• Теги
    • избранные теги
    • Люди316
      • Показать ещё
      Издания22
      • Показать ещё
      Страны / Регионы59
      • Показать ещё
      Разное50
      • Показать ещё
      Компании14
      • Показать ещё
      Формат5
      Международные организации5
      Показатели1
      Сферы2
26 мая, 21:12

Weekend Roundup: Trump’s Siding With Saudi Arabia Against Iran Deepens The Mideast Divide

In a speech in Riyadh ostensibly billed as seeking to unite the Muslim world against terrorism, U.S. President Donald Trump instead further inflamed the Shia-Sunni schism in the region by signaling America’s embrace of the Saudi anti-Iran vision for the Middle East. It was, of course, left unmentioned that the so-called Islamic State, which claimed credit for the truly evil atrocity in Manchester days later, derives part of its fanatic ideology from the fundamentalist Wahhabism strain of Islam that legitimates Saudi Arabia’s monarchy.   One can only imagine how the images of Trump partaking in a traditional sword dance with Saudi officials played to voters who had just gone to the polls in Iran and overwhelmingly returned the reformist leader Hassan Rouhani to the presidency. Rouhani’s re-election was due in no small part to the nuclear and sanctions relief deal he negotiated with the United States and other major powers. That deal was crucial to former U.S. President Barack Obama’s effort to not only curb the proliferation of nuclear weapons, but to establish a new balance in America’s Mideast policy between Sunni and Shia powers as well. It is a tragic mistake for the Trump administration to reverse that policy at the very moment it was producing results in Iran. Seyed Hossein Mousavian, who once headed the Foreign Relations Committee of Iran’s National Security Council, underscores this shift in Iran. “The Iranian electorate has spoken in its decision between two stark alternatives: strengthening civil society and engaging with the world, or turning inward with economic populism and combative foreign policy,” he writes. “In decisively voting for Rouhani, Iranians have endorsed diplomacy and moderation. And they have done so in direct contrast to U.S. President Donald Trump, who has called for increasing tensions with Iran and championed isolationist foreign policy.” Abolhassan Bani-Sadr concurs that Iran’s election was a milestone. The first president of the Islamic Republic of Iran told The WorldPost this week that Rouhani’s landslide win marked a level of democratic culture in his country not seen since before the pro-American shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi: “In this election ― for the first time since the early days of the revolution itself and the rule of our democratic Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh, back before the shah ― the core debates were about human rights, the rights of citizenship and democracy. I am a good barometer to measure this shift, after all, since I was forced out of office in those early revolutionary days by the ayatollahs for promoting these values. This gives us reason to believe that democratic culture is spreading and deepening in Iran.” Despite Trump’s anti-Iran remarks in Riyadh, Bani-Sadr’s hope and expectation is that this budding advance of democratic culture in Iran will make it more difficult for Washington to demonize Tehran. Reza Marashi of the National Iranian American Council expects that, given Rouhani’s victory, Iran will continue to try to engage the U.S.-Saudi alignment and damp down rivalry. But it is a two-way street, he says: “Rouhani’s track record demonstrates that sustained engagement can lower tensions and produce peaceful solutions to conflict. By electing him to a second term, Iran has once again extended its hand. It remains to be seen if the world will unclench its fist.” Turning to other key events, in an article ahead of the G-7 summit in Sicily, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe highlights the populist backlash against free trade and globalization. “We are approaching the 10-year mark since the start of the global financial crisis,” he writes. “Many countries and regions have made tenacious efforts to ride out the crisis and ensure a growth path. Looking at things globally, however, much remains to be done on issues such as youth unemployment, wage levels and productivity. The key to overcoming these challenges,” he boldly states, “is free trade.” But trade, he goes on to stipulate, must not only be free, but fair. Above all, its benefits must be spread more inclusively both within societies and globally, the Japanese leader says, if the zero-sum alternative of protectionism is to be avoided. Finally, Singapore’s scholar-statesman George Yeo explains this week why “civilizational states” in Asia, like China and to some extent Japan, are less prone to populism than the West. As he sees it, China’s largely homogenous Han people, not unlike Japan’s even more homogenous population, “bow before the ideal of a common ancestry and destiny” that ties them together more strongly than any factional or individual interests might divide them. Other highlights in The WorldPost this week: Trump Reportedly Called Germans ‘Very Bad,’ Vowed To Stop German Car Sales In The U.S. Inside North Korea’s Secret Cyber Warfare Cell Climate Change Is Turning Antarctica Green Elon Musk Is ‘Cautiously Optimistic’ After Talking To Trump About Paris Climate Pact There’s A New Type Of Pollution Invading The Oceans WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

