• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании828
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы544
      • Показать ещё
      Люди223
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации95
      • Показать ещё
      Разное676
      • Показать ещё
      Издания65
      • Показать ещё
      Формат13
      Показатели22
      • Показать ещё
      Сферы1
22 апреля, 01:51

Nebraska Farmer Politely Schools Fox News Host On Dangers Of Keystone XL Pipeline

Nebraska farmer Art Tanderup urged the Trump administration on Friday to abandon plans to build the Keystone XL pipeline and focus instead on boosting renewable energy. In a four-minute interview on Fox News, Tanderup ― who heads a group of about 90 Nebraska landowners trying to block the pipeline ― politely countered each of host Sandra Smith’s talking points as she repeatedly suggested his personal stake was the only real reason he opposed the project.   “Our premium goal would be to leave the tar sands in the ground and move more rapidly to renewable fuels,” said Tanderup, who owns a modest 160-acre farm passed down from his wife Helen’s grandfather. Four days after his inauguration, President Donald Trump revived the Keystone XL project with an executive action inviting the Calgary-based pipeline builder TransCanada to reapply for permits to build. In 2015, then-President Barack Obama rejected the pipeline after seven years of deliberation, on the grounds that the environmental risks remained too great. If completed, the pipeline would carry tar sands ― a noxious mix of sand, clay, and viscous oil, considered one of the dirtiest and poorest-quality fuels ― from Canada to Texas to be refined for export. “After we learned how destructive the chemicals and the tar sands are, we have come to realize that this type of fossil fuel should not be happening,” Tanderup said Friday, after Smith asked whether he would still oppose the pipeline if the route didn’t go through his property. “It doesn’t matter where it’s at ― we need to look for other sources of renewable energy. We would fight it wherever it was.” Smith suggested the pipeline would be more secure than transporting tar sands by rail. Indeed, the Fraser Institute, a conservative think tank in Canada, found that moving oil and gas via a pipeline is 4.5 times safer than doing it by rail. But the existing Keystone pipeline already leaked 16,800 gallons of oil on Yankton, South Dakota, last year, Tanderup noted. (Keystone XL, as the name suggests, would be an extension of the existing Keystone pipeline, providing a shortcut to Texas refineries.) “When something is out of sight and underground, and when TransCanada’s fancy detection system doesn’t work most of the time, it’s much more dangerous because you don’t know when those leaks happen,” Tanderup said. By contrast, a train accident would be highly visible and immediately addressed. “Let me ask you, what’s the solution? Because we all want to achieve energy independence in this country,” Smith said. “This was an effort and a step in that direction. How do you achieve that?” “This is not American oil, and it is going across America,” Tanderup replied, before being cut off. “But it’s coming from Canada, rather than the Middle East, would be the argument,” Smith said. “That’s true, but it’s going across America to be refined and exported, which is not for America’s use,” he replied. “If they do not mix some high-quality crude with this, the best they get is poor-grade diesel fuel, which we can’t even burn in this country.” “Well, you’re opening the door to so many controversial discussions that would take all day to get there,” Smith said, ending the segment. “But we definitely wanted to hear your story because this affects you, runs through your family’s farm, through your own backyard. There’s 90 other landowners talking about this. But still there is fierce thoughts on the other side of this, that this is the best thing for this country. But we love to hear your story as well.” Citing its frequent use of Trump administration talking points, critics have lately likened Fox News to a state-run propaganda network. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58877e02e4b070d8cad57814,588a4576e4b0024605fe7bfe,58dd2d3de4b0e6ac7092ebea,5824b105e4b02a051293615f,58f4be6ee4b0b9e9848cf9a0 -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

21 апреля, 16:58

TransCanada (TRP) Sells 13 Hydroelectric Generation Assets

TransCanada Corporation (TRP) recently completed the sale of 13 hydroelectric generation assets to renewable energy investor ArcLight Capital Partners, LLC's affiliate, Great River Hydro, LLC.

Выбор редакции
19 апреля, 21:40

Last stand: Nebraska farmers could derail Keystone XL pipeline

Neligh, NEBRASKA (Reuters) - When President Donald Trump handed TransCanada Pipeline Co. a permit for its Keystone XL pipeline last month, he said the company could now build the long-delayed and divisive project "with efficiency and with speed."

