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Vestas Wind Systems
22 июля, 10:21

Инвестиции в российскую ветроэнергетику достигнут 100 млрд рублей

Совокупный объём инвестиций, которые «Роснано» вложит в российскую ветроэнергетику совместно со своим партнёром Fortum (Финляндия), составит порядка 100 млрд рублей.

04 июля, 19:34

В рейтинге самых "умных" компаний оказались неожиданные лидеры

Журнал Technology Review, издаваемый Массачусетским технологическим институтом, опубликовал рейтинг самых "умных" компаний 2017 года. В него попали 50 фирм, которые "наилучшим образом сочетают инновационные технологии с эффективной бизнес-моделью". Со списком ознакомились Вести.Hi-tech.

14 июня, 20:58

U.S. Clean Energy Output Breaks Record, But Stocks Don't Follow

Wind and solar energy accounted for more than 10% of total electricity generation in the U.S. for the first time ever. Nevertheless, clean energy stocks do not seem to be reacting to the news today.

02 июня, 12:03

World's Biggest Wind-Turbine Maker Falls as Trump Drops Paris

Vestas Wind Systems A/S, the world’s biggest maker of wind turbines, dropped to its lowest in 1 1/2 months after U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to exit the Paris climate accord threw into doubt ...

05 мая, 17:59

Квартальная прибыль Vestas Wind превысила ожидания аналитиков

Датский производитель ветряных двигателей Vestas Wind Systems отчитался о квартальной прибыли, которая превысила средние ожидания аналитиков благодаря увеличению продаж в США, Германии и Китае. Так, чистая прибыль компании возросла с 35 млн евро годом ранее до 160 млн евро ($175,6 млн), хотя аналитики прогнозировали 123 млн евро. Выручка, в свою очередь, повысилась на 29% г/г и достигла 1,89 млрд евро, что также оказалось лучше ожиданий рынка в 1,83 млрд евро. Заметим, что Vestas Wind ожидает зафиксировать выручку в текущем году в размере 9,25-10,25 млрд евро, при этом прибыль до уплаты процентов, налогов и до учета некоторых статей может вырасти на 12-14% г/г.

05 мая, 13:02

Квартальная прибыль Vestas Wind превысила ожидания аналитиков

Датский производитель ветряных двигателей Vestas Wind Systems отчитался о квартальной прибыли, которая превысила средние ожидания аналитиков благодаря увеличению продаж в США, Германии и Китае. Так, чистая прибыль компании возросла с 35 млн евро годом ранее до 160 млн евро ($175,6 млн), хотя аналитики прогнозировали 123 млн евро. Выручка, в свою очередь, повысилась на 29% г/г и достигла 1,89 млрд евро, что также оказалось лучше ожиданий рынка в 1,83 млрд евро. Заметим, что Vestas Wind ожидает зафиксировать выручку в текущем году в размере 9,25-10,25 млрд евро, при этом прибыль до уплаты процентов, налогов и до учета некоторых статей может вырасти на 12-14% г/г.

18 апреля, 00:59

Will Trump Era Spell Trouble for Alternative Energy ETFs?

Despite political risks, there are several reasons to invest in alternative energy ETFs.

05 апреля, 18:41

Порошенко узнал от иностранцев об успехах реформ в Украине

Некоторые иностранные лидеры сказали Порошенко, что в течение последних 2,5 лет в реформировании Украины было сделано больше, чем за предыдущие 23 года.

04 января, 00:38

First Solar (FSLR): Are Better Times Ahead for the Stock?

The solar industry witnessed tough times in 2016, even hurting industry leaders like First Solar Inc. (FSLR).