26 мая, 21:12

Weekend Roundup: Trump’s Siding With Saudi Arabia Against Iran Deepens The Mideast Divide

In a speech in Riyadh ostensibly billed as seeking to unite the Muslim world against terrorism, U.S. President Donald Trump instead further inflamed the Shia-Sunni schism in the region by signaling America’s embrace of the Saudi anti-Iran vision for the Middle East. It was, of course, left unmentioned that the so-called Islamic State, which claimed credit for the truly evil atrocity in Manchester days later, derives part of its fanatic ideology from the fundamentalist Wahhabism strain of Islam that legitimates Saudi Arabia’s monarchy.   One can only imagine how the images of Trump partaking in a traditional sword dance with Saudi officials played to voters who had just gone to the polls in Iran and overwhelmingly returned the reformist leader Hassan Rouhani to the presidency. Rouhani’s re-election was due in no small part to the nuclear and sanctions relief deal he negotiated with the United States and other major powers. That deal was crucial to former U.S. President Barack Obama’s effort to not only curb the proliferation of nuclear weapons, but to establish a new balance in America’s Mideast policy between Sunni and Shia powers as well. It is a tragic mistake for the Trump administration to reverse that policy at the very moment it was producing results in Iran. Seyed Hossein Mousavian, who once headed the Foreign Relations Committee of Iran’s National Security Council, underscores this shift in Iran. “The Iranian electorate has spoken in its decision between two stark alternatives: strengthening civil society and engaging with the world, or turning inward with economic populism and combative foreign policy,” he writes. “In decisively voting for Rouhani, Iranians have endorsed diplomacy and moderation. And they have done so in direct contrast to U.S. President Donald Trump, who has called for increasing tensions with Iran and championed isolationist foreign policy.” Abolhassan Bani-Sadr concurs that Iran’s election was a milestone. The first president of the Islamic Republic of Iran told The WorldPost this week that Rouhani’s landslide win marked a level of democratic culture in his country not seen since before the pro-American shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi: “In this election ― for the first time since the early days of the revolution itself and the rule of our democratic Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh, back before the shah ― the core debates were about human rights, the rights of citizenship and democracy. I am a good barometer to measure this shift, after all, since I was forced out of office in those early revolutionary days by the ayatollahs for promoting these values. This gives us reason to believe that democratic culture is spreading and deepening in Iran.” Despite Trump’s anti-Iran remarks in Riyadh, Bani-Sadr’s hope and expectation is that this budding advance of democratic culture in Iran will make it more difficult for Washington to demonize Tehran. Reza Marashi of the National Iranian American Council expects that, given Rouhani’s victory, Iran will continue to try to engage the U.S.-Saudi alignment and damp down rivalry. But it is a two-way street, he says: “Rouhani’s track record demonstrates that sustained engagement can lower tensions and produce peaceful solutions to conflict. By electing him to a second term, Iran has once again extended its hand. It remains to be seen if the world will unclench its fist.” Turning to other key events, in an article ahead of the G-7 summit in Sicily, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe highlights the populist backlash against free trade and globalization. “We are approaching the 10-year mark since the start of the global financial crisis,” he writes. “Many countries and regions have made tenacious efforts to ride out the crisis and ensure a growth path. Looking at things globally, however, much remains to be done on issues such as youth unemployment, wage levels and productivity. The key to overcoming these challenges,” he boldly states, “is free trade.” But trade, he goes on to stipulate, must not only be free, but fair. Above all, its benefits must be spread more inclusively both within societies and globally, the Japanese leader says, if the zero-sum alternative of protectionism is to be avoided. Finally, Singapore’s scholar-statesman George Yeo explains this week why “civilizational states” in Asia, like China and to some extent Japan, are less prone to populism than the West. As he sees it, China’s largely homogenous Han people, not unlike Japan’s even more homogenous population, “bow before the ideal of a common ancestry and destiny” that ties them together more strongly than any factional or individual interests might divide them. Other highlights in The WorldPost this week: Trump Reportedly Called Germans ‘Very Bad,’ Vowed To Stop German Car Sales In The U.S. Inside North Korea’s Secret Cyber Warfare Cell Climate Change Is Turning Antarctica Green Elon Musk Is ‘Cautiously Optimistic’ After Talking To Trump About Paris Climate Pact There’s A New Type Of Pollution Invading The Oceans WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

