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United Technologies
13 февраля, 18:17

Оптимизация линейки торговых инструментов

Сообщаем вам, что в связи с низкой ликвидностью и слабым интересом со стороны клиентов, будет прекращена торговля по ряду инструментов.Список инструментов: 3M CO. (MMM)CHEVRON CORP. (CVX)CHINA UNICOM LTD. (CHU)EPAM SYSTEMS INC. (EPAM)HSBC HOLDINGS (HBC)MERCK & CO. INC. (MRK)MOBILE TELESYSTEMS  (MBT)PEPSICO INC. (PEP)UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP. (UTX)VIMPELCOM LTD. (VIP)WAL-MART STORES (WMT) C 17 февраля 2017 года открытие новых позиций по данным инструментам будет запрещено, а 10 марта все имеющиеся позиции будут принудительно закрыты по последним котировкам. Пожалуйста, учитывайте данные изменения в своей торговле.

13 февраля, 18:16

Оптимизация линейки торговых инструментов

Сообщаем вам, что в связи с низкой ликвидностью и слабым интересом со стороны клиентов, будет прекращена торговля по ряду инструментов. Список инструментов: 3M CO. (MMM)CHEVRON CORP. (CVX)CHINA UNICOM LTD. (CHU)EPAM SYSTEMS INC. (EPAM)HSBC HOLDINGS (HBC)MERCK & CO. INC. (MRK)MOBILE TELESYSTEMS  (MBT)PEPSICO INC. (PEP)UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP. (UTX)VIMPELCOM LTD. (VIP)WAL-MART STORES (WMT) C 17 февраля 2017 года открытие новых позиций по данным инструментам будет запрещено, а 10 марта все имеющиеся позиции будут принудительно закрыты по последним котировкам. Пожалуйста, учитывайте данные изменения в своей торговле.

