• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Компании1154
      • Показать ещё
      Разное626
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы596
      • Показать ещё
      Международные организации92
      • Показать ещё
      Показатели49
      • Показать ещё
      Издания29
      • Показать ещё
      Люди46
      • Показать ещё
      Формат11
      Сферы1
Waste Management
26 мая, 18:17

Billionaire Who Made Fortune Polluting Oceans To Donate Wealth To Clean Them Up

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); This story is part of a series on ocean plastics. Our oceans may have found an unlikely savior. Norwegian billionaire Kjell Inge Røkke, who accrued his wealth in part through offshore oil drilling, announced this month that he’s donating the majority of his wealth to help save the oceans. Røkke is funding a 600-foot research yacht, which will tackle some of the most pressing environmental concerns of our time ― including how to rescue endangered species and eliminate plastic trash from our big blue seas. “There may not be any economic rationale for the private construction of such a ship, but the case is compelling from the oceans’ point of view,” Røkke said in a statement.  News of the research vessel comes at a time when environmental experts are growing increasingly concerned about the state of our oceans, while the public remains mostly uninterested.  Among a number of initiatives, the Research Expedition Vessel will remove 5 tons of plastic a day from the oceans and melt them down. Some of the plastics will be used for fuel for the ship, and those that can’t be used for other purposes will be returned to waste management facilities on land. Experts, including the World Wildlife Fund, which Røkke has partnered with, agree that collection isn’t enough. That’s why the researchers on board the ship will also work to develop plastic alternatives and identify ways to keep plastics from entering the ocean to begin with, Nina Jensen, CEO of WWF Norway, told HuffPost. WWF works to protect endangered species and natural places. A devastating amount of plastic gets dumped or leaches into marine waters regularly. While precise figures are challenging to nail down, one of the best estimates available says 19 billion pounds of plastic wind up in the ocean every year. At this rate, there will be more plastic than fish (by weight) in the ocean by 2050. Additionally, due to overfishing, pollution and other issues, more than a third of populations of marine fish, mammals, birds and reptiles have been lost since the 1970s, according to WWF.  RESEARCH EXPEDITION VESSEL (REV) from moodmasters on Vimeo. It’s unclear how much the construction of the REV will actually cost, but its proposed amenities and research initiatives are expansive. Outfitted with two helipads and modern laboratories, the REV will accommodate 60 scientists and 40 crew members, and it may be the largest yacht in the world when it’s delivered in 2020, according to Business Insider.  WWF Norway will be charged with helping to develop the project and will reach out to scientific communities, among other tasks. An independent committee will be responsible for choosing projects to pursue, and researchers from all over the world will have a chance to apply. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=59104e54e4b0d5d9049dc664,590816f6e4b05c397681f20b,591c586ce4b0a7458fa49711,590c1a02e4b0104c734db229 Worth $2.7 billion, Røkke owns nearly 67 percent of Aker BioMarine, a shipping and offshore drilling conglomerate, according to Forbes. Jensen admitted that it might seem unusual for an environmental group to partner with an oil tycoon, but that such collaborations are necessary to make significant progress. “One of Nina Jensen’s guiding principles is that the world would be a much better place if we spend more time talking to those we disagree with, rather than just spending time with like-minded people,” Heidi Katrine Bang, public relations manager at WWF Norway, told HuffPost. WWF Norway and Røkke first began working together about a decade ago, Bang added. Though they disagree on a number of issues, including oil exploration, they will continue to have ongoing discussions about those differences, Jensen told Norwegian newspaper Aftenposten. Røkke will continue to be involved with Aker.  “We will still challenge Mr. Røkke when we disagree with him,” Jensen told Aftenposten. In addition to conducting research, the REV will be available for private charters, which will help generate funding. It will also be used privately by the Røkke family, but it’s primary purpose will be to identify how to better protect the oceans and marine life.  “We probably know more about outer space than the ocean space,” Røkke wrote said in a statement released by WWF. “The research vessel facilitates increased knowledge of the challenges, and for finding measures of improvement. The focus is on possibilities and solutions.”  CORRECTION: An earlier version of this story misstated the amount of plastic the Research Expedition Vessel will collect on a daily basis. It will collect about 5 tons of plastic a day.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 мая, 16:23

New Strong Sell Stocks for May 26th

Here are 5 stocks added to the Zacks Rank #5 (Strong Sell) List today:

26 мая, 16:18

Waste Connections Hits 52-Week High on Balanced Growth

Shares of waste management services provider Waste Connections Inc. (WCN) scaled a new 52-week high of $94.15 during yesterday's trading session.

