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09 декабря, 00:50

Pipelines of funds support allies of Dakota Access project

A winter storm hit the Standing Rock protestors the day after the Army Corps of Engineers denied the easement needed to build the pipeline. The pipeline has been boosted by politicians who have been heavily funded by the oil and gas industry. (Photo by Michael Nigro / Pacific Press) (Sipa via AP Images) BY: SOO RIN KIM When the Army Corp of Engineers announced Sunday it would block construction of an essential part of the Dakota Access Pipeline Project and study alternative routs, thousands of protestors at the site -- members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, environmentalists, veterans and others -- joined hands in jubilation. Concern about potential damage to the tribe's sacred lands and leaks that could poison the water supply led to the outcry; a semi-permanent encampment of RVs, teepees and tents sprang up in recent months as the ranks of the objectors grew. But they're not breaking camp just yet. The forces behind the $3.8 billion pipeline, which is expected to carry Bakken Shale oil from northwest North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to connect to an oil reserve in Illinois, have a lot of sway with President-elect Donald Trump, who could order the Corps to reverse course, and those around him. Trump indicated his support for the pipeline, including the segment that has triggered the controversy, on Monday. North Dakota Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D), who has been mentioned as a possible Interior secretary under Trump, has avoided taking a position of the pipeline per se, but encouraged the protestors to go home: "When you look at it, we know one thing for sure: When the administration changes, the easement is going to be approved," Heitkamp said Monday. "I understand the frustration of the protesters, I just think that this fight is not winnable." A member of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, Heitkamp and her leadership PAC have raised $8.7 million since 2011, with $277,879 from the oil and gas industry. That includes $1,500 from the political action committee of Energy Transfer Partners, which owns Dakota Access, LLC, the key player in the project. Fellow North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven (R), who recently came out supporting the pipeline, also received $5,000 from the PAC during his re-election campaign this cycle. With seats on the Energy and Natural Resources and Indian Affairs committees, Hoeven's single biggest financial supporter throughout his senatorial career has been the oil and gas industry, which has given his campaign $673,030 since 2011. In total, Energy Transfer Partners' PAC donated $128,000 to federal candidates this in the 2016 cycle. Trump's interest in the pipeline has been more than just tangential: His 2015 financial disclosure report showed he owned Energy Transfer Partners stock valued at between $500,000 and $1 million. Trump's latest financial report, filed in May 2016, shows he reduced his investment to somewhere between $15,000 and $50,000, but also revealed an investment in Phillips 66 of between $100,000 and $250,000. Phillips 66 owns about 25 percent of the pipeline, making it the biggest partner in the project after ETP. Trump sold all his shares in companies in June, including the investment in ETP, according to his spokesperson, though no documentary evidence of that has been shared. Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren showed his strong support for Trump in late June by donating $100,000 to his joint fundraising committee, $3,000 of which went straight to his campaign. Like many big donors this cycle, Warren flirted with other presidential prospects first, most notably former Texas Gov. Rick Perry. The pro-Perry super PAC Opportunity & Freedom I got a $5 million donation from Warren soon after Perry announced his bid last year -- but Warren received a refund after Perry dropped out of the race a few months later. Perry, it turns out, is on the board of Energy Transfer Partners. National Republican party committees also received $203,400 from Warren this election cycle. At the state level, Warren donated $250,000 to Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott (R) in this election cycle and $10,400 to Louisiana Public Service Commissioner Scott Angelle, who overseas public utilities in the state. Angelle, the onetime head of the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources, is a board member of Sunoco Logistics Partners, a subsidiary of Energy Transfer and one of the smaller owners of the pipeline project. Angelle faces a run-off election for Louisiana's 3rd Congressional District seat on Saturday, and his single biggest supporter has been the oil and gas industry, which has contributed $103,150 so far. Warren doesn't skimp: He has donated over $2.4 million to candidates, parties and committees at the federal level since 2007 and $1.7 million at the state and local level in the last decade. Energetic support Heitkamp is only the latest addition to the list of oil executives and pro-development politicians being considered to run the Interior Department, overseeing the nation's wildlife and natural resources. Trump's key energy advisor and Continental Resources CEO Harold G. Hamm, in particular, has been the mastermind of the energy policies of the president-elect. Hamm and his wife Sue Ann Hamm have donated nearly $1.9 million to federal candidates and committees over the years. This election cycle, individuals (including the chief executive) and the political action committee of Continental Resources donated $15,226 to Trump as well as $10,300 and $10,200 to Heitkamp and Hoeven, respectively. The oil billionaire who was at the forefront of the fracking boom in North Dakota was also considered a leading contender for the top job at the Department of Energy, but recently denied any plans to join Trump's cabinet. In a Wall Street Journal column published Monday, another key energy adviser to the Trump campaign, Rep. Kevin Cramer (R-N.D.) -- who also received $7,400 from Continental Resources this year -- censured the protesters. He, too, counts the energy and natural resources sector as his biggest source of financial support, especially the oil and gas industry: The sector has given his campaign and his leadership PAC $932,925 throughout his congressional career, including his unsuccessful 1996 campaign. Oasis Petroleum, whose well leaked more than 67,000 gallons of crude oil last year, endangering a tributary around the Missouri River, topped Cramer's donors, giving $68,500. North Dakota-based Armstrong Corp and Koch Industries also have given Kramer $32,800 and $33,000, respectively. While members of Congress have voiced their views on the high-profile project, the permitting process has mostly been in the purview of the states. Both the Iowa Utility Board and the North Dakota Public Service Commission have been key here. Unlike IUB members, who were all appointed by Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, the three North Dakota public service commissioners -- Julie Fedorchak, Randy Christmann and Brian Kalk -- were elected to their six-year terms and boasted strong financial support from the energy and natural resources sector. Combined, they brought in a total of $117,550 from those interests. The North Dakota Petroleum Council forked over a total of $15,900 to the three. Hamm, of Continental Resources, gave them $1,000 each. And energy and natural resources donors have been crucial to Branstad, too, accounting for over $1 million out of $1.8 million total contributions to the governor since 2010. Unfortunately for protesters, the Dakota Access Pipeline is not the only pipeline plan that could be revived by the new administration. Cramer -- formerly a North Dakota Public Service Commissioner who helped approve the original Keystone Pipeline in 2010 -- has been a leading voice in reviving the fourth phase of the Keystone project, which would add North Dakota and Montana to its route. Called the Keystone XL, the pipeline proposal was a top election issue in 2014. The Obama administration rejected it last year, but Trump says he backs it to free America from dependence on foreign oil. Beneficiaries of the pipeline would be American oil moguls operating in the region, like Hamm and the Koch brothers. Keystone XL's biggest owner, TransCanada, appears to be stepping up its political game. Contributions from the company's employees and PAC jumped from $4,600 in the 2014 cycle to $243,226 this time around. Ohio Gov. John Kasich received $11,000, while Cramer and Trump received $5,000 and $4,136 each. Even Hillary Clinton, who publicly opposed the extended pipeline, received contributions totaling $1,639. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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08 декабря, 19:27