13 февраля, 15:32

Off-Shorers Should Shut Up

Whirlpool, the big appliance manufacturer, stressed in recent years its preference to make it in America. In 2013, it actually moved dishwasher manufacturing jobs back to the United States from Mexico. The next year, it announced a $40 million investment in its Greenville, Ohio KitchenAid plant, adding 400 jobs. Last year, Whirlpool CEO Jeff Fettig said the company would spend another $40 million to expand its Findlay, Ohio dishwasher plant, adding 50 jobs and raising to $1 billion its investment in U.S. manufacturing since 2010. Last week, Intel announced it would spend $7 billion to upgrade an Arizona facility and employ 3,000 people to fabricate advanced computer wafers – meaning its CEO Brian Krzanich chose the United States over Ireland, Israel and China where Intel already produces silicon wafers. So it makes sense that Fettig and Krzanich serve on President Donald Trump’s new Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The initiative is supposed to help the president promote U.S. job and manufacturing growth. Curiously, though, named to that same 28-member committee are at least seven CEOs who have recently – and sometimes infamously – offshored manufacturing and jobs. They include Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, the corporation that is shipping Indiana jobs from its Carrier subsidiary to Mexico. The performance of the manufacturing council is crucial to large swaths of workers who voted for President Trump based on his promises to stop unfair trade and resurrect American manufacturing. In his inauguration speech, the president told those voters that he would enact “America first” policies. It is no “America first” policy to send jobs from two profitable Carrier plants in Indiana to Mexico for the sole purpose of making extra bucks. That kind of offshoring exhibits a greed first mindset. The CEOs who have pursued that philosophy should shut up and take advice from the committee’s American job creators. The U.S. job generators on the committee include the likes of Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla. His cars were rated the most American-made electrics for content and assembly for the second year in a row in 2016. The council also includes Mario Longhi, the CEO of U.S. Steel, and Klaus Kleinfeld, who last fall became CEO of Arconic, but who for eight years before that was CEO of Alcoa, the corporation that split to create Alcoa and Arconic. U.S. Steel and Alcoa have suffered from unfair trade, so Longhi and Kleinfeld have a strong interest in policies that support American manufacturing. But, oddly, placed on the committee was recently retired Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman, who announced two years ago that the corporation would move 230 jobs making gear and engine oil pumps and valves from its plant in Joliet, Ill., to a factory in Monterrey, Mexico. Another advisor is Nucor CEO John Ferriola, who is building a new mill in Mexico instead of the United States. The joint venture with a Japanese company will make steel for the auto industry. Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas is on the committee too. This month, Dana is closing a truck parts manufacturing plant in Kentucky, shifting the work out of the country and killing 180 good, family-supporting American jobs. In 2007, it closed plants in Syracuse, Ind., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., and shipped the auto parts manufacturing work to Mexico. More than 250 American workers lost their jobs. This is what happens when so many corporations transport factories to Mexico. Then the supply chain – the manufacturing of components like engines and auto parts and steel – moves to Mexico too. For example, while Ford announced in January that it would invest $700 million and create 700 new jobs in Michigan, the auto company still intends to transfer production of its small car, the Focus, from the United States to Mexico. And yet, Ford CEO Mark Fields was chosen for the American manufacturing initiative. The United States lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect. Robots didn’t do it. Trade deficits did. Corporations like Carrier and Rexnord that offshore American factories then ship the manufactured products back to the United States kill good American jobs while ballooning the trade deficit. Those are the problems that workers who voted for Donald Trump wanted him to solve. They want those factories and those jobs back. That, however, is the opposite of the longstanding philosophy of General Electric. Its former CEO Jack Welch famously said, “Ideally, you’d have every plant you own on a barge to move with currencies and changes in the economy.” In other words, when a country like China manipulates the value of its currency and suppresses its workers’ wages, GE would uproot production from Peoria and float it to Beijing – allegiance to the United States be damned. That’s exactly what General Electric does under its current CEO Jeff Immelt. The show 60 Minutes described GE this way in 2009: “No company has gone global more aggressively than General Electric, the conglomerate that makes everything from refrigerators to MRI machines to jet engines.” Between 2004 and 2014, the number of GE employees in the United States declined by nearly 18 percent, from 165,000 to 136,000, while the number abroad rose 19 percent, from 142,000 to 169,000. Immelt was GE chairman that entire time. So it’s confounding that he is a member of an initiative that’s supposed to prioritize American jobs. Under Immelt’s leadership, not only does GE move factories, it uses offshoring as a threat when lawmakers don’t cave to its demands. In September of 2015, two months after Congress declined to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, Immelt announced that GE, which had been among the largest benefactors of the bank, would move 500 U.S. jobs overseas. It was Republicans in Congress who had called the bank corporate welfare and refused to renew its charter. The bank provides financing for transactions that commercial lenders decline as too risky. But within six weeks of GE’s threats, Congress restored the bank, with a majority of Republicans suddenly on board. Frankly, it’s unpatriotic CEOs like Immelt and Hayes who should be stuck on a barge and shipped offshore. An American Manufacturing Jobs Initiative needs more CEOs who actually focus on making it in America. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