12 декабря 2016, 17:01

Donald Trump's Science Fiction

President-elect Donald Trump has been twisting the facts in ways beyond what even George Orwell envisioned in his dystopian novel 1984. When PolitiFact, the Pulitzer Prize-winning truth squad sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times, analyzed more than 300 assertions by Trump since he announced his presidential bid, it found that roughly 70 percent were mostly or completely false while another 15 percent were half-truths. Only 15 percent of his comments were deemed mostly or completely true. Little wonder CNN political commentator and Trump apologist Scottie Nell Hughes recently declared on NPR's Diane Rehm Show that if enough people believe a lie, it's true -- at least for them. "There's no such thing ... anymore as facts," she said. As someone who works for a science advocacy organization, I take issue with Hughes' contention we're living in a post-fact world, especially when it comes to science and its implications. Trump has espoused a number of scientifically unfounded positions with serious consequences for public health and the environment, including the thoroughly debunked claim that childhood vaccines cause autism. But let's start by examining some of his most flagrant lies about climate change, fossil fuels and renewable energy, as well as his policy prescriptions based on those lies. Trump's Mind Opens and Shuts on Climate Change By now, everyone who's been paying attention knows that Trump once tweeted that climate change a "hoax" created by the Chinese. When asked about it on Fox & Friends in January, however, Trump insisted he was joking, and he told The New York Times in his first on-the-record media interview after the election that he has "an open mind to it" and thinks "there is some connectivity" between human activity and climate change. Trump's "open mind" comment was widely reported. What wasn't widely reported is he also told the Times there is widespread disagreement among scientists about whether climate change is actually occurring. There isn't. "It's one issue that's interesting because there are few things where there's more division than climate change," Trump said. "...You know, you can make lots of cases for different views... It's a very complex subject. I'm not sure anybody is ever going to really know." Just yesterday, during an appearance on Fox News Sunday, Trump repeated his assertion that "nobody really knows" if climate change is real. "I'm still open-minded," he told host Chris Wallace. "Nobody really knows. Look, I'm somebody that gets it, and nobody really knows." But Trump doesn't get it. Climate scientists have known about global warming for decades, and the overwhelming majority of them agree that human activity -- primarily the burning of fossil fuels -- is driving up world temperatures. Trump's 'Clean Coal' Fantasy During the second "town hall" presidential debate in early October, an audience member asked Trump and Hillary Clinton how they would meet the country's energy needs while "remaining environmentally friendly and minimizing job loss for fossil power plant workers." It was the closest the two came to fielding a question during the debates related to climate change. Trump's answer was a pure fabrication. After taking a swipe at the Obama administration for putting energy "under siege," he declared: "We need much more than wind and solar... There is a thing called clean coal. Coal will last for a thousand years in this country." In fact, "clean coal" technology, which is supposed to capture and store carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, doesn't currently exist. It has never been demonstrated to work economically on a commercial scale, and no operating U.S. coal power plants use it. And a number of high-profile "clean coal" pilot projects, dogged by cost overruns and scheduling delays, have failed. The claim that the United States has a thousand-year supply of coal is also a Trumparian exaggeration. According to a 2007 National Research Council report, there is likely enough coal at current production levels to last somewhere between 100 and 250 years. During his presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly vowed to revive the coal industry. "Let me tell you," he proclaimed last March, "the miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, which was so great to me last week and Ohio and all over, they're going to start to work again, believe me." Market realities, however, stand in the way of that ever happening. The demand for coal is bound to continue to wane due to the proliferation of cheap natural gas, increased competition from renewables, and energy efficiency programs. As recently as 2008, coal generated about 50 percent of U.S. electricity. Now its share is just 30 percent. Employment in the coal industry, meanwhile, has dropped steadily since it peaked at more than 250,000 in 1980, largely due to automation. It now hovers around 50,000. You could fit them all into Yankee Stadium. Contradicting the claim he has an "open mind" about climate change, Trump has promised to withdraw the Clean Power Plan, the new federal power plant carbon emissions rule. Doing so might stop some coal job losses, but electric utilities have already begun switching to natural gas and renewables. Last year they shuttered 94 coal-fired power plants and this year at least 40 more will likely be closed by the end of this month. At the same time Trump has promised to bring back coal jobs, he also has pledged to promote natural gas. More than a few energy experts have pointed out that those are incompatible objectives. Resuscitating the coal industry also conflicts with Trump's professed goal of protecting the environment. "Clean air is vitally important," he told the Times staff a few weeks ago. "Clean water, crystal clean water is vitally important." If Trump really believes that, why would he want to revive coal? Besides the fact that coal-fired power plants account for roughly a quarter of total U.S. carbon emissions, they also are a leading industrial source of such "traditional" toxic pollutants as mercury, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which have been linked to a host of diseases, as well as premature death. All told, coal's estimated "life-cycle" cost in the United States -- including its impact on miners, public health, the environment and the climate -- is $345 billion annually, according to a 2011 Harvard Medical School study. Trump Blows Hot Air About Wind Trump lost his battle against a wind farm off the coast of his Scottish golf course, but he's continuing his crusade here at home. During his marathon interview with the Times, Trump said "the wind is a very deceiving thing" and then proceeded to make a number of deceptive statements of his own. "First