17 апреля, 17:34

Justin Trudeau A 'Stunning Hypocrite' On Climate Change, Says Top Environmentalist

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Justin Trudeau’s support for more oil pipelines and tar sands drilling is at loggerheads with his image as Canada’s progressive heartthrob prime minister, according to a top environmentalist. In an op-ed published Monday in The Guardian, 350.org founder Bill McKibben called Trudeau a “stunning hypocrite” on global warming. “[W]hen it comes to the defining issue of our day, climate change, he’s a brother to the old orange guy in DC,” McKibben wrote, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump. He said Trudeau was “hard at work pushing for new pipelines through Canada and the US to carry yet more oil out of Alberta’s tarsands, which is one of the greatest climate disasters on the planet.” Tar sands ― a noxious mix of sand, clay and bitumen, a viscous oil ― are considered one of the dirtiest fossil fuels. The controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which Trump jump-started days after taking office in January, would funnel a daily load of 830,000 barrels of tar sands oil to refineries in Texas, producing emissions equal to putting 5.6 million new cars on the road, according to estimates by the environmental nonprofit Friends of the Earth.  Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite. Bill McKibben, 350.org founder A spokesperson for Trudeau did not reply to a request for comment. In 2015, former President Barack Obama rejected pipeline-builder TransCanada’s application to construct the Keystone XL after a seven-year deliberation. Trudeau cheered Trump’s decision to reconsider the pipeline.  “I reiterated my support for the project. I’ve been on the record for many years supporting [Keystone XL] because it leads to economic growth and good jobs for Albertans,” Trudeau told reporters on Jan. 24, when Trump signed an executive action inviting TransCanada to reapply. “We know we can get our resources to market more safely and responsibly while meeting our climate change goals.”  To be sure, the Trudeau administration has made significant moves to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels. In November, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna announced plans to phase out most coal-fired power plants by 2030. Some coal power stations would remain, equipped with carbon-capture technology that has yet to be proved reliable. Nevertheless, the Canadian government forecasts carbon emissions falling by 5 megatons ― equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the road ― if the plan is fully implemented.  In December, Trudeau announced a nationwide minimum price on carbon of about 10 Canadian dollars, or about $7.53 per metric ton. By next year, the administration plans to roll out either a tax on fossil fuels or a cap-and-trade system to exact the levy.  Still, McKibben urged Trudeau’s gushing fans to “stop swooning” over the prime minister, whom he called a “disaster for the planet.” “Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite,” McKibben wrote, before concluding: “Trump’s insulting the planet, in other words. But at least he’s not pretending otherwise.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58331ba2e4b030997bc06e46,58877e02e4b070d8cad57814,5835f6bce4b09b6056000f80,58efb0bfe4b0bb9638e23062,58e66c19e4b05894715ebe13,58dad105e4b054637062e61d -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 апреля, 17:34

Justin Trudeau A 'Stunning Hypocrite' On Climate Change, Says Top Environmentalist