TransCanada to advance Saddle West gas project

NOVA Gas Transmission Ltd. (NGTL), a wholly owned subsidiary of TransCanada Corp., will move forward with its $655-million (Can.) Saddle West project in the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin.

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30 ноября, 13:11

Kellyanne Conway To Visit Canada's Tar Sands, And That Can't Mean Anything Good

President-elect Donald Trump’s former campaign manager Kellyanne Conway will visit Canada’s tar sands early next year ahead of his inauguration. It’s a bad omen for the fight against climate change ― and may portend renewed hope for the controversial Keystone XL pipeline ― considering the president-elect has promised to ramp up fossil fuel production and spurned efforts to halt climate change. But Alberta Prosperity Fund chair Heather Forsyth hailed the move as “a strong signal to Canadians on the importance of this province to the United States” when the super PAC announced the visit on Tuesday. Honoured to be hosting @KellyannePolls upcoming Alberta visit. Let's give her a warm welcome Alberta. https://t.co/1kmgxwyP7D— @AlbertaProsperity (@ABProsperity) November 29, 2016 “This visit by such an influential member of a U.S. administration should stand as a call to action for all Alberta industry,” said Barry McNamar, founder and president of Alberta Prosperity Fund, in a statement. “I hope that Ms. Conway receives an enthusiastic welcome here in Alberta and can return to the U.S. with an informed attitude towards Canadian export products.” The tar sands have been a contentious place in American politics ever since the Keystone pipeline was proposed. It would have carried up to 730,000 barrels of Canadian oil into the country a day, but President Barack Obama rejected the project last year after environmental groups raised concerns about how expensive and dirty the fuel is to produce. Refining oil from tar sands is water-intensive and usually involves the clearing of large swaths of land. The finished product also results in substantially higher greenhouse gas emissions than other means of crude production. While Obama said Keystone wouldn’t “serve the national interest of the United States,” many are now looking to the incoming Trump administration to see if the president-elect plans to reconsider the pipeline.  TransCanada, the company behind Keystone, said it planned to “engage” with Trump shortly after his election and a spokesman said they remained “fully committed to building” the pipeline. That sentiment was echoed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), who has asked Trump to approve the pipeline should a proposal cross his desk. The Washington Post notes that Conway’s visit would “make a powerful symbolic statement about where a Trump presidency might come down on the proposed Keystone XL pipeline that President Obama rejected but which would, if revived, link the oil sands region in Alberta to advanced refineries on the Texas gulf coast.” However, even if Trump is amenable to tar sands, the price of crude oil has plummeted in recent years and the construction of Keystone may no longer be economically viable. Oil cost about $100 a barrel when the project was first proposed, but the price now hovers around $50. Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approved two other tar sands pipelines on Tuesday, the Kinder-Morgan Trans Mountain and Enbridge Line 3, drawing sharp criticism from groups who said the decision contradicted pledges to mitigate climate change. “We’ve heard clearly from Canadians that they don’t want to see someone trying to make a choice between what’s good for the environment and what’s good for the economy,” Trudeau said at a press conference. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 ноября, 01:13