of all," Trump said, "we don't make the windmills in the United States. They're made in Germany and Japan." Wrong. Currently more than 21,000 American workers are making turbines and parts at more than 500 factories across the country, according to the American Wind Energy Association. Another 67,000 work in the industry installing and maintaining wind farms. Although two European firms, Vestas Wind Systems and Siemens, employ thousands of workers in a half-dozen states, the nation's top turbine manufacturer is an American company -- good old General Electric. The U.S. solar industry, meanwhile, boasts more than 200,000 workers, according to the Solar Foundation. All told, the wind and solar industries now provide more than 288,000 jobs, nearly six times more than the coal industry. Trump's next complaint? "The windmills," he claimed, "are devastating to the bird population, O.K." No, not O.K. In fact, birds have much bigger problems than wind turbines. Besides habitat degradation and destruction, the top human-built environmental threat to our feathered friends are buildings. As many as 970 million birds crash into them annually, according to a June 2013 study in the Wilson Journal of Ornithology. Other studies, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), estimate that every year as many as 175 million birds die by flying into power lines, which electrocute tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands more; 72 million are poisoned by misapplied pesticides; some 6.8 million perish by hitting cell and radio towers; and as many as 1 million birds die in oil and gas industry fluid waste pits. Conversely, a September 2014 study in the journal Plos One estimates that wind turbines kill from 214,000 to 368,000 birds annually. In other words, real estate is the main culprit, and the oil and gas industry kills three to five times more birds than wind turbines. Trump's contrived case against wind power has prompted him to call for ending its federal subsidies. "I've been saying the same thing for years about you know, the wind industry," he told the Times. "I wouldn't want to subsidize it." Yes, the wind industry gets a federal subsidy. Called the production tax credit (PTC), it has been instrumental in leveling the playing field between wind and fossil fuels and invaluable for financing new projects, helping make wind one of the fastest growing electricity sources in the country. Since the mid-1990s, Congress has typically granted the wind industry the PTC on a short-term basis and then wavered over renewing it. Last year, the government gave the industry $2.2 billion in tax breaks, but the PTC will begin to decline next year and phase out in 2020. By contrast, the oil and gas industry has been feeding at the federal trough for nearly a century. On average, the industry has received $4.86 billion in permanent tax breaks and subsidies in today's dollars every year since 1918, according to a 2011 study by DBL Investors, a venture capital firm. Wind and other renewable energy technologies, meanwhile, averaged only $370 million a year in subsidies between 1994 and 2009. The 2009 stimulus package did provide $21 billion for renewables, but that support barely began to balance the scales that have tilted toward nuclear power for more than 50 years, oil and gas for 98 years, and coal for more than two centuries. How Much Damage Can Trump Do? Not only will it be next to impossible for Trump to magically bring back coal jobs, there are also trends in both the private and public sector that he and his entourage will have a difficult time stopping. Just after the election, more than 350 U.S companies and investment firms, including DuPont, Intel, Mars, Nike and Starbucks, sent a letter urging Trump, President Obama and Congress to honor the Paris climate agreement, which has been endorsed by 194 countries. "Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk," the companies said in a joint letter. "But the right action now will create jobs and boost U.S. competitiveness." More recently, executives from the oil, electric utility, transportation, technology and retail industries told The Wall Street Journal that their companies are still committed to cutting carbon emissions, regardless of the election results. They cited a number of reasons, including the availability of cheaper natural gas and wind power, as well as pressure from investors, activists and state regulators. "Part of our plan to invest in renewables is to diversify our generation portfolio," an American Electric Power Co. spokesperson explained. "All of those investments don't change with a change in administration. It's a long-term strategy." State governments are also stepping up efforts to address climate change. The Massachusetts Legislature, for example, passed an energy bill in July ensuring that nearly 40 percent of the state's electricity will come from renewables by 2030. Not to be outdone, a day later the New York Public Service Commission approved Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to obtain 50 percent of the state's electricity from renewables by 2030. And in August, the California Legislature passed a bill requiring the state to reduce its carbon emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. As Trump would say, this is a big league deal. Nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population -- 65 million people -- live in those three states, and their combined gross domestic product of $4.25 trillion last year would rank them fourth among the world's nations, just after Japan. No doubt their ambitious climate goals will spur major investments in renewable energy and other clean technologies, create new job opportunities, and dramatically cut carbon emissions. At the federal level, meanwhile, the process the Environmental Protection Agency follows to establish new regulations or kill existing ones will make it difficult to dismantle the Obama administration's climate legacy. And if any Trumparians try to make an end run around standard procedures, science, environmental and public health groups most certainly will take them to court. The scientific community has already announced it is watching closely. At the end of November, more than 2,300 scientists -- including 22 Nobel Prize winners -- signed an open letter calling on the incoming Trump administration and Congress to respect "scientific integrity and independence." The letter, organized by the Union of Concerned Scientists, ended with an explicit warning. "We will continue to champion efforts that strengthen the role of science in policymaking," it concluded, "and stand ready to hold accountable any who might seek to undermine it." Elliott Negin is a senior writer at the Union of Concerned Scientists. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

