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Выбор редакции
18 января, 17:26

BRIEF-Uni-Pixel- GIS shall make $6 mln cash investment within a month of execution of definitive agreement to General Interface Solution

* Uni-Pixel Inc- GIS shall make a $6 million cash investment within a month of execution of definitive agreement to general interface solution limited

Выбор редакции
18 января, 17:21

BRIEF-Uni-Pixel to enter strategic partnership with General Interface Solution Ltd

* Says to enter into a strategic partnership with general interface solution limited, a Taiwan-based subsidiary of Foxconn

18 января, 16:25

Uni-Pixel (UNXL) Catches Eye: Stock Adds 10.5% in Session

Uni-Pixel, Inc. (UNXL) moved big last session, as its shares jumped over 10% on the day.

Выбор редакции
10 января, 09:23

Honda выпустила самобалансирующие мотоциклы

Балансировать на мотоцикле на высоких скоростях легко, нужно лишь крепко держаться. А вот неспешная езда по крытой парковке, в пробках или полная остановка – это другое дело, и мотоциклисту потребуется некоторое мастерство, чтобы не упасть. Подобные манёвры особенно сложны на тяжелых мотоциклах типа крузер. Компания Honda для обретения лучшего баланса разработала технологию Riding Assist, позволяющую совладать с железным конём.

09 января, 23:43

After CES: Automakers Shift from Horsepower to Processing Power

Corbin Brown, Associate Director, Giant Spoon Judging from this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, mobility has supplanted that long-standing automaker race to get from zero to 60 in record time. Just days ahead of the Detroit Auto Show, major automakers revved into Vegas with a major change from the past 50 years and a clear signal about where their industry is headed: from the thrill of driving to the thrill of … riding. A New Era in Mobility “We’re a mobility company!” nearly every automaker screamed on the showroom floor. It’s quite the change from just two years ago, when companies such as Tesla, Toyota and Chevy drove into CES with flashy new electric vehicles or environmentally conscious concept cars in tow. Last year, brands including Mercedes, Faraday and Audi teased that they’d be more focused on autonomy. But this year, major automakers are increasingly transforming into true technology companies that are thinking about holistic mobility — even if that means prepping for a world in which car ownership declines. Here’s how: Car “Derivatives”: Hyundai and Honda, in particular, are focused on applying the technology and intellectual property they’ve built for vehicles to other forms of mobility. There’s Hyundai’s exoskeleton, which is comparable to Lockheed Martin’s mech-suit; Honda’s Uni-Cub, a motorized unicycle that looks sort of like a Segway with a seat; and Ford’s bike-sharing system. These were a few of the many examples. My favorite derivative? Nissan’s autonomous chair, because apparently the world needs such a device. Licensing Must-Have Software: Autonomy is on its way to ubiquity. Mercedes, Nissan, Hyundai, Faraday and other carmakers have all touted their unique autonomous technology. Toyota and Honda made waves with their Alexa-like artificial intelligence–driven assistants — a personification of vehicles that sense and respond to both your emotions and needs. It won’t be long, I suspect, before we see car companies that own the right kind of intellectual property being able to license their software to other manufacturers or inject the technology into derivative products. Services: Rather than just manufacturing vehicles for the likes of Uber and Lyft, several car companies, including Hyundai and Cadillac, revealed plans to “Uberize” their own fleets so that subscribers can summon, share or rent certain vehicles. Ford, perhaps the furthest along in this area, bought Chariot, a ride-sharing service in San Francisco that is already helping the company monetize its own fleet as a service. Mercedes’ new app, Mercedes Me, turns its vehicles into giant sensor-laden Fitbits — able to access and analyze your driving behavior, appointments, sleep quality, physical activity and stress levels, as well as traffic and weather information. The company essentially wants to act as the central operating system (OS) for your connected world combining data from, say, your Nest smart home hub, Apple Watch and Withings Aura sleep sensor, with data from your car. Car Companies Become to Uber What Airbus Is to American Airlines What do you get when you combine autonomy with networked fleets and Alexa-like AI assistants? A completely new driver behavior that changes the way we think about cars and ownership, not to mention transportation. In the not-so-distant future, what will happen to the concept of a “brand” as it relates to the auto industry? Think about the last car commercial you saw. Did it have hairpin turns and elicit a few goose bumps — with Fast and Furious–style drifts? Well, remember it, because it’s a relic of a dying era. When autonomy becomes a true commodity, we will no longer share the same visceral connection from hand to wheel, from foot to pedal. Indeed, when a consumer makes a choice about “brand” in the future, they’ll be thinking about a completely different set of considerations that are uniquely suited to riding — not driving. In this future, the brand decision will be made up of ride-sharing services, not auto manufacturers. The brand you’ll be considering might include Uber, Lyft, Chariot or one of the many new ride suppliers that are bound to pop up. And each service will have its own unique selling proposition — Lyft may be more kid-friendly, Uber may be the best for business and another vendor (Tinder?) might be the best for picking up a date. But even before we get there, when most cars on the road will be semi-autonomous, car buyers will be looking for what they can do in their car, not where it can take them. In the near future, values like accountability, service, comfort, interface compatibility, entertainment and predictive intelligence will supplant horsepower and turning radius. Forgot the Sharing Economy. Next Up: The Autonomy Economy Of all the products and technologies at CES, autonomy has the greatest potential to change life as we know it. As Andreessen Horowitz’s Benedict Evans points out, autonomy will have a drastic impact on the global economy — whether through oil production, population (see: fewer annual road deaths and fewer organ donations), city infrastructure, logistics, insurance and so on. Think about the way our world has changed since the iPhone launched nearly a decade ago now — and multiply that many times over. Yes, autonomy will give birth to entirely new economies that transform dining, shopping, entertainment and media, productivity, education and manufacturing. And after getting a peek into the future this past weekend, it’s clear that we’re in for a ride. Innovation marketing agency Giant Spoon joined forces with OZY Media this year at CES to produce multimedia content that examined how innovations will impact the future for consumers, advertisers, and marketers. The following piece is part of an ongoing series from OZY + Giant Spoon. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
09 января, 10:07

