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20 июля, 22:50

Remarks by President Trump at Pharmaceutical Glass Packaging Initiative Announcement

Roosevelt Room 3:05 P.M. EDT THE PRESIDENT:  Well, thank you very much.  Very exciting -- and exciting times at the White House.  A lot of things happening that are so great for our country.  I want to welcome Made in America Week.  This is what we call Made in America --right here, and they’re all here.  Some of the great business minds, businesses geniuses.  Congratulations fellas, that’s not a bad statement.  (Laughter.)  But they’re right here with us, and I’ll tell you it’s an honor to have them.  We’re continuing our celebration of American manufacturing, and it has been something very important to us -- Made in the USA, Made in America -- and our tribute to the skill, dedication, and grit of the American worker.  We’re showcasing products from all around the country that are stamped with the beautiful letters "Made in the USA."   Today I’m proud to welcome three more great companies -- we’ve had quite a few wonderful companies -- a little smaller generally speaking than yours, but every company is smaller than yours when you get right down to it to it -- to the White House for really a major announcement which you’ll be hearing:  Merck, Pfizer, and Corning.  These three companies are announcing that pharmaceutical glass packaging will now be made in America.  That’s a big step.  That’s a big statement.  We’re very proud of that.  Thank you very much, by the way.  And I know they wouldn’t have done it under another administration.  I feel confident.  These companies have formed a groundbreaking partnership to create thousands of American manufacturing jobs with this innovative new product.  It’s an incredible product.  Merck, Pfizer, and Corning are coming together to create an advanced pharmaceutical glass packaging operations, which include an immediate investment of at least $500 million and the creation of nearly 1,000 new jobs -- and quickly.   The initial investment will be spread across facilities in New York, New Jersey, and a new manufacturing plant in southeast of the United States -- they’re looking right now -- which Corning will be announcing in the coming months, and there’s some pretty good competition.  I know they’re going to make a great deal.   Eventually, the companies here today expect a total investment in this initiative to reach at least $4 billion and create some 4,000 American jobs.  And it’s very innovative on top of it.    This initiative will bring a key industry to our shores that for too long has been dominated by foreign countries.  We’re moving more and more companies back into the United States, and they’re doing more and more of these products.  And that would have been unheard of even a couple of years ago.   These companies have achieved a breakthrough in pharmaceutical glass technology that will be used to store and deliver injectable drugs and vials and cartridges.  This technology is not only great for American jobs and manufacturing, it’s great for patients who now will have access to safer medicines and vaccines.   It’s also great for the healthcare workers who can administer the drugs -- makes it much, much safer for them and safely without having any problems and worrying about vial-breaking, which, as I understand, is a tremendous problem that we’re not going to have anymore.    I know that Secretary Price and the FDA are committed to working with innovative companies like these.  We have tremendous excitement going on at the FDA.  Amazing things are happening there, and I think we’re going to be announcing some of them over the next two months.  We’re going to be streamlining, as we have in other industries, regulations so that advancements can reach patients quickly.  You’re going to see a big streamlining -- I think you already have.  To a large extent, you already have.  Very proud of that.    I especially want to thank Ken Frazier, Ian Read, and Wendell Weeks -- so three of the great, great leaders of business in this country -- along with all the great people at Merck, Pfizer, and Corning for believing in America and the American workers.  This announcement reflects a central theme of my administration that when we invest in America, it’s a win for our companies, our workers, and our nation as a whole. Every day, we are fighting to bring back our jobs, to restore our industry, and to put America first or, as you’ve heard, make America great again.  That’s exactly what we’re doing.  Some people have heard that expression.  It’s been fairly well-used, I think.   I want to thank you all for being here, and I want to thank you for your dedication to Made in America.  Really appreciate it very much, and I’d like to have you say a few words.  Come on up.  Thank you.  (Applause.)   END  3:10 P.M. EDT    

17 июля, 21:30

All the Presidents' Dirty Tricks

Politicians have done some grim things in pursuit of the presidency, but there have also been times when people did the opposite: behaving morally when it was easier not to.