07 декабря 2016, 20:29

Без заголовка

  • 0

President-elect Donald Trump has been twisting the facts in ways beyond what even George Orwell envisioned in his dystopian novel 1984. When PolitiFact, the Pulitzer Prize-winning truth squad sponsored by the Tampa Bay Times, analyzed more than 300 assertions by Trump since he announced his presidential bid, it found that roughly 70 percent were mostly or completely false while another 15 percent were half-truths. Only 15 percent of his comments were deemed mostly or completely true. Little wonder CNN political commentator and Trump apologist Scottie Nell Hughes recently declared on NPR's Diane Rehm Show that if enough people believe a lie, it's true -- at least for them. "There's no such thing ... anymore as facts," she said. As someone who works for a science advocacy organization, I take issue with Hughes' contention we're living in a post-fact world, especially when it comes to science and its implications. Trump has espoused a number of scientifically unfounded positions with serious consequences for public health and the environment, including the thoroughly debunked claim that childhood vaccines cause autism. But let's start by examining some of his most flagrant lies about climate change, fossil fuels and renewable energy, as well as his policy prescriptions based on those lies. Trump's Mind Opens and Shuts on Climate Change By now, everyone who's been paying attention knows that Trump once tweeted that climate change a "hoax" created by the Chinese. When asked about it on Fox & Friends in January, however, Trump insisted he was joking, and he told The New York Times in his first on-the-record media interview after the election that he has "an open mind to it" and thinks "there is some connectivity" between human activity and climate change. Trump's "open mind" comment was widely reported. What wasn't widely reported is he also told the Times there is widespread disagreement among scientists about whether climate change is actually occurring. There isn't. "It's one issue that's interesting because there are few things where there's more division than climate change," Trump said. "...You know, you can make lots of cases for different views.... It's a very complex subject. I'm not sure anybody is ever going to really know." Just yesterday, during an appearance on Fox News Sunday, Trump repeated his assertion that "nobody really knows" if climate change is real. "I'm still open-minded," he told host Chris Wallace. "Nobody really knows. Look, I'm somebody that gets it, and nobody really knows." But Trump doesn't get it. Climate scientists have known about global warming for decades, and the overwhelming majority of them agree that human activity -- primarily the burning of fossil fuels -- is driving up world temperatures. Trump's 'Clean Coal' Fantasy During the second "town hall" presidential debate in early October, an audience member asked Trump and Hillary Clinton how they would meet the country's energy needs while "remaining environmentally friendly and minimizing job loss for fossil power plant workers." It was the closest the two came to fielding a question during the debates related to climate change. Trump's answer was a pure fabrication. After taking a swipe at the Obama administration for putting energy "under siege," he declared: "We need much more than wind and solar.... There is a thing called clean coal. Coal will last for a thousand years in this country." In fact, "clean coal" technology, which is supposed to capture and store carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, doesn't currently exist. It has never been demonstrated to work economically on a commercial scale, and no operating U.S. coal power plants use it. And a number of high-profile "clean coal" pilot projects, dogged by cost overruns and scheduling delays, have failed. The claim that the United States has a thousand-year supply of coal is also a Trumparian exaggeration. According to a 2007 National Research Council report, there is likely enough coal at current production levels to last somewhere between 100 and 250 years. During his presidential campaign, Trump repeatedly vowed to revive the coal industry. "Let me tell you," he proclaimed last March, "the miners in West Virginia and Pennsylvania, which was so great to me last week and Ohio and all over, they're going to start to work again, believe me." Market realities, however, stand in the way of that ever happening. The demand for coal is bound to continue to wane due to the proliferation of cheap natural gas, increased competition from renewables, and energy efficiency programs. As recently as 2008, coal generated about 50 percent of U.S. electricity. Now its share is just 30 percent. Employment in the coal industry, meanwhile, has dropped steadily since it peaked at more than 250,000 in 1980, largely due to automation. It now hovers around 50,000. You could fit them all into Yankee Stadium. Contradicting the claim he has an "open mind" about climate change, Trump has promised to withdraw the Clean Power Plan, the new federal power plant carbon emissions rule. Doing so might stop some coal job losses, but electric utilities have already begun switching to natural gas and renewables. Last year they shuttered 94 coal-fired power plants and this year at least 40 more will likely be closed by the end of this month. At the same time Trump has promised to bring back coal jobs, he also has pledged to promote natural gas. More than a few energy experts have pointed out that those are incompatible objectives. Resuscitating the coal industry also conflicts with Trump's professed goal of protecting the environment. "Clean air is vitally important," he told the Times staff a few weeks ago. "Clean water, crystal clean water is vitally important." If Trump really believes that, why would he want to revive coal? Besides the fact that coal-fired power plants account for roughly a quarter of total U.S. carbon emissions, they also are a leading industrial source of such "traditional" toxic pollutants as mercury, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide, which have been linked to a host of diseases, as well as premature death. All told, coal's estimated "life-cycle" cost in the United States -- including its impact on miners, public health, the environment and the climate -- is $345 billion annually, according to a 2011 Harvard Medical School study. Trump Blows Hot Air About Wind Trump lost his battle against a wind farm off the coast of his Scottish golf course, but he's continuing his crusade here at home. During his marathon interview with the Times, Trump said "the wind is a very deceiving thing" and then proceeded to make a number of deceptive statements of his own. "First of all," Trump said, "we don't make the windmills in the United States. They're made in Germany and Japan." Wrong. Currently