13 февраля, 15:32

Off-Shorers Should Shut Up

Whirlpool, the big appliance manufacturer, stressed in recent years its preference to make it in America. In 2013, it actually moved dishwasher manufacturing jobs back to the United States from Mexico. The next year, it announced a $40 million investment in its Greenville, Ohio KitchenAid plant, adding 400 jobs. Last year, Whirlpool CEO Jeff Fettig said the company would spend another $40 million to expand its Findlay, Ohio dishwasher plant, adding 50 jobs and raising to $1 billion its investment in U.S. manufacturing since 2010. Last week, Intel announced it would spend $7 billion to upgrade an Arizona facility and employ 3,000 people to fabricate advanced computer wafers – meaning its CEO Brian Krzanich chose the United States over Ireland, Israel and China where Intel already produces silicon wafers. So it makes sense that Fettig and Krzanich serve on President Donald Trump’s new Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The initiative is supposed to help the president promote U.S. job and manufacturing growth. Curiously, though, named to that same 28-member committee are at least seven CEOs who have recently – and sometimes infamously – offshored manufacturing and jobs. They include Greg Hayes, CEO of United Technologies, the corporation that is shipping Indiana jobs from its Carrier subsidiary to Mexico. The performance of the manufacturing council is crucial to large swaths of workers who voted for President Trump based on his promises to stop unfair trade and resurrect American manufacturing. In his inauguration speech, the president told those voters that he would enact “America first” policies. It is no “America first” policy to send jobs from two profitable Carrier plants in Indiana to Mexico for the sole purpose of making extra bucks. That kind of offshoring exhibits a greed first mindset. The CEOs who have pursued that philosophy should shut up and take advice from the committee’s American job creators. The U.S. job generators on the committee include the likes of Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla. His cars were rated the most American-made electrics for content and assembly for the second year in a row in 2016. The council also includes Mario Longhi, the CEO of U.S. Steel, and Klaus Kleinfeld, who last fall became CEO of Arconic, but who for eight years before that was CEO of Alcoa, the corporation that split to create Alcoa and Arconic. U.S. Steel and Alcoa have suffered from unfair trade, so Longhi and Kleinfeld have a strong interest in policies that support American manufacturing. But, oddly, placed on the committee was recently retired Caterpillar CEO Doug Oberhelman, who announced two years ago that the corporation would move 230 jobs making gear and engine oil pumps and valves from its plant in Joliet, Ill., to a factory in Monterrey, Mexico. Another advisor is Nucor CEO John Ferriola, who is building a new mill in Mexico instead of the United States. The joint venture with a Japanese company will make steel for the auto industry. Dana CEO Jim Kamsickas is on the committee too. This month, Dana is closing a truck parts manufacturing plant in Kentucky, shifting the work out of the country and killing 180 good, family-supporting American jobs. In 2007, it closed plants in Syracuse, Ind., and Cape Girardeau, Mo., and shipped the auto parts manufacturing work to Mexico. More than 250 American workers lost their jobs. This is what happens when so many corporations transport factories to Mexico. Then the supply chain – the manufacturing of components like engines and auto parts and steel – moves to Mexico too. For example, while Ford announced in January that it would invest $700 million and create 700 new jobs in Michigan, the auto company still intends to transfer production of its small car, the Focus, from the United States to Mexico. And yet, Ford CEO Mark Fields was chosen for the American manufacturing initiative. The United States lost 5 million manufacturing jobs since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) took effect. Robots didn’t do it. Trade deficits did. Corporations like Carrier and Rexnord that offshore American factories then ship the manufactured products back to the United States kill good American jobs while ballooning the trade deficit. Those are the problems that workers who voted for Donald Trump wanted him to solve. They want those factories and those jobs back. That, however, is the opposite of the longstanding philosophy of General Electric. Its former CEO Jack Welch famously said, “Ideally, you’d have every plant you own on a barge to move with currencies and changes in the economy.” In other words, when a country like China manipulates the value of its currency and suppresses its workers’ wages, GE would uproot production from Peoria and float it to Beijing – allegiance to the United States be damned. That’s exactly what General Electric does under its current CEO Jeff Immelt. The show 60 Minutes described GE this way in 2009: “No company has gone global more aggressively than General Electric, the conglomerate that makes everything from refrigerators to MRI machines to jet engines.” Between 2004 and 2014, the number of GE employees in the United States declined by nearly 18 percent, from 165,000 to 136,000, while the number abroad rose 19 percent, from 142,000 to 169,000. Immelt was GE chairman that entire time. So it’s confounding that he is a member of an initiative that’s supposed to prioritize American jobs. Under Immelt’s leadership, not only does GE move factories, it uses offshoring as a threat when lawmakers don’t cave to its demands. In September of 2015, two months after Congress declined to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, Immelt announced that GE, which had been among the largest benefactors of the bank, would move 500 U.S. jobs overseas. It was Republicans in Congress who had called the bank corporate welfare and refused to renew its charter. The bank provides financing for transactions that commercial lenders decline as too risky. But within six weeks of GE’s threats, Congress restored the bank, with a majority of Republicans suddenly on board. Frankly, it’s unpatriotic CEOs like Immelt and Hayes who should be stuck on a barge and shipped offshore. An American Manufacturing Jobs Initiative needs more CEOs who actually focus on making it in America. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

11 февраля, 01:16

Defense Stock Roundup: Earnings Beat at HRS, Miss at TGI; TXT, LMT & RTN Win Big Deals

In terms of growth, the Aerospace and Defense sector secured the second position with 88.9% beating earnings estimates and 44.4% surpassing the revenue mark.

