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24 марта, 21:02

11 Questions Every Woman Needs to Ask the Dermatologist

It's time to stop focusing on one specific issue when you visit your dermatologist. Instead, use your appointment to ask a range of pertinent questions.

24 марта, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Berkshire Hathaway, Amgen, Walgreens Boots Alliance, General Electric and Carnival

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Berkshire Hathaway, Amgen, Walgreens Boots Alliance, General Electric and Carnival

24 марта, 16:04

Walgreen Boots Buyout of Rite Aid Delayed, Other Woes Remain

On Mar 24, we issued an updated research report on Illinois-based leading pharmacy-led, health and wellbeing enterprise, Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. (WBA).

24 марта, 12:27

10 Amazing Beauty Sets for Those on a Budget

With these beauty kits, you can look your best without having to spend a fortune on high-end makeup and skin care products.

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24 марта, 01:05

Valeant: The End Of The Michael Pearson Era

Authored by Roddy Boyd via The Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation, Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, the corporate poster-child for price-gouging, tax-inversion and hedge-fund manager wealth destruction quietly severed all ties with J. Michael Pearson, its former chief executive officer and longtime guiding light, in January according to its annual proxy statement filed this morning. While Pearson stepped down from Valeant in May 2016, and struck a wide-ranging separation agreement that paid him $83,333 per month for consulting–especially the much-touted and at least temporarily disastrous Walgreens contract–his primary job was to cooperate with the seemingly eternally expanding roster of civil and criminal investigations. The deal with Pearson was supposed to last through this December and the use of the word “initial” in the contract’s wording was a suggestion it might be renewed. Valeant, in the Proxy, says it last paid him in October, and in December its board of directors determined no more payments would be made: “In December 2016, the Board determined that we are not in a position to make any further payments to Mr. Pearson, including in connection with his then-outstanding equity awards with respect to 3,053,014 shares.” Pearson’s agreement was terminated in January, for unspecified reasons. Assuming that Valeant’s language isn’t implying that the company simply doesn’t have the cash available to pay Pearson, then a legitimate question becomes whether he did anything to violate the terms of his agreement through non-cooperation. Given that it paid him $1 million annually with full-benefits, allowing him to have an office, an assistant and legal fees paid for, this doesn’t seem to be in his best interests. Also of note is the timing of the cessation of payments to Pearson in October given that charges against Philidor Rx Services were filed on November 17. While it is highly unlikely that Valeant’s board would have a sense of when–or even if–additional charges might be brought, their own counsel was assuredly aware that federal prosecutors have a long-standing practice of refusing to negotiate settlements with companies where they are actively pursuing indictments against current leadership. (Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation readers will recall our investigative work from October 2015 that began an ongoing re-examination of the company’s ethics and business practices that has forced its share price to $10.86 in recent trading, down from over $257 in July, 2015.) A call to Scott Hirsch, Valeant’s Communications chief, seeking comment was not returned.