more than 21,000 American workers are making turbines and parts at more than 500 factories across the country, according to the American Wind Energy Association. Another 67,000 work in the industry installing and maintaining wind farms. Although two European firms, Vestas Wind Systems and Siemens, employ thousands of workers in a half-dozen states, the nation's top turbine manufacturer is an American company -- good old General Electric. The U.S. solar industry, meanwhile, boasts more than 200,000 workers, according to the Solar Foundation. All told, the wind and solar industries now provide more than 288,000 jobs, nearly six times more than the coal industry. Trump's next complaint? "The windmills," he claimed, "are devastating to the bird population, O.K." No, not O.K. In fact, birds have much bigger problems than wind turbines. Besides habitat degradation and destruction, the top human-built environmental threat to our feathered friends are buildings. As many as 970 million birds crash into them annually, according to a June 2013 study in the Wilson Journal of Ornithology. Other studies, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), estimate that every year as many as 175 million birds die by flying into power lines, which electrocute tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands more; 72 million are poisoned by misapplied pesticides; some 6.8 million perish by hitting cell and radio towers; and as many as 1 million birds die in oil and gas industry fluid waste pits. Conversely, a September 2014 study in the journal Plos One estimates that wind turbines kill from 214,000 to 368,000 birds annually. In other words, real estate is the main culprit, and the oil and gas industry kills three to five times more birds than wind turbines. Trump's contrived case against wind power has prompted him to call for ending its federal subsidies. "I've been saying the same thing for years about you know, the wind industry," he told the Times. "I wouldn't want to subsidize it." Yes, the wind industry gets a federal subsidy. Called the production tax credit (PTC), it has been instrumental in leveling the playing field between wind and fossil fuels and invaluable for financing new projects, helping make wind one of the fastest growing electricity sources in the country. Since the mid-1990s, Congress has typically granted the wind industry the PTC on a short-term basis and then wavered over renewing it. Last year, the government gave the industry $2.2 billion in tax breaks, but the PTC will begin to decline next year and phase out in 2020. By contrast, the oil and gas industry has been feeding at the federal trough for nearly a century. On average, the industry has received $4.86 billion in permanent tax breaks and subsidies in today's dollars every year since 1918, according to a 2011 study by DBL Investors, a venture capital firm. Wind and other renewable energy technologies, meanwhile, averaged only $370 million a year in subsidies between 1994 and 2009. The 2009 stimulus package did provide $21 billion for renewables, but that support barely began to balance the scales that have tilted toward nuclear power for more than 50 years, oil and gas for 98 years, and coal for more than two centuries. How Much Damage Can Trump Do? Not only will it be next to impossible for Trump to magically bring back coal jobs, there are also trends in both the private and public sector that he and his entourage will have a difficult time stopping. Just after the election, more than 350 U.S companies and investment firms, including DuPont, Intel, Mars, Nike and Starbucks, sent a letter urging Trump, President Obama and Congress to honor the Paris climate agreement, which has been endorsed by 194 countries. "Failure to build a low-carbon economy puts American prosperity at risk," the companies said in a joint letter. "But the right action now will create jobs and boost U.S. competitiveness." More recently, executives from the oil, electric utility, transportation, technology and retail industries told The Wall Street Journal that their companies are still committed to cutting carbon emissions, regardless of the election results. They cited a number of reasons, including the availability of cheaper natural gas and wind power, as well as pressure from investors, activists and state regulators. "Part of our plan to invest in renewables is to diversify our generation portfolio," an American Electric Power Co. spokesperson explained. "All of those investments don't change with a change in administration. It's a long-term strategy." State governments are also stepping up efforts to address climate change. The Massachusetts Legislature, for example, passed an energy bill in July ensuring that nearly 40 percent of the state's electricity will come from renewables by 2030. Not to be outdone, a day later the New York Public Service Commission approved Gov. Andrew Cuomo's plan to obtain 50 percent of the state's electricity from renewables by 2030. And in August, the California Legislature passed a bill requiring the state to reduce its carbon emissions to 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030. As Trump would say, this is a big league deal. Nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population -- 65 million people -- live in those three states, and their combined gross domestic product of $4.25 trillion last year would rank them fourth among the world's nations, just after Japan. No doubt their ambitious climate goals will spur major investments in renewable energy and other clean technologies, create new job opportunities, and dramatically cut carbon emissions. At the federal level, meanwhile, the process the Environmental Protection Agency follows to establish new regulations or kill existing ones will make it difficult to dismantle the Obama administration's climate legacy. And if any Trumparians try to make an end run around standard procedures, science, environmental and public health groups most certainly will take them to court. The scientific community has already announced it is watching closely. At the end of November, more than 2,300 scientists -- including 22 Nobel Prize winners -- signed an open letter calling on the incoming Trump administration and Congress to respect "scientific integrity and independence." The letter, organized by the Union of Concerned Scientists, ended with an explicit warning. "We will continue to champion efforts that strengthen the role of science in policymaking," it concluded, "and stand ready to hold accountable any who might seek to undermine it." Elliott Negin is a senior writer at the Union of Concerned Scientists. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 ноября 2016, 17:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Sunrun, Vivint Solar, Ballard Power Systems and Hannon Armstrong Sustainable Infrastructure Capital