17 июля, 17:59

Why Canada Is Able to Do Things Better

Most of the country understands that when it comes to government, you pay for what you get.

30 июня, 20:36

Hong Kong’s Handover and Canada’s Unsung Anthem: The Week in Global-Affairs Writing

The highlights from seven days of reading about the world

29 июня, 12:09

China 2017 - Artificial Intelligence Unleashed

http://www.weforum.org/ Artificial intelligence platforms are transforming the way businesses and governments interact with customers and constituents. As we grant more autonomy to AI to make choices on our behalf, how do we make sure it decides in our best interest? Speakers: - Pascale Fung, Professor, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong SAR - Vishal Sikka, Chief Executive Officer, Infosys, USA - Kamal Sinclair, Director, New Frontier Lab Programs, Sundance Institute, USA - Wendell Wallach, Scholar, Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, Yale University, USA - Ya-Qin Zhang, President, Baidu.com, People's Republic of China Moderated by: - Sumit Paul-Choudhury, Editor-in-Chief, New Scientist, United Kingdom

24 июня, 11:00

Евгеника и стерилизации в США

Власти Северной Каролины распорядились выплатить многомиллионные компенсации жителям штата, в начале и середине XX века пострадавшим от политики принудительной стерилизации. Возможности иметь детей их лишали в соответствии с популярным тогда учением о сохранении чистоты генофонда населения. Впрочем, евгеникой в США увлекались далеко не только в Северной Каролине — жертвами этой теории стали десятки тысяч американцев. […]

18 июня, 13:00

Who's Afraid of Free Speech?

What critics of campus protest get wrong about the state of public discourse.

12 июня, 13:23

Was Loving v. Virginia Really About Love?

Fifty years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws banning interracial marriage, but the issues involved in the case extended beyond its current popular understanding as a tribute to romance.

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08 июня, 04:03

The Greatest Hearings in American History

James Comey’s testimony joins the pantheon of dramatic congressional moments.

05 июня, 19:59

Trump's Tweets May Have Sunk His Travel Ban

The president fires off some ill-advised tweets confirming the legal arguments opposed to his policy

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28 мая, 14:00

Food stamps: a lifeline for America's poor that Trump wants to cut

Residents of the Congress Heights section of Washington DC tell of the devastating impact the president’s plan to cut food stamps would have on their families Wendell Britt does not know where he will sleep tonight. It might be a park bench, a pavement, a shelter – “You go to a shelter and they take your fucking phone” – or, if he’s lucky, a friend’s house. “Wherever I lay my head,” he says, wearing a Chicago Bulls cap.The 55-year-old also does not know where his next meal is coming from either – but he does have a lifeline. “Food stamps help me get food in my stomach,” he said this week. “They help a lot of people.” Continue reading...

05 мая, 17:17

South Africa 2017 - Achieving Inclusive Growth

http://www.weforum.org/ The Co-Chairs of the World Economic Forum on Africa highlight the imperatives for the year ahead and the implications for government, industry and society. This session was developed in partnership with CNBC Africa. - Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International, United Kingdom; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Siyabonga Gama, Group Chief Executive Officer, Transnet, South Africa; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Rich Lesser, Global Chief Executive Officer and President, Boston Consulting Group, USA; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa Chaired by - Bronwyn Nielsen, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Director, CNBC Africa, South Africa

04 мая, 20:15

South Africa 2017 - Press Conference: Meet the Co-Chairs of the World Economic Forum on Africa 2017

http://www.weforum.org/ The Co-Chairs Press Conference offers accredited media an opportunity to hear directly from the co-chairs about their expectations for meeting and their outlook for Africa. Speaker - Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International, United Kingdom - Siyabonga Gama, Group Chief Executive Officer, Transnet, South Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France - Rich Lesser, Global Chief Executive Officer and President, Boston Consulting Group, USA - Adrian Monck, Head of Public and Social Engagement, Member of the Managing Board, World Economic Forum - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland

04 мая, 19:37

South Africa 2017 - Africa Economic Outlook

http://www.weforum.org/ What is the regional economic outlook in 2017? Dimensions to be addressed: - Bouncing back from a weak economic performance in 2016 - Responding to policy uncertainty in the US, Europe and China - Preparing for threat of reversal of capital flows to emerging markets This session was developed in partnership with CNBC Africa. - Abdourahmane Cisse, Minister in Charge of the Budget and State-Owned Entities of Côte d'Ivoire; Young Global Leader - Malusi Gigaba, Minister of Finance of South Africa - Frédéric Lemoine, Chairman of the Executive Board, Wendel, France; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa - Wolfgang Schäuble, Federal Minister of Finance of Germany - Ulrich Spiesshofer, President and Chief Executive Officer, ABB, Switzerland; Co-Chair of the World Economic Forum on Africa Moderated by - Bronwyn Nielsen, Editor-in-Chief and Executive Director, CNBC Africa, South Africa

24 апреля, 15:53

GOODBYE, NANNY STATE: Joel Kotkin & Wendell Cox: The Politics of Migration: From Blue to Red. D…

GOODBYE, NANNY STATE: Joel Kotkin & Wendell Cox: The Politics of Migration: From Blue to Red. Democratic “blue” state attitudes may dominate the national media, but they can’t yet tell people where to live. Despite all the hype about a massive “back to the city” movement and the supposed superiority of ultra-expensive liberal regions, people […]

18 апреля, 03:52

Arkansas Court Blocks Executions As State Pushes Ahead With 'Conveyor Belt' Lethal Injections

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); A flurry of court rulings on Arkansas’ unprecedented attempt to execute eight prisoners in an 11-day span has temporarily spared the lives of two prisoners, while leaving the lives of other condemned killers in limbo.  The Arkansas Supreme Court, in a 4-3 decision on Monday, granted stays of execution for Bruce Ward and Don Davis. Both had been scheduled to die Monday, the first of what critics call the state’s “conveyor belt” plan for multiple executions.  “There will be no executions tonight. We are deeply grateful that the Arkansas Supreme Court has issued stays of execution for Bruce Ward and Don Davis,” Scott Braden, assistant federal defender in Arkansas, said in an email statement. State Attorney General Leslie Rutledge said she would immediately appeal. I will appeal Bruce Ward and Don Davis' stays of execution granted by the State Supreme Court to #SCOTUS this evening. #arpx #ARExecutions— Leslie Rutledge (@AGRutledge) April 17, 2017 Later, Rutledge’s office said she wouldn’t appeal Ward’s stay “at this time.” Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) criticized the state Supreme Court for sparing the two men. .@AsaHutchinson issues following statement on today's legal movements on tonight's possible execution #ARnews #ARpx pic.twitter.com/8cdILMV2sn— Greg Yarbrough (@GregYarbrough) April 17, 2017 Soon after the state Supreme Court ruling, a federal appeals court lifted stays for five of the condemned inmates that had been put in place on Saturday. That case challenges the state’s method of performing the executions. A stay for prisoner Jason McGehee was granted in a separate case on Friday. In Monday’s ruling, the U.S. Eight Circuit Court of Appeals said the five inmates had ample time already to file objections to the execution protocol, and only acted at the last minute. Judge Jane Kelly, in a dissent, argued the the case was about more than which drugs are used to put inmates to death, and questioned whether Arkansas was in line with the Eight Amendment’s “evolving standards of decency.” The state is aggressively moving to thin its death row before its supply of midazolam ― a controversial sedative in the lethal-injection cocktail ― expires in April. Hutchinson has said he’s unsure where the state can get more. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related... + articlesList=58ebaadae4b0c89f91203057 Despite the federal appeals ruling, a state court ruling remains in place that blocks the state Department of Corrections from using pancuronium bromide ― a second drug in the lethal three-drug mixture. The state temporary restraining order was granted Friday by Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who has since become controversial for attending a death penalty protest hours after his ruling.  Drugmaker McKesson Medical-Surgical sought the order to prevent the state from using the drug after learning the corrections department had obtained it for executions, which the company doesn’t permit. A day after winning the restraining order, the company filed to withdraw its petition, saying the federal ruling that stayed the executions made the state court order unnecessary.  Griffen drew criticism from Republican lawmakers for taking part in Friday’s protest. Griffen faces potential disciplinary action and was removed from all death penalty-related criminal and civil cases in Pulaski County.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

