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10 июля, 08:00

UK relatives of murdered Jamaica returnees fight for justice

Families say they have been failed by the island’s police and the UK Foreign OfficeWhen 74-year-old Henry Clarke heard one of his dogs barking at his home in Jamaica’s Montego Bay, he went outside to investigate. As he stepped outside, he was shot three times and died from his injuries a few hours later.It was 28 December 2010, more than 50 years after Clarke had travelled to the UK as part of the Windrush generation and six years after he had returned to Jamaica. Continue reading...

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30 июня, 11:19

Jamaica to boost security after murders of returning expats

Provision of liaison officers follows Guardian report on extreme risk to retireesPolice in Jamaica have pledged extra security for returning residents after the murder of five British and Canadian retirees on the Caribbean island.The Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) said it would appoint a specialist liaison officer in each police division to monitor cases of returnees being targeted amid a pattern of violent incidents. Continue reading...

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29 июня, 15:28

Retirees returning to Jamaica face extreme murder risk, say police

Returnees warned they are seen as soft targets following multiple killings of UK expatsJamaican expats who retire there after decades in the UK face an “extreme risk” of murder, a former police chief on the Caribbean island has said, as official figures revealed that at least 85 Britons, Americans and Canadians have been killed in the country since 2012.Senior police figures told the Guardian that returning residents were seen as soft targets by criminals and needed much more protection following the murders of three British retirees on the island in as many months. Continue reading...

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26 июня, 10:28

Man held over deaths of retired British couple in Jamaica

Charlie and Gayle Anderson found dead at home in Portland on SaturdayA man has been taken into custody as part of an investigation into the deaths of a retired British couple in Jamaica.Charlie and Gayle Anderson, 74 and 71 respectively, were found dead in their home in Portland, on the north-east coast of the island, on Saturday. Continue reading...

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24 июня, 21:10

Jamaican murder police investigate deaths of retired British couple

Family of Charlie and Gayle Anderson, aged 74 and 71, are ‘completely devastated’ Jamaican police have opened a double murder investigation after the bodies of a retired British couple were found by officers in their home in Mount Pleasant, in the island’s Portland parish.Charlie and Gayle Anderson,aged 74 and 71, had recently retired to the Caribbean island from Manchester, their family said. Continue reading...

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22 июня, 08:00

Alford Gardner: 'I came to the UK on Windrush and I wouldn't change a thing' – video

Alford Gardner arrived in the UK on the Empire Windrush 70 years ago. One of the only ones left to tell the tale, he remembers a happy ship, dances and round-the-clock calypso. This is the ‘beautiful life of a Jamaican living in Britain’ Continue reading...

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22 июня, 08:00

‘They have traumatised our lives’: the retired NHS nurse too scared to visit family in Britain

Pauline Pennant, 70, told by NHS debt collectors she could be held by immigration officials if she returns to UK A retired nurse in Jamaica who was charged more than £4,000 for cancer tests has said she is too afraid to visit her family in Britain after NHS debt collectors warned her she could be detained by immigration officials.Pauline Pennant, 70, who retired to Jamaica in 1993 after 30 years working mainly in London hospitals, fell seriously ill on a visit to the UK three years ago when she was diagnosed with secondary bone cancer. Continue reading...

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07 июня, 12:47

Legal or ‘illegal’, migrants are human beings | Luke de Noronha

The UK categorises Caribbean migrants according to the date they arrived. But people should not be labelled in this wayWe now know that nearly 1,000 flights were booked to deport people to the Caribbean in the 12 months up to March. We don’t know exactly how many were deported, but hundreds were forcibly expelled in the year leading up to the Windrush scandal breaking.Deportations have been paused, in light of the fiasco, and the Home Office will no doubt claim that the overwhelming majority of previous deportations were of “illegal immigrants”. This may be true, but illegal immigrants and Windrush migrants are not neatly defined groups: both are the products of legal definition rather than human types. We should remember that behind every illegal immigrant is a real person, and behind each enforced removal a complicated story. Continue reading...

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25 мая, 08:00

Windrush scandal: 'You don't need that passport, they said'

Melvin Collins, 72, who spent decades in Britain, is living off handouts in Jamaica unable to go back to the UK after Gatwick took his crucial passportMelvin Collins never expected to spend his retirement surviving on handouts. But after 52 years living and working in Britain, the 72-year-old finds himself reliant on goodwill and generosity to keep food on the table and a roof over his head.In December, he says, he hit rock bottom. Christmas Day was spent alone in a two-room flat owned by his 92-year-old aunt, Lena, 7,400 miles from his daughter, son, brother, sister, nephews and nieces in Britain. Continue reading...

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25 мая, 08:00

Windrush citizens trapped in Jamaica criticise British officials

High commission accused of ‘heartless’ behaviour towards people trying to return to UKThe British high commission in Kingston has compounded the misery of Windrush victims by failing to resolve their cases for over two decades, the Labour MP David Lammy has said.The Guardian has heard testimony from a number of British citizens who said they were dealt with dismissively when they asked for help at the UK’s diplomatic base in the Jamaican capital. Continue reading...

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24 мая, 17:14

Windrush at 70: portraits of a generation – in pictures

Harry Jacobs established a studio in Stockwell, south London, where he became a renowned photographer to the Caribbean community for decadesIf you find yourself in a south London front room, you may see a photograph on the sideboard, or in an ornate cardboard frame pinned to the wall, showing family members standing in front of a bucolic backdrop and behind an oversized basket of flowers. The photo, one of approximately 60,000, was taken by my grandfather, Harry Jacobs, some time between the late 1950s and 1999. Continue reading...