Oilmen, pro-development financiers and Sarah Palin in the queue for Interior

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin has been mentioned as a possible Interior Secretary. But pretty much all the names floating around for that post would make the oil and gas industry happy. (Gage Skidmore/Flickr) BY: SOO RIN KIM While names were announced for a slew of appointments to President-elect Donald Trump's administration last week, there are still some significant posts left -- like running the Interior Department, which is in charge of wildlife and natural resources. Oil execs and other pro-development types seem to be the leading contenders here, meaning it's likely that the department will be taking a drastic shift away from its focus of the last few years on conservation and renewable energy. Robert E. Grady: The former George H.W. Bush speechwriter and policy advisor who ran the Office of Management and Budget's unit on natural resources, energy and science, Grady is best known in the environmental world for his key role in negotiating amendments to push through the Clean Air Act of 1990. Though the administration championed the law for reining in acid rain and toxic pollutants, environmental groups argued that some of the administration's provisions blunted its effect. Currently a partner at private equity fund Gryphon Investors, Grady has donated a relatively modest $218,667 to federal politicians, including $5,400 to Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.), $1,500 each to House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) and his leadership PAC and $1,000 to Trump this year. In 2012, he donated $7,500 to GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney and $35,000 his joint fundraising committee. Grady is also a longtime aide to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and a former chairman of the New Jersey Investment Council, overseeing the $81 billion public pension fund. Grady's name has also surfaced to run the Energy Department or the Environmental Protection Agency. Forrest Lucas: The sponsor of a number of racing events who also won naming rights to the Indianapolis Colts' home stadium, the founder and president of Lucas Oil is a familiar face in his home state Indiana. His appointment would be widely hailed by the oil and gas industry, which has battled conservationists in the Obama administration. Employees of Lucas Oil Products (including Lucas himself) have donated a total of $965,486 since 2002 to federal candidates and committees; this year's biggest beneficiary was GOP Indiana Rep. Marlin Stutzman, who had an unfruitful senatorial campaign. The Indiana oilman has also taken on a big role protecting farmers, ranchers and outdoor enthusiasts from threats posed by "animal rights groups" and "anti-farming extremists," such as the Humane Society of the United States. His 501(c)(4) nonprofit group Protect the Harvest is a driving force of the anti-animal rights effort, spending nearly $1.9 million since 2010. The social welfare group has laid out $246,297 for federal political ads in the past two election cycles, including $53,500 supporting Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) this year. The National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Missouri Pork PAC, Missouri Cattlemen Association and Missouri Pork Producers are among the top donors to the nonprofit, and Lucas himself has given it $298,000. Lucas and his wife Charlotte Lucas, who co-founded Lucas Oil, have donated a total of $752,272 over the years, including $197,054 this cycle. Trump's joint fundraising committee, Trump Victory Fund, got $25,000 of that. Two years ago, Lucas took out a full-page ad in the Indianapolis Star apologizing for a Facebook post by his wife that read, "I'm sick and tired of minorities running our country! As far as I'm concerned, I don't think that atheists (minority), muslims (minority)n or any other minority group has the right to tell the majority of the people in the United States what they can and cannot do here." In the apology, Lucas said his wife's comments were "harsh and insensitive," although he said she did not intend to offend anyone. Harold G. Hamm: The Continental Resources chief executive who just became the 54th richest person in the world with personal net worth of $15.4 billion, Hamm was a key energy policy advisor to Romney four years ago and has played a similar role for Team Trump this year. He was the mastermind in shaping Trump's campaign pledge to revive the Keystone XL oil pipeline project with TransCanada -- rejected by Obama last year -- with the condition that North Dakota oil get a bigger share of space in the pipeline. Hamm's Continental Resources is a major player in the North Dakota oil scene. Also being considered for the Energy Department spot, the man Trump calls the "king of energy," holds the view that the U.S. has abundant oil  "abundance" view on the oil reserve issue, and has criticized Obama's focus on domestic renewable energy as indirect support for Islamic terrorism by making the United States rely on Middle Eastern oil. The fracking mogul and his wife Sue Ann Hamm have donated nearly $1.9 million to federal candidates and committees over the years, including $5,000 to Romney's campaign and $985,000 to pro-Romney super PAC Restore our Future in 2012. This year, he donated $5,400 to Ryan, $2,600 to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and $1,000 to Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), as well as $5,400 to Trump. Meanwhile, tensions have fired up in North Dakota as demonstrators clash with the police over the contested Dakota Access Pipeline, which is expected to carry oil obtained from fracking by Hamm's Continental Resources. Trump himself was deeply involved in the pipeline, having invested between $500,000 and $1 million in Energy Transfer Partners, the key player in the project, Trump's financial disclosure report from May 2015 showed. And CEO Kelcy Warren has returned the favor by donating $3,000 to the Trump campaign this year and an additional $100,000 to his joint fundraising committee. Trump dropped most of his investment in the company this summer, leaving only $50,000. Sarah Palin: The former Alaska governor might be a long shot for Interior, but the presence of her name on the list is attracting mega-attention nationwide. Putting aside all other controversies revolving around her, we can safely assume which direction the Interior Department would head under Palin: "Drill, baby, drill." (Wolves, among other animals, might not be thrilled with the appointment, either.) The energy and natural resources sector, led by the oil industry, was Palin's main financial  supporter at the beginning of her state political career in 2002. In the 2006 gubernatorial election, though government employees and individuals from the finance sector topped her donors list, the energy and natural resources sector lead by commercial fishing and oil and gas industries played a key role in her victory. Palin pushed through oil and natural gas development plans during her time in office, including controversial drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; she also signed legislation to grant a pipeline contract to TransCanada. The construction project was cancelled in 2014 after research showed it was inefficient. After the unsuccessful presidential campaign with GOP candidate John McCain in 2008, Palin resigned from the office and started SarahPAC. The political action committee has spent a total of $14.8 million over the last four election cycles. This year, the PAC spent about $2.1 million, just $72,500 of which went to federal candidates, including $5,000 to Trump. Nearly $900,000 was spent by the PAC on fundraising. Ray Washburne: CNBC reported last week that Washburne, a Dallas investor who is currently leading the Trump transition team on commerce, could be next in charge of the country's federal land and natural resources. Washburn was vice chairman of the 2016 Trump Victory Fund and a former Republican National Committee chair. Individuals from his company Charter Holdings, involved in real estate, restaurants, private equity and energy investments, have donated a total of $517,000 to Republican candidates over last three election cycles. This includes Washburne's $2,700 to New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and another $5,400 to Texas Rep. Pete Sessions this cycle. Overall, the Texas investor and his wife Heather Washburne contributed a total of $579,811 to Republican candidates and the Republican party. Robert B. Gillam: The Alaska investor is the latest addition to the rumored interior secretary list according to the Alaska Dispatch Publishing. Having graduated from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania with Trump in 1968, Gillam said in a statement, "I recognized that suddenly it was possible for me to serve in a role that has otherwise been one of career politicians." Unlike his rivals for the slot, Gillam's federal political contributions over the years have been bipartisan. The millionaire financier made his single biggest donation in 2010, when he donated $50,000 to Alaskans Standing Together, a super PAC that spent $1.8 million to secure Republican Sen. Lisa Murkowski's seat in Alaska. He has given $28,250 to national Republican party committees and $23,550 to GOP candidates -- but has also donated $37,000 to the Democratic Party of Alaska and $14,300 to Democratic candidates. During the 2016 cycle, he sent $5,000 to GOP Alaska Sen. Dan Sullivan's leadership PAC, True North PAC. Backed by the air transport and railroads industries as well as the Koch brothers, Sullivan's PAC gave $105,000 to Republican candidates including Ayotte, Blunt and Murkowski. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 ноября, 17:16

Low Oil Prices Spur M&A Activity: Top 5 Energy Deals of 2016

Among the dozens of notable M&A deals in the energy space in 2016, the following are five of the most important.