23 марта, 22:40

Stock Research Reports for Amgen, Berkshire & Walgreens

Stock Research Reports for Amgen, Berkshire & Walgreens

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21 марта, 18:23

CVS Decision To Stop Selling Cigarettes Changed Customers' Lives

(Reuters Health) ― The retail pharmacy company CVS Health helped its customers quit smoking by pulling cigarettes off the shelves two years ago, a new study suggests. Smokers who purchased cigarettes exclusively at CVS stores were 38 percent less likely to buy tobacco after the national chain stopped selling cigarettes, the study shows. In addition, cigarette sales dropped 1 percent ― or by 95 million packs ― in 13 states in the eight months after CVS left the tobacco market in September 2014, according to the report in the American Journal of Public Health. “It shows that responsible behavior by a pharmacy has public health benefits for the whole population,” Stanton Glantz said in a phone interview. He directs the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco, and was not involved with the study. The results provide “very strong evidence” that removing tobacco from CVS’ more than 7,800 stores reduced smoking, Glantz said. “It was a big enough effect that you could see it in the population level, which is very impressive,” he said. The findings heartened Dr. Troyen Brennan, CVS Health’s chief medical officer and one of the study’s authors. “We think that this research definitely shows that if pharmacies didn’t sell cigarettes, fewer people would smoke, more people would live longer, and fewer people would die,” he said in a phone interview. Brennan and a team of CVS researchers analyzed data from a nationally representative survey of consumers’ cigarette purchases at drug, food, big box, dollar, convenience and gas station retailers prior to and one year following the company’s exit from the cigarette market. While they found that shoppers who purchased cigarettes exclusively from CVS were 38 percent more likely to stop buying cigarettes altogether, they could not conclude that those customers kicked the habit. The data shows they did not purchase cigarettes elsewhere, but it remained unclear whether they got cigarettes from another source, possibly a friend or relative, Brennan said. But states in which CVS pulled out of the tobacco market sold 0.14 fewer packs of cigarettes per smoker a month compared to other states, the study found. In 1970, the American Pharmaceutical Association declared cigarette displays to be in conflict with the public health role of pharmacies. The following year, the association recommended that pharmacies stop selling tobacco. But until CVS quit the business, nationwide pharmacy chains had ignored the recommendation. “We know that tobacco kills 488,000 people a year in the U.S.,” Brennan said. “How can you sell that kind of thing when you’re supposed to be emphasizing health care?” Public health advocates have pressed Walgreens to also clear its shelves of cigarettes. But the pharmacy chain, one of the nation’s largest, has refused to leave the tobacco market. Asked to comment about the study, Walgreens provided a written statement. “We believe that the most effective step we can take to help smokers quit is to address the root causes of smoking, which go far beyond the small percentage of smokers who access this product at pharmacies,” it says. “We have made an active decision to reduce space and visibility of tobacco products in certain of our stores as we focus on helping customers who want to stop smoking,” the statement says. Robin Koval, CEO and president of Truth Initiative, a Washington, D.C. nonprofit dedicated to ending youth smoking, took Walgreens to task for failing to follow CVS’ lead and “missing a significant opportunity to serve their customers’ health and welfare.” The new study underscores the need for Walgreens to remove tobacco from its stores, Koval, who was not involved in the study, said in an email. Smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the U.S. One in four American adults use tobacco, and nearly 17 percent smoke cigarettes. The vast majority of smokers want to quit, Brennan said. Consequently, moving cigarettes out of their line of sight helps them to abstain. “Cigarettes are an impulsive buy,” he said. “When you change availability, you can change the smoking habits of individuals.” SOURCE: http://bit.ly/2lMrHQD American Journal of Public Health, online February 16, 2017. function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 марта, 17:15

UnitedHealth Extends Expiration Date of SCA Share Exchange

UnitedHealth Group Incorporated (UNH) recently declared that the expiration of its previously announced exchange offer for all of the outstanding shares of Surgical Care Affiliates, Inc. (SCAI) ("SCA???) has been extended.

15 марта, 17:24

Will Fred???s Emerge a Winner from Walgreens-Rite Aid Merger?

Discount retailer, Fred's Inc. (FRED) seems to have stolen the show and emerged as the big winner from the proposed merger between Rite Aid Corporation (RAD) and Walgreens Alliance, Inc. (WBA).