25 мая, 16:30

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott, Waste Management, General Mills and Raytheon

The Zacks Analyst Blog Highlights: Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott, Waste Management, General Mills and Raytheon

25 мая, 15:57

Вице-мэра Таллина задержали по подозрению в коррупции

Вице-мэр Таллина Арво Сарапуу задержан в качестве подозреваемого по уголовному делу о сделках с вывозом мусора.

24 мая, 20:48

Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott & Others

Analyst Reports for Alphabet, Morgan Stanley, Abbott & Others

24 мая, 14:26

Republic Services Down to Hold on Competition, Margin Woes

On May 24, Zacks Investment Research downgraded Republic Services, Inc. (RSG)to a Zacks Rank #3 (Hold).

Выбор редакции
17 мая, 19:19

Eversource Energy (ES) Hit by Regulatory and Weather Woes

Eversource Energy's first-quarter earnings of 82 cents per share lagged the Zacks Consensus Estimate of 83 cents by a penny.

17 мая, 16:36

Regeneron, Nuance Communications, Waste Management, Waste Connections and Republic Services highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

Regeneron, Nuance Communications, Waste Management, Waste Connections and Republic Services highlighted as Zacks Bull and Bear of the Day

16 мая, 23:00

3 Waste Removal Stocks in Focus as Clean Power Plan Pauses

With Obama's environmental policies taking a backseat and Trump's pro-growth agenda with regulatory rollbacks gaining cynosure, waste removal stocks have been in the spotlight.

14 мая, 02:04

The trash-talking Mays take ordinary to another plane | Catherine Bennett

Hunting was just a sideshow; nothing was going to go down better with TV viewers than taking the bins outHousehold waste management. Surely the most triumphant aspect of the Mays’ first joint interview was the speed with which they progressed to a subject that, perhaps more than any other, was likely to resonate throughout The One Show audience. The excruciating spectacle had hardly begun before Philip, asked about home life with Theresa, joked: “I get to decide when I take the bins out. Not if I take them out.” He repeated: “I definitely do the bins.”Though additional talk of “boy and girl jobs” has preoccupied viewers who think a woman prime minister should also, ideally, be challenging gendered boundaries within the home, the really important message here – that the Mays are not too grand to care about the bins – cannot have been lost on, say, readers of the Daily Mail. There, rubbish is a source of unending inspiration for its star columnist, Richard Littlejohn. “Whenever I sit down to write about the shambles which passes for refuse collection these days”, as Littlejohn has admitted, “my problem is not what to include but what to leave out.” Continue reading...

12 мая, 14:43

Clean Harbors Inks Deal with Lonestar to Expand Foothold

Clean Harbors, Inc. (CLH) recently inked a definitive agreement to acquire Lonestar West Inc.

Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
Выбор редакции
10 мая, 17:24