23 ноября, 15:31

Statoil Gains Operatorship of Brazilian Offshore License

Norwegian company Statoil ASA (STO) recently concluded the takeover of operatorship of Petrobras' 66% operated interest of the BM-S-8 offshore license in Brazil's highly prolific Santos basin.

22 ноября, 16:59

ConocoPhillips to Divest Kenai LNG Export Terminal in Alaska

ConocoPhillips (COP) is looking to divest its Kenai liquefied natural gas ("LNG") export terminal in Alaska.

22 ноября, 16:55

Concho to Acquire Northern Delaware Basin Assets for $430M

Concho Resources Inc. (CXO) announced that it has inked a definitive agreement to purchase about 24,000 gross (16,400 net) acres in the northern Delaware Basin for about $430 million.

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16 ноября, 19:09

Billionaire Green Activist Steyer Vows To Battle Trump, Says Money Not An Issue

Billionaire environmental activist Tom Steyer, who has spent more than $140 million on fighting climate change, said on Tuesday he will spend whatever it takes to fight President-elect Donald Trump’s pro-drilling and anti-regulation agenda. The former hedge fund manager from California is putting together a strategy that will “engage voters and citizens to fight back” once Trump takes the White House in January, he told Reuters in an interview. However, he stressed he was not planning to fight Trump through the courts. Instead, he would focus on “trying to present an opposite point of view and trying to get that point of view expressed, and communicated to citizens.” Steyer’s pledge to fight Trump suggests an intensifying battle for U.S. public opinion on global climate change, an issue that has already divided many Americans, lawmakers, and companies between those who consider it a major global threat and those who doubt its existence. Other U.S. environmental groups are also preparing to resist Trump’s agenda, with some vowing street protests and more established organizations that helped draft some of President Barack Obama’s environmental regulations preparing to defend them in court. “We have always been willing to do whatever is necessary,” Steyer said, when asked how much money he was willing to spend to oppose Trump’s agenda. Trump campaigned on a promise to drastically reduce environmental regulation and ease permitting for infrastructure, moves he said would breathe life into an oil and gas industry ailing from low prices, without harming U.S. air and water quality. He has also called climate change a hoax and has promised to “cancel” the Paris Climate Accord between nearly 200 nations to slow global warming, a deal he said would cost the U.S. economy trillions of dollars and put it at a disadvantage. While the approach has cheered the industry, it has sent shockwaves through the environmental movement, which is confronting the prospect of losing all progress it made during the Obama administration. Steyer, who had endorsed Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, called Trump’s policies dangerous. “Every single one of these things, whether it was getting rid of Paris or cutting back the EPA, we think are extremely dangerous to the security of every American,” Steyer said. “We think it is based on willful ignorance of the facts and flies in the face of the realities facing the world.” ARCTIC DRILLING Steyer’s main political vehicle, NextGen Climate, on Tuesday called on the Obama administration to defy Trump’s pro-drilling agenda by issuing an order permanently blocking all new drilling in the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans. The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Trump has also promised to ask Canadian oil pipeline company, TransCanada Corp, to resubmit its application to build a pipeline into the United States that would link Alberta’s vast oil sands to American refineries and ports on the Gulf Coast. The project, Keystone XL, had been rejected by the Obama administration after years of mass protests and lobbying by environmental organizations. Steyer said the project may no longer make sense since a slump in oil prices has reduced the profitability of oil sands production. Steyer, who four years ago left the hedge fund firm he co-founded to devote himself full-time to environmental activism, said young voter turnout in areas where NextGen focused its mobilization efforts during the 2016 campaign was up more than 20 percent from the last presidential election in 2012. “Did we get the president we want, absolutely not. Did we get a majority of clean energy supporters in the senate, no,” Steyer said. “But in terms of what we did, and the strategy we took, we wouldn’t do anything differently.” NextGen poured nearly $69 million into its elections related programs during the presidential campaign, according to federal records compiled by OpenSecrets.org, slightly lower than the $74 million it spent during the mid-term congressional elections in 2014, when only two of the six candidates it supported won. (Reporting by Richard Valdmanis, editing by Ross Colvin) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 ноября, 01:32

