toasts. Bread with red tuna and its roe. Roast pancetta at the local bar: magnificently fatty, piggy porchetta. More almond cakes.TuesdayBreakfast Unidentified Sicilian object stuffed with cheese and sausage. Almost Glaswegian in its loveliness.Lunch More Don Carmello – no apologies for going back. Antipasto di mare included fish-laced caponata.Dinner Negroni and cicchetti at Grand Café Tabbacco, Catania. Then airline food worse even than it had been on way over. "Beef rendang" looked like Pedigree Chum, so I ate cheese and oatcakes and BA nuts.WednesdayBreakfast Bagel and tea – am a sucker for a bagel, one side marmalade, the other Marmite.Lunch Homemade lemon cake and tea. I meant not to eat because I knew what was coming later…Dinner Kitchen Table on Charlotte Street, for a review – though you'll have to wait until 10 November to read it. Fourteen courses. Several highlights, chief among them a giddily brilliant liquoricey pear cake.ThursdayBreakfast Tea and a Crunchie – not proud of this: I'm calling it elevenses.Lunch Garufin in Holborn. Pulled pork, chorizo, beans, squash – earthy and wonderful. Quail cooked in an escabeche – the presentation made me hoot. Presa Ibérico on quinoa flavoured with smoked oil – could almost convert me to quinoa.Afternoon Pal who owns Belvidere Place B&B in Broadstairs has just got a licence, so I'm "helping" her with a bloody mary tasting. (Big Tom wins.)Dinner Thai sticky rice with a little lime and fish sauce. Sometimes you just need something, well, soothing.FridayBreakfast Espresso, pomegranate, banana – almost healthy.Lunch The last of the (possibly illegally imported) datterini, evoo, smoked Maldon, bread, Berocca.Snack Percy Pigs – I buy them "for the children".Dinner Risotto with tagliata hacked from a mammoth T-bone from the Butcher of Brogdale. Husband made it: bloody gorgeous in every sense.Allegra McEvedyBreakfast is important in our house – it's the one meal of the day that I'm guaranteed to have with my daughter. Lunch is a big variable – weekdays, if I'm writing, I'll just grab a bowl of soup or knock up a salad, but more often than not I'll be recipe testing or out tasting for the businesses I consult for, so don't want a proper lunch. Suppers, too, have no real pattern – I'm generally out no more than twice a week, and at home it's usually based around what's about to go off in the fridge.SaturdayBreakfast Bacon and pineapple butties – must be a Saturday!Lunch Friends over. Stunning bit of plaice, and probably the last time I do peas and lettuce this year – definitely a sunshine dish. And an emergency pud – vanilla sponge stolen from a friend with a quick plum compote and pistachios.Dinner My sister and her kids came round for supper, so we had the first big beefy braise of the winter.SundayBreakfast Some days I have eggs, others muesli. On big days, eggs are the way to go. Homemade River Cottage green tomato chutney put some zoom in today's oeuf.Lunch Cafe Anglais: the compulsory umami-laden starter that is Rowley's parmesan custard, then more beef.Supper A rioja-based meal with friends. Ended up making canapés a bit pissed: hummus and mung beans, potatoes and pesto... Basically any leftovers I had in the fridge.MondayBreakfast Had the plaice bones from Saturday in the fridge, so put on a fish stock while eating my muesli.Lunch A cheese straw Parthenon set the tone on the first day of cooking for the new book. Didn't have a sit-down lunch because of that: shared a PPP – potato pesto pizza – with the girls for lunch, then more baking with raspberry jam tarts. Had a proper madeleine moment when I ate one later – hadn't had a jam tart for years and I came over a bit emotional. Love that food can do that to you.Supper Easy supper with my daughter – my favourite Turkish veggie pilaff.TuesdayBreakfast Quick and yum hot breakfast on a cold day: lemon and sugar pancakes. Lunch More baking. Limbering up for Bonfire night with spicy sausage rolls. Munched a lot of sponge today, plus peppermint cream hearts. A great day in the McEvedy kitchen.Dinner One of the girl's boyfriends had been shooting at the weekend, and she brought round pheasants as a present. Because I don't have enough food in my life...WednesdayBreakfast Marmite crumpet.Lunch A typing-in-the-recipes day, so had salad with poached egg and homemade chorizo.Supper Went to a Peruvian place called Ceviche. Had a fantastic dish called pisco – so good.ThursdayBreakfast Muesli.Lunch Tasting, so didn't really eat lunch. On the menu were 14 organic Irish seaweeds.Supper Mussels were on day three, so needed cooking: never-fail marinière.FridayBreakfast A white peach compote that I made in August – I'd taken it out of the freezer for an end-of-work bellini yesterday, so we had the rest as a smoothie this morning.Lunch Was left with an empty tart shell after testing a shortcrust recipe, so rummaged around in the fridge for ingredients to fill it with: last of my homemade chorizo, four old ends of various cheeses and peas from the freezer. With a bit of lettuce and the last of the toms, it made pretty much my perfect lunch (just add a glass of sauvignon blanc).Supper The Queen Adelaide on Uxbridge Road. Scotch eggs make the best pub supper – the kedgeree ones were awesome, closely followed by the pickled egg one.Tom Parker Bowles"The primary requisite for writing well about food," mused the great AJ Liebling, "is a good appetite. Without this, it is impossible to accumulate… enough experience of eating to have anything worth