15 марта, 15:05

Why CIOs Make Great Board Directors

According to Korn Ferry unpublished data, there has been a 74% increase in the number of CIOs serving on Fortune 100 boards in the past two years. It’s no wonder CIOs are the fastest-growing addition to the boardroom: They can help address a host of issues of crucial importance to boards, including using technologies to create operational efficiencies and competitive advantage; identifying opportunities related to cloud computing, digitization, and data; addressing threats and risks associated with information security; and using their experience and judgment to oversee, question, and provide input on technology budgets. But there’s room for growth. Only 31% of Fortune 100 boards currently have a director who is a CIO, even though technology is at the core of every business today. As Sheila Jordan, CIO at Symantec and director at FactSet, put it, “All companies are technology companies today. Technology is a lever to run the business, but also to change and grow.” How should boards incorporate a CIO director? What role should a CIO play on the board, and what’s the profile of a CIO who can add real value? Based on our experience in recruiting CIO directors for Fortune 100 companies, here are a few guiding principles. Update your mindset about the role of technology on the board. CEOs and boards still generally view technology as a cost. But “more boards are waking up to the power of leveraging technology as a competitive weapon,” according to Tim Theriault, former CIO of Walgreens Boots Alliance and current board member of Alliance Data, The Vitamin Shoppe, and Wellmark Blue Cross and Blue Shield. While boards may define their need for a technology director somewhat differently, “every board should have access to someone who knows what technology can do for the business and what the trends are,” says Theriault. “Boards need to gain an appreciation for what the possibilities are, including how technology can help established successful companies with needed transformation. To do that, they should surround themselves with people who can be helpful. Some CEOs are still in denial, and time is against them — the longer it takes, the more dramatic the needed transformation and the higher the risk.” “Most companies measure their technology spend as a percentage of revenue,” says Frank Modruson, former CIO of Accenture and currently on the boards of Zebra Technologies, First Midwest Bancorp, and Forsythe Technology, so “having someone on the board with the relevant expertise and an understanding of what’s needed can be invaluable.” Often, says Modruson, that sophisticated expertise comes down to one fundamental skill, which is to ask the right questions of the internal CIO: Are we spending enough? Are we aligned on the critical business priorities? Did we get the desired results? How old are the core systems or platforms? The latter question is crucial and can easily be overlooked by directors who lack a technology background, because once technology starts working, it generally keeps working, although it may be far from optimal. Define the role as an interface between the board and the internal CIO. The CIO on the board is often a valuable translator between the board, the internal CIO, and other technology-related functions. In this regard, a CIO director can play a pivotal role in educating other board members and the CEO, giving them the ability to knowledgeably probe on technology matters. Based on the demands of budget dollars, an experienced, informed board member should be able to ensure priorities are identified to address issues related to digital transformation. “Companies that don’t recognize that they need to invest in new technology end up with more and more legacy systems,” says Jordan, “which are a breeding ground for risk.” This engagement between directors and management starts with the permission and knowledge of the CEO. “The savvier CEO wants someone on the board who can connect appropriately with management on technology-related issues and make recommendations,” says Charlie Feld, founder of The Feld Group Institute, which works with global corporations to develop next-generation business and IT leaders, and former CIO at Frito-Lay, BNSF Railway, and Delta Air Lines. “Traditionally, boards have tended to stay out of operational functions, but technology is so pervasive that the best practice is to have direct board engagement in technology through active committees, just as they would with audit, compensation, and other key areas.” “On the FactSet board, I’ve been encouraged to meet with the management team and to give advice to the CEO and the CIO,” says Jordan. “It’s important that the board understand the management team, and that interaction helps. I’m constantly asking myself, what experience can I bring to the board and the management team that they can leverage? I can guide them by saying, let’s look at this trend or here’s a new technology to consider. It’s not about managing the day-to-day, but about the experience and knowledge I can share to open their eyes to the future.” Look for hybrids and cast a wide net. CIO directors should be capable of straddling business and technical worlds at the highest levels and acting as a connecting rod between the board and internal technical functions. “I would push for someone who has deep technical skills and who is business-savvy and a good storyteller,” says Feld. “But every business leader has to speak the language of business: P&L.” CIOs who can bring this hybrid combination of skills to the board are invaluable, says Feld: “No one sees all the functions except the CEO and the CIO. The CIO is a system integrator, so he or she envisions all the critical connections.” Generally speaking, CIO director prospects will have served as a CIO or CTO of a large organization whose market sector is relevant to the company of the board doing the recruiting. Ideal candidates will have faced similar systems and technology challenges to those the board is facing and be able to provide valuable insights. He or she will also have achieved sufficient professional stature to be able to interact on a peer-to-peer level with those already on the board. In addition to assessing the skills and experience CIOs bring as hybrid experts, there can be a cultural hurdle to clear. “Boards can initially be hesitant about less-traditional directors,” says Theriault. “They want to make sure any new directors will be a good fit with the rest of the board and that they will be able to participate and contribute value to board discussions beyond their functional area. There is a fallacy that CIOs are tech geeks; successful CIOs understand people, technology, and business strategy.” Boards should not fall into the trap of adhering to rigid criteria that may unnecessarily screen out CIO director candidates and impede chances of recruiting a CIO to the board. In particular, requiring previous board experience will severely narrow the universe of potential candidates, eliminating many CIOs who could make effective directors. There are reliable methods of assessing candidates’ fit for the board, including intensive referencing of those who have worked closely with the candidate and have a keen sense of competencies and behavior-related traits that speak to the individual’s desirability, or not, as a team member. Moreover, there are ways of compensating for experience gaps, if all else looks favorable, in the onboarding process. They may include an external director education program, if the person is a novice board member, and mentoring by a senior director. From Korn Ferry’s perspective, in recruiting directors for a wide range of industry and functional areas, CIOs are the most sought-after directors. With many CIOs able to serve on only one external board, if any, with the consent of their CEO, demand should soon outstrip supply. And because technology is now of strategic importance, we are beginning to see boards create technology committees, further accelerating demand for CIO directors. Much like now-required audit and compensation committees, technology committees comprise directors with specific expertise, who meet as a group and then make recommendations to the board. Even with access to the best CIO directors, there are no guarantees that a company will not face unforeseen challenges arising from technology-related risk. But having an accomplished CIO director is the most effective way to make sure the board identifies the most-pressing technology priorities, establishes greater importance for the technology functions, and plays an active role in attracting top technology leaders. Perhaps most important of all, the CIO director can constructively challenge plans for the technology functions, which are the backbone of every successful enterprise today.

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14 марта, 21:17

Despite Battered Rite Aid Shares, Walgreens Buy Still On

Walgreens Boots Alliance is committed to buying Rite Aid even as the acquisition target’s stock price is well below the even lower price Walgreens executives have agreed to pay.

Выбор редакции
10 марта, 08:07

Best Buy and 15 Other Stores People Love to Hate

Shoppers love Trader Joe's and Amazon but are disappointed with their experiences at other stores, such as Walmart, one of the most hated stores in the U.S.