10 февраля, 06:16

Sounds Like Donald Trump's A Fan Of This Dem Jobs Bill

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― President Donald Trump liked the sound of a Democratic bill that would punish companies for offshoring jobs, according to a senator who met with the president at the White House on Thursday.  The proposal from three Rust Belt Democrats would put companies at a disadvantage in bids for federal contacts if they’ve laid off workers and shifted production overseas. Bill co-sponsor Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) pitched it to Trump at a meeting the president held with several senators.  “He said, ‘I get it, I’m 100 percent for this type of legislation and let’s see if we can get going on it,’” Donnelly told The Huffington Post.  Of course, Trump has been known to say things he doesn’t really mean. And White House spokespeople declined to comment on Donnelly’s description of his conversation with the president. But if a Republican president supported the proposal, it would be significant. For years, Democrats have introduced similar bills designed partly to stop companies from offshoring jobs ― and especially to shame Republicans who vote no. “It’s always been a message bill in the past,” said Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing, an advocacy group funded by steel companies and the United Steelworkers union.  “It’s also fair to say that the playing field may have shifted a little bit,” Paul said. “You have a president who at least says he objects to these practices.”  During the campaign, Trump objected strongly to firms laying off workers and building plants in other countries. He frequently bashed Carrier, an air-conditioner manufacturer that had planned to shutter an Indiana factory and shift production to Mexico. After he won the election last November, Trump successfully bullied the company into changing its plans.  Though Carrier received modest tax breaks for keeping the plant open, a bigger factor may have been that its parent company, United Technologies, is a big government contractor that didn’t want to risk angering the president. The firm’s CEO partly explained the deal by saying “about 10 percent off our revenue comes from the U.S. government.” Donnelly’s legislation, co-sponsored with Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), would essentially subject every government contractor to the same kind of pressure Carrier got. Firms that have laid off large numbers of workers and moved production abroad would be put on a public list and have points subtracted from their bids for federal contracts. It’s not clear how many jobs such a policy might save, but there’s big money involved. The Department of Defense spends nearly $300 billion a year on contracts.  At Thursday’s meeting, Donnelly said he pointed out to the president that Friday will be the anniversary of Carrier executives telling workers they would all be fired and their jobs shipped to Mexico ― a moment captured on viral video. Donnelly has been advocating on behalf of other Indiana workers losing their jobs to offshoring, including workers at a Rexnord Corp. plant a mile from the Carrier factory.  “I said, ‘Look, I need your help on this,’” Donnelly said. “’I know you’ve talked about this repeatedly and you’ve worked on this issue, and I know it’s important to you, and together we want to keep these jobs in the United States.’ And he said, ‘Absolutely.’” Trump invited several Republican and Democratic senators to the White House Thursday to sell them on Neil Gorsuch, Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court.   function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_2'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 февраля, 06:16