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23 мая, 19:19

'It’s like a death sentence': ex-NHS worker billed £4,388 for treatment

Falling ill on a visit from Jamaica became costly nightmare for Pauline Pennant, who had worked in UK for 30 yearsWhen Pauline Pennant, 70, and her 80-year-old husband, Basil, visited London for their nephew’s wedding three years ago, it was supposed to be the happiest occasion. Instead it was the start of an ongoing nightmare.Pennant, a former nurse, became seriously ill and was admitted to Croydon University hospital on 25 August 2015. She received the worst news: a CT scan had found secondary bone cancer. The doctor advised her to see an orthopaedic oncologist and referred her for further tests to find the primary cancer. Continue reading...

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23 мая, 13:47

'I'll never trust the English again': Jamaica's Windrush backlash

As the 70th anniversary of the ship’s arrival nears, relations between the UK and its former colony are fraying, with the extent of the scandal’s human damage proving difficult to measureSeventy years ago on Thursday, the Empire Windrush sailed imperiously into Jamaica’s capital, greeted by throngs of spectators. Among them were musicians and boxers, craftsmen and clerks, all chasing dreams of a better life in the mother country.The 70th anniversary should have been a moment of national pride on both sides of the Atlantic. Instead in Jamaica there is deepening resentment over the treatment of those who left for Britain, amid the spiralling consequences of what has become known as the Windrush crisis. Continue reading...

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16 мая, 20:57

Race was big factor in deportation scandal, Windrush citizens say

Parliamentary committee concerned that human rights may have been breachedTwo victims of the Windrush scandal have told MPs they believed they would not have faced deportation were it not for their race. Two of the first people whose cases were documented by the Guardian, Paulette Wilson and Anthony Bryan, were questioned about their experience of being classed by the Home Office as illegal immigrants during the joint human rights committee, along with Bryan’s wife, Janet McKay Williams, and Wilson’s daughter, Natalie Barnes. Continue reading...

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09 мая, 17:33

The 'hostile environment' made me feel like an alien: Windrush victim – video

Paulette Wilson and her daughter Natalie Barnes speak about how the Home Office's policy affected them after Paulette, who moved to the UK from Jamaica in 1968 when she was 10 and has never left, was classed as an illegal immigrant, taken to the Yarl’s Wood removal centre and threatened with deportation  Continue reading...

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09 мая, 08:00

The Windrush shaped Britain. Why not recognise that? | Patrick Vernon

June marks 70 years since the start of the postwar immigration boom. A national holiday would be a fitting tributeBack in 2010 I wrote an article arguing that we would have failed as a nation if, by 2018, there was still no substantive recognition for the Windrush generation on the 70th anniversary of their arrival in Britain. I have been part of a call to action for a public holiday called Windrush Day on 22 June, the anniversary of the arrival of the MV Empire Windrush at Tilbury docks in 1948. For we need to remember that many aspects of British society today would be unrecognisable without the contributions that immigration and integration have made: from the NHS to the monarchy, our language, literature, enterprise, public life, fashion, music, politics, science, culture, food and even humour. Related: Windrush Day: a fitting way to celebrate our immigrant population Continue reading...

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05 мая, 08:00

The 'hostile environment' made me feel like an alien: Windrush victim – video

Paulette Wilson and her daughter Natalie Barnes speak about how the Home Office's policy affected them after Paulette, who moved to the UK from Jamaica in 1968 when she was 10 and has never left, was classed as an illegal immigrant, taken to the Yarl’s Wood removal centre and threatened with deportation  Continue reading...

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29 апреля, 21:22

Windrush citizens share their relief at being listened to

Victims of Home Office blunders are trying to rebuild their lives despite ordeal of past few yearsTwo weeks after the Windrush scandal finally seized politicians’ attention, victims of Home Office mistreatment have expressed relief that the issue is getting the attention it needs, and anger that it has taken so long to attract mainstream interest.Hubert Howard, 61, was delighted last week to be contacted by the Peabody Trust, the housing association where he had worked for over a decade as a caretaker until the Home Office classified him as an illegal immigrant, and his employers were forced to dismiss him. Continue reading...

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28 апреля, 19:24

'No basis to remain': woman, 63, told she will be removed from UK to Jamaica

Yarl’s Wood detainee handed papers saying she will be placed on specially chartered flightA 63-year-old woman has been told she has been booked on an immigration removal flight to Jamaica, as the government scrambles to minimise the damage over the scandal of the removal of citizenship rights from Windrush migrants.The woman, who is currently being held at the Yarl’s Wood immigration removal centre, was handed papers on Friday telling her she had no basis to remain in the country and she was to be removed on a specially chartered flight to Jamaica. Continue reading...

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22 апреля, 21:56

'I feel disgusted': how Windrush scandal shattered two brothers' lives

Trevor and Desmond Johnson’s family units have been destroyed, but they sense Home Office cruelty is routineTrevor and Desmond Johnson flew from Jamaica to London in 1971 as unaccompanied minors to join their parents who had moved to the UK several years earlier, hoping to make a better life for the family. The brothers were 10 and 11 when they arrived, both incredibly excited about the future, but almost half a century later, both men’s lives have been shattered by the Windrush scandal.Trevor, a widowed single parent looking after two teenage daughters, was wrongly told in 2014 that he was in Britain illegally and had his benefits cut off. An employee from Capita – the private company used by the Home Office for immigration work – called to tell him that officers would come to his house to deport him back to the country he had left as a child. He spent that night waiting up with his daughters, listening for the knock at the door. Continue reading...