17 апреля, 14:24

Monday's Morning Email: U.S. Puts North Korea On Notice

TOP STORIES (And want to get The Morning Email each weekday? Sign up here.) TENSIONS CONTINUE TO ESCALATE WITH NORTH KOREA The U.S. is working with China and other allies to develop a list of appropriate responses to North Korea’s threats. According to South Korea, the country tried to launch a missile Sunday and failed. And Vice President Mike Pence cited recent attacks in Syria and Afghanistan as why North Korea should consider its next move carefully. The New York Times called it the “Cuban Missile Crisis in slow-motion.” [Reuters] HUNT IS ON FOR SUSPECT WHO ALLEGEDLY KILLED MAN IN FACEBOOK VIDEO “The chilling video, which was posted to Steve Stephens’ personal Facebook page around 2 p.m. local time, showed him driving in his car and complaining about a woman. He then approached an elderly black man, shot him at close range and drove off.” [HuffPost] ARKANSAS EXECUTIONS HALTED A federal judge temporarily blocked the executions of the eight men. And Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen, who blocked Arkansas from using a lethal injection drug, came under fire for protesting about the death penalty in front of the governor’s house. [Reuters] WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT TURKEY’S REFERENDUM And the country’s new constitution. [HuffPost] THE WHITE HOUSE POWER STRUGGLE CONTINUES Vanity Fair takes a lengthy look at the dynamics at play. Here’s why you should be paying attention to top economic aide Gary Cohn. And a look at a White House that is run “like a family business.” [Reuters] 68 SYRIAN CHILDREN KILLED After a suicide bomb hit a bus envoy carrying residents out of besieged towns. [HuffPost] HOW AN ALL SPORTS COLLEGE FAILED, AND DESTROYED ITS STUDENTS “My dad, who’s in prison, is eating better than we were at that school.” [ESPN] ‘WHAT WAS SAVED’ “Ten years after the Virginia Tech shooting, objects of grief.” [WaPo] WHAT’S BREWING UNITED CHANGED ITS LAST-MINUTE CREW BOARDING POLICY To ensure this public relations nightmare never happens again. All the while, Delta changed its policy so that it can pay you up to $9,950 to volunteer to switch flights. [HuffPost] YES, MELISSA MCCARTHY WAS SPICEY IN AN EASTER BUNNY COSTUME FOR ‘SNL’ THIS WEEK Our lives are truly complete. And Harry Styles’ solo performance and that Jared Kushner skit were just icing on the cake. [HuffPost] APRIL THE GIRAFFE FINALLY GAVE BIRTH It is now safe to go on Facebook again without 7 zillion notifications about the impending arrival. [HuffPost] ‘THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS’ JUST HAD THE LARGEST GLOBAL BOX OFFICE OPENING WEEKEND EVER This is in fact the eighth in the franchise of a movie about car chases. Some things never change. [HuffPost] WELL THAT’S IT: A VOICE OF OUR GENERATION IS OFF THE AIR The “Girls” finale aired last night so prepare yourself for an onslaught of think pieces. Check out Matt Zoller Seitz’s interview with show runners Jenni Konner and Lena Dunham as well as this look at the best quotes  throughout “Girls” six seasons and what it was like to grow up with the show. [HuffPost] PRINCE HARRY IS ALL OVER THE NEWS For his secret Easter visit to see girlfriend Meghan Markle, his frank discussion of the impact of his mother’s death and what the palace plans to do this summer to commemorate the 20th anniversary of Princess Diana’s death. [HuffPost] WE ARE COUNTING DOWN THE DAYS Until Netflix releases the TV version of “Where In The World Is Carmen Sandiego?” [HuffPost] BEFORE YOU GO What the proposed tax cuts could mean. In case you missed it ― the first trailer for “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” dropped. The last known person to be born during the 1800s has died. Sounds like Radiohead’s Coachella set did not go as planned. We don’t know how we feel about the new Oreo flavor. What is this clear coffee magic? Now that’s our kind of Easter Egg hunt: A helicopter dropped over 45,000 eggs from the air. The “Survivor” contestant who outed another contestant claims he has been fired from his job because of it. A rotating restaurant killed this 5-year-old after he became stuck. A suspect has been arrested in the killing of 27-year-old jogger in Massachusetts. “Meet the Catholic priest whose Twitter puts Trump to shame.” The death of the allure of Facebook instant articles for publishers. Instagram stories have turned out to be a nightmare for Snapchat. What happened to Curt Schilling? CORRECTION: This post has been updated to reflect the name and position of Judge Wendell Griffen, who protested the death penalty in Arkansas. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 апреля, 23:49