24 мая, 14:15

НОВОСТИ от ANNA NEWS на 14:00 24 мая 2017

Президент России Владимир Путин и новый президент Франции Эммануэль Макрон обсудят региональные конфликты, сообщил пресс-секретарь главы государства Дмитрий Песков. Ранее сообщалось, что встреча президентов России и Франции пройдет 29 мая. Двум президентам необходимо познакомиться, поскольку это будет их первая встреча, сообщил Песков. Путин и Макрон обменяются мнениями по «болевым точкам» международной повестки дня — региональным конфликтам, которые всем известны, отметил Песков. Сбывается прогноз аналитиков ANNA NEWS о внеочередном срочном визите Путина в Париж, который может состояться в последние дни мая 2017 года. По оценке наших экспертов, на встрече с Владимиром Путиным Эммануэль Макрон огласит условия ультиматума сдачи Ирана и Башара Асада в свете новых инициатив США ( в свете ближневосточного турне Трампа) назначить главным террористом мира Иран, читай — Россию. Предполагается унизительная форма вероятного ультиматума. Это на наш взгляд, объясняется природным черным юмором Жака Аттали. Но Аттали не учитывает в своих построениях особенности характера тех или иных высокопоставленных лиц. Миллиардер Алишер Усманов опубликовал второе видеообращение к оппозиционеру Алексею Навальному, в котором сравнил его с героем повести Михаила Булгакова «Собачье сердце». Видеообращение опубликовано на официальной странице бизнесмена в социальной сети «ВКонтакте». «Давным-давно уже великий русский писатель Булгаков в повести «Собачье сердце» описал такого персонажа с огромной разрухой в голове — Полиграфа Шарикова, который всё мечтал отнять и поделить. Вот ты, Алексей, Полиграфом становишься, достойный продолжатель. Но, если Шариков просто глупый, необразованный демагог по книге, ты идёшь далеко дальше», — отметил Усманов. По его словам, он ждал от Навального извинений, а не приглашения на дебаты. В Москве полицейские вызвали сотрудников МЧС, так как не смогли самостоятельно открыть наручники. Инцидент произошел в ОВД «Сокольники». Сотрудники правоохранительных органов приковали наручниками к отопительной батарее нескольких уроженцев Таджикистана. Они не смогли сами открыть замок, поэтому пришлось вызывать спасателей. Сотрудники МЧС прибыли на вызов и справились с наручниками. Экс-гендиректор "Седьмой студии" и бывший главный бухгалтер задержаны по делу о хищении Неустановленными лицами из числа руководства АНО "Седьмая студия" с 2011 по 2014 годы были похищены бюджетные средства в размере около 200 млн рублей Агентство ANNA-News это волонтерский проект. Волонтеры ANNA-News ведут свои репортажи с мест событий, снимают видеоролики и публикуют аналитические статьи по проблеме национальной безопасности России и ее союзников в современных военно-политических условиях. ANNA-News это самые последние и актуальные новости из районов боевых действий Более подробно на сайте http://anna-news.info Помочь материально: http://anna-news.info/помощь-агентству-anna-news/ Мы в соцсетях: Вконтакте https://vk.com/anna_news Facebooke https://www.facebook.com/newsanna/ Twitter https://twitter.com/annanews_info Instagram https://www.instagram.com/anna_news.info/

22 мая, 09:26

ГЛАВНОЕ от ANNA NEWS на утро 22 мая 2017

Глава КНДР Ким Чен Ын распорядился наладить производство баллистических ракет, очередной провокационный запуск которой он осуществил сегодня ночью. КНР попросила 100 дней для нормализации ситуации с КНДР. Сбывается прогноз аналитиков ANNA NEWS о внеочередном срочном визите Путина в Париж, который может состояться в последние дни мая 2017 года. Газета Ъ даже назвала дату внеочередного визита — 29 мая. Пресс-секретарь президента России Песков не стал отрицать возможность подобного визита. ANNA NEWS также считает весьма вероятным данное событие. По оценке наших экспертов, на встрече с Владимиром Путиным Эммануэль Макрон огласит условия ультиматума сдачи Ирана и Башара Асада в свете новых инициатив США назначить главным террористом мира Иран, читай — Россию. И канализировать текущий вооруженный региональный конфликт в Афганистан и Среднюю Азию. Наши эксперты считают, что боевики ИГ вскоре перекрасятся в движение Антиталибан, которое выдвинет свои отряды к границам России и Китая. Правда про такие топорные стратегии у нас говорят: гладко было на бумаге, да забыли про овраги. Для реализации этих амбициозных планов требуется ликвидировать Башара Асада и заставить Иран добровольно вывести шиитские вооруженные формирований из Сирии. Ясно, что Иран не согласится на территориальный раздел Сирии. России, вероятно, предложат оставить военно-морскую и военно-воздушную базы в Латакии и Тартусе. Но России этого мало. Унизительная форма вероятного ультиматума, на наш взгляд, объясняется природным черным юмором Жака Аттали. Но Аттали не учитывает в своих построениях особенности характера тех или иных высокопоставленных лиц. CNN продолжаент кампанию против Трампа. На этот раз опубликовав утвеждение, что Саудовская Аравия и Объединенные Арабские Эмираты обещают перевести в фонд Иванки Трамп $100 млн долларов. Агентство ANNA-News это волонтерский проект. Волонтеры ANNA-News ведут свои репортажи с мест событий, снимают видеоролики и публикуют аналитические статьи по проблеме национальной безопасности России и ее союзников в современных военно-политических условиях. ANNA-News это самые последние и актуальные новости из районов боевых действий Более подробно на сайте http://anna-news.info Помочь материально: http://anna-news.info/помощь-агентству-anna-news/ Мы в соцсетях: Вконтакте https://vk.com/anna_news Facebooke https://www.facebook.com/newsanna/ Twitter https://twitter.com/annanews_info Instagram https://www.instagram.com/anna_news.info/