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Sunrun, Vivint Solar, Ballard Power Systems and Hannon Armstrong Sustainable Infrastructure Capital

16 ноября 2016, 17:33

4 Green Stocks to Buy Despite a Trump Presidency

Evidence on the ground tells a different tale and picking stocks from the sector may still be a smart investment option.

08 ноября 2016, 12:08

Фондовые индексы Европы слабо растут во вторник

Фондовые индексы Западной Европы умеренно поднимаются во вторник в ожидании результатов выборов президента США.

19 августа 2016, 09:14

Европейские индексы в четверг выросли впервые за пять сессий

Фондовые индексы Западной Европы завершили в плюсе торги в четверг впервые за пять сессий на ожиданиях, что центробанки мира продолжат поддерживать глобальную экономику.

16 августа 2016, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: WilderHill Clean Energy Portfolio, Market Vectors Global Alternative Energy ETF, Global Clean Energy Portfolio, First Trust Nasdaq Clean Energy Green Energy Index and iShares Global Clean Energy ETF

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: WilderHill Clean Energy Portfolio, Market Vectors Global Alternative Energy ETF, Global Clean Energy Portfolio, First Trust Nasdaq Clean Energy Green Energy Index and iShares Global Clean Energy ETF

15 августа 2016, 21:50

What Lies Ahead for Alternative Energy ETFs?

Alternative energy stocks and ETFs are likely to benefit from a Clinton presidency.

06 апреля 2016, 22:35

Covanta Unit Buys Facility, Expands Southeast U.S. Presence

Covanta's (CVA) unit acquired a material processing facility in Augusta, GA, and further expanded its operations in Southeast U.S.

Выбор редакции
03 марта 2016, 09:12

BRIEF-Vestas Wind Systems selects Dassault Systemes' "Sustainable Wind Turbines" industry solution

* Vestas Wind Systems A/S selects Dassault Systemes' "Sustainable Wind Turbines" industry solution experience for its manufacturing operations management Source text for Eikon: Further company coverage: (Gdynia Newsroom)

