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22 февраля, 21:51

20 Craziest Fights in NHL History

As far back as anyone can remember, fighting has been a part of hockey and the NHL. We have the 20 craziest hockey fights in league history.

05 февраля, 15:44

The Washington Salon That Saved Liberalism

How the House of Truth spurred a wave of progressive breakthroughs—and what today’s Democrats can learn from it.

01 февраля, 20:54

A Jeffersonian for the Supreme Court

Neil Gorsuch’s record suggests a willingness to transform the law and to enforce constitutional limitations on the excesses of Congress and the president.

30 января, 19:09

Clarence Thomas Should Be Trump's Model When Selecting Scalia's Replacement

The late Antonin Scalia was almost universally regarded as a brilliant jurist who not only wrote more beautifully than any Supreme Court justice since Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. but also transformed the nature of constitutional interpretation itself. President Trump stated during the election campaign that he would "appoint judges very much in the mold of Justice Scalia." It is also Scalia's seat that the president will be nominating someone to fill on Thursday. The current cacophony about which judge on the president's short list is the most "Scalia-esque" is therefore understandable. But it is misguided. I mean no disrespect to Justice Scalia--his Supreme Court opinions are the most fun for law professors to teach because he wrote so well--but the justice the president should be using as a model when selecting Scalia's replacement is Clarence Thomas. Why? For two primary reasons. First, because no justice in the history of the Court has understood the connection between our nation's two founding documents, the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States, better than Justice Thomas. He has been reading, writing, and speaking about the subject since his days as chairman of the EEOC during the Reagan Administration. Although opponents of Thomas's nomination to the Court a quarter of a century ago, such as Harvard's Laurence Tribe, tried to use Thomas's commitment to the principles of the Declaration against him, they were foolish to do so. After all, Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration in 1776 as "an expression of the American mind," Abraham Lincoln invoked the Declaration in the 1850s and '60s to help end slavery, and Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963 was sown from the Declaration's promise that every person in America would one day live in a nation "where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character." Justice Thomas shares this vision of the American regime. For example, he reminded the faculty and students of James Madison University in Virginia that Madison, the chief architect of the Constitution, based the Constitution on "universal principles, [which] we find ... most succinctly and, indeed, elegantly stated by Madison's close friend, Thomas Jefferson, in our Declaration of Independence." Thomas went on in his speech to describe how the Constitution secures the rights promised to all Americans by the Declaration. President Trump would be well served by reading Justice Thomas's James Madison Day Lecture. He also should read Thomas's Lincoln Day address to the Claremont Institute. That speech, in my judgment, is the most significant speech about the Declaration since Rev. King's "I Have a Dream." There, Thomas urges the American people "to be ever vigilant in reminding us--me and everyone else who has the privilege of serving our nation through public office--of the principles of our Founding and how they apply to the controversies of our time." The second reason that President Trump should use Justice Thomas as a model when selecting Scalia's replacement is less jurisprudential than the first, but at the present moment in American politics--arguably the meanest and the most uncivil in our history--it is probably more important. Justice Scalia, for all his skill as a literary stylist, sometimes crossed the line with his impassioned rhetoric. And as we all know, the presidential election campaign that led to Donald Trump's victory was frequently caustic, to put it mildly, and the opening days of the new Administration have not deviated from that path. Thomas, in contrast, has an unparalleled reputation on the Court for being kind to everyone, no matter what their station in life. He mentors young persons. He visits people in the hospital. He lingers after speeches and events until everyone who wants to meet him, ask him a question, or take a photograph with him has had a chance to do so. He knows the names of everyone who works at the Court and he cares about them and their families. And when you interact with him one on one, as I have been fortunate enough to do on a couple of occasions, he wants to talk about you, not about himself. The Supreme Court could use another justice like Clarence Thomas, and so could the American people. Let's hope that President Trump realizes it too. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

29 января, 22:44

What History Teaches Us About Trump's Immigration Order

Political lessons from 1850.

27 января, 19:51

Trump's ‘America First’ policy will help Trinidad and Tobago, official says

US President Donald Trump’s “America First” policy can assist Trinidad and Tobago in its efforts to become a regional energy hub. That is according to Wendell Motley who heads the Trinidad and Tobago government Energy Task Force, established in part, to help realize the island’s move to be a conduit for energy products in the greater Caribbean.

25 января, 13:26

26 Strangest Sports Superstitions

Modern sports are full of crazy routines and superstitions about curses. In this article, we have compiled the 26 strangest sports superstitions.

23 января, 23:44

Did Jeff Sessions forget wanting to execute pot dealers?

By John Donohue and Max Schoening, Stanford University Before the Senate Judiciary Committee votes on Jeff Sessions' nomination to be attorney general, senators should demand an explanation for the sudden bout of amnesia he had at his nomination hearing earlier this month. When Sen. Patrick Leahy asked him about his past support for imposing mandatory death sentences on people twice convicted of dealing marijuana, Sessions smiled and claimed to have a foggy memory. "Well, I'm not sure under what circumstances I said that," he told the committee. Perhaps this will refresh Sessions' memory: In 1996, when serving as Alabama's attorney general, he promoted H.B. 242, S.B. 291, a state bill to establish mandatory death sentences for a second drug trafficking conviction, including for dealing marijuana. His support for the bill was reported at the time by several local newspapers, as well as The Alabama Lawyer, the Alabama State Bar's official publication. The Alabama Lawyer described the bill as part of a legislative package that Sessions and then-Governor Fob James proposed to "fix a broken system." On Feb. 29, 1996, for example, The Huntsville Times reported that the proposed package of bills to fight crime by "ending parole, eliminating part of the appeals in death penalty cases, and executing people twice convicted of being drug kingpins" had drawn "praise from Attorney General Jeff Sessions." The drug bill was advertised as targeting "kingpins," but to qualify for execution, the defendant merely needed to lead a group of five people and make the minimum wage in drug proceeds. Alabama's minimum wage was US$4.25 per hour in 1996. We teach and study death penalty law, but you didn't need to be an expert to know that the bill to execute drug dealers would "never pass constitutional muster," as The Huntsville Times then reported. That's because by 1987, the Supreme Court had completely banned mandatory death sentences. The court ruled that the individual circumstances of the crime and defendant must always be considered. Furthermore, in 1977, the high court had held that even in cases of rape, the death penalty is "grossly disproportionate," "excessive" and therefore unconstitutional. Despite Sessions' support, the Alabama bill never passed. Presumably, the Alabama legislature had a better understanding of wise policy and the Constitution than their attorney general did. Making a broken system worse At his nomination hearing, Sessions said that he currently does not support mandatory executions for drug trafficking. But the fact that he once supported it in direct violation of established constitutional law is deeply troubling, especially in light of his direct knowledge, as Alabama attorney general, of the prosecutorial misconduct, racial bias and systematically weak defense lawyering that permeated the state's capital system. As the state's top attorney between 1995 and 1997, Sessions sought to uphold more than 40 death sentences, even in the most questionable circumstances. For example, Sessions knew that during trial, prosecutors had hidden DNA-related evidence from Larry Padgett that pointed to his innocence. Yet Sessions still tried to convince the Alabama Supreme Court to uphold Padgett's death sentence. Thankfully, Sessions was unable to persuade Alabama's highest court. Padgett was exonerated at his second trial. Sessions also worked to uphold the death penalty against defendants who'd received grossly inadequate legal representation, such as Jimmy Lee Dill. At the guilt phase of Dill's trial, his lawyers didn't call a single witness. They thus failed to present evidence that the victim died due to improper medical care, more than nine months after Dill shot him during a drug deal gone awry. The attorneys also failed to submit mitigating evidence at sentencing, telling the judge that "we were just blank on submitting it." Had they tried harder, the attorneys would have found powerful mitigating evidence: Dill was intellectually disabled and had been sexually abused as a child, according to Bryan Stevenson, the renowned public interest lawyer who took on his case a month before he was executed in 2009. Dill was represented at trial by court-appointed lawyers whose compensation for out-of-court preparation was capped at $1,000 by Alabama law. This is very low pay given the time-intensive nature of capital defense work. A study of federal capital trials in the 1990s found that defense attorneys spent an average of 1,480 out-of-court hours preparing death penalty cases. As Alabama attorney general, Sessions could have sought reforms to address the glaring flaws in his state's capital system. Instead, he chose to promote policies such as executing small-time drug dealers, and reducing death penalty appeals in a state where judges were already overriding jury decisions against the death penalty. Sessions' purported forgetfulness at his nomination hearing can be explained in two ways. One explanation is that he lied under oath and actually remembered supporting the bill. Indeed, Sessions also may have been reminded by a New York Times op-ed we published the day before his hearing, which highlighted his support for the bill. Alternatively, President Trump's pick for attorney general really did forget promoting the legislation. This possible explanation is perhaps more frightening: that Sessions couldn't recall advocating to kill drug dealers would suggest that he didn't give much thought to backing such an extreme and unlawful policy. At the end of the day, we need an attorney general who is trustworthy, understands the demands of the Constitution and respects them, and has good judgment on criminal justice enforcement policy. The record of Jeff Sessions as Alabama's attorney general and his current evasiveness about his prior support for a mandatory death penalty for marijuana dealers raises concerns on all these grounds. John Donohue, C Wendell and Edith M Carlsmith Professor of Law, Stanford University and Max Schoening, Law Student, Stanford University This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 22:05