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Justin Trudeau’s support for more oil pipelines and tar sands drilling is at loggerheads with his image as Canada’s progressive heartthrob prime minister, according to a top environmentalist. In an op-ed published Monday in The Guardian, 350.org founder Bill McKibben called Trudeau a “stunning hypocrite” on global warming. “[W]hen it comes to the defining issue of our day, climate change, he’s a brother to the old orange guy in DC,” McKibben wrote, referring to U.S. President Donald Trump. He said Trudeau was “hard at work pushing for new pipelines through Canada and the US to carry yet more oil out of Alberta’s tarsands, which is one of the greatest climate disasters on the planet.” Tar sands ― a noxious mix of sand, clay and bitumen, a viscous oil ― are considered one of the dirtiest fossil fuels. The controversial Keystone XL pipeline, which Trump jump-started days after taking office in January, would funnel a daily load of 830,000 barrels of tar sands oil to refineries in Texas, producing emissions equal to putting 5.6 million new cars on the road, according to estimates by the environmental nonprofit Friends of the Earth.  Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite. Bill McKibben, 350.org founder A spokesperson for Trudeau did not reply to a request for comment. In 2015, former President Barack Obama rejected pipeline-builder TransCanada’s application to construct the Keystone XL after a seven-year deliberation. Trudeau cheered Trump’s decision to reconsider the pipeline.  “I reiterated my support for the project. I’ve been on the record for many years supporting [Keystone XL] because it leads to economic growth and good jobs for Albertans,” Trudeau told reporters on Jan. 24, when Trump signed an executive action inviting TransCanada to reapply. “We know we can get our resources to market more safely and responsibly while meeting our climate change goals.”  To be sure, the Trudeau administration has made significant moves to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuels. In November, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna announced plans to phase out most coal-fired power plants by 2030. Some coal power stations would remain, equipped with carbon-capture technology that has yet to be proved reliable. Nevertheless, the Canadian government forecasts carbon emissions falling by 5 megatons ― equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the road ― if the plan is fully implemented.  In December, Trudeau announced a nationwide minimum price on carbon of about 10 Canadian dollars, or about $7.53 per metric ton. By next year, the administration plans to roll out either a tax on fossil fuels or a cap-and-trade system to exact the levy.  Still, McKibben urged Trudeau’s gushing fans to “stop swooning” over the prime minister, whom he called a “disaster for the planet.” “Trump is a creep and a danger and unpleasant to look at, but at least he’s not a stunning hypocrite,” McKibben wrote, before concluding: “Trump’s insulting the planet, in other words. But at least he’s not pretending otherwise.” type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58331ba2e4b030997bc06e46,58877e02e4b070d8cad57814,5835f6bce4b09b6056000f80,58efb0bfe4b0bb9638e23062,58e66c19e4b05894715ebe13,58dad105e4b054637062e61d -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

04 апреля, 00:03

AP on President Trump keeping his promises to overturn President Obama’s destructive policies

BIT BY BIT, TRUMP METHODICALLY UNDOING OBAMA POLICIES “From abortion to energy to climate change and personal investments, Trump is keeping his promises in methodically overturning regulations and policies adopted when Barack Obama was president.” Bit By Bit, Trump Methodically Undoing Obama Policies By Darlene Superville The Associated Press April 3, 2017 … From abortion to energy to climate change and personal investments, Trump is keeping his promises in methodically overturning regulations and policies adopted when Barack Obama was president. … CLIMATE CHANGE Trump signed an executive order last week to deliver on his pledge to unravel Obama's efforts to curb global warming. The order launched a review of the Clean Power Plan, Obama's chief effort to curb carbon emissions by restricting greenhouse gas emissions at coal-fired power plants. Trump also lifted a 14-month-old halt on new coal leases on federal lands. The Obama administration had imposed a three-year freeze on such leases in January of last year. … ABORTION/FAMILY PLANNING Trump is expected to sign legislation erasing another Obama rule, one that barred states from withholding federal family planning funds from Planned Parenthood affiliates and other clinics that provide abortions. The rule was finalized shortly before Obama left office in January. … KEYSTONE XL OIL PIPELINE Trump greenlighted the long-delayed project on March 24, reversing Obama's decision less than 18 months earlier. After Trump invited TransCanada, the Canadian company building the $8 billion pipeline, to resubmit its application, the State Department approved the project, saying it would advance U.S. national interests. Obama had said the project would not. … DAKOTA ACCESS PIPELINE Under Obama, the Army Corps of Engineers had declined in December to allow pipeline construction under South Dakota's Lake Oahe on grounds that alternate routes needed to be considered. … The project has moved forward again under Trump, who acted shortly after taking office. … FUEL EFFICIENCY STANDARDS The Trump administration is re-examining federal requirements governing the fuel efficiency of cars and trucks. In 2012, the Obama administration set fuel economy regulations for model years 2017-2025 and agreed to complete a midterm evaluation by next year. Then, days before Obama left office, the Environmental Protection Agency decided to keep stringent requirements it had set in place for model years 2022-2025. The auto industry balked. Trump announced in Michigan that he's putting the midterm review back on track. His decision has no immediate effect but requires the EPA to determine no later than April 2018 whether the 2022-2025 standards are appropriate. TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP Obama was his administration's biggest cheerleader for the sweeping agreement involving the U.S. and 11 other Pacific Rim nations. But the Senate needed to ratify it, and bipartisan opposition basically doomed it before he left office. As a candidate, Trump railed against this agreement and pledged to withdraw from it, saying he was a better negotiator and could strike better deals. Shortly after taking office, he directed the U.S. trade representative to withdraw and said he would pursue individual deals with the other countries. ABORTION/MEXICO CITY POLICY Trump reinstated a ban on providing federal money to international groups that perform abortions or provide information about them. Obama had lifted the ban when he took office in 2009. … PERSONAL FINANCE Trump has instructed the Department of Labor to delay an Obama-era rule that would require financial professionals who charge commissions to put their clients' best interests first when advising them on retirement investments. Read the entire article here

03 апреля, 18:05

US State Department issues long-awaited permit for Keystone XL pipeline

The US Department of State issued a presidential permit for the proposed Keystone XL crude oil pipeline more than 8 years after sponsor TransCanada Corp. originally sought cross-border approval of the project. Under-Secretary for Political Affairs Thomas A. Shannon Jr. signed the permit after President Donald J. Trump reversed his predecessor Barack Obama's decision and said the project would be in the US national interest.

31 марта, 00:34

Here Come The Lawsuits To Stop Keystone XL Pipeline

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Environmental groups filed two federal lawsuits this week seeking to block construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which President Donald Trump recently approved.  The State Department and other federal agencies shirked their responsibilities to evaluate the oil pipeline’s environmental impact, both lawsuits allege. They argue that the plunge in oil prices makes the project unviable and that new research shows oil from Canada’s tar sands is especially destructive to the environment.  The lawsuits, which activists had promised after Trump green-lighted the pipeline last week, revive a protracted fight against construction that began during the Obama administration. Trump’s decision reversed former President Barack Obama’s rejection of the project.  The Trump administration violated the National Environmental Policy Act by relying on “woefully out of date” information about plans to import oil from Canada’s tar sands region to Nebraska, according to a suit filed Wednesday by the Northern Plains Resource Council, the Sierra Club and other organizations.  The State Department based its approval of the Keystone XL last week on an environmental study completed in 2014, the lawsuit said. That same report was used by the Obama administration to conclude the pipeline was not in the national interest and to deny permits to developer TransCanada in 2015.  “The Trump Administration broke the law by arbitrarily endorsing a permit to build the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline,” Anthony Swift of the Natural Resources Defense Council said in a statement. “It ignored public calls to update and correct a required environmental impact statement that should have led to one conclusion. Piping some of the dirtiest oil on the planet through America’s heartland would put at grave risk our land, water and climate.” Extracting oil from the tar sands is more energy-intensive than drilling, and the oil itself is considered one of the dirtiest fossil fuels. A gallon of tar sands oil releases 15 percent more carbon dioxide than “conventional oil,” according to the Union of Concerned Scientists. Supporters, including Trump, say the pipeline will foster U.S. energy independence and will create jobs. Soaring U.S. energy production already has the country on track for producing as much as it consumes, and it’s unclear how importing oil from Canada aids that goal. Though the pipeline would require thousands of temporary construction workers, it would permanently employ fewer than three dozen.  The second lawsuit, filed by the Indigenous Environmental Network and the North Coast Rivers Alliance on Monday, argues that the government should have replaced the 2014 environmental report with current data, and that officials failed to thoroughly consider impacts on both sides of the border. It further alleges that wildlife protections, such as the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, were ignored.  “Oil, water and fish do not mix. KXL poses an unacceptable risk to the Missouri River and its fisheries, including the nearly extinct Arctic grayling,” Frank Egger, North Coast Rivers Alliance president, said in a statement. “No oil pipeline is safe. One major oil spill, and the Missouri River and adjacent aquifers would be polluted for generations.” Both lawsuits were filed in federal court in Montana, where the pipeline would cross the border into the U.S. The 1,179-mile pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels of oil per day from Alberta to Nebraska.  A State Department spokeswoman declined to comment on the litigation. Officials from the Department of the Interior, which also was named as a defendant in both lawsuits, didn’t respond to HuffPost’s inquiries.  TransCanada spokesman Matthew John said the company is focused on securing approval for the pipeline route in Nebraska, where the state Public Service Commission will vote on it. That review is expected to take seven months or more.  “We’ll be working with stakeholders up and down the route to make sure that they’re informed on the project,” John told HuffPost.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
30 марта, 18:50

Environmental groups sue Trump administration for approving Keystone pipeline

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Several environmental groups filed lawsuits against the Trump administration on Thursday to challenge its decision to approve construction of TransCanada Corp's controversial Keystone XL crude oil pipeline.

29 марта, 16:30

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Pioneer Natural Resources, RSP Permian, Concho Resources, TransCanada and Energy Transfer Partners

Zacks Industry Outlook Highlights: Pioneer Natural Resources, RSP Permian, Concho Resources, TransCanada and Energy Transfer Partners

28 марта, 22:23

Oil & Gas Stock Roundup: TransCanada's Keystone Approval, Chevron's Asset Sale and More

It was a week where oil prices went back to their losing streak on persistent oversupply fears, while natural gas futures breached the $3 barrier on bullish weather update.

28 марта, 22:04

Energy's Back, and These Stocks Are Going to Excel

Energy's Back, and These Stocks Are Going to Excel

27 марта, 17:10

Stock Market News for March 27, 2017

Benchmarks closed mostly in the red on Friday after Trump administration failed to get enough support among Republicans to pass the healthcare bill

Выбор редакции
27 марта, 16:15

Nebraskan Landowners Resist Keystone XL By Refusing to Sell Their Property to TransCanada

Retired school teacher and farmer Art Tanderup says he and nearly a hundred other landowners are pushing the Public Service Commission in Nebraska to deny permits for the pipeline Visit http://therealnews.com for more stories and help support our work by donating at http://therealnews.com/donate.

27 марта, 15:57

TransCanada's Keystone XL Projects Receives Nod from Trump

TransCanada Corporation's (TRP) Keystone XL pipeline has finally received permission from the Trump administration to continue construction work.

25 марта, 02:07

Keystone XL Protesters Won't Back Down After Trump Approval

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Environmentalists, Native American tribes and landowners vowed to continue fighting the contentious Keystone XL pipeline project Friday after President Donald Trump reversed the Obama administration and granted a key construction permit.   Opponents quickly outlined a multi-pronged battle plan calling for litigation, political pressure and demonstrations aimed at derailing construction of the project, intended to deliver more than 800,000 barrels of oil per day from Canada to Nebraska.  Pipeline owner TransCanada cleared a major regulatory hurdle with Friday’s Department of State permit allowing construction of the international project. But completion is far from a certainty, according to activists who spoke to reporters in a conference call.  A key remaining battle is a Nebraska government review that’s expected to take months. The project must also withstand court challenges. And heated protests, like those during TransCanada’s attempt to obtain government permission during the Obama administration, are likely to be rekindled.  “Game on,” said Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org. “The fight will be very intense.” Pipeline backers claim the project will create jobs — though how many is disputed — and will deepen U.S. energy security. Opponents say the intensive process to extract crude from Canada’s tar sands region makes it particularly harmful to the environment, and ruptures would hold disastrous consequences. Pressure public officials Montana and South Dakota officials have previously approved the $8-billion pipeline to carry 830,000 barrels of oil per day through their states. But Nebraska’s five-member Public Service Commission must still decide whether to accept the route.  The commission’s approval is essential to TransCanada. It would enable the company to use eminent domain to acquire property from dozens of landowners who’ve refused to sell. Bold Alliance President Jane Kleeb said she’ll encourage voters to express their disapproval of the pipeline to the four Republicans and one Democrat on the commission.  Keystone  “is all risk and no reward,” Kleeb said. “We will be pressuring those commissioners to reject the pipeline.” Nebraska opponents say the pipeline could harm an important aquifer and the delicate sand hills region.  The terms for two of the commission’s members expire next year, possibly making them more susceptible to messages about Keystone XL. In a campaign for a commission seat in a liberal district around Lincoln, Kleeb predicted that an anti-pipeline challenger would challenge a Republican incumbent.  Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts (R), however, operates as a countervailing force. He said on Twitter that the Trump administration’s decision “is a welcome step forward” to bolster energy security and job creation. Sue in court Activists said they believe the State Department approved the pipeline permit by circumventing environmental laws and the rights of Native American tribes living in the three states along the route. One problem, the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Anthony Swift pointed out, is that the State Department may have based its decision on an outdated study of the project. A fresh environmental review would have taken months to complete, but Trump ordered the State Department to make its decision within 60 days.  To meet the deadline, the State Department didn’t consider new evidence about the harmfulness of tar sands oil production, Swift said. The old data also overestimated the value of the oil, when the commodity was selling for more than $100 a barrel, while the recent price has been less than half that amount.   Obama rejected TransCanada’s application in 2015 after years of debate, saying it would diminish U.S. standing on global climate change. Nearby Native American tribes have also invoked legal claims against construction.  The Rosebud Sioux tribe of South Dakota contends the pipeline would violate treaty rights to an area that had been established in mid-1800s agreements with the federal government. That position is reminiscent of arguments made by the Standing Rock Sioux in their ongoing attempts to defeat the Dakota Access Pipeline. Keystone XL also would run into lands claimed by the Ponca tribe of Nebraska. “Our tribe has had limited to no consultation” with the Keystone builders, said Ponca Chairman Larry Wright. He described the pipeline as “the continued raping of our land and culture” and said he feared it would pollute what he described as “sacred” waters. Take it to the streets The renewed effort to to kill the Keystone XL will likely see public demonstrations to mobilize opponents. Demonstrations were hastily announced for Friday night in Washington, New York and other cities. The Rosebud Sioux and other Sioux tribes may establish protest camps near the construction route, according to Indigenous Environmental Network organizer Dallas Goldtooth. The tribes “are willing to hold a physical space” and practice non-violent resistance, Goldtooth said.  A similar strategy helped galvanize public support for the Standing Rock Sioux against the Dakota Access Pipeline, but also led to repeated clashes with police and more than 700 arrests.  Follow the money If pressure fails to sway government regulators and corporate bosses, opponents will target pipeline financial backers, said Michael Bruno, the Sierra Club’s executive director. Bruno said banks and other lenders may withhold funds to TransCanada if enough customers threaten boycotts.  “This project will not get built,” Brune said. “It’s one of the worst deals imaginable to the American people.” Agreement between the two camps seems unlikely. TransCanada President and CEO Russ Girling said in a video Friday that he’d like to know more about opponents’ views, but made it clear he thinks the pipeline is positive.  “We will work closer with the communities to best understand what their concerns are,” Girling said. “But the fact that they understand North America needs energy, they need energy and the safest way to get energy is through a safe and modern pipeline.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 марта, 02:07

Keystone XL Protesters Won't Back Down After Trump Approval

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Environmentalists, Native American tribes and landowners vowed to continue fighting the contentious Keystone XL pipeline project Friday after President Donald Trump reversed the Obama administration and granted a key construction permit.   Opponents quickly outlined a multi-pronged battle plan calling for litigation, political pressure and demonstrations aimed at derailing construction of the project, intended to deliver more than 800,000 barrels of oil per day from Canada to Nebraska.  Pipeline owner TransCanada cleared a major regulatory hurdle with Friday’s Department of State permit allowing construction of the international project. But completion is far from a certainty, according to activists who spoke to reporters in a conference call.  A key remaining battle is a Nebraska government review that’s expected to take months. The project must also withstand court challenges. And heated protests, like those during TransCanada’s attempt to obtain government permission during the Obama administration, are likely to be rekindled.  “Game on,” said Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org. “The fight will be very intense.” Pipeline backers claim the project will create jobs — though how many is disputed — and will deepen U.S. energy security. Opponents say the intensive process to extract crude from Canada’s tar sands region makes it particularly harmful to the environment, and ruptures would hold disastrous consequences. Pressure public officials Montana and South Dakota officials have previously approved the $8-billion pipeline to carry 830,000 barrels of oil per day through their states. But Nebraska’s five-member Public Service Commission must still decide whether to accept the route.  The commission’s approval is essential to TransCanada. It would enable the company to use eminent domain to acquire property from dozens of landowners who’ve refused to sell. Bold Alliance President Jane Kleeb said she’ll encourage voters to express their disapproval of the pipeline to the four Republicans and one Democrat on the commission.  Keystone  “is all risk and no reward,” Kleeb said. “We will be pressuring those commissioners to reject the pipeline.” Nebraska opponents say the pipeline could harm an important aquifer and the delicate sand hills region.  The terms for two of the commission’s members expire next year, possibly making them more susceptible to messages about Keystone XL. In a campaign for a commission seat in a liberal district around Lincoln, Kleeb predicted that an anti-pipeline challenger would challenge a Republican incumbent.  Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts (R), however, operates as a countervailing force. He said on Twitter that the Trump administration’s decision “is a welcome step forward” to bolster energy security and job creation. Sue in court Activists said they believe the State Department approved the pipeline permit by circumventing environmental laws and the rights of Native American tribes living in the three states along the route. One problem, the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Anthony Swift pointed out, is that the State Department may have based its decision on an outdated study of the project. A fresh environmental review would have taken months to complete, but Trump ordered the State Department to make its decision within 60 days.  To meet the deadline, the State Department didn’t consider new evidence about the harmfulness of tar sands oil production, Swift said. The old data also overestimated the value of the oil, when the commodity was selling for more than $100 a barrel, while the recent price has been less than half that amount.   Obama rejected TransCanada’s application in 2015 after years of debate, saying it would diminish U.S. standing on global climate change. Nearby Native American tribes have also invoked legal claims against construction.  The Rosebud Sioux tribe of South Dakota contends the pipeline would violate treaty rights to an area that had been established in mid-1800s agreements with the federal government. That position is reminiscent of arguments made by the Standing Rock Sioux in their ongoing attempts to defeat the Dakota Access Pipeline. Keystone XL also would run into lands claimed by the Ponca tribe of Nebraska. “Our tribe has had limited to no consultation” with the Keystone builders, said Ponca Chairman Larry Wright. He described the pipeline as “the continued raping of our land and culture” and said he feared it would pollute what he described as “sacred” waters. Take it to the streets The renewed effort to to kill the Keystone XL will likely see public demonstrations to mobilize opponents. Demonstrations were hastily announced for Friday night in Washington, New York and other cities. The Rosebud Sioux and other Sioux tribes may establish protest camps near the construction route, according to Indigenous Environmental Network organizer Dallas Goldtooth. The tribes “are willing to hold a physical space” and practice non-violent resistance, Goldtooth said.  A similar strategy helped galvanize public support for the Standing Rock Sioux against the Dakota Access Pipeline, but also led to repeated clashes with police and more than 700 arrests.  Follow the money If pressure fails to sway government regulators and corporate bosses, opponents will target pipeline financial backers, said Michael Bruno, the Sierra Club’s executive director. Bruno said banks and other lenders may withhold funds to TransCanada if enough customers threaten boycotts.  “This project will not get built,” Brune said. “It’s one of the worst deals imaginable to the American people.” Agreement between the two camps seems unlikely. TransCanada President and CEO Russ Girling said in a video Friday that he’d like to know more about opponents’ views, but made it clear he thinks the pipeline is positive.  “We will work closer with the communities to best understand what their concerns are,” Girling said. “But the fact that they understand North America needs energy, they need energy and the safest way to get energy is through a safe and modern pipeline.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 марта, 01:29

President Trump Delivers on Jobs for the American People

“Today we take one more step in putting the jobs, wages, and economic security of American citizens first.” – President Donald J. Trump FROM 8 YEARS OF OBSTRUCTION TO 8 WEEKS OF ACTION: Today, President Donald J. Trump announced TransCanada would receive a Presidential permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline. Despite complying with every requirement and study, including relocating the route, the Keystone XL pipeline faced eight years of obstruction. In his first week in office, President Trump signed a Presidential Memorandum to clear roadblocks to construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline. The Keystone XL pipeline is a $8 billion investment that will move 800,000 barrels of oil per day to Gulf Coast refineries, reducing the United States’ dependency on foreign oil. Constructing the Keystone XL pipeline is expected to support 42,100 jobs across the country for up to two years, 16,100 would be directly related to the project. The Keystone XL pipeline is expected to contribute approximately $3.4 billion to the United States GDP. Under the Trump administration, Government bureaucracy is getting out of the way so this $8 billion investment can finally get started. PARTNERING WITH PRIVATE SECTOR: Today, President Trump joined Charter Communications in announcing their commitment to invest in American jobs. Charter will be opening a brand new call center in McAllen, Texas, where the company will create 600 new American jobs. Charter will invest $25 billion in its United States infrastructure. Over the next four years, Charter will hire 20,000 American workers and is committed to on-shore 100 percent of the foreign call center and technical support roles it inherited from Time Warner Cable. MAKING JOB CREATION A PRIORITY: President Donald J. Trump is looking out for the American workers who Washington has left behind. President Trump has worked with the private sector to deliver tens of thousands of new jobs for Americans. President Trump ordered the United States to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement and negotiations. President Trump signed legislation, House Joint Resolution 38, to prevent the burdensome “Stream Protection Rule” from causing further harm to the coal industry. President Trump ordered the review of the “Clean Water Rule: Definition of Waters of the United States,” known as the WOTUS rule, to evaluate whether it is stifling economic growth or job creation. THE PRESIDENT FULFILLING HIS PROMISE: President Trump promised the American people he would put their interests first. In his “Contract with the American Voter,” President Trump promised he would lift “roadblocks and allow vital energy infrastructure projects, like the Keystone Pipeline, to move forward.” As a candidate, Mr. Trump promised “I am going to bring back the jobs that have been stripped away from you and your country.”

25 марта, 00:41

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Killed Bill

House Speaker Paul Ryan pulled the GOP’s new health-care legislation, after Republicans didn’t have the votes to pass it.

Выбор редакции
24 марта, 23:21

Hurdles Still Remain For Keystone XL Pipeline

TransCanada still needs to secure some of the land rights for the pipeline with landowners and a permit from the state of Nebraska, which could result in a rash of lawsuits that could drag out the process for years.

08 октября 2012, 19:40

Проект Аляска-Азия по экспорту СПГ в $65 млрд

Консорциум, состоящий из ряда крупных нефтяных компаний, продолжает активно разрабатывать грандиозные планы по созданию инфраструктуры для транспортировки сжиженного природного газа из Аляски в Азию. В марте этого года консорциум Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips и BP PLC в сотрудничестве с TransCanada уже объявлял о начале разработке проекта экспорту СПГ из Аляски в Азию. Тогда компании оценили его в $40 млрд. Теперь аппетиты компаний существенно выросли, и речь идет уже о проекте, чья стоимость может составить от $45 млрд до $65 млрд. В данный проект будет входить строительство газопровода длиной почти в 1300 км от газовых месторождений, расположенных на северном склоне Аляски до побережья с пропускной способностью в 3-3,5 млрд куб. м в день. На побережье будет построен завод по сжижению природного газа, а также терминалы по хранению и отгрузке газа для его последующей транспортировки на азиатские рынки. Согласно заявлениям участвующих сторон проект окажет серьезное влияние не только на экономику самой Аляски, но также и на строительный сектор США. По прогнозам компаний, в целом потребуется 1,7 млн метрических тонн стали, а также 15 тыс. рабочих в пик строительства. В целом проект Аляска-Азия по экспорту сжиженного природного газа может стать одним из самых дорогостоящих проектов в отрасли во всем мире. Он обойдется в 7-10 раз дороже, чем аналогичный проект на побережье Мексиканского залива, предложенный компанией Cheniere Energy. Кроме того, скорее всего, он будет стоить дороже, чем проект по сжижению и транспортировке природного газа из месторождения Gorgon на шельфе Австралии, в 160 км к северо-западу от континента. Стоимость этого проекта изначально оценивалась в $37 млрд, но затем выросла до $43 млрд, вынудив Chevron начать пересмотр запланированных затрат. Запуск проекта Gorgon планируется в 2014 г. Проект Аляска-Азия нуждается в одобрении как местных, так и федеральных властей. Причем одобрение должно быть получено не только на строительство, но и на экспорт газа в другие страны. Президент Обама уже заявил, что не станет одобрять новые проекты по экспорту природного газа, пока Министерство энергетики не представит доклад, который бы обосновывал их экономическую эффективность. Министерство уже неоднократно откладывало выпуск данного доклада. В случае если проект будет одобрен, на его строительство, по ряду оценок, может уйти более 10 лет. Что интересно, эта идея отнюдь не нова: она появилась еще в начале 1980-х гг. Компания Yukon Pacific в 1982 г. также предложила проект с очень схожими условиями. Его первоначальная стоимость тогда разнилась от $14 млрд до $18 млрд. Однако ему так и не суждено было реализоваться по ряду причин, в основном экономического характера.