15 февраля 2016, 09:58

Растущие европейские акции

Этот рейтинг включает акции крупных компаний Евросоюза, котировки которых сильнее всего выросли за год (с января 2015 по февраль 2016 года). В обзор включены компании с капитализацией от €10B (таких компаний в Европе несколько сотен). Капитализация и оборот компаний приведены в пересчёте евро. Котировки приведены в валютах торгов.Отметим, что в сравнении с предыдущим аналогичным рейтингом (ноябрь 2015 года), картина существенно поменялась. Биржевой кризис января 2016 года ослабил позиции многих крупных компаний. Если в прошлом рейтинге все компании демонстрировали рост котировок не менее 50% годовых, то теперь таких компаний лишь две. При этом, семёрку полностью покинули самые большие европейские компании с капитализациями от €19B — их кризис затронул особенно сильно. Такие компании сегодня имеют годовой рост котировок не более 30%. Первое место. PandoraТикер: PNDORAБиржа: Copenhagen Stock ExchangeСтрана: ДанияВалюта торгов: датская кронаКапитализация: €14BГодовой оборот: €1.5BP/E: 32Годовой рост котировок: 106%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 1.0% Характерный «воздушный» стиль рекламных плакатов компании Pandora. Ювелирная компания, основанная в 1982 году. Разрабатывает, производит и реализует изделия ручной работы из золота, серебра, натуральной кожи, текстиля и других материалов. Поначалу работала исключительно в Дании, но сейчас основное производство перенесено в Таиланд, а изделия продаются в более чем 90 странах через множество точек продаж (в том числе, более 1400 фирменных магазинов). Акции Pandora присутствуют на публичном рынке с 2010 года. Поначалу они торговались неудачно и в 2011 году сильно подешевели. Но с 2012 года котировки начали расти и к настоящему времени втрое превысили начальные значения. Хотя котировки компании отлично росли 4 года, сейчас её P/E уже достаточно велик, поэтому продолжение роста совершенно не гарантировано. Сегодня акции Pandora представляются умеренно рисковым вложением. Второе место. Vestas Wind SystemsТикер: VWSБиржа: Copenhagen Stock ExchangeСтрана: ДанияВалюта торгов: датская кронаКапитализация: €12BГодовой оборот: €6.7BP/E: 22Годовой рост котировок: 55%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 0.9%Многие люди видели ветровые электростанции издали, но не представляют их истинных размеров. Здесь изображён тягач, транспортирующий отдельно ветрогенератор без установленных лопастей. Каждая лопасть, в свою очередь, будет в несколько раз длиннее самого генератора.Один из крупнейших в мире и первый в истории производитель ветровых электростанций. Компания была основана в 1898 году, но первую ветровую электростанцию построила лишь в 1979 году. До этого она выпускала широкий круг других изделий — контейнеров, миксеров, сельскохозяйственной техники и т. д. На сегодняшний день портфолио Vestas включает десятки тысяч ветрогенераторов общей мощностью более 30 гигаватт в десятках стран. Кризис 2008 года крайне тяжело ударил по Vestas Wind Systems. Её акции подешевели втрое непосредственно в момент кризиса, а после кризиса продолжили дешеветь. За период с 2008 по 2012 год котировки Vestas упали в 28 (!) раз. Но с 2013 года положение компании стало укрепляться и к настоящему моменту котировки отыграли большую часть падения.Сейчас, судя по P/E, компания оценена адекватно, и трудно сказать, продолжится ли рост. Как и акции Pandora, акции Vestas можно назвать умеренно рисковой инвестицией. Третье место. AdidasТикер: ADSБиржа: Deutsche BorseСтрана: ГерманияВалюта торгов: евроКапитализация: €19BГодовой оборот: €15BP/E: 28Годовой рост котировок: 46%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 1.6%В России Adidas — поистине народная компания, слава которой вышла далеко за пределы спорта. В начале 1990-х годов, когда вся западная фирменная одежда у нас была предметом роскоши, Adidas превратился в такой же символ статуса, как и в конце 1990-х — сотовый телефон. Сейчас эта одежда не считается дорогой, но по прежнему остаётся символом и традиционной “униформой” среди определённых слоёв населения. Это стало поводом для множества шуток, но это нисколько не умаляет, а лишь подчёркивает успех компании.Один из крупнейших в мире производителей спортивной одежды и инвентаря. Компания была основана в 1920 году как семейное швейное предприятие под названием Dassler. Особую славу марке Dassler принесли Олимпийские игры 1936 года, когда афроамериканский бегун Джесси Оуэнс в её обуви завоевал четыре золотые медали и установил пять мировых рекордов. После войны компания была переименована в Adidas и в 1950-х годах её продукцию использовало уже множество известных спортсменов. Сейчас Adidas имеет 8 заводов в Германии и более 25 дочерних предприятий в других странах. С 2006 года одним из подразделений Adidas стала другая известная компания — её давний конкурент Reebok.Котировки Adidas быстро восстановили свои позиции после кризиса 2008 года, а к концу 2013 года почти вдвое превысили докризисный рекорд. В 2014 году они вновь просели, но к настоящему моменту отыграли падение и установили новый рекорд.