Sounds Like Donald Trump's A Fan Of This Dem Jobs Bill

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); WASHINGTON ― President Donald Trump liked the sound of a Democratic bill that would punish companies for offshoring jobs, according to a senator who met with the president at the White House on Thursday.  The proposal from three Rust Belt Democrats would put companies at a disadvantage in bids for federal contacts if they’ve laid off workers and shifted production overseas. Bill co-sponsor Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) pitched it to Trump at a meeting the president held with several senators.  “He said, ‘I get it, I’m 100 percent for this type of legislation and let’s see if we can get going on it,’” Donnelly told The Huffington Post.  Of course, Trump has been known to say things he doesn’t really mean. And White House spokespeople declined to comment on Donnelly’s description of his conversation with the president. But if a Republican president supported the proposal, it would be significant. For years, Democrats have introduced similar bills designed partly to stop companies from offshoring jobs ― and especially to shame Republicans who vote no. “It’s always been a message bill in the past,” said Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing, an advocacy group funded by steel companies and the United Steelworkers union.  “It’s also fair to say that the playing field may have shifted a little bit,” Paul said. “You have a president who at least says he objects to these practices.”  During the campaign, Trump objected strongly to firms laying off workers and building plants in other countries. He frequently bashed Carrier, an air-conditioner manufacturer that had planned to shutter an Indiana factory and shift production to Mexico. After he won the election last November, Trump successfully bullied the company into changing its plans.  Though Carrier received modest tax breaks for keeping the plant open, a bigger factor may have been that its parent company, United Technologies, is a big government contractor that didn’t want to risk angering the president. The firm’s CEO partly explained the deal by saying “about 10 percent off our revenue comes from the U.S. government.” Donnelly’s legislation, co-sponsored with Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), would essentially subject every government contractor to the same kind of pressure Carrier got. Firms that have laid off large numbers of workers and moved production abroad would be put on a public list and have points subtracted from their bids for federal contracts. It’s not clear how many jobs such a policy might save, but there’s big money involved. The Department of Defense spends nearly $300 billion a year on contracts.  At Thursday’s meeting, Donnelly said he pointed out to the president that Friday will be the anniversary of Carrier executives telling workers they would all be fired and their jobs shipped to Mexico ― a moment captured on viral video. Donnelly has been advocating on behalf of other Indiana workers losing their jobs to offshoring, including workers at a Rexnord Corp. plant a mile from the Carrier factory.  “I said, ‘Look, I need your help on this,’” Donnelly said. “’I know you’ve talked about this repeatedly and you’ve worked on this issue, and I know it’s important to you, and together we want to keep these jobs in the United States.’ And he said, ‘Absolutely.’” Trump invited several Republican and Democratic senators to the White House Thursday to sell them on Neil Gorsuch, Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court.   function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_2'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

06 февраля, 23:41

Основные фондовые индексы США в последний час торгов находятся ниже нулевой отметки:

Компоненты индекса DOW преимущественно в минусе (19 из 30). Больше остальных упали акции Verizon Communications Inc. (VZ, -1.26%). Лидером роста являются акции United Technologies Corporation (UTX, +1.01%). Все индексы S&P в минусе. Больше всего упал сектор конгломератов (-1.7%).Источник: FxTeam

06 февраля, 19:48

Wall Street. Основные фондовые индексы США около нуля

Основные фондовые индексы США немного около нулевой отметки в понедельник на фоне отсутствия основных катализаторов, в том числе экономических данных, а также неопределенности из-за политики президента США Дональда Трампа. Рынки резко выросли после победы на выборах Трампа в ноябре, на надежде, что его планы, включая более простые правила для бизнеса, высокие расходы на инфраструктуру и снижение налогов будет стимулировать экономику. Тем не менее, инвесторы настороженно отнеслись к изоляционистской политике Трампа. Инвесторы также продолжают оценивать пятничный отчет по рынку труда, который оказался неоднозначным и несколько омрачил ожидания повышения процентных ставок ФРС. Напомним, Министерство труда сообщило о росте уровня безработицы и замедлении темпов повышения средней почасовой оплаты труда. Судя по рынку фьючерсов, инвесторы ожидают повышения процентных ставок ФРС на мартовском заседании с вероятностью 13% против 18% в минувший четверг. Кроме того, как показал сегодня отчет, представленный Conference Board, индекс тенденций занятости США, представляющий из себя совокупность индикаторов рынка труда, улучшился по итогам января, вслед за снижением в предыдущем месяце. Согласно данным, январский индекс тенденций занятости увеличился до 130,04 пункта по сравнению с 129,73 пункта в декабре (пересмотрено с 129,62 пункта). В годовом выражении индекс вырос на 2,4%. Компоненты индекса DOW преимущественно в минусе (18 из 30). Больше остальных упали акции Johnson & Johnson (JNJ, -0.83%). Лидером роста являются акции United Technologies Corporation (UTX, +1.01%). Все индексы S&P в минусе. Больше всего упал сектор конгломератов (-1.8%). На текущий момент: Dow 20004.00 +18.00 +0.09% S&P 500 2290.25 -0.75 -0.03% Nasdaq 100 5161.50 +6.50 +0.13% Oil 53.34 -0.49 -0.91% Gold 1229.90 +9.10 +0.75% U.S. 10yr 2.44 -0.06 Информационно-аналитический отдел TeleTradeИсточник: FxTeam

06 февраля, 16:10

Lockheed Gets DoD Deal for F-35 at Historically Low Prices

Lockheed Martin Corp. (LMT) has won a contract, worth $8.5 billion, from the Department of Defense ("DoD") for the production of 90 F-35 fighters.

01 февраля, 23:05

The Best Business Reads of January

The month’s most interesting stories about money and economics from around the web

31 января, 18:31

Will Lockheed Martin Act on Trump's F-35 Cost Cut Plans?

Trump informed reporters that his administration has slashed the cost of 90 F-35 jets of Lockheed Martin (LMT) out of the 3,000 planes that have been ordered by the U.S. government

31 января, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Ford and United Technologies

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Microsoft, Ford and United Technologies

30 января, 20:51

Q4 Earnings Scorecard and Analyst Reports for Ford, Microsoft & United Technologies

Q4 Earnings Scorecard and Analyst Reports for Ford, Microsoft & United Technologies

30 января, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Rockwell Collins, L3 Technologies, Northrop Grumman, United Technologies and Lockheed Martin

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Rockwell Collins, L3 Technologies, Northrop Grumman, United Technologies and Lockheed Martin

28 января, 01:06

Dow 30 Stock Roundup: Boeing, Caterpillar, Johnson & Johnson, DuPont Beat on Earnings

The Dow gained over the week following continuing optimism over Trump's first actions as President and encouraging earnings results.

28 января, 00:09

Defense Stock Roundup: Q4 Earnings Beat at NOC, BA, LLL, COL, UTX, LMT, Miss at TXT

Impressively, 85.7% of the aerospace and defense companies have posted a beat this quarter (as of Jan 26, 2017).

27 января, 17:43

President Trump Announces Manufacturing Jobs Initiative

(Washington, DC) — President Trump announced today that as part of his overall job creation agenda he will launch a Manufacturing Jobs Initiative. The President will be meeting with some of the world’s most successful and creative business leaders to share their experiences and gain their insights. President Trump plans to continually seek information and perspectives from a diverse range of business leaders, including those listed below and others, on how best to promote job growth and get Americans back to work again. The first series of meetings were organized by Andrew Liveris, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the Dow Chemical Company. The President has expressed his appreciation to Mr. Liveris for his ongoing efforts in this regard. Initial business leaders assisting with the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative include: Andrew Liveris, The Dow Chemical Company Bill Brown, Harris Corporation Michael Dell, Dell Technologies John Ferriola, Nucor Corporation Jeff Fettig, Whirlpool Corporation Mark Fields, Ford Motor Company Ken Frazier, Merck & Co., Inc. Alex Gorsky, Johnson & Johnson Greg Hayes, United Technologies Corp. Marilynn Hewson, Lockheed Martin Corporation Jeff Immelt, General Electric Jim Kamsickas, Dana Inc. Klaus Kleinfeld, Arconic Brian Krzanich, Intel Corporation Rich Kyle, The Timken Company Thea Lee, AFL-CIO Mario Longhi, U.S. Steel Denise Morrison, Campbell Soup Company Dennis Muilenburg, Boeing Elon Musk, Tesla Doug Oberhelman, Caterpillar Scott Paul, Alliance for American Manufacturing Kevin Plank, Under Armour Michael Polk, Newell Brands Mark Sutton, International Paper Inge Thulin, 3M Richard Tumka, AFL-CIO Wendell Weeks, Corning          The attendees may or may not change from session to session, but the specific agenda subjects will likely change because of the importance of this issue to the American economy and its workers. No consensus advice or recommendations resulting from group deliberations or interaction is expected or will be solicited.

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26 января, 17:20

Honeywell Software to Cut Operating Costs of Japan Airlines

Japan Airlines Co., Ltd., the flag carrier airline of Japan, has recently adopted the GoDirect Fuel Efficiency software of industrial goods manufacturer Honeywell International Inc. (HON) to reduce its operating costs.