Honda выпустила самобалансирующие мотоциклы

Новая система Honda Riding Assist помогает мотоциклистам держать равновесие, а также позволяет железным коням передвигаться самостоятельно

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 января, 01:04

Без заголовка

  • 0

Having a waiting list of new clients for your products or services is a good problem. Who doesn't want to have it? But while anyone can jabber about how good it is, few businesses have had the fortune of seeing it happen to them and even fewer have the transparency to share what's worked for them with everyone else. Well, I found an inspiring entrepreneur who's done it consistently and who's willing to share what works with my readers - how awesome! Enter Sabri Suby, Head of Growth at online marketing agency, King Kong. Sabri Suby has gone from starting the business in his bedroom with $0 and and aiming to turnover more than $7 million in 2017. CREDIT: KINGKONG.COM.AU I interview him and we had a lively, enriching chat about his business and some good secrets of his success. Enjoy! Tell us about your background and how you started your business. I grew up in a small beach town, Byron Bay. My first serious job and exposure to sales was a cold-calling gig, where we would call businesses to buy their empty ink cartridges....and then we'd go on the sell them back once refilled. I struggled at first, however after 3 weeks I was the top salesperson and was making a great income at the ripe old age of seventeen. I lived in London and the US for some time before returning back to Australia. I enrolled in a Business Degree Majoring in Marketing. It was at uni where I started my first business over the summer break, it took off and I dropped out to manage the business growth. Since dropping out of university I've started, run and sold several multi-million dollar businesses. All of which, were centered around the digital space. I took a look at what other agencies were doing and all they seemed to talk about were impressions, click-through-rates and social reach. They all failed to talk in actual dollars and ROI. Many times I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back in the ridiculous $10,000's of thousands of dollar range for simple things like banner ads. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No wishy washy branding campaigns but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. What problem does King Kong solve and why is it important? We solve the biggest problem that exists for businesses "how do I get new customers". It's something we're immersed in every minute of every day. The number one reason businesses fail is "lack of capital" which in other words is lack of sales and revenue. Sales and marketing is 80% of the battle in business and we solve this problem. How did you come across this idea and what motivated you to start King Kong? Having started several businesses all centered around the digital space, Customer acquisition has always been my responsibility. Many times in my businesses I had gotten quotes for these types of digital marketing services and they all came back with ridiculous strategies with no focus on ROI. I saw a real gap in the market for an agency that would actually multiply a client's marketing spend into ROI. No 'wishy washy branding campaigns' but actual real revenue generation and customer acquisition. I think having this focus in our business is why we've grown so fast and have had to literally turn down clients and put them on a wait list in order to not compromise the quality of our work. How did you acquire your first customer and how long did that take? Cold calling. One day. How many hours a week do you work and could you tell us your schedule from start to finish? Work starts from the moment I open my eyes, until I close them at night. As entrepreneur I look at everything I do as work, as it all plays a vital role to who I am as a person, my energy levels and the outcomes and goals I'm striving for in my business. Most weeks I would work 100+ hours. I wake up at 5am and go the gym, where I do a mixture of cardio and weight training, followed an intense sauna session. This really gets me into a peak state to start my day. I arrive at the office by 7am and start my day with my important tasks first, this is definitely when I'm my most productive. 8:30am I'll stop for breakfast or a bulletproof coffee. At 9am I have a morning sales meeting. Followed by meetings with my team members of the different departments; Paid Social, Paid Search, Organic Search and client management. By 10:30am I'm looking at 'Top Of The Pyramid' activities that are the most impactful for my time: Customer acquisition, sales funnel optimisation, coming up with new offers, setting up and refining procedures and systems to manage the growth of the business. 12pm I'll stop for a quick 15-minute lunch before I get back into it. 2pm-4pm most days is spent recruiting for the next A-player to join our team. 4-5:30pm I'm usually assisting my sales team with anything they need help with. 5:30-7pm is spent replying to emails and assigning tasks to the team. 7-8:30pm is spent communicating with our team members in the northern hemisphere. I try to get into bed by 9:30pm so I get my 8 hours sleep before starting again at 5am. What are some hardships you had to overcome in the beginning and how did you overcome them? Managing growth and finding top talent to help service the wait list of new clients. List a few of your favorite books that you recommend others in your industry to read. The Ultimate Sales Machine by Chet Holmes, Purple Cow Seth Godin and The Go-Giver by Bob Burg. What are some mistakes you made and how did you fix them? Not having all service level agreements and contract legally airtight. Hired a lawyer. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.