HUFFPOST HILL - House Republicans Vote Unanimously To Fight Later

When our grandchildren ask us what we did during the great political unraveling, we will be able to hold our heads high and tell them that we tweeted “oh” above some incendiary content.  Donald Trump has apparently been cribbing 7th grade civics essays, as he began a tweet this morning, “The Electoral College is actually genius in that it…” And Donald Trump’s transition is already in disarray, potentially harming the nation’s defense networks, its economy and Eric Trump’s plans to resurrect Late Night Shots. This is HUFFPOST HILL for Tuesday, November 15th, 2016: HOUSE GOP UNANIMOUSLY BACKS RYAN - Oh, man, the infrastructure battle sure is going to be fun. Susan Cornwell and Susan Heavey: “U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan was unanimously nominated on Tuesday by his fellow Republicans for re-election as speaker in the new Congress next year, the House Republican Conference said on Twitter. Ryan, who faced no challengers for the post from within Republican ranks, was nominated during a closed-door meeting of all Republican lawmakers in the House. He will face an election in January, when all members of the new House, both Democrats and Republicans, vote on a new speaker. Republicans kept their majorities in both the House and Senate in the Nov. 8 elections in which voters elected Republican Donald Trump to the White House over Democrat Hillary Clinton. ‘It is a tremendous honor to be nominated by my colleagues to serve as speaker of the House,’ Ryan said on Twitter. ‘Now it’s time to go big.’” [Reuters] DEMOCRATS PUT OFF LEADERSHIP VOTE - Though the party has gotten out of bed for the first time in days, it’s now just staring blankly at a pond, ripping overlarge chunks of bread from a loaf and tossing them listlessly at ducks. Jennifer Bendery and Laura Barron-Lopez: “The most immediate question is whether Pelosi should keep her post. Publicly, Democrats said it’s not her fault that their party got trounced nationally. ‘Ms. Pelosi enjoys great respect and support in the Democratic Caucus,’ said [Rep. G.K.] Butterfield [(D-N.C.)]. ‘This is no reflection on her leadership at all.’ ‘I think she’s done a damn good job,’ said Rep. Brendan Boyle (D-Pa.). ‘I think she’s a far better leader than Boehner was to his caucus.’ But some said the election was a wake-up call on the need for major changes. ‘It is past time’ for Pelosi to go, said a Democratic lawmaker who requested anonymity to speak more freely.... There aren’t obvious replacements for Pelosi, though one name has been floated: Rep. Tim Ryan (D-Ohio), who represents the kind of white, working class district that sided so heavily with Trump in the election. There’s an obvious problem with Ryan, though. ‘We’ve got Trump, [Mitch] McConnell, [Chuck] Schumer, [Paul] Ryan. All these white men,” said another Democrat who asked for anonymity to be more candid. “Are we going to put another white guy in?’” [HuffPost] THE DOCTOR WON’T SEE YOU NOW - Republicans have been telling everyone for years they want to trash Obamacare and severely cut Medicare and Medicaid, so let’s believe them. Jonathan Cohn and Jeffrey Young: “Donald Trump and Republican leaders in Congress have made clear they are serious about repealing Obamacare, and doing so quickly. But don’t assume their dismantling of government health insurance programs will stop there…. But Republicans are not trying to replicate what Medicaid, Medicare and the Affordable Care Act do now. Nor are they trying to maintain the current, historically high level of health coverage nationwide that these programs have produced. Their goal is to slash government spending on health care and to peel back regulations on parts of the health care industry, particularly insurers. [HuffPost] Like HuffPost Hill? Then order Eliot’s new book, The Beltway Bible: A Totally Serious A-Z Guide To Our No-Good, Corrupt, Incompetent, Terrible, Depressing, and Sometimes Hilarious Government Does somebody keep forwarding you this newsletter? Get your own copy. It’s free! Sign up here. Send tips/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to [email protected] Follow us on Twitter - @HuffPostHill TRUMP’S TRANSITION A TOTAL MESS -  Andrew Restuccia and Nancy Cook: “Top Donald Trump campaign advisers who have taken charge of the president-elect’s transition team are casting aside much of the work on Cabinet picks that New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and his aides put in place over several months — and leaving behind a far more chaotic operation dominated by Trump loyalists. Trump aides have nixed at least one Christie-backed person being considered for a Cabinet position in the aftermath of last Friday’s shakeup, a person closely tracking the transition told POLITICO. The transition team has yet to publicly release a code of ethics for itself or for nominees. And an aide to a person being considered for a top Cabinet position said the person had not yet been asked to complete a detailed questionnaire to suss out red flags.... By comparison, President-elect Barack Obama’s transition team was deep into the vetting process by early November 2008 — not just meeting with prospective nominees but also compiling fat dossiers on them, according to emails made public through WikiLeaks.” [Politico] MAKE AMERICA GRAFT AGAIN - What’s the over/under on Trump’s first White House Christmas party being held down Pennsylvania Ave at his Old Post Office Building hotel? Betsy Woodruff: “A campaign watchdog group filed a complaint with federal election officials that alleges Stephen Bannon—recently named one of Donald Trump’s top White House advisers—may have gotten paid illegally during Trump’s campaign by pro-Trump