There's A Huge Problem With Kids' Toys That No One's Talking About

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); This story is part of a series on ocean plastics. There’s nothing quite like seeing the look of sheer joy on a child’s face after handing him a brand new, shiny gift. That is, until you consider just how damaging an effect said present will have on the world he’s going to inherit. The toy industry is massive. It hit $20.36 billion in sales last year and shows no sign of slowing down ― nor does the negative impact it’s having on the environment. Plastic toys, which tend to be inexpensive and vibrantly colored, account for 90 percent of the market, according to a plastics trade magazine. And while they pose the same risks as any other plastic item, these cheap playthings often have shorter life spans than high-quality toys and are pretty much impossible to recycle.  “If it’s a flimsy plastic toy that clearly isn’t going to have more than a lifetime of a few days or weeks, would you really want to be getting that material?” Kevin Brigden, senior scientist at Greenpeace International Science Unit, told HuffPost. “As soon as you open it, you’ll be putting it into the waste stream.” Heck, even pricier plastic toys will get thrown out someday. And while they might not land in the trash right away, they can’t be recycled either. Environmentalists have a number of pressing concerns when it comes to the way in which plastic is interacting with the environment. In 2014, Americans generated about 33 million tons of plastic. The year before, only 9.5 percent of plastics were recycled, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. But the scope of the issue is so severe, experts say they can’t even pinpoint accurate figures to define the problem. One of the things that separates plastic toys from other plastic objects is that they’re essentially destined for the landfill, said Brent Bell, vice president of recycling at Waste Management, a company that provides recycling solutions to businesses and residences in North America.  “There are really very few toys that are good candidates for recycling,” Bell told HuffPost. Plastic toys pose a unique challenge because they’re typically composed of other materials too, such as metals. The recyclable components can’t be separated out, and become prohibitive for recycling centers, Bell explained. It’s not just the environmental impact that advocates are concerned about. The health effects of the chemicals used in the manufacturing of plastic toys are not fully known, but at least one type of common chemical, called phthalates ― which is used to soften soys ― has been linked to a number of health issues, including birth defects, cancer and diabetes, The New York Times reported in 2014. And since children often put toys in their mouths, they’re at an increased risk.  Environmental experts say to look to the products of eras past ― when toys were made from durable materials that could be passed down from one generation to the next. Before World War II, heavy-duty toys were the standard. But once metal became hard to come by, plastics took over ― and have dominated the industry ever since.  Items made from wood, cotton, metal and natural rubber are considered feasible alternatives to plastic toys.  While other plastic products, like soda bottles, are becoming increasingly worrisome to environmentalists, they’re actually more manageable than plastic toys. Plastic soda bottles are composed of one uniform type of plastic, and the major beverage companies have made their bottles entirely recyclable. While this doesn’t necessarily mean consumers are always recycling these products, at least the potential is there. Soft drink companies also have the opportunity to produce refillable bottles, which can keep the products in use. Toys typically serve one role and can’t be repurposed. Another issue with plastic toys is the rate at which they’re being consumed. Children receive plastic toys for birthdays and holidays, in gift bags at parties and inside cereal boxes and meals at fast food restaurants. These types of trinkets often occupy a kid’s attention for a short amount of time and then get discarded. Or, the playthings can be made from such insufficient materials that they’ll fall apart after just a few uses and quickly wind up in the trash. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58fed37be4b0c46f0781d426,590e00c0e4b0d5d9049ceb53,58ee9ec1e4b0b9e984891ddf,58e99a38e4b05413bfe3792d “You have all these toys ― they’re cheap, they’re made out of plastic, they break easily. Most of the time they end up in the trash,” said Steve Rho, CEO of sustainable toy company Big Future Toys. “It was totally incongruent for us to buy these toys for our kids for their edification and enjoyment. We’re actually harming their environment that they’re going to live in for the rest of their lives.” It hit Rho just how detrimental plastic toys are after he took one of his daughters to a birthday party at a Chuck E. Cheese’s location in Los Angeles. At the end of the event, all of the kids received a bag about the size of a 2-gallon milk jug, filled to the brim with “kitschy cheap little toys,” Rho said. When his daughter got home, she played with the toys with her sister for a little while, until most of them broke. Rho and his wife, Kristin, had no choice but to dump the plastic bits into the garbage since they knew their local recycling center wouldn’t accept such items. “It kind of dawned on us, that was us ― one family,” Rho said. “Let’s think of all the other families at this birthday party, all the families that come to Chuck E. Cheese’s for birthday parties every day ― that’s a huge amount of plastic waste. The magnitude of it started to dawn on us. How big an industry toys are, how much of an impact they could have if they were made sustainably.” That’s when Rho, who works as a product manager in the clean fuel industry by day, decided to develop Big Future Toys together with his wife. The burgeoning company makes magnetic building sets composed of FSC wood, which means the wood was harvested sustainably. It’s not just flimsy toys that immediately fall apart that are problematic. Major toy companies produce exorbitant amounts of plastic packaging that’s immediately thrown out, and they also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, among other issues.  Lego, for example, poses environmental concerns because of the extraction and refinement of oil required to make its toys. That’s where three-quarters of Lego’s carbon footprint comes from, Fast Company reported.  Lego said it’s working to make its products more sustainable, but that’s still a long way off. The company is investing about $150 million into identifying and implementing eco-friendly alternatives to its current materials by 2030.  In 2013, Hasbro ― the maker of Play-Doh ― vowed to reduce its packaging material, eliminate polyvinyl chloride (a type of plastic) from its packaging, and increase its use of recycled content, GreenBiz reported. Bell, of the company Waste Management, would like to see manufacturers utilize recycled content to make the toys, and encourages consumers to donate old toys. While there are some companies that are disrupting the market and crafting environmentally friendly toys, there aren’t many. Yoxo, for example, makes its toys out of recycled wood fiber and can be recycled again once consumers are finished with them. Green Toys manufactures its products from recycled milk jugs, yogurt cups and other types of recycled plastic. Finding such ecologically responsible items in big box stores isn’t common, though. “Overall, the sustainable toy market is still very much a niche type of thing,” Rho said. “You’re not going to find these really sustainable options when you walk into Toys R Us. Or it’s going to be a very limited selection.” If buying sustainable toys isn’t an option, Rho suggests scaling back on the amount of items families buy for kids. “This will sound crazy coming from a toy company ― maybe you don’t buy a toy, maybe you substitute an experience, a trip to the zoo or to a great show,” Rho said. “It reduces clutter in your home and you’re not using so many natural resources.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