Judge Who Blocked Use Of Execution Drug Blasted For Anti-Death Penalty Protest

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Amid the legal battle over Arkansas’ plan to execute as many as eight prisoners in 11 days, one of the judges that ruled against the state has angered death penalty supporters with a dramatic protest of capital punishment. On Friday, Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen issued a temporary restraining order blocking Arkansas from using its supply of vecuronium bromide, one of three drugs in its lethal injection cocktail. Griffen granted the order after McKesson Medical-Surgical, which does not want its product used in executions, petitioned to stop the state on the grounds that the drug had been misleadingly obtained. Within an hour of issuing that order, Griffen joined anti-death penalty protesters gathered outside Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson’s mansion in Little Rock. Griffen was dressed as an inmate and bound to a cot with ropes to look like a condemned prisoner on a gurney.   RIGHT NOW: Judge Wendell Griffen protesting #Arkansas #executions in front of Governor's Mansion by laying on a gurney. #ARNews pic.twitter.com/16Myw4vHiu— Mitchell McCoy (@MitchellMcCoy) April 14, 2017 Arkansas Republicans including U.S. Sen. Tom Cotton and state Sen. Trent Garner quickly criticized Griffen’s protest. On Saturday, Garner called for the judge to resign or face impeachment.  Judge Griffen should resign immediately, or face impeachment. His actions are a disgrace and unacceptable. #arpx #arleg #impeachment https://t.co/NYJLqT9Wqj— Senator Trent Garner (@Garner4Senate) April 15, 2017 Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge (R) raised the issue of Griffen’s protest in a motion to have his temporary restraining order thrown out and him removed from the case. The state argued that Griffen couldn’t be considered even “remotely impartial” when it comes to the death penalty. “As a public opponent of capital punishment, Judge Griffen should have recused himself from this case,” a spokesman for Rutledge said in a statement. “Attorney General Rutledge intends to file an emergency request with the Arkansas Supreme Court to vacate the order as soon as possible.” The state also took issue with a recent post on Griffen’s personal blog, which interweaves justice and religion. The judge wrote: Premeditated and deliberate killing of defenseless persons ― including defenseless persons who have been convicted of murder ― is not morally justifiable. Using medications designed for treating illness and preserving life to engage in such premeditated and deliberate killing is not morally justifiable.  type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related Coverage + articlesList=58f16b81e4b0bb9638e42e51 Griffen, a former Baptist minister and a lawyer, has faced criticism for his off-the-bench commentary before. He criticized the University of Arkansas’ lack of racial diversity in 2002 and attacked President George W. Bush for the government’s response to Hurricane Katrina and the Iraq War in 2005. The latter may have been part of the reason he lost his re-election bid for the Arkansas Court of Appeals a few years later. In 2011, he won a seat on the state’s 6th Circuit court. “We have never, in my knowledge, been so afraid to admit that people can have personal beliefs yet can follow the law, even when to follow the law means they must place their personal feelings aside,” Griffen told The Associated Press on Saturday. Griffen’s ruling on Friday had put another wrench in the state’s plan to start the series of eight executions on Monday and complete them before its supply of one hard-to-obtain lethal injection drug expired. Two of the eight prisoners had already been granted stays of execution when a federal judge on Saturday halted those of the remaining inmates on grounds that the state’s hasty schedule denied them due process.  McKesson Medical-Surgical moved to lift Griffen’s temporary restraining order following the federal court ruling, arguing that the order had become unnecessary.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