New York Times Apologizes For Much-Ridiculed Story About Fathers

The reporter and editor responsible for publishing a much-derided New York Times story about fathers are sorry for running the article, they told The Huffington Post Monday morning. “It was a bad idea from the get-go,” said Wendell Jamieson, the editor who oversees the Times’ Metro section, where the story appeared on Sunday. “It was conceived with the best intentions, but it fell flat. And I regret it.” Filip Bondy, the freelancer who wrote the story, said, “Sorry, sorry, sorry.” The Times story, “How Vital Are Women? This Town Found Out as They Left to March,” ran the day after millions of women took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. The article, however, wasn’t about women or the extraordinary political challenges they’re likely to face under President Donald Trump. Rather, it focused on upper-class suburban dads in the liberal enclave of Montclair, New Jersey, who on Saturday had to ― gasp! ― look after their own children while their wives marched for equality. “Routines were radically altered,” Bondy noted in the story, explaining that fathers had to bring kids to play dates and sports events. They also apparently had to feed the children: “Growling stomachs required filling on a regular basis.” Breaking news: Fathers care for their kids! The piece seemed to reinforce three old-fashioned tropes about gender and parenting: Men can’t handle parenting tasks; men who manage to handle the basics of parenting are exceptional and worthy of a news story; and parenting is fundamentally the work of women. Moms sometimes leave their kids with dad for a few hours and the NYT is ON IT. @NYTOnIthttps://t.co/4oUgr3ySNA— Ben Casselman (@bencasselman) January 23, 2017 .@nytimes @filipbondy perpetuates 1950's fiction that doing family work is not a normal part of fatherhood. Should stick to sports writing. https://t.co/frrXaZKzVP— Melissa Cresswell (@msweetk) January 23, 2017 I took care of my kids while my husband was away for work last week. @nytimes when would you like to interview me?https://t.co/C41dyMfPpL— Corinne Purtill (@corinnepurtill) January 23, 2017 By treating “men perform parental duties” as headline news, the Times’ story came across as an artifact from some earlier era ― maybe 1983, when the Michael Keaton comedy “Mr. Mom” presented a dad taking care of his own children as a wacky, topsy-turvy scenario. Bondy, a 65-year-old freelancer and former sportswriter for the Daily News, read the critical tweets on Sunday while he was babysitting for his 5-year-old granddaughter at home. His daughter-in-law was traveling back from the Washington march. “I deserved it,” he said of the response to his story. Bondy ― who, like many journalists, including a number of New York Times staffers, lives in Montclair ― said he should have known better. He did a lot of parenting work when he was raising his children along with his wife ― both of them working full-time, he said. “It was a piece about the women go off to war and what happens back home,” he said. “You know, more conventionally the men go off to war and the women stay home.” It was pointed out to Bondy that these days women go to war, too. The piece was meant to be lighthearted, he said. “But these are not light times.”  Bondy said he chose Montclair as the setting for his piece because its residents voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton.  That made the article’s misfire seem all the more poignant. “We all voted for Hillary, but don’t get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight-up 19th century,” tweeted Heather Havrilesky of New York magazine. (Havrilesky lives in California.) "We all voted for Hillary, but don't get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight up 19th century" https://t.co/xIa2JGJ8uB— Heather Havrilesky (@hhavrilesky) January 23, 2017 Jamieson told HuffPost that the story was conceived by men at the Times who thought it would be a “fun look” at what happens in a town when all the women are away. Jamieson noted that female editors on the Metro desk did look at the piece. Nevertheless, “we blew it,” he told HuffPost. While some critics on Twitter suggested the article is an example of what happens when newsrooms skew male, Jamieson disagreed. “Metro is a very gender-diverse department,” he said. The deputy editor of the Times’ Metro section, Dean Chang, also tweeted a mea culpa. “The tone was tricky, and we didn’t end up in the right place,” Chang wrote Sunday on Twitter. “But [Bondy] is a... fine man and a fine writer. I’ll take the blame.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

23 января, 22:05

New York Times Apologizes For Much-Ridiculed Story About Fathers

The reporter and editor responsible for publishing a much-derided New York Times story about fathers are sorry for running the article, they told The Huffington Post Monday morning. “It was a bad idea from the get-go,” said Wendell Jamieson, the editor who oversees the Times’ Metro section, where the story appeared on Sunday. “It was conceived with the best intentions, but it fell flat. And I regret it.” Filip Bondy, the freelancer who wrote the story, said, “Sorry, sorry, sorry.” The Times story, “How Vital Are Women? This Town Found Out as They Left to March,” ran the day after millions of women took to the streets around the world to stand up for their rights. The article, however, wasn’t about women or the extraordinary political challenges they’re likely to face under President Donald Trump. Rather, it focused on upper-class suburban dads in the liberal enclave of Montclair, New Jersey, who on Saturday had to ― gasp! ― look after their own children while their wives marched for equality. “Routines were radically altered,” Bondy noted in the story, explaining that fathers had to bring kids to play dates and sports events. They also apparently had to feed the children: “Growling stomachs required filling on a regular basis.” Breaking news: Fathers care for their kids! The piece seemed to reinforce three old-fashioned tropes about gender and parenting: Men can’t handle parenting tasks; men who manage to handle the basics of parenting are exceptional and worthy of a news story; and parenting is fundamentally the work of women. Moms sometimes leave their kids with dad for a few hours and the NYT is ON IT. @NYTOnIthttps://t.co/4oUgr3ySNA— Ben Casselman (@bencasselman) January 23, 2017 .@nytimes @filipbondy perpetuates 1950's fiction that doing family work is not a normal part of fatherhood. Should stick to sports writing. https://t.co/frrXaZKzVP— Melissa Cresswell (@msweetk) January 23, 2017 I took care of my kids while my husband was away for work last week. @nytimes when would you like to interview me?https://t.co/C41dyMfPpL— Corinne Purtill (@corinnepurtill) January 23, 2017 By treating “men perform parental duties” as headline news, the Times’ story came across as an artifact from some earlier era ― maybe 1983, when the Michael Keaton comedy “Mr. Mom” presented a dad taking care of his own children as a wacky, topsy-turvy scenario. Bondy, a 65-year-old freelancer and former sportswriter for the Daily News, read the critical tweets on Sunday while he was babysitting for his 5-year-old granddaughter at home. His daughter-in-law was traveling back from the Washington march. “I deserved it,” he said of the response to his story. Bondy ― who, like many journalists, including a number of New York Times staffers, lives in Montclair ― said he should have known better. He did a lot of parenting work when he was raising his children along with his wife ― both of them working full-time, he said. “It was a piece about the women go off to war and what happens back home,” he said. “You know, more conventionally the men go off to war and the women stay home.” It was pointed out to Bondy that these days women go to war, too. The piece was meant to be lighthearted, he said. “But these are not light times.”  Bondy said he chose Montclair as the setting for his piece because its residents voted overwhelmingly for Hillary Clinton.  That made the article’s misfire seem all the more poignant. “We all voted for Hillary, but don’t get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight-up 19th century,” tweeted Heather Havrilesky of New York magazine. (Havrilesky lives in California.) "We all voted for Hillary, but don't get it twisted. The division of labor in our homes is straight up 19th century" https://t.co/xIa2JGJ8uB— Heather Havrilesky (@hhavrilesky) January 23, 2017 Jamieson told HuffPost that the story was conceived by men at the Times who thought it would be a “fun look” at what happens in a town when all the women are away. Jamieson noted that female editors on the Metro desk did look at the piece. Nevertheless, “we blew it,” he told HuffPost. While some critics on Twitter suggested the article is an example of what happens when newsrooms skew male, Jamieson disagreed. “Metro is a very gender-diverse department,” he said. The deputy editor of the Times’ Metro section, Dean Chang, also tweeted a mea culpa. “The tone was tricky, and we didn’t end up in the right place,” Chang wrote Sunday on Twitter. “But [Bondy] is a... fine man and a fine writer. I’ll take the blame.” -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 января, 22:49

President Obama Grants Commutations

WASHINGTON – Today, the President granted commutation of sentence to 330 individuals: Abdulmuntaqim Ad-Deen – Baltimore, MD Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; District of Maryland Sentence: 235 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (October 8, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Lesly Alexis – Boca Raton, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine powder and more than 50 grams of cocaine base; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 384 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $1,000 fine (July 29, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 262 months' imprisonment. Gary J. Anderson – Barre, VT Offense: Possession with intent to distribute MDMA; distribution of MDMA; District of Massachusetts Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 16, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on July 18, 2017. Terry Anderson – Mabank, TX Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine; conspiracy to launder money; Eastern District of Texas Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (May 1, 1997) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Kevin Lavon Andrews – Clearwater, FL Offense: Carrying or possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine; Middle District of Florida Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; 120 months' supervised release (February 11, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 156 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Daniel Ary, Jr. – Shreveport, LA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute; possession of a firearm in relation to drug trafficking; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 180 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (March 6, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Demetrius S. Autery – Winter Haven, FL Offense: Possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Middle District of Florida Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (April 4, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Connie Avalos – Menifee, CA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Eastern District of Kentucky Sentence: Life imprisonment (November 30, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 235 months, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug abuse treatment. Derrick L. Baines – Kansas City, MO Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 27, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Tonya Barney – Ivins, UT Offense: Possession of methamphetamine with intent to distribute; District of Utah Sentence: 204 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 10, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug abuse treatment. David Barren – Pittsburgh, PA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute over five kilograms of cocaine; conspiracy to structure financial transactions; concealment money laundering (31 counts); structuring (two counts); money laundering – avoid reporting requirements (six counts); promotion money laundering (2 counts); money laundering over $10,000 (seven counts); District of Maryland Sentence: Life imprisonment; 5 years’ supervised release (August 11, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug abuse treatment. Herman Barron, III – Brooklyn, NY Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (March 25, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Tony Barrow – New York, NY Offense: Importation of cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine; District of Puerto Rico Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; 4 years’ supervised release (November 16, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Senaca Bartlett – Chicago, IL Offense: Possess with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base (“crack cocaine”); Western District of Wisconsin Sentence: 210 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 29, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Christopher Bass – Orlando, FL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and more than 50 grams of cocaine base; Northern District of Florida Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (September 10, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment. Damion Rurshe Bates – Kalamazoo, MI Offense: Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack cocaine); Western District of Michigan Sentence: 210 months' imprisonment; 5 years' supervised release (February 22, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Todd Begley – Nashville, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; Middle District of Tennessee Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (April 27, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Carolyn Ann Bell – Lawton, OK Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (crack); Western District of Oklahoma Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (May 21, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Curtis Bell – Miami, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and cocaine base; distribution of cocaine and aiding and abetting; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release (May 22, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Henry P. Bennett, Jr. – Huger, SC Offense:         1. Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine; attempted possession with intent to distribute cocaine (three counts); possession with intent to distribute cocaine (three counts); District of South Carolina 2. Supervised release violation; District of South Carolina Sentence:        1. Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (December 18, 2008)                         2. 33 months’ imprisonment (concurrent) (December 18, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 273 months' imprisonment. Dorian Lee Benoit – Lake Charles, LA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine, cocaine base and marijuana; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute marijuana; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (April 30, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Christopher Bernard – Shreveport, LA Offense: Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (March 30, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Elaine Beston – Great Falls, MT Offense: Conspiracy to possess methamphetamine with intent to distribute; District of Montana Sentence: 192 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (July 16, 2008); amended to 180 months' imprisonment (July 20, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. James Zell Bishop – Bay Minette, AL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute crack cocaine; Southern District of Alabama Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (May 21, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Benjamin Blount – Oakdale, LA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (July 8, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Walter Bradberry – Mobile, AL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 28, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Alonzo F. Brooks – Asheville, NC Offense: Possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (February 26, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Adrian R. Brown – Athens, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possession with intent to distribute 15 kilograms or more of cocaine hydrochloride; conspiracy to knowingly conduct and attempt to conduct unlawful financial transactions affecting interstate commerce; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (April 12, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Jerome Brown – Pittsburgh, PA Offense:  Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Western District of Pennsylvania Sentence:  240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 11, 2009) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Rodney Rodriguez Brown – Atmore, AL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute crack cocaine; Southern District of Alabama Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 months’ supervised release (June 5, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Pamela Brownlee – Decatur, GA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute a detectable amount of cocaine base (three counts); Southern District of Florida Sentence: 188 months' imprisonment; four years' supervised release (December 19, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Thomas Burton – Plain Dealing, LA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; possession of firearms during a drug trafficking crime; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 17, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months' imprisonment. Tiara Buskey – Pensacola, FL Offense: Possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $500 fine (November 8, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Jeffrey Calhoun – Long Beach, CA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance (two counts); Central District of California Sentence: 264 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (September 8, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Willie Albert Cannon – Tampa, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a quantity of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (two counts); possession of a firearm; Middle District of Florida Sentence: 420 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (January 17, 1995); amended to 352 months’ imprisonment (June 12, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Jose Carmona – Philadelphia, PA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine; possession with intent to distribute heroin; Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 10, 1993) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Ramiro Cervantes – Blountsville, AL Offense: Attempting to possess with the intent to distribute a mixture and substance containing methamphetamine; Northern District of Alabama Sentence: 324 months' imprisonment; 120 months' supervised release; $2,000 fine (January 23, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 235 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. John Dennis Chapman – Piedmont, AL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute at least five kilograms of cocaine; conspiring to launder monetary instruments; Northern District of Georgia Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 4, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 168 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Raul Chavez – San Jose, CA Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture, distribute, and to possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine; Eastern District of California Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; 60 months' supervised release (December 18, 2000) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 262 months' imprisonment. Artrone Cheatham – Montgomery, AL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine base; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: 235 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (September 23, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Calvin Burkett Clark – Jefferson, SC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; District of South Carolina Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (May 13, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 168 months’ imprisonment. Kenneth Clark – Calumet City, IL Offense: Possession of cocaine base (crack) with the intent to distribute; Central District of Illinois Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (May 19, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 120 months’ imprisonment. Jeffrey Glynn Coleman – Milwaukee, WI Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of five kilograms of cocaine; Eastern District of Wisconsin Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (October 2, 2006); amend to 240 months' imprisonment (December 17, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Cassandra Collins – Jefferson, TX Offense:  Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Western District of Louisiana Sentence:  240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (April 4, 2008) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Ladarius Venice Cook – Florissant, MO Offense: Possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base (crack); felon in possession of a firearm; Eastern District of Missouri Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (June 28, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 200 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment.  Cortez Cooper – Harvey, IL Offense:         1. Possession with intent to distribute cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; Northern District of Illinois 2. Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute cocaine and cocaine base; use of a telephone in the commission of a felony drug trafficking offense (two counts); possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; Northern District of Illinois Sentence:        1. 120 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (January 29, 2004) 2. 240 months’ imprisonment (concurrent); eight years’ supervised release; $1,000 fine (August 2, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Trenton A. Copeland – Pensacola, FL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine; Northern District of Florida Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (March 23, 2012) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 168 months’ imprisonment. John Timothy Cotton – Houston, TX Offense: Continuing Criminal Enterprise; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (January 26, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment. Johnnie L. Cotton – Venice, IL Offense: Possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine; felon in possession of a firearm; Southern District of Illinois Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $900 fine (August 15, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Timothy G. Craig – Greenville, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine; District of South Carolina Sentence:  292 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (March 8, 2005) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Japlin Cureton – Charlotte, NC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and cocaine base; Western District of North Carolina Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; 8 years’ supervised release (September 29, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Steven Jermonte Cureton – Huntersville, NC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine base, cocaine, marijuana, and 3,4 methylenedioxymethamphetamine a/k/a ecstasy; Western District of North Carolina Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 11, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Keith Adell Dancer – Waco, TX Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute cocaine; Western District of Texas Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years’ supervised release; $3,000 fine (February 16, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment. Timothy Lashaun Dandridge – Midfield, AL Offense: Unlawful distribution of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base (three counts); unlawful possession with the intent to distribute a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base; unlawful possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Northern District of Alabama Sentence: 180 months’ imprisonment; 60 months’ supervised release (January 9, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Terrance H. Darby – Newark, NJ Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a crime; possession of a weapon by a convicted felon; District of New Jersey Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; four years' supervised release (April 3, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Emanuel Jurel Davidson – Columbus, OH Offense: Possession with intent to distribute in excess of 50 grams of cocaine base; Southern District of Ohio Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $2,000 fine (June 2, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Shondu Maurice Dawson – Raleigh, NC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute more than 50 grams of cocaine base (crack) and more than 500 grams of cocaine; carried a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime and possess said firearm in furtherance of such drug trafficking crime; Eastern District of North Carolina Sentence: 241 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (April 12, 2005); amended to 214 months' imprisonment (September 19, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Gary Allen Day – West Monroe, LA Offense: Possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (October 11, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Maria Aide Delgado – Weslaco, TX Offense:         1. Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine, 218.5 kilograms of marijuana (two counts); Southern District of Texas 2. Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine, cocaine base, and marijuana; Western District of Louisiana Sentence:        1. 100 months’ imprisonment; four years’ supervised release; $15,000 fine (October 10, 2007) 2. 240 months’ imprisonment (consecutive); 10 years’ supervised release (April 19, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence for conviction imposed in the Western District of Louisiana commuted to 110 months and unpaid balance of $15,000 fine imposed in the Southern District of Texas remitted when her sentence expires. Damon Andre Dill – Chester, PA Offense: Felon in possession of a firearm; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; possession with intent to distribute cocaine; Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: 322 months’ imprisonment; six years’ supervised release (September 5, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Qustion Dingle – Okeechobee, FL Offense: Possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base; possession of a quantity of crack cocaine; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; Southern District of Florida Sentence: 216 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release; $1,000 fine (May 1, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019 and unpaid balance of the $1,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Michael A. Douglas, Jr. – Lynchburg, VA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of a substance containing cocaine base; felon in possession of a firearm; Southern District of Indiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $1500 fine (April 25, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Dezmend Rashawn Doweary – Norfolk, VA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute heroin; Eastern District of Virginia Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 22, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Lourdes Castro Duenas – Mangilao, Guam Offense: Criminal conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine hydrochloride (ICE); possession of methamphetamine hydrochloride with intent to distribute; District of Guam Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 2, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug abuse treatment. Alton J. Easley – Kansas City, KS Offense: Possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of crack cocaine; conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 2, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Keith Edgerson – Ann Arbor, MI Offense: Felon in possession of a firearm; possession of a stolen firearm; possession with intent to distribute marijuana; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Eastern District of Michigan Sentence: 294 months’ imprisonment; four years’ supervised release (June 6, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Christopher Demetrius Elliott – Brandon, FL Offense: Possession of a firearm and ammunition by a convicted felon; possession of marijuana; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 180 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (May 14, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Carla Grace Engler – Dubuque, IA Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine (actual) within 1,000 feet of a protected location; attempting to manufacture five grams or more of methamphetamine (actual) within 1,000 feet of a protected location (two counts); possession of red phosphorus knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that it would be used to manufacture methamphetamine; failure to appear on pretrial release; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 361 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 12, 2006); amended to 325 months’ imprisonment (March 21, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 200 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Michael Delevan Engles – Tulsa, OK Offense: Felon in possession of a firearm (two counts); possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance, mixture or substance containing methamphetamine, and sentencing enhancement; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Northern District of Oklahoma Sentence: 420 months’ imprisonment; six years’ supervised release (February 24, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 270 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Travis J. Every – Harvey, LA Offense: Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base (2 counts); distribution of less than 500 grams of cocaine hydrochloride; distribution of five grams or more of cocaine base; conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Eastern District of Louisiana Sentence: 300 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (September 3, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 175 months’ imprisonment. Paul S. Fields – Emmalena, KY Offense: Manufacture of over 100 marijuana plants; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 188 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (July 26, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 10 years’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Linda Finch –Anniston, AL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); possession with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); Northern District of Alabama Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (April 1, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Carroll James Flowers – Galena, KS Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture or distribute more than one kilogram of methamphetamine; District of Kansas Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (June 19, 2002) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Chauncey Floyd – Spartanburg, SC Offense: Possession with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base and cocaine; District of South Carolina Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (August 26, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Lance Foster – Gary, IN Offense: Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base, commonly known as crack cocaine/aiding and abetting; Northern District of Indiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 15, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, and conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Stacy Dean Foster- Bethel, OK Offense: Attempt to manufacture methamphetamine; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; establishment of manufacturing operations; Eastern District of Oklahoma Sentence: 352 months’ imprisonment; 4 years’ supervised release (June 13, 2006); amended to 295 months’ imprisonment (August 17, 2016) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Robert L. Franklin – Montgomery, AL Offense: Engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise; possession with intent to distribute cocaine and aiding and abetting; distribution of cocaine base (2 counts); distribution of cocaine; carrying a firearm in relation to a drug trafficking charge; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: Life plus 60 months’ imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 22, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment James Anthony Frink – Chadbourn, NC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute more than 50 grams of cocaine base (crack); distribution of five grams or more of cocaine base (crack) and aiding and abetting (three counts); possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking offense; Eastern District of North Carolina Sentence: 187 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $9,050 fine (January 7, 2008); amended to 180 months’ imprisonment (December 16, 2014) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 and unpaid balance of the $9,050 fine remitted. Mike Fulton – Winterville, GA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession of firearm by convicted felon; Middle District of Georgia Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 5 years’ supervised release (January 10, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Melvin Fudge – Grand Rapids, MI Offense: Committing a drug trafficking offense within 1,000 feet of a school; Western District of Michigan Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $10,000 fine (October 28, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019 and unpaid balance of the $10,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Jose Luis Garcia – Gretna, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine (five counts); Eastern District of Louisiana Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $25,000 fine (March 20, 1996) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 300 months' imprisonment and unpaid balance of $25,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Juan Garcia – Tyler, TX Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute marijuana; aiding and abetting the possession with intent to distribute marijuana; witness tampering; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (September 28, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Raymond Garcia – Las Vegas, NV Offense: Conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance; possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance; District of Nevada Sentence: 293 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 13, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Rene Garcia, Jr. – Independence, MO Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; Western District of Missouri   Sentence: 327 months' imprisonment, five years' supervised release, $261,600 fine (September 3, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 and unpaid balance of $261,600 fine remitted. Antonio Maurice Gardner – Temple, TX Offense: Possession with intent to distribute at least five grams of “crack” cocaine, a Schedule II narcotic drug controlled substance, within 1,000 feet of a public school; aiding and abetting; Western District of Texas Sentence: 235 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (August 4, 2006); $1,000 fine Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Reginald Stern Gardner – Mason City, IA Offense:         1. Possession with intent to distribute 5 grams or more of cocaine base, cocaine, and marijuana after having previously been convicted of two felony drug offenses; Northern District of Iowa                         2. Escape from custody; Northern District of Iowa Sentence:        1. 360 months' imprisonment (consecutive); eight years' supervised release (May 12, 2004)                         2. 24 months' imprisonment (May 12, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 234 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Gregory A. Garton – Casper, WY Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute, and to distribute, methamphetamine, cocaine, and marijuana; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine and aiding and abetting; distribution of methamphetamine; felon in possession of a firearm; felon in possession of ammunition; carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime (three counts); District of Wyoming Sentence: 900 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $2,200 fine (April 9, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment and unpaid balance of $2,200 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Dustin Gary – Philadelphia, PA Offense:         1. Criminal conspiracy; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (crack); felon in possession of a firearm; Eastern District of Pennsylvania 2. Possession of a prohibited object (marijuana) while in prison; District of New Jersey Sentence         1. 292 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release, $1,500 fine (September 12, 2002); amended to 240 months’ imprisonment (July 8, 2008) 2. Six months’ imprisonment (consecutive) (October 17, 2011) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Robert Raymond Garza – Harlingen, TX Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 100 kilograms or more of marijuana; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (January 30, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months' imprisonment. Tavaris Gay – Miami, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Southern District of Florida Sentence: 200 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release; $5,000 fine (June 18, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 130 months’ imprisonment, and unpaid balance of $5,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Eric German – Haughton, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine; possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine; conspiracy to commit money laundering; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: Life imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (December 15, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 324 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Daniel Gilliam – Columbia, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute and distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base; District of South Carolina Sentence: 222 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 28, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Troy Gilmore ─ Eutawville, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine and cocaine base; conspiracy to launder money; District of South Carolina Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (September 10, 2004)  Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Terry Glasscock – Lebanon, KY Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute cocaine; using or carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime or possessing a firearm during, in relation to, and in furtherance of such crime; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 425 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (September 17, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 295 months' imprisonment. Earl Glenn, Jr. – Chester, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of a quantity of cocaine and 280 grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of crack cocaine; District of South Carolina Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (November 20, 2012) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 235 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Waymon Audra Goodley – Hillsboro, TX Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine; use of a communication facility to facilitate the commission of a drug felony (two counts); Eastern District of Texas Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (April 19, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 William Goodwill ─ Decatur, IL Offense: Distribution of fifty or more grams of cocaine base; Central District of Illinois Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (January 20, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Robby Joe Goram –Eight Mile, AL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to manufacture methamphetamine; Southern District of Alabama Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (November 12, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 140 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. William Leonardo Graham – Essex, MD Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; District of Maryland Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (November 6, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 300 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Wilbert Decosta Greaves – Jacksonville, NC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; distribution of cocaine base; Eastern District of North Carolina Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 60 months’ supervised release; $17,100 fine (January 4, 1996) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Charles Lee Green – Ville Platte, LA Offense: Distribution of cocaine base (crack); Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 300 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (March 23, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Samuel Green – Wilmington, DE Offense: Possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine; felon in possession of firearms; District of Delaware Sentence: 420 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (July 18, 1994); amended to 360 months’ imprisonment (June 12, 1997) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Vaughn Greene – Brooklyn, NY Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute at least five kilograms of cocaine and at least 1,000 kilograms of marijuana; Northern District of Georgia Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (July 1, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire May 19, 2017. Stuart John Greger – Glennville, GA Offense: Distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); Southern District of Georgia Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (December 7, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Tyrone Grimes – Inwood, NY Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute cocaine, cocaine base, and marijuana within 1,000 feet of a public elementary school; engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise, convicted felon in possession of a gun; Eastern District of New York; Sentence: 420 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (October 29, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment. Ricky Lee Groves – Smithfield, NC Offense: Continuing criminal enterprise; use of a firearm during a drug trafficking crime and aiding and abetting; trading food stamps for cocaine base and aiding and abetting (five counts); Eastern District of North Carolina Sentence: Life imprisonment plus 60 months' imprisonment, five years' supervised release (February 16, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment. Thaddeas Kulani Thomas Hall – Waipahu, HI Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; possession of a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; District of Hawaii Sentence: 180 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (June 16, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Forrest Hamm – Miami, FL Offense:         1. Possession of contraband (marijuana) in a federal correctional institution; District of New Jersey 2. Possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine; Middle District of Georgia 3. Supervised release violation; Southern District of Florida Sentence:        1. Two months' imprisonment (consecutive) (September 3, 2013)                         2. 262 months' imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (February 5, 2004)                         3. 30 months’ imprisonment (consecutive) (June 3, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Eddie Harley – Baltimore, MD Offense: Conspiracy to distribute a mixture containing cocaine, heroin, and cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute a mixture containing cocaine; possession with intent to distribute a mixture containing cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute a mixture containing heroin; District of Maryland Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (January 21, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Monica Haro – Mission, TX Offense: Conspiracy to commit money laundering; Western District of Texas Sentence: 188 months' imprisonment; three years' supervised release; $1,000 fine (November 12, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Anthony T. Harris – Murfreesboro, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine and some quantity of marijuana; distribution of 50 grams of crack cocaine within 1,000 feet of a protected area; Middle District of Tennessee Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (November 8, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Antone C. Harris – Indianapolis, IN Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base; Southern District of Indiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment’ 10 years’ supervised release (September 8, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Brandon W. Harris – Mt. Vernon, IL Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing methamphetamine; Southern District of Illinois Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $200 fine (May 3, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Clenneth J. Harris – Chattanooga, TN Offense: Possession of 50 grams or more of cocaine base for distribution; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (November 6, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Efrem Zemblish Harris – Tulsa, OK Offense: Conspiracy to possess cocaine with intent to distribute and to distribute cocaine in excess of five kilograms, cocaine base in excess of 50 grams, and a quantity of marijuana, and sentencing enhancement; conspiracy to use telecommunication facilities to commit or facilitate acts constituting a felony and sentencing enhancement; conspiracy to establish or maintain a location for the purpose of storing or distributing controlled substances and sentencing enhancement; possession of marijuana with intent to distribute; interstate travel in aid of racketeering; Northern District of Oklahoma Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $5,000 fine (June 5, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment and unpaid balance of $5,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires. Eric Harris – Philadelphia, PA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine base and marijuana; distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (four counts); distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine; possession with intent to distribute marijuana; possession of cocaine and cocaine base with intent to distribute within 1,000 feet of a school; Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 12 years' supervised release; $2,500 fine (January 19, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019 and unpaid balance of $2,500 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Linwood Claude Harris, Jr. – Monroe, GA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute crack cocaine; Northern District of Georgia Sentence: 250 months' imprisonment; 20 years' supervised release; $2,000 fine (February 10, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months’ imprisonment. Shaun Kevin Harris – Sutton, WV Offense: Cocaine conspiracy; aiding and abetting distribution of crack cocaine (two counts); distribution of crack cocaine; possession with intent to distribute crack cocaine; Northern District of West Virginia Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $5,000 fine (January 30, 2002) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Tyrone A. Harris – Spotsylvania, VA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute and to distribute cocaine base; Eastern District of Virginia Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; 60 months’ supervised release (August 15, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Charles Harrison – Charlotte, NC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute one kilogram or more of heroin; District of Columbia Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years’ supervised release; $25,000 fine (July 21, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 and unpaid balance of $25,000 fine remitted. Marlon R. Harrison – Savannah, GA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Southern District of Georgia Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 26, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Todd Lowell G. Haworth – Kina, ID Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine; District of Idaho Sentence: 276 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $2,000 fine (December 21, 2005); amended to 235 months' imprisonment (October 13, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Andre Haynes – Miami, FL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute at least 50 grams of cocaine base; Southern District of Florida Sentence: 202 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (January 25, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on October 16, 2017. Gregory Hearn – Kilgore, TX Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (April 2, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Antonio Jeron Hemphill – Rock Hill, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base; District of South Carolina Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 14, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Michael Henderson – Newark, NJ Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute heroin; Western District of North Carolina Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (December 24, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Walter Henry, III – Capitol Heights, MD Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin; aiding and abetting; unlawful possession with intent to distribute 100 grams or more of heroin (two counts); District of Columbia Sentence: Life imprisonment; four years’ supervised release (March 12, 2001) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Lejandra Deshawn Herman – Knoxville, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine hydrochloride; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 2, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Domingo Hernandez – Ledgewood, NJ Offense: Conspiracy to distribute controlled substance; unlawful transport of firearms; District of New Jersey Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (October 2, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months’ imprisonment. Jackie Hernandez – Park Forest, IL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute one kilogram or more of heroin; knowingly and intentionally used telephone in furtherance of a drug offense; Northern District of Indiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (October 23, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Keith Angelo Hernandez – Atlanta, GA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession of a firearm during commission of a crime; Northern District of Georgia Sentence: 322 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (January 25, 1996) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Ramiro Hernandez – Edinburg, TX Offense: Conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance; Eastern District of Wisconsin Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $8,400 restitution (March 13, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Hassan Hills – Pensacola, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine, 50 grams or more of cocaine base, and marijuana; Northern District of Florida Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $1,500 fine (December 19, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Eric Hinton – Ypsilanti, MI Offense: Distribution of a controlled substance (2 counts); Eastern District of Michigan Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 5 years’ supervised release (February 9, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Brian Douglas Hoggard – Coatesville, PA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); distribution of 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack) and aiding and abetting (2 counts); Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: 204 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $3,000 fine (March 27, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on July 19, 2018 and unpaid balance of the $5,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires. Lawrence Honore – New Orleans, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); Eastern District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (August 28, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Charles Allen House – Garden Grove, CA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine; Northern District of Texas Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (May 17, 1996) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Daniel Alfonso Jacobo – Cedar Rapids, IA Offense: Possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine mixture after a conviction for felony drug offense; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 10, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Walter Jenkins – Colorado Springs, CO Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute 50 grams of cocaine base and aiding and abetting; possession of firearms during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; possession of firearms during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime (second and subsequent conviction); District of Colorado Sentence: 720 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (August 8, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 322 months' imprisonment Antwaine Tacoma Johnson – Littleton, NC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base (crack); Eastern District of North Carolina Sentence: 183 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (December 11, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Dempsey Johnson – Kansas City, MO Offense: Conspiracy to distribute MDMA and cocaine base; Western District of Missouri Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (September 10, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 162 months’ imprisonment. Karmell Demetrius Johnson – Mobile, AL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute crack cocaine; use, carry, or possess a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Southern District of Alabama Sentence: Life plus 60 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 14, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017.   Thomas Johnson – Miami, FL Offense: Felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition; possession with intent to distribute five grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute a detectable amount of cocaine powder; Southern District of Florida Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment, eight years' supervised release (September 29, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Antonio D. Jones – Nashville, TN Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possession of firearms in relation to a drug trafficking offense; felon in possession of firearms; Middle District of Tennessee Sentence: Life plus five years' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (November 15, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Kiwanis Miyo Jones – Clayton, AL Offense: Controlled substance - sell, distribute, or dispense (4 counts); violent crime/drugs/guns; unlawful transport of firearms; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: Life plus 60 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 16, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 170 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Ryan K. Jones – Ste. Genevieve, MO Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine; possess a listed chemical used to manufacture methamphetamine; Western District of Wisconsin Sentence: 328 months’ imprisonment; three years’ supervised release (December 23, 2003); amended to 240 months’ imprisonment (May 18, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Wayne Jordan – Morrisville, PA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; distribution of methamphetamine; Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (April 1, 1998); amended to 324 months' imprisonment (January 29, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Bobby Dale Kelley – Coweta, OK Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine; Northern District of Oklahoma Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $5,000 fine (March 17, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Kenneth Earl Kelley – Mossy Head, FL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 500 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing methamphetamine; Northern District of Florida Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 23, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Corey Kelly – Camden, NJ Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than five grams of crack cocaine; distribution of crack cocaine (two counts); District of New Jersey Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 4 years’ supervised release; $2,000 fine (September 5, 2000) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. John Kelly – Monroe, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine base with prior narcotics convictions; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 12, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Alfred William Kemfort – Maui, HI Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; District of Hawaii Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 17, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Douglas Kennedy – Hillside, NJ Offense: Conspiracy to distribute narcotics; narcotics possession (three counts); possession of firearm in furtherance of a drug-trafficking crime (two counts) possession of a weapon by a convicted felon (two counts); District of New Jersey Sentence: 180 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (August 21, 2008); amended to 480 months’ imprisonment (July 2, 2013) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Robert Ketchledge – Delano, PA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute over 50 grams of cocaine base; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Southern District of Florida Sentence: 195 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (August 10, 2007); amended to 180 months' imprisonment (April 4, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Alonzo King – Kansas City, MO Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of crack cocaine following a prior felony drug conviction; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (August 26, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Moses King – North Charleston, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine; possession with intent to distribute cocaine; District of South Carolina Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (January 26, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Wendell Dean Kopp – Billings, MT Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribution of methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession of firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking offense (two counts); District of Montana Sentence: Life plus five years’ imprisonment (October 21, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Allan Aquino Lafuente – Kapolei, HI Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; distribution of five or more grams of methamphetamine (two counts); distribution of 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; possession of a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; District of Hawaii Sentence: 300 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $1,000 fine (September 14, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months’ imprisonment, and unpaid balance of $1,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires. Dennis Chan Lai – San Francisco, CA Offense:  Continuing criminal enterprise; possession with intent to distribute, aiding and abetting (31 counts); possession of illegal weapon (two counts); possession of weapon without serial numbers; Northern District of California Sentence:  Life plus 10 years’ imprisonment; five years’ parole (July 8, 1988) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Linnard O. Lawson – New Brighton, PA Offense:         1. Felon in possession of a firearm; possession with intent to distribute and distribution of 5 grams or more of a mixture and substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine base, commonly known as crack; Western District of Pennsylvania 2.  Possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; felon in possession of a firearm; Northern District of Ohio Sentence:        1. 120 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (August 26, 2009)                         2. Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $5,000 fine (October 6, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment and unpaid balance of $5,000 fine remitted when his sentence expires. Wendell Layne – Soddy Daisy, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; attempt to possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; aiding and abetting; distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; felon in possession of a firearm; obstruction of justice; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (January 3, 1997) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. James Marcus LeBlanc – Lake Charles, LA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine base; distribution of cocaine base (three counts); Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 120 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (January 14, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Tarry Cordell London – Mansfield, LA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession of a firearm in relation to drug trafficking; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 180 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (November 7, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Gilbert Lopez – Fayetteville, NC Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine; distribution of cocaine and aiding and abetting; conspiracy to launder drug proceeds; laundering of monetary instruments and aiding and abetting (14 counts); Eastern District of Pennsylvania Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release (September 13, 1993) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment James Keith Loveless – Pixley, CA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; District of Nebraska Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (June 30, 1997); amended to 292 months' imprisonment (December 17, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 James Lynch – Greenville, IN Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute in excess of 50 grams of methamphetamine (two counts); possession with intent to distribute in excess of five grams of methamphetamine; Southern District of Indiana Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (October 20, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 262 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Michael Anthony Mahan – Flint, MI Offense: Distribution of an unspecified quantity of cocaine base (2 counts); possession with intent to distribute more than 50 grams of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine; Western District of Michigan Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release; $5,000 fine (May 9, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017, and unpaid balance of the $5,000 fine remitted Larry Steven Malone – Bend, OR Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture and distribute methamphetamine; manufacture methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; felon in possession of a firearm; District of Oregon Sentence: Life imprisonment; five years' supervised release (July 3, 1995); amended to 360 months' imprisonment (October 5, 2016) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Kenio Marshall – Snellville, GA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 500 grams or more of cocaine hydrochloride; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (January 11, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 188 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Crystal Dawn Mattern – Dilworth, MN Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and distribute a controlled substance; District of North Dakota Sentence: 228 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (May 5, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Valencia K. Matthews – Centralia, IL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute crack cocaine; distribution of less than five grams of crack cocaine; Southern District of Illinois Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $400 fine (June 28, 2010) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Johnny Ray McAtee – Dubuque, IA Offense: Attempt to manufacture and aid and abet the manufacturing of 50 grams or more of actual methamphetamine (pure) after being convicted of one or more felony drug offenses; possession of pseudoephedrine, knowing the pseudoephedrine would be used to manufacture methamphetamine; possession of red phosphorous, knowing the red phosphorous would be used to manufacture methamphetamine; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 7, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Joseph McBride – Trenton, NJ Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five or more kilograms of cocaine; carrying or possessing a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; Middle District of Florida Sentence: 300 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (July 12, 2002) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. John McCallum – Spring Valley, NY Offense: Narcotics conspiracy; distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (two counts); Southern District of New York Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (January 9, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017.   John McCauley – Chicago, IL Offense:  Distribution of 4.41 grams of cocaine after having been previously convicted of a felony drug offense; distribution and aid and abet the distribution of 3.61 grams of cocaine base and .76 grams of cocaine after having been previously convicted of a felony drug offense; distribution and aid and abet the distribution of .51 grams of cocaine base after having been previously convicted of a felony drug offense; distribution and aid and abet the distribution of 19.17 grams of cocaine base after having been previously convicted of a felony drug offense; failure to appear; Northern District of Iowa Sentence:  366 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release; $2,150 restitution (April 2, 2004) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. James McCloud – Rochester, NY Offense: Possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; possession with intent to distribute 5 grams or more of cocaine base; felon in possession of a firearm; Western District of New York Sentence: 180 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release; $1,500 fine (June 20, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019 and unpaid balance of $1,500 fine remitted when his sentence expires, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Jeffrey Preston McClung – Harrisonburg, VA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute marijuana; distribution of marijuana; carry a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking offense; money laundering; Western District of Virginia Sentence: 410 months' imprisonment; 48 months' supervised release (July 10, 1998); amended to 387 months' imprisonment (March 23, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. John McCray, Sr. – East Saint Louis, IL Offense:  Conspiracy to distribute heroin and cocaine base; distribution of heroin and cocaine base; Southern District of Illinois Sentence:  240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release; $750 fine (March 6, 2007) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. James McDade – Shreveport, LA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; conspiracy to commit laundering of monetary instruments; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (May 10, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment. Frederick McGary – Hammond, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Eastern District of Louisiana Sentence: 300 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (February 20, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Martin McGee – Beersheba Springs, TN Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 202 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (November 9, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Ezekial McLain – Albany, NY Offense: Conspiracy to possess and distribute cocaine and cocaine base; Northern District of New York Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (November 6, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Cartell Alexander McLemore – Milwaukee, WI Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; being a felon in possession of a firearm; being a felon in possession of ammunition; Eastern District of Wisconsin Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (October 26, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 Randy McMahan – Wellford, SC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; District of South Carolina Sentence: Life plus 120 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (April 18, 2007) Commutation Grant:  Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment. Recco Salaves Meeks – Shelby, NC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and cocaine base; Western District of North Carolina Sentence: 230 months and six days’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (September 26, 2006) Commutation Grant: Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Deone Antonio Melvin – Upper Marlboro, MD Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine; money laundering conspiracy; distribution of cocaine; possession of firearms in furtherance of drug trafficking (2 counts); felon in possession of a firearm; District of Maryland Sentence: 540 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (September 26, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months' imprisonment. Luis Marin Mendoza-Esquivel – Riverside, CA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute, distribution, and aiding and abetting the distribution of 500 grams or more of methamphetamine mixture following a prior felony drug conviction; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 290 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (December 13, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Wayne Merrell – Dunlap, TN Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture 500 grams or more of methamphetamine; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (November 15, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Richard Glen Milburn – Limestone, TN Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possession with the intent to distribute 100 kilograms or more of marijuana; conspiracy to distribute and possession with the intent to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine; attempt to possess with the intent to distribute methamphetamine; carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking offense (two counts); attempt to possess with the intent to distribute marijuana; attempt to possess with the intent to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine; possession with the intent to distribute methamphetamine; possession of an unregistered short barreled firearm; possessing contraband in prison; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 480 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (April 19, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 180 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Kristi Miller – Santa Maria, CA Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture 50 grams or more of methamphetamine actual or 500 grams or more of methamphetamine mixture; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (May 6, 2011) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Timothy Wayne Miller – London, KY Offense:         1. Conspiracy to distribute over 50 grams of methamphetamine; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine (4 counts); possession with intent to distribute oxycodone; carrying a firearm during a drug trafficking crime; Eastern District of Kentucky 2. Knowingly failed to appear; Eastern District of Kentucky Sentence:        1. 300 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (July 8, 2004) 2. 120 months’ imprisonment (concurrent); three years’ supervised release (July 8, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Robert W. Mims – Pensacola, FL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine and 50 grams or more of cocaine base; Northern District of Florida Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $500 fine (May 21, 2002) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Ervin Mincey – Swainsboro, GA Offense: Distribution of 27.72 grams of cocaine base; Southern District of Georgia Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; eight years' supervised release (January 17, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 210 months' imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. James Edward Mitchell – Oxnard, CA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; District of Montana Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (March 31, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Lewis Lynn Mitchell – Medical Lake, WA Offense: Possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; District of Montana Sentence: 288 months’ imprisonment, eight years’ supervised release (August 2, 2007) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Terry Mitchell – Miami, FL Offense: Continuing criminal enterprise; distribution of cocaine and aiding and abetting (two counts); carrying a firearm during a drug trafficking crime; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: Life plus 60 months' imprisonment; five years' supervised release (May 22, 1995) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Emmett Alvin Monson – Rosedale, NY Offense: Conspiracy: possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride and heroin; possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride (two counts); possess with intent to distribute heroin (four counts); Middle District of North Carolina Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; 8 years’ supervised release (September 20, 1993) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Richard Ruiz Montes ─ Escalon, CA Offense: Conducting a continuing criminal enterprise; manufacture of marijuana and aiding and abetting; possession with intent to distribute marijuana and aiding and abetting; possession with intent to distribute marijuana (two counts); Eastern District of California Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 60 months’ supervised release (November 21, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence to expire on May 19, 2017. Anthony Lawayne Moon – Knoxville, TN Offense: Possession with intent to distribute five kilograms or more of cocaine hydrochloride; Eastern District of Tennessee Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (September 28, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Larry D. Moon ─ Louisville, KY Offense: Possession with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine base, aiding and abetting; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (2 counts); Western District of Kentucky Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (August 21, 1996); amended to 360 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (September 24, 1999)          Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Sentra Moore – Montgomery, AL Offense: Aiding and abetting possession to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; aiding and abetting possession to distribute 50 or more grams of cocaine base; aiding and abetting firearm/drug trafficking; Middle District of Alabama Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (October 1, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Steven Rayford Moore – Sherman, TX Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine base; Eastern District of Texas Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release; $5,000 fine (June 26, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 262 months' imprisonment and unpaid balance of the $5,000 fine remitted. Jeremy Jason Morefield – Shreveport, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 50 grams or more of methamphetamine and 500 grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of methamphetamine; possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release (July 13, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Chico Untras Morgan – Opelika, AL Offense: Distribution of a controlled substance (cocaine base); Middle District of Alabama Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (January 21, 2010) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, and conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Fred Lenard Morrison – Valdese, NC Offense: Possession with intent to distribute cocaine; simple possession of cocaine base; District of South Carolina Sentence: 320 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (December 13, 1996) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. David Andrew Mortensen – Salt Lake City, UT Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams of methamphetamine; District of Utah Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 60 months' supervised release (September 18, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Cory D. Mosby – Rock Island, IL Offense: Possession of cocaine base (crack) with intent to distribute; possession of a firearm in furtherance of drug trafficking; felon in possession of firearms; Central District of Illinois Sentence: 322 months’ imprisonment; eight years’ supervised release; $2,500 fine (August 17, 2007); amended to 300 months’ imprisonment (March 10, 2009) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 195 months’ imprisonment and unpaid balance of $2,500 fine remitted when his sentence expires.  Leo Muhammad – Compton, CA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute cocaine; Eastern District of Missouri Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 21, 2005); amended to 292 months’ imprisonment (January 29, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 240 months’ imprisonment. Saeed Abdul Muhammad – Spotsylvania, VA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute and possess with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possess with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; Eastern District of Virginia Sentence: Life imprisonment; three years’ supervised release (August 22, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 210 months' imprisonment Dottie Nixon – Lincolnton, NC Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute and to distribute a quantity of cocaine and cocaine base within 1,000 feet of a school; Western District of North Carolina Sentence: 360 months' imprisonment; six years' supervised release (August 13, 2001); amended to 324 months' imprisonment (November 19, 2015) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Alonzo Norman, Jr. – Springfield, LA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine base and aiding and abetting; distribution of cocaine base; Eastern District of Louisiana Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (February 18, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Deon Christopher Nowell – Charleston, SC   Offense: Possession with intent to distribute and distribution of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine; possession of a firearm by a convicted felon; using and carrying a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; District of South Carolina Sentence: 300 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (March 10, 2005) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Charles Lee Parker – Marietta, GA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine base; Southern District of Mississippi Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (January 25, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 262 months' imprisonment. William Howard Penn, Jr. – Morgan City, LA Offense: Narcotics, sell distribute or dispense, conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute; narcotics – sell, distribute or dispense, possession with intent to distribute; racketeering, narcotics – interstate travel in aid of illegal activity; Western District of Louisiana Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (November 10, 1997) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Christopher Clayton Pfaff – Ottumwa, IA Offense: Conspiracy to manufacture methamphetamine; Southern District of Iowa Sentence: 262 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (June 26, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Hope Aree Pinkerton – Alta, IA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine mixture and manufacture five grams or more of methamphetamine actual after having been convicted of a prior felony drug offense; Northern District of Iowa Sentence: 240 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (August 5, 2004) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Larry Blane Pittman – San Diego, CA Offense: Conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of a mixture of methamphetamine; Western District of Kentucky Sentence: 262 months' imprisonment; 10 years' supervised release (December 20, 2001) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Max Orvel Plumlee – Newport News, VA Offense: Engaging in a continuing criminal enterprise; distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine (eight counts); use of a firearm during a drug trafficking crime (two counts); distribution and possession with intent to distribute cocaine base (two counts); renting, leasing, and making premises available for storing and distributing cocaine; conspiracy; money laundering (five counts); engaging in monetary transactions in property derived from specified unlawful activity (four counts); Eastern District of Virginia Sentence: Life imprisonment plus 300 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (July 18, 1994) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Charles Edward Price – Vicksburg, MS Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine base; Southern District of Mississippi Sentence: 292 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release; $1,500 fine (June 3, 2008) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017 and unpaid balance of the $1,500 fine remitted.  Calvin Pritchett ─ Cleveland, OH Offense: Possession with the intent to distribute cocaine; felon in possession of a firearm; Northern District of Ohio Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (November 30, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on May 19, 2017. Tony Roger Pullings – Ocala, FL Offense: Conspiracy to distribute cocaine hydrochloride and cocaine base; distribution of cocaine (three counts); Middle District of Florida Sentence: 360 months’ imprisonment; five years’ supervised release (May 14, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on January 19, 2019, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Dennis Ragland – Lincoln, AL Offense: Conspiracy to possess with the intent to distribute and distribution of controlled substances; distribution and possession with the intent to distribute controlled substances; felon in possession of a firearm; use and carrying of a firearm during and in relation to a drug trafficking crime; Northern District of Alabama Sentence: 330 months’ imprisonment; three years’ supervised release (November 29, 2006) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 210 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment. Sergio Ramirez – Des Moines, IA Offense: Conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine; distribute methamphetamine; Southern District of Iowa Sentence: 240 months’ imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (January 22, 2003) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to expire on July 18, 2017. Alex Randell – Tallahassee, FL Offense: Possess with intent to distribute cocaine base, conspiracy to distribute cocaine base; Northern District of Florida Sentence: Life imprisonment; 10 years’ supervised release (July 23, 1999) Commutation Grant: Prison sentence commuted to a term of 360 months’ imprisonment, conditioned upon enrollment in residential drug treatment Ernest Reagan ─ Knoxville, TN Offense: Possession with intent to distribute 50 grams or more of cocaine base; possession with intent to distribute cocaine hydrochloride; felon in possession of firearms; possession of firearms in furtherance of a drug traffic

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29 декабря 2016, 17:33

5 Resistance Resolutions

As we enter a perilous new year, here are five resistance resolutions: 1. Practice resistance each day. Political resistance is an American tradition; “eternal vigilance is the price of liberty.” Take a stand for democracy. Slow down and focus. Resist. If you’ve experienced a life-threatening disease, the process will be familiar.  Live one day at a time. Focus on the essentials: taking care of yourself and regaining your health. Trump is a democracy-threatening disease. Focus on taking care of yourself and regaining democracy. Perhaps begin each day with an aphorism: “I am a patriot;” “Actions speak louder than words;” “It is easier to resist at the beginning than at the end;” “I will not let Trump defeat me.”  Whatever works for you. Follow with a simple act of defiance.  For example, resolve to not listen to news for 24 hours.  Resolve to add another name to your “Boycott Trump Donors” list.  Join a march or demonstration.  Send $ to the resistance.  Etcetera. Above all, resist the Trump propaganda machine that repeats lies over and over until many Americans believe they are the truth.  Resist the “normalization” of Trump.  What is happening is not normal; America is experiencing a right-wing coup. 2. Acknowledge that you are grieving.  Trump’s victory was a traumatic event, a death of sorts.  Place yourself along the continuum of the five stages of grief; are you in denial, anger, bargaining, depression, or acceptance? If you are stuck in depression, acknowledge where you are.  Seek assistance. In terms of this traumatic event, “acceptance” means “recognizing what is true.” What is true is that a narcissistic, paranoid, white-supremacist bloviator is going to become President of the United States. Recognizing what is true doesn’t imply passivity or acquiescence. Remember Niebuhr’s Serenity Prayer: “God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference.” In this situation, acceptance means recognizing what is true and, then, moving forward with resistance.  Trump may become President but we do not have to accept his authority.  We do not have to believe what he says or support his actions. Resistance requires serenity, courage, and wisdom.  Get your shit together, the resistance needs you. 3. Spend time in nature.  Instead of watching the news or checking Facebook, take a walk.  Get away from the hustle and bustle of urban life and, for however brief a period, immerse yourself in nature.  Take a deep breath and look around.  This is what we are fighting for. Read Wendell Berry’s poem, “The Peace of Wild Things.” Take a break “in the grace of the world.” Ground your activism in the earth. 4.  Join with others. Developing a broad, mindful resistance movement is an exercise in community building.  First, treat your family with kindness. Don’t let yourself withdraw or lash out in redirected anger.  Embrace yourself and your loved ones.  Offer comfort. Extend that circle of love and support to your friends and community. Recognize that if you have been stuck in depression, or passivity, your allies may feel the same way.  Reach out with compassion. 5. Cherish your own perspective. Search for your own truth and guard it ferociously. Recognize what you can change and find the courage to take action.  Help your friends negotiate the transition from depression to action. On February 15, 2015, the noted neurologist, Oliver Sacks, published an essay in the New York Times, "My Own Life," on how he had come to grips with the knowledge that he had terminal liver cancer.  (Sacks died in August.)  Sacks wrote of feeling "intensely alive" and added: "I feel a sudden clear focus and perspective. There is no time for anything inessential. I must focus on myself, my work and my friends."Now you and I are faced with the possible death of democracy.  There is no time for anything inessential.  We must focus.  We must resist. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 декабря 2016, 18:55

Donald Trump And The Constitution

One of Donald Trump's plans when he becomes president is to strike back at the press for the negative stories they print about him. During the primary season, he made these comments about our libel laws. "One of the things I'm going to do if I win, and I hope we do and we're certainly leading. I'm going to open up our libel laws, so when they write purposely negative and horrible and false articles, we can sue them and win lots of money." He repeated these remarks in October after he won the Republican nomination: "Well, in England they have a system where you can actually sue if someone says something wrong. Our press is allowed to say whatever they want and get away with it. And I think we should go to a system where if they do something wrong . . . . then yes, I think you should have the ability to sue them." Presumably Trump is concerned that once he becomes president, the press will examine each and every word and act of his presidency and comment adversely on what he does. There are at least three problems with his plan to "open up" the libel laws. First, libel laws are not the creation of the federal government. They are common law torts that are enforceable in state courts in the same way that a trespass or battery claim is enforced. They are seldom if ever a matter of legislation. It is difficult to imagine that Congress would "open up" libel claims by passing a federal law making libel more enforceable, and, in particular, making criticism of the government subject to a stricter rule. A very long time ago, in the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, the federal government tried to punish adverse comments made by the press about its actions. That law made it a crime to "write, print, utter or publish . . . . any false, scandalous and malicious writing against the government." Those laws are considered one of the most repugnant acts of legislation ever passed by Congress and can hardly stand as a proper model for current legislation. In 1918, Congress also passed the Sedition Act, which forbade the use of "disloyal, profane, scurrilous, or abusive language" about the United States government, its flag, or its armed forces, or the "use of any other language that caused others to view the American government or its institutions with contempt." One provision of the law was upheld in 1919 in the case of Abrams v. United States. In that case, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., dissented, writing in a famous phrase: "[T]he best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the competition of the market." The majority opinion in Abrams was repudiated in many later Supreme Court cases which cited it only to quote from Justice Holmes' dissent. Second, even if President Trump tried to get such a law passed and persuaded the House to do so, the Democrats in the Senate could easily filibuster such a bill. The third problem for President Trump is the First Amendment to the Constitution. The famous words from that Amendment states that "Congress shall make no law . . . abridging the freedom of speech or of the press." Of course, there are many federal laws that punish speech and the press, such as laws making it a crime to commit perjury or fraud or to disclose classified information. But as far as libel is concerned, in 1964, the Supreme Court laid down a very restrictive rule in New York Times v. Sullivan: "The constitutional guarantees [of the First Amendment] require, we think, a federal rule that prohibits a public official from recovering damages for a defamatory falsehood relating to his official conduct unless he proves that the statement was made with 'actual malice'--that is, with knowledge that it was false or with reckless disregard of whether it was false or not." That rule was extended to cover not only a public official, but a "public figure" as well. And public figures were later defined in a 1974 case, Gertz v. Welch, as individuals who have assumed "roles of especial prominence in the affairs of society. . . . More commonly, those classed as public figures have thrust themselves to the forefront of particular public controversies in order to influence the resolution of the issues involved. In either event, they invite attention and comment." Subsequently, the Supreme Court has reaffirmed the holding of New York Times v. Sullivan, again and again. In the most recent discussion of the case in 2012, United States v. Alvarez, the Supreme Court struck down a federal law that made it a crime for an individual to falsely state that he or she was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor. Even if the statement was untrue, the First Amendment could protect lies. The Court said: "some false statements are inevitable if there is to be an open and vigorous expression of views in public and private conversation, expression the First Amendment seeks to guarantee." It later said "The remedy for speech that is false is speech that is true," echoing the Holmes dissent in Abrams. What was the line-up of the Justices in Alvarez? Justice Kennedy wrote the majority opinion, and it was supported by the four liberal justices (Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor and Kagan), as well as by Chief Justice Roberts. Justice Alito dissented (with Justices Scalia and Thomas). But even Alito affirmatively cited the Sullivan case. So there is simply no inkling that any of the current Justices are of a mind to overrule Sullivan, certainly not among the six Justices who were in the majority. The First Amendment, as interpreted by the Supreme Court, outweighs any act of Congress. Libel, defamation or slander involve acts of speech or of the press. Thus they are protected by the First Amendment as interpreted by the Supreme Court in Sullivan. Regardless of what Trump can persuade Congress to do, the current Court is not likely to overrule one of its greatest and most important precedents. Leon Friedman is a Professor of Constitutional Law at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

25 декабря 2016, 17:11

A&E Cancels Upcoming KKK Docuseries Over Cash Payments

The A&E cable television network said on Saturday it has canceled an upcoming documentary about efforts to help Ku Klux Klan members break away from the hate group, after learning cash payments were made “to facilitate access” to the film’s subjects. The documentary series, “Escaping the KKK,” completed after a year and a half in production, was set to premiere on Jan. 10 and air in eight parts, capped by a town hall-style special broadcast on ending hate in America. The decision to scrub the project came shortly after A&E said it had changed the series title to “Escaping the KKK,” from “Generation KKK,” in order to better reflect that the film was a work of documentary journalism rather than realty-TV entertainment. The network also had announced a partnership with a civil rights group, Color of Change, which was to produce accompanying segments featuring civil rights leaders to furnish context for the documentary series. As described by A&E, the series was intended to examine “anti-hate extractors,” who work to help individuals extricate themselves from the Klan, a white-supremacist group with a long history of violence, primarily against blacks, but also Jews, immigrants and other groups. The film drew controversy soon after plans for the series were unveiled earlier this week, with actors Wendell Pierce and Ellen Pompeo among those criticizing the project on social media and Pierce calling for a network boycott, Variety reported. Pierce demanded A&E provide evidence that the documentary subjects were not paid for their participation, as subjects of reality TV programs typically would be, and the network insisted that no such payments were made, according to Variety. On Saturday, however, the network acknowledged learning from its third-party producers that some cash payments were made to Klan members who participated in the documentary “in order to facilitate access” to them. The network statement said the payments, though “understood to be nominal,” were nevertheless “a direct violation of A&E’s policies and practices for a documentary.” The Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist groups, long relegated to the fringe of American discourse, have gained growing attention during the past year as their leaders vocally embraced the presidential candidacy of Republican Donald Trump and exulted in his Nov. 8 victory. Trump has disavowed their support, though he has appointed Steve Bannon, former head of the website Breitbart News - a forum for a range of far right-wing opinion-makers, including white nationalists, neo-Nazis and anti-Semites - to serve as his chief White House strategist. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

07 декабря 2016, 09:00

Remembrance of tastes past: Syria’s disappearing food culture | Wendell Steavenson

For Syrians in exile, food is more than a means of sustenance. It is a reminder of the rich and diverse culture being destroyed by civil warIn February 2013, Ebtisam Masto fled Syria with her six children. They crossed the border to Lebanon and headed for the capital, Beirut, where Masto’s husband, Mohammed, had been working to support his family since before the civil war began.When they arrived, Masto registered the family with the UN refugee agency in the city. There she heard about a cooking programme for women that was run by the Catholic charity Caritas. Masto, who was scared, insecure and on the verge of clinical depression, signed up. “I wanted to do something with my life,” she told me. Continue reading...

03 декабря 2016, 22:45

Reflections on Fake News

Fake news is an old story. It has featured in domestic politics and international affairs since the beginning of time. The British famously defined an ambassador as an "honest man sent abroad to lie for the good of his country." A prime mission of the Central Intelligence Agency is to spread false news to influence the outcome of foreign elections. The very first CIA covert action manipulated the 1948 Italian elections. By its own later admissions to the House Select Committee on Intelligence, the agency forged documents and letters purported to come from the Communist Party of Italy (PCI) to besmirch its reputation and discredit its leaders; funded anonymous books and magazine articles vividly detailing alleged communist activities in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union; and, published pamphlets exposing PCI candidates' sex and personal lives and insinuating they harbored fascist or anti-church sympathies. The CIA intervened with multiple covert actions costing between $800,000 and $1 million in Chile's 1970 presidential election with the hope of derailing Marxist candidate Salvador Allende. The Senate Select Committee found: "Propaganda placements were achieved through subsidizing right-wing women's and 'civic action' groups." It would thus be stunning if the Russian or Chinese intelligence services refrained from seeking to influence elections in the United States to their advantage by imitating the C.I.A.'s modus operandi abroad of spreading false news. Intelligence services do not play by Queensbury Rules. In any event, prohibiting fake news would be problematic. Generally speaking, falsehoods and truths are both protected by the First Amendment. The United States Supreme Court explained in United States v. Alvarez (2012) that false statements may not punished unless they cause some demonstrable concrete harm, for example, fraud, defamation, or a miscarriage of justice. The Court in Alvarez invalidated a federal prohibition on lying about receiving military decorations or medals. In reliance on that precedent, the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Susan B. Anthony List v. Driehaus voided an Ohio statute prohibiting malicious falsehoods in political campaigns for the purpose of influencing the outcomes. Justice Louis Brandeis lectured in Whitney v. California (1927) that the customary remedy for bad speech or demagoguery is more speech or superior arguments, not enforced silence. He largely echoed John Milton's Areopagitica: "Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse in a free and open encounter?" Brandeis and Milton were too rosy. Mark Twain was more right than wrong in quipping that, "A lie can travel halfway around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes." But prohibiting "fake" or "false" news would be a cure worse than the disease, i.e., censorship by other means. The government cannot be trusted with distinguishing fake from genuine news because it has ulterior motives. News the government dislikes would be conflated with fakery, and news the government approved would be conflated with truthfulness. Private businesses like Facebook cannot be trusted with distinguishing fake from genuine news because its overriding mission is to make money and to win popularity, not to spread truth. It would suppress news that risked injury to its reputation or profits but leave news that did the opposite undisturbed. The entire concept of fake news is troublesome. Candidates for public office routinely make statements divorced from truth. Was it "fake" news for 1968 presidential candidate Richard Nixon to maintain he had a "secret plan" to end the Vietnam War when he had no such thing? Is it "fake" news when candidates make fanciful promises to create millions of new jobs, cut taxes, balance the budget, and slash government spending which carry the plausibility of King Canute's stopping the tides? The lion's share of campaign speeches typically dwell outside the domain of credibility. Are they all "fake" news? They seek to persuade the audience to believe in a future they know is impossible. Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes captured the optimal approach to fake news in his famous dissenting opinion in Abrams v. United States (1919): "[T]he best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the competition of the market...That at any rate is the theory of our Constitution." The solution is not perfect. But it is better than all the alternatives. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 ноября 2016, 21:46

Our Profiteering Health Insurance Industry: Should The Government Bail It Out Again?

Backtrack to 2008 to 2010, when the increasing costs and unaffordability of insurance and health care for Americans were a front-burner issue. They remain so today. Soon after coming into office, the new Obama administration worked for two years, in the name of health care "reform," to appease corporate stakeholders in our well-entrenched medical-industrial complex. The political question then was not what was in the best interests of patients and families, but how to gain the support of the major corporate players, especially the insurance, hospital, and drug industries. Following their huge campaign donations, sending more than 4,500 lobbyists to the Beltway (eight for every member of Congress) (1) and a rapidly revolving door of conflicts of interest, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA, or ACA and Obamacare) was passed by a narrow margin in Congress almost seven years ago. Today, it is obvious to all that patients are still not protected by good insurance coverage at affordable rates, and that the very name of the bill is a misnomer. The costs of health care keep rising at rapid rates as insurers, hospitals and drug companies blame others for these increases. None of these industries have contained costs as they pursue their business model of making profits, with their highest priority maximizing revenues for their CEOs and shareholders. As we are now seeing, insurers exit markets when they are not sufficiently profitable, even as health care stocks have soared to the highest sector of the S & P 500. Not only did the health insurance industry get some 20 million new enrollees as a result of the ACA (mostly through Medicaid expansion), but insurers gained many ways to decrease their risk for covering enrollees' health care costs. These include offering plans covering as little as 60 percent of costs (bronze plans), receiving "risk corridor" funds protecting them from losses (now a court case), benefit designs that still discriminate against the sick, shrinking provider networks, restrictive drug formularies, offering limited-benefit bare-bones policies, and deceptive marketing practices. In no way have they contained costs, even as they have been subsidized by new enrollees through the exchanges. All the while, they have gained market power through consolidation as they consume 15 to 20 percent of U. S. health care expenditures, mostly through profiteering, administrative overhead, and bureaucratic waste. If their merger agreements survive court challenges, just three giants--Anthem/Cigna, United Health Group, and Aetna/Humana will collectively have a margin share exceeding more than 130 million Americans. (2) Insurers have segmented the market in their own interests, shifting the burden of care of sicker patients to public programs. They have increasingly privatized both Medicare and Medicaid, resulting in higher administrative costs compared with public Medicare and Medicaid. They also maximize profits by cutting staff and value of coverage, resulting in worse outcomes for patients compared with public plans. (3) Most people are unaware that the government already pays for about 64 percent of total health care spending--about $1.9 trillion in 2013, much of that by subsidizing private health care industries, especially private health insurance. There is a long history to this subsidization, dating back to policy decisions after World War II giving tax exemptions to employers for their costs of providing employer-sponsored health insurance. The ACA bailed out the industry in 2010, which is once again calling for more government subsidies to stay in business. A just-released estimate by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) acknowledges that the three-year risk corridor deficit from 2014 through 2016 for insurer losses will exceed $14 billion. (4) The Congressional Budget Office and the Joint Committee for Taxation estimate that the net subsidy from the federal government in 2016 for health insurance for people under age 65 and costs for Medicaid enrollees under age 65 will be $660 billion. (5) That estimate includes effects of preferential tax treatment for employer-sponsored coverage. We can anticipate that insurers will make good on their threats to leave the market when we recall that 2.4 million private Medicare beneficiaries were abandoned in 2002, when they lost their Medicare + Choice coverage despite infusion of more federal dollars. (6) The incoming Trump administration and Republican-controlled Congress will be pressured to continue a further federal bailout of the private health insurance industry. But why whip a dead horse? It is past time to learn that corporate greed and the business model do not, and will never, serve the common good. As Wendell Potter, former Cigna executive and author of Deadly Spin: An Insurance Company Insider Speaks Out on How Corporate PR is Killing Health Care and Deceiving Americans, observes: Folks, we are guilty of magical thinking. We've fallen for insurers' deception and misdirection, hook, line and sinker. And many of us can't be persuaded that we are being duped. Meanwhile, the shareholders of the big for-profits are laughing all the way to the bank. Every single day. (7) We--Americans needing health care, employers, federal and state governments, and all of us taxpayers--cannot afford another bailout of the health insurance industry, especially since we have a real fix-- single-payer, not-for-profit national health insurance, Medicare for All. It will provide universal access to care for our entire population, save us all money, give us free choice of physician and hospital, and improve our health care outcomes in a reformed system dedicated to service and the public interest. Corporate stakeholders with their political and economic power, and their lobbyists (most unregistered) are again pushing for continued government bailouts of this industry, which has not earned it. Another bailout cannot reverse the health insurance industry's continuing death spiral. John Geyman, M.D. is the author of The Human Face of ObamaCare: Promises vs. Reality and What Comes Next and How Obamacare is Unsustainable: Why We Need a Single-Payer Solution For All Americans visit: http://www.johngeymanmd.org Sources: 1. Eaton, J, Pell, MB. Lobbyists swarm capitol to influence health reform. Washington, D.C. The Center for Public Integrity, February 23, 2010) 2. Mattioli, D, Hoffman, L, Mathews, AW. Anthem hears $48 billion Cigna deal. Wall Street Journal, July 23, 2015: A1 3. Geyman, JP. The health insurance industry's last-ditch holdup. The Huffington Post, August 15, 2016.) 4. Blase, B. A taxpayer bailout of ObamaCare insurers just got a lot more expensive. Forbes, November 21, 2016.) 5. CBO and JCT. Federal subsidies for health insurance coverage for people under 65: 2016 to 2026. March 24, 2016. 6. Waldholz, M. Prescriptions. Medicare seniors face confusion as HMOs bail out of program. Wall Street Journal, October 3, 2002: D4.) 7. (Potter, W. It's way past time for us to stop deluding ourselves about private health insurers. The Progressive Populist, September 1, 2016: p. 20.) -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

20 ноября 2016, 20:23

The Struggle Ahead

Let there be no doubt. We stand in the face of danger. Danger to our nation, to our values, to our liberties, to all that our nation stands for. We have done this to ourselves. We underestimated the risk. We did not work hard enough. We did not have the foresight to imagine that this could actually happen to us. It is our fault. We must not make the same mistake again. Having turned our lives, our safety, and our children's futures over to the whims of a thoughtless, reckless, ignorant, and immoral huckster, we must stand guard and fight back against peril. These are, indeed, perilous times. We should not underestimate the threat. We must remember that at different times throughout our history we have owned slaves, denied women the vote, segregated children because of their race, burned crosses, lynched innocent black men, interned almost 100,000 American citizens because of their Japanese ancestry, imprisoned thousands of Americans because they criticized the first World War, blacklisted tens of thousands of our fellow citizens because of their political beliefs during the age of McCarthy, and driven millions of our fellow Americans into the closet and treated them as strange freaks of nature because we ignorantly despised their sexual orientation. We are capable of great ugliness and hatred. Let us not kid ourselves. We as a People have made a grievous mistake. This is a nation built on the promise of freedom, of equality, of dignity, of civility, of respect for the rule of law, and of the continuing search for moral progress. We have accomplished great things. We have ended slavery through a horribly painful Civil War. We have ended lynching. We have outlawed racial segregation. We have enacted laws designed to guarantee civil rights and voting rights and equal rights for historically oppressed members of our society. We have learned from our mistakes. We have struggled over time to see the light and to make this a stronger, fairer, and more decent nation. We have a long way to go, but we have much to be proud of. Yet now we have taken a huge step backwards, even though a majority of the American people clearly rejected that step at the ballot box. But rules are rules, and rules should be respected. Individuals, though, need not be respected merely because they hold titles. They must earn our respect. They must earn our trust. Donald Trump might turn out to be a decent president. But in his initial steps, he has cast grave doubts on that prospect. With decisions and appointments he has made in the days since the election he has already turned toward the dark side. Immediately after the election, President Obama, being the good and generous man that he is, asked us all to give the president-elect the benefit of the doubt. But in his initial actions our president-elect has already generated even more doubt about his understanding of and commitment to the most fundamental values of our nation. He has waved a flag of intolerance, injustice, and incivility. "Courage," Louis Brandeis once wrote, "is the secret of liberty." We must remember that. We must be courageous. We must speak out. We must not be careless. We must not assume the best. We must take our freedom for granted. If we do, there is a grave risk that we, our children, and our children's children will suffer greatly for our indifference. Listen to those who have thought hard about these dangers. "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil," Edmund Burke proclaimed, "is for good men to do nothing." "Eternal vigilance," declared the abolitionist Wendell Phillips, "is the price of liberty." "No man," explained General Douglas MacArthur, "is entitled to the blessings of freedom unless he be vigilant in its preservation." "The future," warned President Ronald Reagan, "doesn't belong to the faint-hearted. It belongs to the brave." Remember those words. Perhaps things won't be so bad. At this moment, though, we should prepare for a struggle for the very soul of our land. This election turned out the way it did because too many good-hearted, well-meaning, thoughtful, and caring people didn't take the danger seriously enough. Let us not make that mistake again. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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19 ноября 2016, 02:46

Couple Spends 2 Months In Jail After Cops Mistake Baking Soda For Cocaine

A Utah couple spent more than eight weeks in jail after authorities in Arkansas mistakenly identified bags of baking soda as cocaine and arrested them for allegedly transporting $300,000 worth of drugs, Salt Lake City’s KUTV News reports. Gale Griffin and her husband, Wendell Harvey, haul cargo for the U.S. military. They were delivering a load in May, when guards at Fort Chaffee, an Army National Guard installation, conducted a routine search of their truck. During the search, the guards found several baggies containing a white powdery substance, which Griffin explained was baking soda that she was using to treat an upset stomach. Unconvinced, the guards notified local police. When officers tested the powder using a $2 narcotics identification kit, it was identified as a controlled substance. The officer said, “’You have over $300,000 in cocaine,’” Griffin told KUTV News. “I told him, ‘I never had two nickels to rub together. Are you crazy?’ He said, ‘I’ve never had two nickels to rub together either, but now I’m the owner of your truck.’” Unable to afford bail, the couple stayed behind bars until mid-July, when a lab analysis found that the substance was, in fact, baking soda and contained no illicit substances. “We’re not chemists, and we don’t roll with a chemistry set in the back of a police car,” Fort Chaffee Police Chief Chuck Bowen explained when Little Rock’s KATV News asked about the mistake. Field tests for drugs can often be incorrect. In a Nevada study, authorities re-examined a number of field tests conducted from 2010 to 2013 and found that 33 percent of them had resulted in false positives, KUTV News reports “There’s no telling how many mistakes they’ve made,” Harvey told KATV News. “It’s a mistake, but these mistakes happen quite often I think.” All charges against the couple were dismissed. However, Griffin and Harvey now find themselves out of work because their security clearances – required to haul cargo for the military – have been revoked. They also say they had to wait a month after their release to regain their truck and it was heavily damaged. A GoFundMe.com campaign has been started to help them get back on their feet. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 ноября 2016, 01:20

A Third Term Alternative?

Here is a funny thing to contemplate: if Barack Obama were running in the current election, he'd probably win a third term. His most recent job approval rating of 54 percent is one of the highest for a president before the election since modern polling began. It also suggests that he is far more popular than the two major candidates to succeed him, both of whom have strong negatives. The only problem, of course, is a bit of the constitutional text that prohibits him from running, namely the 22nd amendment, which limits the president to two terms. Term limits are of ancient origin and date back to the ancient Greeks. The American founding fathers thought about adopting term limits for the presidency in our foundational text, but declined to include them. Constitutional silence on the matter, however, did not prevent an informal norm from emerging. George Washington left office after two terms and set a precedent that would be followed by the next thirty presidents, including some, such as Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson, who could easily have won a third term. As early as 1839, John Quincy Adams was calling the two-term limit a "tacit subsidiary constitutional law." Later in the nineteenth century, when President Ulysses S. Grant was considering running for a third term, a popular outcry declared the rule to be an unwritten constitutional norm. The scope and limits of this unwritten norm, however, became an issue when Theodore Roosevelt sought to run on his independent Bull Moose ticket in 1912. Roosevelt had succeeded to the presidency in 1901 after the assassination of William McKinley in 1901, and had served through 1908 after winning his own election. He then decided not to run again, but four years later changed his mind. During the 1912 campaign, Roosevelt was shot by a madman who justified his actions on the grounds that two terms was the maximum allowed. (Roosevelt finished his speech before seeking medical care, but didn't win the presidency.) The 1912 winner, Woodrow Wilson, made noises about a third term in 1920, but was too unpopular to have a chance at it. When another Roosevelt, Theodore's cousin Franklin Delano, ran for a third term in 1940, it was considered to be a major break with tradition, but also one that was subsequently blessed with his large margin of victory over Wendell Willkie. In 1947, however, two years after Roosevelt's death, the Republican Party introduced the 22nd amendment to formalize the informal rule, and it was ratified in 1951. Since then, only constitutional law scholars spend much time thinking about third terms, conjuring scenarios in which, say, Bill Clinton is named Vice-President and then succeeds his impeached spouse (all hypothetical of course). Outside the United States, term limits are popular. As colleagues and I discovered, some 60% of constitutions that have a fixed term head of state place some limit on the number of terms that can be served. Term limits have been very popular in Latin America, and are often effective when leaders want to overstay their terms: Colombia's Alvaro Uribe, for example, was prevented by the Constitutional Court from holding a referendum on amending the constitution to seek a third term in 2010. In 2009, President Manuel Zelaya of Honduras was removed from office after threatening to seek a second term. But in other countries, courts have been more compliant. Nicaraguan strongman Daniel Ortega was allowed to run for a third term (which he won yesterday) after courts ruled that term limits were undemocratic as they restrict the will of the majority. There is something to this point. In a democracy, the people are supposed to choose the leader. Why should we leave the most popular, experienced person out of the running? While there is a risk of someone staying too long, there may be ways to deal with this. Our proposal was to have a superescalating majority requirement. Here's how it would work. If the first election requires a mere plurality of votes, the second would require an absolute majority of votes, so that one would have to get 50% of all votes cast. Each subsequent election would require 5% more of a majority, so that eventually every president would exhaust their support. Under our scheme, Obama would have to get 55% of the vote for a third term; apparently this year's election would still be razor-close, but we'd have an alternative that was truly popular with the American people. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.