billionaires. And now, a new set of Federal Election Commission filings that haven’t yet been reported on may give the group’s case some additional heft. At issue are payments of nearly $200,000 that a super PAC called Make America Number 1 made to a company tied to Bannon. On Aug. 17, Bannon left his post as chairman of Breitbart News and became the Trump campaign’s CEO. Available FEC filings show the campaign didn’t pay Bannon a salary. Larry Noble, General Counsel for the Campaign Legal Center, said he believes the super PAC covertly paid Bannon for his campaign work through his moviemaking company. Neither the super PAC nor Bannon provided a response to Noble’s comment.” [Daily Beast] GIULIANI, MAN - Unlike homeless people, hizzoner can’t just put his foreign entanglements in a van and whisk them across city lines to Yonkers. Sam Stein, Jason Cherkis and Paul Blumenthal: “[T]he The Wall Street Journal reported in 2007 that one of [Giuliani Partners’] clients was the government of Qatar, to which Giuliani provided ‘security advice.’ Through Giuliani Partners, the former mayor also reportedly tried to enrich the Qatari government through real estate deals.... Giuliani advised the [TransCanada Corp] in 2007 on its plan to store liquefied natural gas on the Long Island Sound. It’s unclear if the company is still a client, since there is no disclosure. But should Giuliani end up at the State Department, he would find himself playing a critical role in one of TransCanada’s largest unfinished projects.The company has expressed interest in resuscitating the controversial Keystone XL pipeline after President Barack Obama rejected it last November.” [HuffPost] HATE READING IS GREAT FOR BUSINESS  - More people are subscribing to news services in the wake of the election, which is great, but we suspect more people will be reading PEOPLE’s hard-hitting Trump coverage, too. Daniel Marans and Michael Calderone: “[The Times] has picked up new subscribers to both its print and digital editions at four times the normal rate, according to spokeswoman Danielle Rhoades-Ha. The Times is one of several publications to tout increased paid readership or donations in the aftermath of Trump’s victory. The uptick in subscriptions is a bright spot amid a flurry of unflattering post-mortems on the media’s role in propelling Trump to become the Republican nominee and general uncertainty about the industry’s influence going forward. The Wall Street Journal, another legacy newspaper known for its dogged reporting ― and a conservative editorial page that nonetheless excoriated Trump throughout the campaign ― reported a similar surge in readers and subscribers.” [HuffPost] HATE IS ALSO GOOD FOR BUSINESS  - We can’t wait for BreitbartPRO’s industry coverage with an eye toward the globalist takeover of the banking system. Look out, American Banker!  David Bauder: “Following the installation of Breitbart’s chief executive to a top job in President-elect Donald Trump’s administration, the news organization in its infancy when Barack Obama took office has big expansion plans and the goal of being the best source of news on the new administration. That scares its critics, which consider Breitbart News the home of cheerleaders rather than journalists — and often offensive ones at that.... Breitbart is planning a move into more spacious Washington offices, looking to add reporters in Germany, France, the Middle East and Asia, wants to add coverage of the media and technology to its conservative-framed news and hopes to produce more video, said Alexander Marlow, the site’s editor in chief, on Monday. Its own cable network is a dream, but unlikely now, he said.” [AP] Hmmmmmm: “Breitbart News is preparing a lawsuit against a ‘major media company’ over claims that it is a white nationalist website, it said in an exclusive statement to The Hill.” [The Hill] BECAUSE YOU’VE READ THIS FAR - Here’s a stupid dog video. THE ‘OFFICIAL SHOES OF WHITE PEOPLE’ - Sperry must be incredulous. Katie Mettler: “Last week, not even a full 24 hours after President-elect Donald Trump earned that title, a senior official for the shoe company New Balance invoked his name in an interview. ‘The Obama administration turned a deaf ear to us and frankly, with President-elect Trump, we feel things are going to move in the right direction,’ Matthew LeBretton, New Balance’s vice president of public affairs, told the Wall Street Journal.... All this, however, did not stop one more dividing force from smearing the New Balance brand. In a post written over the weekend, neo-Nazi blogger Andrew Anglin declared New Balance the ‘Official Shoes of White People.’ ‘I’m a Nike guy. Or rather, I was,’ Anglin wrote on his popular website the Daily Stormer, which promotes an anti-Semitic, white supremacist agenda. ‘It’s time to get on-board with New Balance now. Their brave act has just made them the official brand of the Trump Revolution.’” [WaPo] COMFORT FOOD - Why some countries have non-contiguous borders ― the Michigans of the world, if you will. - Ken Bone has a YouTube channel now. - What Jon Stewart is up to these days. TWITTERAMA @kasie: Rep. Joe Wilson, R-Southern Gentleman, tells me he’s not wearing his MAGA hat out of conference meeting because he only wears hats outside @jabush: “the holiday pr pitches come earlier every year, huh,” she said to no one in particular @SimonMaloy: after a long period of reflection and soul-searching I have determined that Hillary Clinton lost because of the issues I consider important Got something to add? Send tips/quotes/stories/photos/events/fundraisers/job movement/juicy miscellanea to Eliot Nelson ([email protected]) or Arthur Delaney ([email protected]). -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