setting down. Each day brings only two opportunities for field work, and they are not to be wasted minimising the intake of cholesterol. They are indispensable, like a prizefighter's hours upon the road." Far be it from me to contradict AJ, but with training that "field work" can be stretched to at least five instances a day. The first bit of this week was fairly normal, the second more gruelling, as I was in the US to flog my new book – and to miss out on a raft of New York newbies and old favourites would be remiss. Well, that's my excuse.MondayBreakfast Nothing at all, but that's pretty much normal for me.Lunch Tom yum goong soup at Tawana on Westbourne Grove, followed by larb gai and miang kum – hot as buggery.Dinner Couscous with pickled chillies and harissa, a bowl of lentils and a Drumstick for pudding.TuesdayBreakfast A rare occurrence: fruit and carrots.Lunch Haddock and potato soup, and then plaice at Hereford Road (a rather more regular occurrence).Dinner Boiled egg and soldiers.WednesdayBreakfast and lunch Typical last-minute rush to get ready to go to Philadelphia for filming, so didn't get round to eating a thing all day, until I sat down to fish pie on the 5pm BA flight from Heathrow T5 – just about OK.Dinner Landed in NYC around 8.30pm and went straight to dinner at Smith & Wollensky – a brutally monolithic onion and tomato salad, then a gargantuan New York strip that was not as good as it thought it was.ThursdayMid-morning A day in Philly. Cheese steak sandwich at Jim's – a touch bland; should have added onions. Then a hot dog. Good bun and topping, but the sausage lacked snap and smoke. Good local fizzy drink.Dinner Oysters, clams and lobster roll at Sansom Street Oyster House.FridayDidn't eat all day because was in and out of QVC's studio. Ended up in some bar in the evening for a much-needed drink. They did a good burger, too.SaturdayMid-morning snack Still in New York – gobstoppers to keep me going.Lunch To Tomoe Sushi – one of the best in town for spicy tuna tartare and eel otoro among other things.Dinner Blue Smoke's Memphis ribs – not enough smoke, but the pulled pork was pretty damned good.SundayBreakfast Are you kidding?Lunch Sunday lunch at Má Pêche: to start, a broth of glorious, beefy, greasy depth – the sort you want to dive into – filled with chunks of wobbling tendon. And then, of course, David Chang's pork buns – world-famous, still world-class.Dinner Il Buco Alimentari e Vineria in the East Village. Good food. Noisy, though. Home-cured salumi were damned good. And then spaghetti con bottarga – sweetly saline.• Tom Parker Bowles's new book, Let's Eat: Recipes From My Kitchen Notebook, is published by Pavilion at £25. To order a copy for £20 including free UK mainland p&p, go to guardian.co.uk/bookshop or call 0330 333 6846.Angela HartnettFew chefs get three square meals a day – sometimes I'm lucky to get one – but I pick at stuff through service, so don't go hungry. Looking back, I should eat breakfast more, but that would mean being organised first thing, which is not a strong point.MondayBreakfast Black coffee, like every day.Lunch A day off, so went to see my mother. We had a nice minestrone.Dinner Nuts, beans, salad leaves and beetroot, all bought at Aldeburgh food festival at the weekend.TuesdayBreakfast Coffee, then to Murano for service – that keeps you going, as you pick and taste right through.Dinner Late supper at the Green Man & French Horn on St Martin's Lane. I joined friends after service, so hoovered up the remains of what they'd been eating – zander, partridge, leeks, eggs – and rounded things off with an ace jam tart.WednesdayBreakfast I actually had some time today, so grapefruit with the usual coffee – more treat than habit.Lunch Staff lunch is always at 10.45am – today it was leftover veg turned into a stew or pasta.ThursdayBreakfast Coffee first, as always.Then testing for a private party – couscous salad with hot smoked salmon. Stayed on for lunch service, and picked my way through to lunch.Dinner Spent afternoon on admin and errands, so headed to Murano: pasta with bread, high in carbs!FridayDinner Pretty much what I ate on Wednesday, except I came home to a slice of spinach tart. It's a thing of beauty when made well, but I have to admit this was not the best – still, the spinach came from Mum's garden.SaturdayBreakfast Late breakfast coffee and toasted St John bread – it's so handy to have the bakery round the corner.Lunch Running late (again) and had to get to work, so just a quick salad.Dinner Good job I had something light earlier, because tonight I had a huge Action Against Hunger meal: Claude Bosi's buckwheat soup, Tom Kerridge's slow-cooked hake, carrot purée and lardo, Phil Howard's roast guinea fowl with semolina gnocchi and Andrew Fairlie's chocolate hedgehog.Sunday Breakfast To Nordic Bakery with my nephew, who loves the place – egg and herrings on rye bread while the kids ate their way through cinnamon buns and rye muffins. Numerous coffees, too, obviously.Lunch Had family over – made some salads, sardines on tomato and fennel, and linguine with vongole, chilli and garlic. No dessert, because I didn't get to St John in time to pick up some of their doughnuts – they always sell out so early• Angela Hartnett is chef/patron at Murano, London W1.Food & drinkAngela HartnettChefsHeston BlumenthalNigella LawsonMarina O'LoughlinTom Parker BowlesAngela HartnettHeston BlumenthalNigella LawsonAllegra McEvedyguardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds