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Выбор редакции
16 января, 03:55

Unilever boss lives by African proverb

Paul Polman, the head of Unilever, shares the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

Выбор редакции
16 января, 03:55

Unilever boss lives by African proverb

Paul Polman, the head of Unilever, shares the business advice he wishes he had been given when he started out.

13 января, 12:52

Our SDGS: from 2015 through 2016 to 2017

Building the Bridge for All In August 2015, 193 countries agreed on the UN's 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) which replaced the millennium goals set in September 2000. At the UN Sustainable Development Summit at the end of September they were presented in New York under the name: Transforming Our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 2015 was a pivotal time and went into the books as a global breakthrough year with both the climate agreement in Paris, signed in December of that year, and the agreement of the SDGs. The interconnection between the UN goals and the climate agreement is clear since SDG number 13 is specifically about climate action, and many other SDGs are related to climate and environmental conditions as well. As we enter 2017, we are well on our way from that starting point as we have been on our path towards reaching our global goals for one and a half years. And we should be seeing movement as 2030 is actually very nearby and we are left with a mere 14 years to get a tremendous job done. So, what has been achieved so far? Where do we stand now? What can we expect in 2017 and what needs to be done to reach the goals? Looking back on the past one and a half years, we can definitely say that the launching of the goals has had tremendous impact already. Straight after establishing the goals, the word spread quickly throughout the world and many people learned about the SDGs; the frontrunners were quickly committed and involved. This was partly due to the goals being articulated clearly thus making a uniform language for all to use. This uniform terminology had immediate impact, which was shown in the many articles, references during conferences, and pledges that soon followed. Gathering the building blocks 2016 saw the gathering of the building blocks and the laying of groundwork, with numerous coalitions being formed. Judith Rodin, President of the Rockefeller Foundation explained, "To realize the SDGs we need to foster a new era of collaboration and coordination." To that end, many practical platforms were launched by the United Nations, such as the October 2016 launch of a new platform for scaling up innovative finance solutions, a platform for business solutions for 2030, and a pioneers' program to profile SDG pioneers throughout the world, and so on. Additionally, business, industry and national coalitions and partnerships have been formed to address the SDGs on a large scale. Global business partnerships such as the Business Commission was launched by Paul Polman, CEO of Unilever, during the World Economic Forum in Davos last January, to urge the private sector to make advancements on sustainable development. Unilever also joined a host of industry partners to create an open platform called Paragon, to combine their market research forces in addressing key global development and sustainability challenges. 2016 was also declared the year of green finance in the UK, with financial leaders convening to encourage sustainable investments and the divestment from polluting industries such as fossil fuels. And nations are forming pacts as well. Costa Rica, for example, is bringing together a broad cross-section of society including entrepreneurs of large and small companies as well as academics, and civil organizations - all working towards achieving dynamic links to approach their own challenges such as improving public transportation and doing so with the SDGs firmly in mind. And the Netherlands saw seventy signatories from business and civil society including AkzoNobel, Philips, numerous banks, universities, and foundations such as UNICEF all join together in a Charter to provide innovative solutions based on knowledge and technology. Also, during the Global Impact Investors' meeting of the GIIN in Amsterdam on December 7 2016, 21 Dutch financial institutions, including ABN AMRO, presented the agenda for further collaboration and partnership platforms to Minister Ploumen. The list goes on. So, the coalitions of the willing grew fast in the last months of 2015 and 2016 and got the societal motors running. Preparing a sound foundation In addition to these collaborations, assessments have been done to get a clear picture of where we are now and what still needs to be achieved. Reports and research have also been done this past year on how business can contribute to achieving the goals and what new markets are opening up. The World Business Council for Sustainable Development produced an 'SDG Compass' to guide companies on how they can align their strategies, measure and manage their contribution to the realization of the SDGs. And the UN, together with over 6000 business leaders from all over the world, co-created a Global Opportunity Report identifying 15 new sustainable markets. Research into business intentions and practices is being conducted as well, for example, PWC - one of the largest financial consultancy firms -- surveyed nearly one thousand businesses about their plans to address the SDGs. They found that while 71% of the companies are planning how they will engage with the SDGs, only 10% are planning to assess their impact on the SDGs relevant to their industry, or even understand how to do this. Clearly there is work to be done to continue to educate and guide businesses. And while capital initiatives such as the UK's Year of Green Finance and the Sustainable Stock Exchange initiative, which welcomed its 60th member in 2016, are developing and gaining ground, there is much more that can be done in 2017 for capital redirection. According to the 2016 World Federation of Exchanges (WFE) study, "Stock exchanges ranked pressure from investors last when noting the main motivators for introducing Environmental Social and Corporate Governance (ESG) initiatives. And the 2016 UN Global Compact-Accenture CEO survey reported that "only 10% of CEOs cited investor pressure as a driver for sustainability." So, as we have just crossed over the threshold to 2017 and looking back on 2016, I can see that tremendous groundwork has been done on which we can build. Groundwork in terms of collaborations started, research and insights gathered, awareness created and initiatives started. Nevertheless, let's not be naïve: still only a small minority of businesses are really aware of the goals, and there is a need for private investment of 2.5 trillion dollars a year. So, we have only just begun our journey. Many others must help to create a sound foundation on which to build the bridge, so we can all walk the path. There is an urgent need to speed up and scale up, since the scale of our solutions must meet the scale of our goals. Building the bridge Let us make 2017 the year we prepare that acceleration. Let's move on from the groundwork to building the bridge everyone can walk on. And let's get everybody lined up to cross that bridge the following year. We need more businesses and institutions to join in as building this bridge is a huge job and it must be a firm and thorough bridge. Bear in mind, there is a long way to go: In 2014 there were 154,000,000 malnourished children in the world and the goal for 2030 is to end all forms of malnutrition. In 2000 -> 1,750,000,000 people lived in extreme poverty. In 2012 -> 900,000,000 lived in extreme poverty and the goal for 2030 is that no one lives in extreme poverty. In 2015, our worldwide economy produced 34,650,000 Kiloton Co2 emissions, which is a significant increase compared to the year 2000, while CO2 emissions should be drastically decreasing in order to limit the warming of the Earth to 2 or preferably 1.5 degrees. So, the bridge must lead to solutions for all these challenges. 2016 has been quite a year, and I recognize that we have seen a lot happen that could make us fearful, doubtful, or sceptical whether we talk about the Brexit, the US elections, or the still growing terrorist threat. But in the words of Christiana Figueres, a Costa Rican diplomat and the leading lady in the 2015 Paris Agreement, "We'll transform on." The world has chosen a sustainable course and recognized what needs to be done for the long-term benefit on our world and our people. This movement will not be stopped by political swings or any other current affairs. And do keep in mind: it is about the deeds, not the words. If we all contribute, we will make 2017 another year to never forget, using the groundwork to build the bridge, and looking forward to us all crossing it afterwards. Building it will be rewarding and thankful. And it will be successful business-wise as well. You will see this next year when we look back to admire the bridge we have built, and we look ahead in anticipation of watching business, capital, civil society, and governments crossing the bridge we've built together. So, take everybody with you that you can to help meet the biggest challenge and opportunity of all times for all of us. Marga Hoek -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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12 января, 14:15

Глава Unilever предложил сменить мировую экономическую модель

Нынешняя мировая финансовая система не соотносится с реальностью, нужно разработать новую экономическую модель. Об этом заявил генеральный директор англо-голландской компании Unilever Пол Полман. По его словам, один из главных вызовов — это отсутствие общих ценностей.

Выбор редакции
12 января, 02:06

Рекламе тесно в телевизоре // Онлайн-видео заработало на крупных брендах

Расходы на видеорекламу в рунете в прошлом году росли на 18%, обгоняя рост ее аудитории. Ключевыми рекламодателями для этого рынка стали крупнейшие компании, включая Procter & Gamble, Unilever и Coca-Cola. Но этот вид рекламы они пока рассматривают только как дополнение к кампаниям, запущенным на ТВ: в интернет уходит лишь 6% всех бюджетов, выделенных на видео.

Выбор редакции
12 января, 00:21

Рекламе тесно в телевизоре // Онлайн-видео заработало на крупных брендах

Расходы на видеорекламу в рунете в прошлом году росли на 18%, обгоняя рост ее аудитории. Ключевыми рекламодателями для этого рынка стали крупнейшие компании, включая Procter & Gamble, Unilever и Coca-Cola. Но этот вид рекламы они пока рассматривают только как дополнение к кампаниям, запущенным на ТВ: в интернет уходит лишь 6% всех бюджетов, выделенных на видео.

11 января, 15:11

Председатель Правительства России Дмитрий Медведев выступит на Гайдаровском форуме в РАНХиГС

12 января в Президентской академии открывается VIII Гайдаровский форум – одно из наиболее значимых политико-экономических событий в стране с участием влиятельных экспертов со всего мира. По традиции в работе форума примет участие Председатель Правительства Российской Федерации Дмитрий Медведев. Он выступит на центральной дискуссии форума «Россия и мир: выбор приоритетов». Модератором дискуссии выступит ректор Российской академии народного хозяйства и государственной службы при Президенте РФ Владимир Мау. Ежегодно Гайдаровский форум становится площадкой для обсуждения повестки работы Правительства РФ на текущий год. В пленарной дискуссии «Россия и мир: выбор приоритетов» также примут участие первый заместитель директора-распорядителя Международного валютного фонда Дэвид Липтон, премьер министр Польши (2004–2005) Марек Белька и премьер-министр Австралии (2007–2010, 2013) Кевин Майкл Радд. Кроме того, подтвердили свое участие ведущий экономический обозреватель Мартин Вульф и CEO Unilever Пол Полман. Эксперты определят экономические приоритеты России во внутренней и внешней социально-экономической политике, обсудят основные факторы экономического роста. Гайдаровский форум проводится с 2010 г. и объединяет экспертов, ведущих мировых ученых и политиков, представителей финансовых кругов и глобальной бизнес-элиты. Организаторы форума – Российская академия народного хозяйства и государственной службы при Президенте РФ, Институт Егора Гайдара и Ассоциация инновационных регионов России (АИРР).

11 января, 03:11

12-14 января 2017 года Министр экономического развития РФ Максим Орешкин примет участие в VIII Гайдаровском форуме «Россия и мир: выбор приоритетов»

12 января 2017 года 8:30-10:30 Деловой завтрак - экспертная дискуссия Консультативного совета по иностранным инвестициям в России при поддержке Unilever (Корпус 2, 2 этаж, Аудитория 237). 13 января 2017 года 9:30-11:30 Панельная дискуссия «Устойчивый экономический рост: модель для России» (Корпус 5, 5 этаж, Актовый зал). 14 января 2017 года 10:00-12:00 Панельная дискуссия «Новая налоговая политика России: какие изменения нас ожидают с 2018?» (Корпус 5, 5 этаж, Актовый зал). Место проведения: г. Москва пр. Вернадского, д. 82, РАНХиГС при Президенте РФ. Контакты для информации во время работы Форума: Буланкина Юлия +7 903 798-46-38,[email protected] Лашкина Елена +7 916 501-00-68,[email protected]

10 января, 18:00

More Than 600 Companies Urge Trump Not To Renege On Climate

More than 600 businesses are demanding that President-elect Donald Trump’s administration uphold U.S. commitments to low-carbon policies and the Paris Climate Agreement.  Over 630 companies signed a letter released Tuesday urging Trump, members of Congress and outgoing President Barack Obama to continue low-carbon policies, increase investments in renewable energy and keep commitments to the Paris Climate Agreement ― which Trump has threatened to quit. The U.S. ratified the accord last year.   The companies, which range from large corporations to family-owned businesses, wrote:  We, the undersigned members in the business and investor community of the United States, re-affirm our deep commitment to addressing climate change through the implementation of the historic Paris Climate Agreement. We want the US economy to be energy efficient and powered by low-carbon energy. Cost-effective and innovative solutions can help us achieve these objectives. Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost US competitiveness. We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond, to realize the Paris Agreement’s commitment of a global economy that limits global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius. The companies that signed the letter together have more than $1 trillion in annual sales and nearly 2 million employees, organizers said.   IKEA’s North American division, one of the signatories, emphasized the importance of businesses banding together against climate change.  “All parts of society have a role to play in tackling climate change, but policy and business leadership is crucial,” IKEA spokeswoman Mona Astra Liss told The Huffington Post. “The Paris Agreement was a bold step towards a cleaner, brighter future, and must be protected. IKEA will continue to work together with other businesses and policymakers to build a low-carbon economy, because we know that together, we can build a better future.” The signatories include those known for environmental activism, such as outdoor gear retailer Patagonia, paper and cleaning supplier Seventh Generation, and disposable products retailer Eco-Products. They also include California utilities provider Pacific Gas and Electric, and solar energy companies Sungevity and SolarCity.  Other large companies that signed the letter include DuPont, General Mills, HP, Johnson & Johnson, VF Corp. and Unilever. Trump’s cabinet appointees generally oppose the type of environmental progress outlined in the letter. His picks include Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, whose company is under investigation for climate denial, as secretary of state; Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, which he is suing to stop power plant regulations; former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to lead the Department of Energy, which he once pledged to eliminate; and Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to lead the Department of Justice. All four of those Trump cabinet picks have either downplayed the effects of climate change or denied its existence.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 января, 18:00

More Than 600 Companies Urge Trump Not To Renege On Climate

More than 600 businesses are demanding that President-elect Donald Trump’s administration uphold U.S. commitments to low-carbon policies and the Paris Climate Agreement.  Over 630 companies signed a letter released Tuesday urging Trump, members of Congress and outgoing President Barack Obama to continue low-carbon policies, increase investments in renewable energy and keep commitments to the Paris Climate Agreement ― which Trump has threatened to quit. The U.S. ratified the accord last year.   The companies, which range from large corporations to family-owned businesses, wrote:  We, the undersigned members in the business and investor community of the United States, re-affirm our deep commitment to addressing climate change through the implementation of the historic Paris Climate Agreement. We want the US economy to be energy efficient and powered by low-carbon energy. Cost-effective and innovative solutions can help us achieve these objectives. Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk. But the right action now will create jobs and boost US competitiveness. We pledge to do our part, in our own operations and beyond, to realize the Paris Agreement’s commitment of a global economy that limits global temperature rise to well below 2 degrees Celsius. The companies that signed the letter together have more than $1 trillion in annual sales and nearly 2 million employees, organizers said.   IKEA’s North American division, one of the signatories, emphasized the importance of businesses banding together against climate change.  “All parts of society have a role to play in tackling climate change, but policy and business leadership is crucial,” IKEA spokeswoman Mona Astra Liss told The Huffington Post. “The Paris Agreement was a bold step towards a cleaner, brighter future, and must be protected. IKEA will continue to work together with other businesses and policymakers to build a low-carbon economy, because we know that together, we can build a better future.” The signatories include those known for environmental activism, such as outdoor gear retailer Patagonia, paper and cleaning supplier Seventh Generation, and disposable products retailer Eco-Products. They also include California utilities provider Pacific Gas and Electric, and solar energy companies Sungevity and SolarCity.  Other large companies that signed the letter include DuPont, General Mills, HP, Johnson & Johnson, VF Corp. and Unilever. Trump’s cabinet appointees generally oppose the type of environmental progress outlined in the letter. His picks include Exxon Mobil CEO Rex Tillerson, whose company is under investigation for climate denial, as secretary of state; Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt to lead the Environmental Protection Agency, which he is suing to stop power plant regulations; former Texas Gov. Rick Perry to lead the Department of Energy, which he once pledged to eliminate; and Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions to lead the Department of Justice. All four of those Trump cabinet picks have either downplayed the effects of climate change or denied its existence.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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10 января, 15:38

Prices of Oxo, Bisto and Mr Kipling to rise after pound's Brexit plunge

Premier Foods joins companies seeking to offset weakness of sterling, after Unilever’s row with Tesco over Marmite pricesShoppers will have to pay more for Oxo stock cubes, Bisto gravy and Mr Kipling cakes as the firm behind the brands prepares to raise prices to offset the fall in the pound triggered by the Brexit vote.Premier Foods, which also owns Homepride, Batchelors and Ambrosia rice pudding, will become the latest in a string of companies to offset the weakness of sterling after Unilever clashed with Tesco over the price of products including Marmite. Continue reading...

03 января, 14:50

Coca-Cola (KO) Underperforms: Will It Turn Around in 2017?

The Coca-Cola Company (KO), once a darling to dividend investors, has been struggling to boost sales. Will the stock turn around in 2017?

31 декабря 2016, 23:41

How Investors Pushed Corporates to Disclose Climate Risk in 2016

Kelli Barrett compiled this retrospective for Ecosystem Marketplace. Market research firms are reporting strong holiday-season sales for 2016, numbers not seen since the mid-2000s, as lower gas and food prices, a rising stock market and higher wages propelled shoppers into stores and onto retail websites.  And while consumerism typically has a negative effect on the world's forests - everything, it seems, comes from the rainforest - it isn't necessarily true this year, or at least there is reason to be optimistic. Earlier this month, Ecosystem Marketplace scouted the holiday shopping landscape for its eco-friendliness discovering some promising gift ideas - Gucci's retro handbag is made with deforestation-free leather - and finding supply change disclosure and transparency efforts from CDP, Canopy  and Forest Trends' Supply Change project make it markedly easier to determine a product's environmental impact, though it's still difficult. Mark Trexler, the longtime expert on environmental policy who now runs the Climatographers, wrote this year that the private sector is massive and diverse and sees the climate problem in different ways. However, investors and the business community as a whole are increasingly becoming more involved in climate action that involves sustainable supply chains and forests, a global movement that began in earnest in 2014 with the New York Declaration on Forests. Supply Change, tracking corporate commitments through publicly disclosed data on the "Big Four" forest-risk commodities: palm oil, cattle, soy and wood, identified a rise in corporate commitments to end deforestation this year. The report, Tracking Corporate Commitments to Deforestation-free Supply Chains, 2016, tracked pledges up from 307 commitments and 243 commitments in March of 2015 to 579 pledges and 366 companies. And since nations signed the Paris Climate Agreement on Earth Day 2016, 41 corporates joined the Science Based Targets initiative setting rigorous climate targets that align with the Paris Agreement. In total, over 150 businesses have joined. But while companies are making progress on greening their supply chains, all is far from well. It's an incredibly difficult process and companies quickly learned in 2016 that setting a deforestation or sustainability commitment is far different than achieving it. The cattle sector, for instance, is particularly difficult to track because of their mobility. Many companies are turning to certification programs at least to get started as 77% of commitments tracked by Supply Change rely in some way on third-party commodity certifications such as the Forest Stewardship Council or the Roundtable for Sustainable Palm Oil. The Forest Trust, however, is one organization interested in helping companies turn their commitments into action in ways that don't involve certification programs. "Supply chains are vast, complicated intricate things with a lot of moving parts and players," said Kevin Rabinovitch, the Global Director of Sustainability for candy and food giant Mars. "They are more like webs than chains." Only half of the companies that pledged to source certified soy have yet to integrate it into their supply chains, although 74% of the companies that committed to sustainable palm oil have done so, according to a CDP report released in March. NGOs such as Climate Focus say companies need more help, and during the November climate talks, the Global Canopy Programme and Stockholm Environment Institute launched a platform called Trase, (Transparency for Sustainable Economies), which makes it possible to track soybeans from specific municipalities in Brazil, through traders, to end countries. "A major blocker toward the zero deforestation economy is supply chain complexity and supply chain opacity," Niki Mardas, the Executive Director of Global Canopy Programme, said. "There's an urgent need for a breakthrough in transparency and to move toward a more radical transparency." Such supply chain transparency will not only benefit businesses but also the watchdogs tracking companies' progress on commitments they have set. During the climate talks, Climate Focus released a progress report on the NYDF, which focused on the second of its 10 goals: "Support and help meet the private-sector goal of eliminating deforestation from the production of agricultural commodities." The assessment couldn't produce results on parts of the goal because there is currently no available data to determine whether corporate commitments to reduce deforestation are translating into real reductions. 2016's Commitment Conundrums Companies continued to establish targets this year and last to improve sourcing of commodities driving deforestation, many of them setting their target date at 2020, the same year other companies who started working toward that goal much earlier. The corporate newcomers are aiming to achieve in a shortened timeline what the early movers are taking a decade to do. "This raises a lot of questions," says Supply Change Senior Associate Ben McCarthy. "Are they biting off more than they can chew? Are they cutting corners to meet their goals? Or does the second-mover advantage mean they'll actually pull it off?" In September, Ecosystem Marketplace explored the action required for companies to achieve their targets. Disclosure is another issue. There is a high-progress/low disclosure paradox found in the company profiles Supply Change tracks. Of the commitments that have progress information publicly available, the average achievement rate is 72%. However, only 48% of the commitments are disclosing progress information. Do companies only disclose progress when it is good news? How can companies be held accountable for these commitments? And, since the progress information is almost always self-reported, can the numbers be trusted? We can expect to see these questions often throughout the coming year. Regional Progress on Deforestation Brazil's Soy Moratorium has been a successful tool in lowering deforestation attributed to soy in the Amazon, and in May, industry associations administering the moratorium decided to renew it. "The soy industry in Brazil is now leading the world in terms of private-sector leadership," said Holly Gibbs, the University of Wisconsin-Madison professor who has extensively researched the moratorium. "They're sending a strong signal to the palm sector, to the cattle sector, and to other places in the world - like Argentina's Gran Chaco region, where soy expansion continues to lead the conversion of forests to farms." Also in Brazil, municipalities launched efforts to lower their high rates of deforestation, and in February, Ecosystem Marketplace explored the birth of the country's first "Green Municipality," sprawling Paragominas in the state of Pará. The efforts could pay off as consumer giants such as Unilever and Marks & Spencer have made announcements to source raw materials from environmentally conscious regions. Paragominas' efforts have yielded mixed results and significant insights into what it takes to slow deforestation in the Amazon. Meanwhile, Kenyan dairy farmers are leveraging trees to boost their milk yields through an agroforestry project. They're receiving funds from food companies Danone and Mars, both of which are interested in using sustainable agriculture to build sustainable supply chains. Food and Forests Sustainable agriculture is critical to solving the climate challenge as food production is a major driver of global warming, contributing about a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, and stands to be among the sectors most affected by climate disruptions. Speaking of food, America's love affair with the avocado came to a head in 2016 as revelations revealed farmers are chopping forests in central Mexico in order to grow more of the famously healthy commodity. Ecosystem Marketplace explored the problem in detail in August as well as solutions, which aren't coming in a neat tidy box. It can be a vicious cycle as regions clear forests to grow more food but deforestation disrupts ecosystem services and often undermines food security as well as energy and water. In September, the Global Canopy Programme published a policy brief suggesting policymakers of the Amazon follow the integrated approaches of the water-energy-food nexus so as to promote policies that preserve forests and the service they provide. Marrakesh Musings The international climate talks in Marrakesh, Morocco helped close out the year with the private sector expected to play an important role in the talks. Last year's Paris Climate Agreement enshrined forests as a key climate mitigation tool, and cleansing the "Big Four" from corporate supply chains is integral to saving forests. The talks were somewhat overshadowed by the surprising results of the United States presidential election on November 8. Donald Trump was elected president raising questions as to the US' role in future international climate negotiations and action at home. "We cannot pretend that last night's election outcome was anything less than deeply disturbing to those of us who care about climate stability and the role of the United States in the world," said Nathaniel Keohane, Vice President for Global Climate at the Environmental Defense Fund. "Mr. Trump should listen to the large majority of Americans who support climate action, and to the overwhelming majority of climate scientists who warn that the time for action is now." Regional governments, businesses and investors pledged almost immediately after the election that they would carry on efforts to decarbonize and align with the objectives of the Paris Agreement. Indeed, 365 US businesses and investors reaffirmed their support for the Paris Climate Agreement via a letter addressed to US President Barack Obama, President-Elect Donald Trump, Congress and other global leaders and calling on them to continue their support for the Paris Agreement and for low-carbon development. "It is not going to be governments alone, or even principally, that solve the climate challenge," said US Secretary of State John Kerry during a speech in Marrakesh. "The private sector is the most important player." Talking nearly one week after the election of Trump, pension fund managers like Pete Grannis of New York state and Gerald Cartigny of Dutch fund manager MN said they have no plans to re-load their portfolios with high-carbon fossil fuels - because the numbers don't make sense. Perils and Possibilities of Supply Chain Change The supply change space experienced a wide range of ups and downs in 2016. It closed out the year with two reports, one CDP published and the other from the Global Canopy Programme (GCP). CDP's report, written at the behest of 365 institutional investors, revealed that disruptions in supplies of forest risk commodities could cost USD 906 billion per year. GCP's report delivered pressing news as well. Of the entities listed on its Forest 500, which names and shames the 500 entities that can end deforestation, 57% either have no policies to end deforestation in place or none GCP deems credible. While both reports were on the doom and gloom side, it's possible that greater awareness among companies on the benefits of sustainable sourcing, coupled with investor interest in sustainability, could propel them to act. Something to do in 2017. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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30 декабря 2016, 18:59

Малоимущие деревенские пенсионеры получат 4 тонны подарков

В рамках акции "Продукты в глубинку" фонда продовольствия "Русь" более 4,7 тыс. нуждающихся получат наборы продуктов и товаров повседневного спроса от компании Unilever

30 декабря 2016, 18:01

How to Stop Short-Term Thinking at America’s Companies

U.S. companies are hyper-focused on quarterly earnings. What can be done to push them to invest more in the years and decades ahead?

29 декабря 2016, 19:21

The Great Lakes Have Become A Dumping Ground For Millions Of Pounds Of Plastic

About 21.8 million pounds of plastic flow into the Great Lakes each year, new research from the Rochester Institute of Technology shows. Lead author Matthew Hoffman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, calculated the estimate in Inventory and Transport of Plastic Debris in the Laurentian Great Lakes paper, which the Marine Pollution Bulletin journal published online this month. It’s the first attempt to determine the total amount of plastic waste entering the world’s largest freshwater system, he said. Over half of the plastic debris, or 5,300 metric tons, has ended up in Lake Michigan yearly, study estimates found. That’s equivalent to 100 Olympic-sized pools full of plastic bottles, the researchers said. They calculated the amount of plastic flowing into the lakes using population totals along the shores of each of the five lakes and existing estimates for the amount of plastic waste individuals produce and how much of that ends up reaching water. The formula is based on one that researchers used last year in a study that estimated about 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans annually. Though their totals make sense compared to the ocean numbers, the quantity is still “startling,” Hoffman said. “The size, I think, is the first thing that jumped out at me,” he told The Huffington Post. Using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Coastal Forecast System the research team simulated the movement of plastic particles entering the lakes between 2009 and 2014 to see where currents carried them. A video of their data simulation shows plastic particles entering and moving through Lake Erie in 2009: Hoffman originally wondered if they’d find any indication that debris collects in specific areas of the Great Lakes, similar to the “garbage patches” formed in the Pacific Ocean by current and wind movement. Instead, they found that while particles do occasionally accumulate, sustained wind events periodically pushed them to shore. The difference might actually make it easier for people to care about the environmental effects of plastic pollution, Hoffman suggested. “Abstractly, this feels awful, but it’s also far away from us,” he said about garbage collecting in the middle of the ocean. “In the Great Lakes, it’s coming back on the shores and we’re going to encounter it a lot more as humans.” Plastic makes up more than 80 percent of the garbage that litters Great Lakes beaches, another study found last year. Hoffman said plastic’s impact on the environment, animals and humans is “still one of the big unknowns.”  “We hope that this is a good first step in spurring other studies, other interest in the Great Lakes,” Hoffman said. Environmentalists and researchers have, in recent years, called attention to the problem of microplastics getting into lakes, rivers and the oceans. Tiny particles of plastic, called microbeads, have been used in products like exfoliating face wash and aren’t always effectively captured by waste treatment plants. A 2013 study that counted microplastics in several sample areas of the Great Lakes found an average of 43,000 particles per square kilometer. Companies including Unilever pledged to phase out microbeads, several Great Lakes states considered bans and President Barack Obama signed legislationlast year that will prohibit microbeads in rinse-off cosmetics. However, a loophole allows companies to continue using microbeads in other products, from detergents to sandblasting materials. It also didn’t apply to other types of plastic debris, like microfibers ― one source of those is fleece clothing, which sheds tiny plastic fibers when you wash it. “The microbeads were definitely an issue, but that’s not all the plastic that’s getting in” the Great Lakes, Hoffman said. “That hasn’t been solved. … With the microbead ban, there’s a tendency to feel like, we did something. Which is great, but there’s still more that needs to be done.” Hoffman acknowledges that their calculations are only estimates. Their model doesn’t account for a number of variables that could affect how plastic travels in the lakes, including particles’ size and type, their vertical movement and specific weather events. However, they compared its outputs to earlier research that collected actual samples of plastic debris in small areas of the lakes and found that their results were a decent match at most of the sample sites. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 декабря 2016, 19:21

The Great Lakes Have Become A Dumping Ground For Millions Of Pounds Of Plastic

About 21.8 million pounds of plastic flow into the Great Lakes each year, new research from the Rochester Institute of Technology shows. Lead author Matthew Hoffman, assistant professor of mathematical sciences, calculated the estimate in Inventory and Transport of Plastic Debris in the Laurentian Great Lakes paper, which the Marine Pollution Bulletin journal published online this month. It’s the first attempt to determine the total amount of plastic waste entering the world’s largest freshwater system, he said. Over half of the plastic debris, or 5,300 metric tons, has ended up in Lake Michigan yearly, study estimates found. That’s equivalent to 100 Olympic-sized pools full of plastic bottles, the researchers said. They calculated the amount of plastic flowing into the lakes using population totals along the shores of each of the five lakes and existing estimates for the amount of plastic waste individuals produce and how much of that ends up reaching water. The formula is based on one that researchers used last year in a study that estimated about 8 million tons of plastic enter the oceans annually. Though their totals make sense compared to the ocean numbers, the quantity is still “startling,” Hoffman said. “The size, I think, is the first thing that jumped out at me,” he told The Huffington Post. Using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Great Lakes Coastal Forecast System the research team simulated the movement of plastic particles entering the lakes between 2009 and 2014 to see where currents carried them. A video of their data simulation shows plastic particles entering and moving through Lake Erie in 2009: Hoffman originally wondered if they’d find any indication that debris collects in specific areas of the Great Lakes, similar to the “garbage patches” formed in the Pacific Ocean by current and wind movement. Instead, they found that while particles do occasionally accumulate, sustained wind events periodically pushed them to shore. The difference might actually make it easier for people to care about the environmental effects of plastic pollution, Hoffman suggested. “Abstractly, this feels awful, but it’s also far away from us,” he said about garbage collecting in the middle of the ocean. “In the Great Lakes, it’s coming back on the shores and we’re going to encounter it a lot more as humans.” Plastic makes up more than 80 percent of the garbage that litters Great Lakes beaches, another study found last year. Hoffman said plastic’s impact on the environment, animals and humans is “still one of the big unknowns.”  “We hope that this is a good first step in spurring other studies, other interest in the Great Lakes,” Hoffman said. Environmentalists and researchers have, in recent years, called attention to the problem of microplastics getting into lakes, rivers and the oceans. Tiny particles of plastic, called microbeads, have been used in products like exfoliating face wash and aren’t always effectively captured by waste treatment plants. A 2013 study that counted microplastics in several sample areas of the Great Lakes found an average of 43,000 particles per square kilometer. Companies including Unilever pledged to phase out microbeads, several Great Lakes states considered bans and President Barack Obama signed legislationlast year that will prohibit microbeads in rinse-off cosmetics. However, a loophole allows companies to continue using microbeads in other products, from detergents to sandblasting materials. It also didn’t apply to other types of plastic debris, like microfibers ― one source of those is fleece clothing, which sheds tiny plastic fibers when you wash it. “The microbeads were definitely an issue, but that’s not all the plastic that’s getting in” the Great Lakes, Hoffman said. “That hasn’t been solved. … With the microbead ban, there’s a tendency to feel like, we did something. Which is great, but there’s still more that needs to be done.” Hoffman acknowledges that their calculations are only estimates. Their model doesn’t account for a number of variables that could affect how plastic travels in the lakes, including particles’ size and type, their vertical movement and specific weather events. However, they compared its outputs to earlier research that collected actual samples of plastic debris in small areas of the lakes and found that their results were a decent match at most of the sample sites. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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23 декабря 2016, 01:07

Why It Pays To Find Your Company's Global Purpose

Co-authored by Paula Miquelis, Senior Project Manager, & Laura Allen, Founder, at Gone Adventurin. Every company's supply chain ends with a human being's life. And the people who need a company's services, use its products, or are on its payroll rely on one planet. And here is something most can agree on: Our planet is suffering. The list of societal and environmental problems seems endless. Hunger, poverty, inequality, war, water scarcity, climate change, and so on. Within these wicked problems may lie a company's most compelling and profitable driver: A global purpose to save the world. The world's companies will play a vital role in solving these complex human problems. Businesses have the collective ability to reach billions of people and exert tremendous spending power. This power positions them to be key players in restoring our planet. Embracing this higher purpose is not only good for the planet, it may be an essential business strategy for the modern organization. President & CEO of Novo Nordisk, Lars Rebien Sørensen, warns, "In the long term, social and environmental issues become financial issues." Embracing a long-view and awakening a compelling global purpose now may sustain the life of the business itself. What is purpose? Purpose has become the latest business buzzword. So it is important to be clear on its enduring and powerful definition. Quite simply, purpose is "...the reason for which something exists." Your company's purpose is not a mission statement, a tactic, or a goal. It is quite literally a company's guiding reason for existence on the planet. The company's job is to justify that reason every day. A reason for existence doesn't fade with time or change with market conditions. Purpose taps into people's psychological desire to make the world better and to do good. Purpose permeates every behavior and thought in a company. And a good purpose is a reason worth committing to that inspires service to the greater good. A company's purpose has to be more important than the company itself. And when companies embrace a guiding global purpose that seeks to better the world beyond their financial returns, success follows. Why? Because a global purpose drives the people who drive the profit. Why a Global Purpose Drives Profit Having a global purpose is good business. In Built to Last, Jim Collins found that companies with a higher purpose outperform the market by an average of six-to-one. Those companies also experienced growth rates three times that of their competitors. The economic power of a higher purpose can be found when studying a company like Unilever. Unilever's brands with a clear and communicated societal purpose - like Comfort, Dove, and Ben & Jerry's - are growing faster than the rest of the portfolio. Unilever CEO Paul Polman said, "Our sustainable living brands are growing 30% faster than the rest of our business and delivered nearly half our total growth in 2015, our latest figures show." Former Procter & Gamble Marketing Director Jim Stengel found similar results in his study on the relationship between a higher purpose and market growth. Stengel's research demonstrated that purpose-driven brands perform ten times better than others in similar categories and grow at significantly faster rates than the overall market. Why all this profit and growth? Ultimately it comes down to human psychology. A Global Purpose Drives The People Who Drive Your Business From a social science perspective, the effect of purpose on both employees and customers is not surprising. When people see their work as serving the greater good they are more likely to be engaged, committed, and productive. A sense of global purpose has been found to be one of the most powerful psychological motivators for both employees and customers. Ultimately, people want to believe in something that's bigger than themselves. People and organizations who believe in and prove their reason for existence inspire more loyal people to join their movements and invest in their products. In numerous studies, like those published by the firm Imperative, a sense of purpose is ranked as the most significant factor in job satisfaction and quadruples the likelihood of being engaged at work. And by 2025 nearly 70% of consumers and employees will identify with the Millennial generation. A recent survey by Deloitte found that an overwhelming 75% of Millennials indicated that they were more likely to do business with or work for a company that exists to better society. And customers want to be a part of changing the world, too. People are psychologically drawn to products and services that align with their beliefs about the way the world should and can be. Simon Sinek, in his 2009 viral Ted Talk implored, "People don't buy what you do. They buy why you do it." He is proving to be right. Case Study: A Luxury Fragrance Company That Empowers Farmers In Emerging Countries Serge Majoullier, Perfumer and David Morenon, Deputy Purchasing Manager in Nepal. Image Credit: Gone Adventurin & MANE MANE Flavor and Fragrance Manufacturer offers an inspiring case of how a global purpose can transform a business. MANE is one of the world's leading flavors and fragrances companies and produces flavors, fragrances, and ingredients for beverages, biscuits, confectionery, dairy products, and savory food applications. What does it mean for a flavor and fragrances manufacturer to drive profit through a global purpose? For MANE it means creating sustainable sourcing in its markets in emerging countries. MANE realized that 70% of worldwide raw materials are produced by smallholder farmers, yet millions of those farmers remain impoverished. Poverty among smallholder farmers is one of the most pressing social issues in developing countries and when these farmers are not empowered, they cannot grow enough high quality raw materials. Additionally, MANE's clients have started to put pressure on the company to create transparent value chains. Poverty among smallholder farmers constitutes one of the world's most pressing social issues. Now it's at the core of MANE's purpose too. In 2015, MANE created sustainable sourcing initiatives in Nepal to develop a market of a new species of pepper called Timur. The challenge was to partner with grassroots and local NGOs to empower farmers on the ground through workshops and trainings to grow better quality raw materials. The ultimate goal was to help remote pepper farmers secure a more sustainable living. Beyond simply having a business goal, MANE decided to immerse its employees in this global purpose and use storytelling to involve its stakeholders in this global purpose. The results were transformational. Not only did the project create an entire market for the Timur product and help the economy of Nepal to grow, MANE won the first communications price at the World Perfumery Congress garnering hundreds of thousands dollars worth of free public relations promotion. Watch MANE's inspiring sustainable sourcing initiatives here. MANE proves that filling a societal need and profit are not mutually exclusive. In fact, purpose can drive profit. 3 Ways to Discover and Enact Your Company's Global Purpose In our fast-paced and results-oriented marketplace, many company leaders simply don't think they have the time or resources to invest in purpose - or they don't conceptualize their industry as particularly "world-saving." But every company does and can have a compelling global reason for existence. The key for leaders is to begin discovering this purpose, strategizing around it, and then telling the story to its stakeholders. Here are three powerful ways to start now: 1. Identify your company's problem. What is the world problem that your company exists to solve? This problem can become your purpose. A great place to start is by reading the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) report and and facilitating discussion in your organization around the 17 identified key topics below. Not only do the SDGs provide a great framework for finding a compelling global purpose but they are also a great and credible way to communicate about it. They aim to inspire business leaders to think deeper into the many issues that plague the world; from hunger to gender inequality. "The seventeen Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are our shared vision of humanity and a social contract between the world's leaders and the people. They are a to-do list for people and planet, and a blueprint for success." said Ban Ki-moon, the former UN Secretary-General. Image Credit: United Nations 2. Authentically communicate your global purpose. Human beings rely on stories to make sense of our world and so do your customers and employees. Telling the story of how your company helps to deliver your global purpose can generate stakeholders' emotional commitment to your company and brand. Below are a few tips to start: Show the people who make your products and where they make them Take stakeholders and employees on journeys to see the origins of your materials Have customers themselves tell stories about how your company is changing the world Consistently strategize: Which of our products or services can make the world a better place; and how is that a business opportunity? The Lipton tea brand offers a powerful example of engaging stakeholders in their purpose. Lipton decided to intentionally strategize about what they wanted their consumers thinking about when they drank their morning tea. Lipton wanted them to feel that their tea was more than tea - it was serving the world. By telling the story of the tea farmers working in beautiful sustainable plantations and connecting them to the partnership of Lipton with one of the most impactful forest NGOs, Rainforest Alliance, Lipton gives consumers a world-changing purpose. Learn more about Lipton's global purpose here. 3. Start seeing social and environmental issues as business opportunities. Just as the MANE company example shows us, global needs can also be business opportunities. For example, let's imagine you are a leader making equipment for optometrists and surgeons, as well as contact lenses. Your bigger purpose is to eradicate avoidable blindness because you know there are opportunities. Four billion people in the world need glasses but only 2.5 billion of people have glasses, so you can tap into a massive market of 1.5 billion people Another example comes from the food industry and answers the question: What is the future of food? For Caleb Harper, director of the Open Agriculture Initiative at (MIT), the future of food is not a disaster as many pundits would have us believe, it's a business opportunity - especially for tech companies. Caleb wants to change the food system by connecting growers with technology. Caleb said, "With the right tech, urban agriculture could turn basements, warehouses, walls and skyscrapers into farms." Re-framing critical issues or "problems" as opportunities can be powerful. Your company's purpose is already out there in the world. Identifying it and building your company around it pays. What is your cause? Why does your company exist? How can tackling social and environmental issues grow your business - and save the world? Gone Adventurin is a social enterprise - based in Singapore and operating across Asia - that helps companies to grow through social and environmental impact. The organisation has been tackling different issues from waste recycling for consumer goods companies to sustainable supply chain or water scarcity. The team has been working with many different companies such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble or Danone. Zach Mercurio is a consultant, speaker, and educator who builds purposeful organizations and empowers purposeful people to better our world. Learn more here. Featured Image Credit: Gone Adventurin -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

22 декабря 2016, 14:28

На Гайдаровском форуме выступят представители Unilever и Johnson&Johnson

В экспертных дискуссиях Гайдаровского форума — 2017 в РАНХиГС примут участие руководители Unilever, The Coca-Cola Company, EY и Johnson & amp;Johnson, сообщили "Газете.Ru" в пресс-службе РАНХиГС. Как сообщается, на ...