16 апреля, 00:26

Outcry after Arkansas judge who stayed executions joins anti-death penalty rally

Republican lawmakers questioned Judge Wendell Griffen’s impartiality after he lay bound on a cot following his ruling to halt executionsThe judge who on Friday barred Arkansas from executing six prisoners in rapid succession followed his ruling by attending an anti-death penalty rally, where he lay down on a cot and bound himself as though he were a condemned man on a gurney. Related: Arkansas executions: health giant sues state as federal judge issues injunction Continue reading...

15 апреля, 18:08

U.S. Judge Halts Arkansas Plan For Rapid Series Of Executions

By Steve Barnes LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Reuters) - A U.S. federal judge on Saturday temporarily blocked plans by Arkansas to carry out a rapid series of executions this month, after the inmates argued the state’s rush to the death chamber was unconstitutional and reckless. Arkansas, which has not carried out an execution in 12 years, planned to begin the lethal injections of at least six convicted murderers on Monday and complete the executions before the end of April. Since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty in 1976, no state has ever put as many inmates to death in as short a period. The ruling on Saturday by a federal court in Little Rock threatens that plan, as did an order on Friday by an Arkansas state judge. The federal judge, however, provided officials with an opportunity to address her concerns at a hearing on Monday. Arkansas had scheduled the fast-paced series of executions in order to beat the expiration date on its batch of one of the three drugs used in its lethal injection cocktail. U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker, in a 101-page ruling, found the state’s plan would deny the inmates their legal rights by depriving them of adequate counsel because prison officials allow only a single lawyer to be present for any execution. If the attorney had to rush out to file an emergency petition, it would deprive the inmate of a lawyer to witness the execution, Baker said. “The court finds that plaintiffs are entitled to a preliminary injunction based on their challenge to (the state’s) viewing policies, in their current form, as unreasonable restrictions of plaintiffs’ right to counsel and right of access to the courts,” Baker wrote. Baker ordered lawyers for the state and the death row prisoners to return to court on Monday with a revised plan for viewing the executions and having defense counsel present. Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge vowed to appeal the temporary restraining order. “It is unfortunate that a U.S. District Judge has chosen to side with the convicted prisoners in one of their many last-minute attempts to delay justice,” Judd Deere, a spokesman for Rutledge, said in a statement.   CONDEMNED PRISONERS The lawsuit behind the injunction was filed on behalf of nine condemned prisoners. One of them was never put into the execution schedule for April. Two others won stays of execution from state courts, leaving six of the original petitioners currently in line for their executions to be carried out. The state’s mixture of drugs used in executions has brought legal challenges, and Baker’s ruling on Saturday also raised questions about whether one of them, midazolam, was effective enough at preventing pain during executions. Arkansas employs potassium chloride in combination with vecuronium bromide and midazolam. The latter drug is intended to render the inmate unconscious before the other two chemicals are administered to paralyze the lungs and stop the heart. Governor Asa Hutchinson has said the state must act quickly because its midazolam supply expires at the end of the month. John Williams, attorney for some of the death row prisoners welcomed Baker’s ruling, saying it was legally sound and reasonable. “The unnecessarily compressed execution schedule using the risky drug midazolam denies prisoners their right to be free from the risk of torture,” he said in a statement. Critics have contended that the drug does not achieve the level of unconsciousness required for surgery, making it unsuitable for executions. Supporters have said it is effective, and the U.S. Supreme Court has authorized its use. On Friday, Arkansas Circuit Court Judge Wendell Griffen, an outspoken opponent of capital punishment, issued an order on Friday blocking the state from using vecuronium bromide after a petition from its maker, McKesson Medical-Surgical Inc. The company, along with other pharmaceutical makers, objects to its drug being used in executions. Rutledge filed an emergency petition with the Arkansas Supreme Court on Saturday seeking to overturn Griffen’s order.   (Reporting by Steve Barnes; Writing by Alex Dobuzinskis; Editing by Alistair Bell) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.