10 мая, 17:24

There's A Huge Problem With Kids' Toys That No One's Talking About

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); This story is part of a series on ocean plastics. There’s nothing quite like seeing the look of sheer joy on a child’s face after handing him a brand new, shiny gift. That is, until you consider just how damaging an effect said present will have on the world he’s going to inherit. The toy industry is massive. It hit $20.36 billion in sales last year and shows no sign of slowing down ― nor does the negative impact it’s having on the environment. Plastic toys, which tend to be inexpensive and vibrantly colored, account for 90 percent of the market, according to a plastics trade magazine. And while they pose the same risks as any other plastic item, these cheap playthings often have shorter life spans than high-quality toys and are pretty much impossible to recycle.  “If it’s a flimsy plastic toy that clearly isn’t going to have more than a lifetime of a few days or weeks, would you really want to be getting that material?” Kevin Brigden, senior scientist at Greenpeace International Science Unit, told HuffPost. “As soon as you open it, you’ll be putting it into the waste stream.” Heck, even pricier plastic toys will get thrown out someday. And while they might not land in the trash right away, they can’t be recycled either. Environmentalists have a number of pressing concerns when it comes to the way in which plastic is interacting with the environment. In 2014, Americans generated about 33 million tons of plastic. The year before, only 9.5 percent of plastics were recycled, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. But the scope of the issue is so severe, experts say they can’t even pinpoint accurate figures to define the problem. One of the things that separates plastic toys from other plastic objects is that they’re essentially destined for the landfill, said Brent Bell, vice president of recycling at Waste Management, a company that provides recycling solutions to businesses and residences in North America.  “There are really very few toys that are good candidates for recycling,” Bell told HuffPost. Plastic toys pose a unique challenge because they’re typically composed of other materials too, such as metals. The recyclable components can’t be separated out, and become prohibitive for recycling centers, Bell explained. It’s not just the environmental impact that advocates are concerned about. The health effects of the chemicals used in the manufacturing of plastic toys are not fully known, but at least one type of common chemical, called phthalates ― which is used to soften soys ― has been linked to a number of health issues, including birth defects, cancer and diabetes, The New York Times reported in 2014. And since children often put toys in their mouths, they’re at an increased risk.  Environmental experts say to look to the products of eras past ― when toys were made from durable materials that could be passed down from one generation to the next. Before World War II, heavy-duty toys were the standard. But once metal became hard to come by, plastics took over ― and have dominated the industry ever since.  Items made from wood, cotton, metal and natural rubber are considered feasible alternatives to plastic toys.  While other plastic products, like soda bottles, are becoming increasingly worrisome to environmentalists, they’re actually more manageable than plastic toys. Plastic soda bottles are composed of one uniform type of plastic, and the major beverage companies have made their bottles entirely recyclable. While this doesn’t necessarily mean consumers are always recycling these products, at least the potential is there. Soft drink companies also have the opportunity to produce refillable bottles, which can keep the products in use. Toys typically serve one role and can’t be repurposed. Another issue with plastic toys is the rate at which they’re being consumed. Children receive plastic toys for birthdays and holidays, in gift bags at parties and inside cereal boxes and meals at fast food restaurants. These types of trinkets often occupy a kid’s attention for a short amount of time and then get discarded. Or, the playthings can be made from such insufficient materials that they’ll fall apart after just a few uses and quickly wind up in the trash. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58fed37be4b0c46f0781d426,590e00c0e4b0d5d9049ceb53,58ee9ec1e4b0b9e984891ddf,58e99a38e4b05413bfe3792d “You have all these toys ― they’re cheap, they’re made out of plastic, they break easily. Most of the time they end up in the trash,” said Steve Rho, CEO of sustainable toy company Big Future Toys. “It was totally incongruent for us to buy these toys for our kids for their edification and enjoyment. We’re actually harming their environment that they’re going to live in for the rest of their lives.” It hit Rho just how detrimental plastic toys are after he took one of his daughters to a birthday party at a Chuck E. Cheese’s location in Los Angeles. At the end of the event, all of the kids received a bag about the size of a 2-gallon milk jug, filled to the brim with “kitschy cheap little toys,” Rho said. When his daughter got home, she played with the toys with her sister for a little while, until most of them broke. Rho and his wife, Kristin, had no choice but to dump the plastic bits into the garbage since they knew their local recycling center wouldn’t accept such items. “It kind of dawned on us, that was us ― one family,” Rho said. “Let’s think of all the other families at this birthday party, all the families that come to Chuck E. Cheese’s for birthday parties every day ― that’s a huge amount of plastic waste. The magnitude of it started to dawn on us. How big an industry toys are, how much of an impact they could have if they were made sustainably.” That’s when Rho, who works as a product manager in the clean fuel industry by day, decided to develop Big Future Toys together with his wife. The burgeoning company makes magnetic building sets composed of FSC wood, which means the wood was harvested sustainably. It’s not just flimsy toys that immediately fall apart that are problematic. Major toy companies produce exorbitant amounts of plastic packaging that’s immediately thrown out, and they also contribute to greenhouse gas emissions, among other issues.  Lego, for example, poses environmental concerns because of the extraction and refinement of oil required to make its toys. That’s where three-quarters of Lego’s carbon footprint comes from, Fast Company reported.  Lego said it’s working to make its products more sustainable, but that’s still a long way off. The company is investing about $150 million into identifying and implementing eco-friendly alternatives to its current materials by 2030.  In 2013, Hasbro ― the maker of Play-Doh ― vowed to reduce its packaging material, eliminate polyvinyl chloride (a type of plastic) from its packaging, and increase its use of recycled content, GreenBiz reported. Bell, of the company Waste Management, would like to see manufacturers utilize recycled content to make the toys, and encourages consumers to donate old toys. While there are some companies that are disrupting the market and crafting environmentally friendly toys, there aren’t many. Yoxo, for example, makes its toys out of recycled wood fiber and can be recycled again once consumers are finished with them. Green Toys manufactures its products from recycled milk jugs, yogurt cups and other types of recycled plastic. Finding such ecologically responsible items in big box stores isn’t common, though. “Overall, the sustainable toy market is still very much a niche type of thing,” Rho said. “You’re not going to find these really sustainable options when you walk into Toys R Us. Or it’s going to be a very limited selection.” If buying sustainable toys isn’t an option, Rho suggests scaling back on the amount of items families buy for kids. “This will sound crazy coming from a toy company ― maybe you don’t buy a toy, maybe you substitute an experience, a trip to the zoo or to a great show,” Rho said. “It reduces clutter in your home and you’re not using so many natural resources.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Выбор редакции
07 мая, 12:24

Lebanon battles pollution with first zero-waste project

Lebanon battles pollution with first zero-waste project Lebanon's first zero-waste management programme was launched in 2016 and has helped tackle the country's garbage crisis. Workers separate recyclables from biodegradable material by hand and natural waste is made into compost. Al Jazeera's Imtiaz Tyab reports from Beit Mery. - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: http://www.aljazeera.com/

05 мая, 15:33

Stericycle (SRCL) Beats Q1 Earnings, Updates 2017 Guidance

Stericycle, Inc. (SRCL) reported relatively healthy first-quarter 2017 results with modest improvement in revenues on a year-over-year basis.