Как и вышеперечисленные акции, акции Adidas сегодня — умеренно рискованное вложение денег. Устойчивый рост котировок компании прекратился в 2014 году. Сейчас акции адекватно оценены и их цена, вероятно, будет колебаться.  Четвёртое место. Infineon TechnologiesТикер: IFXAБиржа: Deutsche BorseСтрана: ГерманияВалюта торгов: евроКапитализация: €10BГодовой оборот: €3.8BP/E: 29Годовой рост котировок: 42%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 1.3%Футуристическая архитектура сингапурского офиса Infineon Technologies.Крупный производитель микросхем, применяемых во множестве областей от автомобильной электроники до банковских карт. Имеет заводы в Германии, Австрии, Италии и Венгрии. Ранее компания была подразделением Siemens. Самостоятельный статус Infineon Technologies приобрела в 1999 году, однако тесные связи с Siemens сохраняются до сих пор. Рост котировок Infineon с 2009 года — это восстановление позиций после катастрофического падения в 2007-2008 годах. Лишь в конце 2015 года котировки превысили рекорд 2007 года.Несмотря на общий положительный тренд, котировки Infineon довольно волатильны, особенно в недавнее время. Это делает её акции довольно рисковым вложением. Пятое место. ThalesТикер: HOБиржа: EuronextСтрана: ФранцияВалюта торгов: евроКапитализация: €14BГодовой оборот: €13BP/E: 25Годовой рост котировок: 37%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 1.7%Рекламный плакат Thales: «Мир сложен, но ваши решения не обязаны быть такими же сложными».Приборостроительная компания, разрабатывающая электрические устройства для автомобильной, аэрокосмической и других транспортных отраслей, а также для рынка ценных бумаг. Компания названа в честь греческого философа Фалеса Милетского. Имеет отделения в десятках стран на большинстве континентов (более половины оборота компании приходится на филиалы за пределами Франции).В отличие от акций многих других компаний, акции Thales после 2007 года дешевели не резко, а постепенно. Их котировки достигли “дна” лишь в 2011 году. Но с 2013 года они вышли в рост, который продолжается до сих пор. Сейчас цена акций Tahles значительно превышает докризисную.С 2013 года котировки компании демонстрируют явный положительный тренд, хотя и с локальными просадками. Одна из таких просадок происходит именно сейчас (с начала года цена акций упала с 70 до 60 евро). Но учитывая умеренное значение P/E, этим акциям есть, куда расти. Возможно, именно сейчас лучшее время, чтобы приобрести их.  Шестое место. ScaniaТикер: SCV-BБиржа: NASDAQ OMX StockholmСтрана: ШвецияВалюта торгов: шведская кронаКапитализация: €17BГодовой оборот: €11BP/E: 25Годовой рост котировок: 36%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: -На фоне множества других автопроизводителей, Scania отличается особенно узнаваемым и запоминающимся дизайном. Даже в России эти кабины уже сравнимы по известности с отечественными ЗиЛами и КамАЗами.Один из известнейших в мире производителей грузовиков, автобусов, промышленных и морских двигателей. Scania — один из старейших в мире автопроизводителей, он был основан в 1891 году. Сегодня это интернациональная компания, которая, помимо Швеции, имеет заводы во Франции, Нидерландах, Аргентине, Бразилии, Польше и России. Компания ведёт активные разработки в области альтернативной энергетики. Экологически чистые автобусы Scania на этиловом спирте уже стали визитной карточкой города Стокгольма и готовятся к массовому внедрению в ряде других городов мира. Следует отметить, что, несмотря на публичный статус компании, более 80% её акций находятся во владении двух других автогигантов — Volkswagen и Man. Седьмое место Veolia Environnement  Тикер: VIEБиржа: EuronextСтрана: ФранцияВалюта торгов: евроКапитализация: €12BГодовой оборот: €24BP/E: 31Годовой рост котировок: 33%Годовая доходность по дивидендам: 3.2%Футуристическая «зелёная» архитектура очистных сооружений Veolia Environnement в Гонконге.Многопрофильная компания, работающая в четырёх сферах деятельности: водоснабжение, коммунальные услуги, энергетика и транспортные услуги (включая обслуживание аэропортов, управление железными дорогами и городским транспортом). В своей отрасли это одна из старейших компаний: она была основана в 1853 году императором Луи Наполеоном III (изначально для водоснабжения). Сейчас Veolia Environnement владеет электростанциями, мусоросжигательными заводами, водоочистными станциями и другими предприятиями в десятках стран мира включая большинство стран Европы.Как и для Vestas Wind Systems, кризис 2008 года стал сильным испытанием для Veolia Environnement (резкое падение в 2008 году и затяжной спуск до 2012). С 2008 по 2012 год котировки компании снизились в 7 раз. Сейчас они примерно вернулись на уровень 2009-2010 годов, но ещё весьма далеки от докризисных рекордов. Инвестиции в Veolia обладают, по-видимому, довольно небольшим риском. Котировки демонстрировали неплохой рост в 2015 году. Сейчас коэффициент P/E достаточно велик и, возможно, потолок роста уже достигнут. Но в сравнении с ситуацией 2007 это явно не пузырь и сильное падение тоже маловероятно. Кроме того, из всех компаний рейтинга данная компания выплачивает самые высокие дивиденды.