09 марта, 16:00

Walgreens Boots Grapples with Headwinds: Should You Dump?

On Mar 8, we issued an updated research report on Illinois-based leading pharmacy-led, health and wellbeing enterprise Walgreens Boots Alliance, Inc. (WBA).

07 марта, 20:19

Americans Want Chaffetz To Get Them Health Care That Costs Less Than An iPhone

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); People are not happy with Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s (R-Utah) health care “solution” for low-income Americans.  In an appearance on CNN on Tuesday morning, Chaffetz proposed that a fix for people who have trouble affording health care coverage under President Donald Trump’s newly proposed law is simply to not buy an iPhone. “Americans have choices, and they’ve got to make a choice,” he said on CNN. “So rather than getting that new iPhone that they just love and want to go spend hundreds of dollars on that, maybe they should invest in their own health care. They’ve got to make those decisions themselves.” Naturally, the comment outraged many people, who pointed out the absurdity of such a suggestion on sites including Twitter. Some have been proposing their own alternative for Chaffetz ― find them a health care system that costs less than what they’re paying for their iPhones. @jasoninthehouse my cell is $50/mo (thru family plan thru son's employer).Give me good healthcare coverage fo $50/mo-I'll give up my cell https://t.co/lG1wwWRF5z— my2cnts (@cblazina) March 7, 2017 @jasoninthehouse what an amazing deal! I will gladly trade my 8 yr old phone I paid $15 at Walgreens for Healthcare. Where can I sign up?— Meg Rodgers (@MegRodgersHarp) March 7, 2017 . My last surgery hospital bill was $38,000 Rep. Jason Chaffetz show me an iPhone that cost as much I paid $0 for my iPhone. Free w/contract https://t.co/5WFf39yJ9q— KimberlyDewayn (@KimDSummons) March 7, 2017 Hey Jason @jasoninthehouse I'm writing this to you on my $600 iPhone, bought once every 2 years. Can you get me insurance for $300 a year? — eli friedmann (@eligit) March 7, 2017 iPhone monthly bill: $40Health insurance (w/subsidy!): $264/monthIf @jasoninthehouse has some idea how I can do better, my DMs are open!— Gary Legum (@GaryLegum) March 7, 2017 Others have been comparing the cost of an iPhone to their health care expenditures: Hey @jasoninthehouse, my son's hip surgery was $10,000 with insurance. My iPhone $20 a month.— Amanda (@Divamanda23) March 7, 2017 My broken ankle cost $117,000 so that's around 234 iPhones @jasoninthehouse.— roxane gay (@rgay) March 7, 2017 My cell phone cost as much as two and a half months of premiums sans subsidies and it's an iPhone 6. https://t.co/KMW7vG7zDS— Professor Pancakes (@trollprincess) March 7, 2017 The last time I was in the hospital (on top of everything else) I was charged $90 for two ibuprofen. https://t.co/HswOjMVcfU— Veronica Belmont (@Veronica) March 7, 2017 6 days in ICU cost my family 310 iPhones, and that was when we had insurance, @jasoninthehouse— PissedOffPreMed (@pissedoffpremed) March 7, 2017 My insulin, with no insurance coverage, would cost me about $3,000 a month. $36,000 a year. An iPhone 7 is $650. https://t.co/8bJm6TreSW— Michael (@Home_Halfway) March 7, 2017 My one night in the hospital was $30,000+, or over 47 iPhones. My premiums are about 16 iPhones/yr. @jasoninthehouse— Steve Brown (@sbrown23) March 7, 2017 Hey, @jasoninthehouse! Can you tell me how many iPhones my wife's brain tumor will cost? I'm trying to budget here.— Daniel Poehlman (@DPoem) March 7, 2017 After Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson’s comments about “immigrants” on “slave ships” Monday, it’s been a banner week already for the GOP. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
06 марта, 08:00

Alliance Boots dealmaker Murphy set to leave KKR

Executive instrumental in acquisition of UK chain and its later merger with Walgreens

Выбор редакции
06 марта, 08:00

Alliance Boots dealmaker Murphy set to leave KKR

Executive instrumental in acquisition of UK chain and its later merger with Walgreens

03 марта, 17:02

Fred's Dismal Comps Trend Continues, February Sales Fall

Fred's Inc. (FRED) witnessed a soft start to fiscal 2017, with comps exhibiting a year-over-year decrease in the first month of the first quarter fiscal 2017.

Выбор редакции
03 марта, 00:57

10 Skin Care Products That Have Stood the Test of Time

If there's one beauty lesson you should have learned from your mom and grandmother, it's which classic skin care products are worth sticking with for life.