15 ноября, 17:14

ExxonMobil to Augment Polyethylene Capacity at Beaumont

ExxonMobil Corporation (XOM) recently announced that it has started construction of a new production unit at its polyethylene plant in Beaumont. The cost of the project has not been disclosed.

14 ноября, 16:44

Hess Cuts Workforce by Over 11% to Cope with Price Volatility

Hess Corporation (HES) has reportedly cut a number of jobs to combat the persistent oil price volatility.

14 ноября, 16:00

ConocoPhillips Plans Divestments Worth $8 Billion in 2017

ConocoPhillips (COP) recently announced plans to commence a multi-billion dollar divestment program next year in order to survive price volatility.

11 ноября, 17:49

Chesapeake Divests Shallow Natural Gas Devonian Assets

Chesapeake Energy Corporation (CHK) intends to divest a giant package of shallow natural gas assets in the U.S. region of Appalachia.

10 ноября, 21:35

Here’s The Oil Industry’s Wish List For President Trump

Under Donald Trump’s presidency, oil and gas pipelines ― including the controversial Keystone XL and Dakota Access conduits ― will crisscross the United States. Environmental protections will be scrapped, not one by one, but in a complete regulatory overhaul. The country will re-evaluate, if not toss out, the historic climate accord reached in Paris last year. Fewer government watchdogs will police pollution. At least that’s how the American Petroleum Institute sees the next four years. During a call with reporters on Thursday, Jack Gerard, chief executive of the oil and gas industry’s largest trade group, laid out a vision to reverse much of the environmental progress made over the last eight years. After all, Republicans, who will gain control over most of the federal government next year, are the only major party in the developed world to reject scientific evidence of climate change.  “The implication of having a Republican Senate, a Republican House and a Republican presidency is driven more by the American people’s clear direction: We want to be focused on job creation,” Gerard said, touting what he called a coming “American energy renaissance.” “It’s also a recognition that some of the unnecessary burdens of regulation are not what we are supposed to be doing.” Gerard declined to name his preferred picks to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy or the Department of the Interior, which upholds federal trust responsibilities to Native Americans and oversees public lands and national parks. But Gerard’s likely pleased with the options Trump has floated so far. Already, the campaign has tapped Mryon Ebell, a climate skeptic, to lead the EPA working group on Trump’s transition team. Trump’s longtime friend Harold Hamm, the billionaire chief executive of the oil company Continental Resources, is a leading contender for energy secretary. Another oil executive, Forrest Lucas, the 74-year-old co-founder of the oil products company Lucas Oil, is on the short list for interior secretary. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who coined the slogan “drill, baby, drill” during her failed 2008 vice presidential bid, is also on that list. Trump’s proposed $1 trillion plan to rebuild infrastructure should include support for the rejected Keystone XL pipeline and the hotly contested Dakota Access Pipeline, Gerard said. Last year, President Barack Obama put the kibosh on Keystone XL, the proposed 1,179-mile oil conduit from Alberta to Nebraska, but TransCanada, the company behind it, said Wednesday it planned to re-pitch the idea to the incoming administration. The Dakota Access Pipeline, which Native American tribes and environmentalists have been battling for months, seemed likely to move ahead anyway, despite Obama’s tepid calls to halt construction. A Trump presidency may seal its victory. “To quote James Hansen,” said Michael. E. Mann, professor of atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, citing the famed climate scientist, “I fear this may be game over for the climate.” Gerard declined to point out which environmental restrictions he deemed most burdensome, and instead proposed a complete overhaul of the regulatory system. “We need to look at the current regulatory approach holistically,” he said. “When you look at it holistically, you can raise which ones need to be addressed to allow the energy system, to allow infrastructure, to move forward.” The historic climate accord reached in Paris last December ― the first international agreement to reduce carbon emissions that included the world’s biggest polluters, the U.S. and China ― could be tossed out, Gerard suggested. “I don’t want to speak for this administration,” he said. “There is a lot of discretion, obviously, in the power of the executive in how it relates to the Paris agreement.”   The treaty, which went into effect last Friday, calls for massive cuts to carbon emissions and sweeping investments in clean, renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Instead, Gerard said the incoming administration should bolster natural gas production, which typically occurs through the controversial extraction technique known as fracking. Natural gas overtook coal as the country’s leading source of electricity this year. Though the gas emits fewer carbon particles, natural gas wells leak methane, a potent greenhouse gas that can trap 84 times as much heat as the equivalent amount of carbon dioxide in the first 20 years it’s in the atmosphere, according to the nonprofit Environmental Defense Fund. Earlier this year, a natural gas blowout near Los Angeles caused the biggest methane leak in U.S. history. Still, Gerard said the industry can largely police itself. “We’ve demonstrated that we’re capturing methane more and more over time, and the challenge there is relatively small,” he said. “We’re highly motivated to capture all methane, that’s our business that we do, and sell the product.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 ноября, 21:35

Here’s The Oil Industry’s Wish List For President Trump

Under Donald Trump’s presidency, oil and gas pipelines ― including the controversial Keystone XL and Dakota Access conduits ― will crisscross the United States. Environmental protections will be scrapped, not one by one, but in a complete regulatory overhaul. The country will re-evaluate, if not toss out, the historic climate accord reached in Paris last year. Fewer government watchdogs will police pollution. At least that’s how the American Petroleum Institute sees the next four years. During a call with reporters on Thursday, Jack Gerard, chief executive of the oil and gas industry’s largest trade group, laid out a vision to reverse much of the environmental progress made over the last eight years. After all, Republicans, who will gain control over most of the federal government next year, are the only major party in the developed world to reject scientific evidence of climate change.  “The implication of having a Republican Senate, a Republican House and a Republican presidency is driven more by the American people’s clear direction: We want to be focused on job creation,” Gerard said, touting what he called a coming “American energy renaissance.” “It’s also a recognition that some of the unnecessary burdens of regulation are not what we are supposed to be doing.” Gerard declined to name his preferred picks to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy or the Department of the Interior, which upholds federal trust responsibilities to Native Americans and oversees public lands and national parks. But Gerard’s likely pleased with the options Trump has floated so far. Already, the campaign has tapped Mryon Ebell, a climate skeptic, to lead the EPA working group on Trump’s transition team. Trump’s longtime friend Harold Hamm, the billionaire chief executive of the oil company Continental Resources, is a leading contender for energy secretary. Another oil executive, Forrest Lucas, the 74-year-old co-founder of the oil products company Lucas Oil, is on the short list for interior secretary. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, who coined the slogan “drill, baby, drill” during her failed 2008 vice presidential bid, is also on that list. Trump’s proposed $1 trillion plan to rebuild infrastructure should include support for the rejected Keystone XL pipeline and the hotly contested Dakota Access Pipeline, Gerard said. Last year, President Barack Obama put the kibosh on Keystone XL, the proposed 1,179-mile oil conduit from Alberta to Nebraska, but TransCanada, the company behind it, said Wednesday it planned to re-pitch the idea to the incoming administration. The Dakota Access Pipeline, which Native American tribes and environmentalists have been battling for months, seemed likely to move ahead anyway, despite Obama’s tepid calls to halt construction. A Trump presidency may seal its victory. “To quote James Hansen,” said Michael. E. Mann, professor of atmospheric science at Pennsylvania State University, citing the famed climate scientist, “I fear this may be game over for the climate.” Gerard declined to point out which environmental restrictions he deemed most burdensome, and instead proposed a complete overhaul of the regulatory system. “We need to look at the current regulatory approach holistically,” he said. “When you look at it holistically, you can raise which ones need to be addressed to allow the energy system, to allow infrastructure, to move forward.” The historic climate accord reached in Paris last December ― the first international agreement to reduce carbon emissions that included the world’s biggest polluters, the U.S. and China ― could be tossed out, Gerard suggested. “I don’t want to speak for this administration,” he said. “There is a lot of discretion, obviously, in the power of the executive in how it relates to the Paris agreement.”   The treaty, which went into effect last Friday, calls for massive cuts to carbon emissions and sweeping investments in clean, renewable energy sources such as solar and wind. Instead, Gerard said the incoming administration should bolster natural gas production, which typically occurs through the controversial extraction technique known as fracking. Natural gas overtook coal as the country’s leading source of electricity this year. Though the gas emits fewer carbon particles, natural gas wells leak methane, a potent greenhouse gas that can trap 84 times as much heat as the equivalent amount of carbon dioxide in the first 20 years it’s in the atmosphere, according to the nonprofit Environmental Defense Fund. Earlier this year, a natural gas blowout near Los Angeles caused the biggest methane leak in U.S. history. Still, Gerard said the industry can largely police itself. “We’ve demonstrated that we’re capturing methane more and more over time, and the challenge there is relatively small,” he said. “We’re highly motivated to capture all methane, that’s our business that we do, and sell the product.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 ноября, 16:47

BP, Oman Oil Company Sign Amended Licensing Agreement

BP plc (BP) and Oman Oil Company Exploration & Production inked an agreement with the Government of the Sultanate of Oman to modify the Oman Block 61 exploration and production sharing agreement.

09 ноября, 23:39

Donald Trump Victory Breathes New Life Into Keystone XL Pipeline

Donald Trump’s surprise general election win in the early hours of Wednesday has already resuscitated plans to build the Keystone XL pipeline.  TransCanada, the company behind the proposed 1,179-mile oil conduit from Alberta to Nebraska, announced plans on Wednesday to meet with Trump officials to once again pitch the pipeline. President Barack Obama rejected Keystone XL last November after seven years of reviews, a move hailed by environmentalists. “TransCanada remains fully committed to building Keystone XL,” Mark Cooper, a spokesman for the company, said in a statement emailed to The Huffington Post. “We are evaluating ways to engage the new administration on the benefits, the jobs and the tax revenues this project brings to the table.”  The company did not say whether it planned to formally reapply to build the pipeline. Former Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper urged Trump to reconsider Keystone XL in a congratulatory tweet on Wednesday.  Congratulations to Donald Trump on his impressive victory. Canada/US partnership is strong. There is much to do, incl moving ahead with KXL.— Stephen Harper (@stephenharper) November 9, 2016 Trump said in May that he would support the pipeline if the U.S. government could get a share of its revenue, which may not be legal. “I want it built, but I want a piece of the profits,” Trump said during a speech on his energy policies to oil-industry workers in North Dakota. “That’s how we’re going to make our country rich again.”  Still, Trump’s core campaign pledge to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement could put TransCanada’s plans in jeopardy. In June, the company used a legal clause in NAFTA to sue the U.S. government. Oil, gas and coal stocks surged in the hours after Trump claimed victory. Shares of renewable energy companies, by contrast, plummeted. Trump has called scientific evidence of climate change “bullshit” and “a hoax,” and has vowed to reverse much of Obama’s energy policies. During his campaign, he threatened to pull out of the historic climate accord that was reached in Paris last December and went into effect last week.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 октября 2012, 19:40

Проект Аляска-Азия по экспорту СПГ в $65 млрд

Консорциум, состоящий из ряда крупных нефтяных компаний, продолжает активно разрабатывать грандиозные планы по созданию инфраструктуры для транспортировки сжиженного природного газа из Аляски в Азию. В марте этого года консорциум Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips и BP PLC в сотрудничестве с TransCanada уже объявлял о начале разработке проекта экспорту СПГ из Аляски в Азию. Тогда компании оценили его в $40 млрд. Теперь аппетиты компаний существенно выросли, и речь идет уже о проекте, чья стоимость может составить от $45 млрд до $65 млрд. В данный проект будет входить строительство газопровода длиной почти в 1300 км от газовых месторождений, расположенных на северном склоне Аляски до побережья с пропускной способностью в 3-3,5 млрд куб. м в день. На побережье будет построен завод по сжижению природного газа, а также терминалы по хранению и отгрузке газа для его последующей транспортировки на азиатские рынки. Согласно заявлениям участвующих сторон проект окажет серьезное влияние не только на экономику самой Аляски, но также и на строительный сектор США. По прогнозам компаний, в целом потребуется 1,7 млн метрических тонн стали, а также 15 тыс. рабочих в пик строительства. В целом проект Аляска-Азия по экспорту сжиженного природного газа может стать одним из самых дорогостоящих проектов в отрасли во всем мире. Он обойдется в 7-10 раз дороже, чем аналогичный проект на побережье Мексиканского залива, предложенный компанией Cheniere Energy. Кроме того, скорее всего, он будет стоить дороже, чем проект по сжижению и транспортировке природного газа из месторождения Gorgon на шельфе Австралии, в 160 км к северо-западу от континента. Стоимость этого проекта изначально оценивалась в $37 млрд, но затем выросла до $43 млрд, вынудив Chevron начать пересмотр запланированных затрат. Запуск проекта Gorgon планируется в 2014 г. Проект Аляска-Азия нуждается в одобрении как местных, так и федеральных властей. Причем одобрение должно быть получено не только на строительство, но и на экспорт газа в другие страны. Президент Обама уже заявил, что не станет одобрять новые проекты по экспорту природного газа, пока Министерство энергетики не представит доклад, который бы обосновывал их экономическую эффективность. Министерство уже неоднократно откладывало выпуск данного доклада. В случае если проект будет одобрен, на его строительство, по ряду оценок, может уйти более 10 лет. Что интересно, эта идея отнюдь не нова: она появилась еще в начале 1980-х гг. Компания Yukon Pacific в 1982 г. также предложила проект с очень схожими условиями. Его первоначальная стоимость тогда разнилась от $14 млрд до $18 млрд. Однако ему так и не суждено было реализоваться по ряду причин, в основном экономического характера.