19 мая, 23:23

Weekend Roundup: Why New Talks With North Korea Are In The Cards

North Korea’s recent launch of a missile it claims is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead — and its possible role in intercontinental cyberattacks — have upped the stakes in what is already arguably the most dangerous global crisis. Paradoxically, Pyongyang’s heightened provocations, combined with the limited arsenal of tenable responses by the international community, are pushing the relevant powers in conflict closer to talking than ever before. Indeed, U.S. President Donald Trump has said he is willing to talk to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. South Korea’s newly elected president, Moon Jae-in, also said in his first days in office that he is open to visiting the North under the right circumstances. Yoon Young-Kwan, a former South Korean foreign minister, writes that Moon’s policy is akin to the “Ostpolitik” approach of former German Chancellor Willy Brandt, which prepared the way for German unification after the end of the Cold War.  Top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying spells out the urgent realism that is forcing a fresh approach that departs from the sanctions plus “strategic patience” thinking that has guided the policy of America and its allies in recent years. As I write in my piece summarizing our discussion, “Madame Fu’s fundamental point is that increased sanctions or threats of military action without talks is precisely what is driving North Korea to intensify its weapons program.” Trying to outsource the problem to China won’t work, in her view, because, as I relay, “China is not a party to the antagonism and hostility that has caused the security dilemma of North Korea. The country’s deep insecurity comes from its constant fear of the kind of regime change preceded by sanctions that the United States and its allies have executed elsewhere, including in Iraq.” The best that can be achieved, Madame Fu argues, now appears to be a “Pareto-optimal” solution. Such a path, I write, recapping her words, “may not meet the optimal benefits every party seeks but would ensure the minimum interest of all parties with minimal cost. In other words, compromise all around.” To make that work, she explains in a Brookings Institution historical review, action aimed at reducing the present high level of tension must be both “synchronized and reciprocal.”  Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry also soberly warns that military action is unrealistic. “If the U.S. conducted a preemptive military strike,” he writes, noting that he planned such an option back in 1994 before the North crossed the nuclear threshold, “it would trigger bloody reprisal attacks on Seoul, quite possibly leading to a second Korean war, this one entailing the use of nuclear weapons.” The only alternative now, he concurs with Fu Ying, is for the U.S. and China to adopt a common approach. “I believe that there is now an opportunity for creative diplomacy that has not previously existed. This opportunity has opened because China is now more deeply concerned than in the past about the damaging consequences of the North’s nuclear program. ... The U.S. could seize this opportunity not by insisting that China should solve the problem, but by working together with China to solve it.” Conflict scholar David Cortright agrees with Fu Ying that “the leaders of North Korea will not give up the bomb until they feel more secure.” To reach that end, he argues that, as with Iran, the U.S. should promise “to lift sanctions and renew trade in exchange for nuclear restrictions.” Writing from Seoul, Seok-Hyun Hong, the publisher of one of South Korea’s largest newspapers who spoke with President Trump this week as President Moon’s envoy, says “time is running out for my country” and that “South Korea must prevent a war at any cost.” He then lays out a two-stage roadmap for Trump to draw back from the brink. In the first stage, North Korea would agree to stop development of nuclear arms and missiles at the current level. On that basis, a new dialogue or negotiations would start with Pyongyang in stage two. “Donald Trump,” he writes, “may be the U.S. president who can turn the tables in the region to transform troubles and threats into opportunity and bring us closer to resolving the North Korean issue. But this will only be possible if he stops to think and channel his aggression into a concrete plan such as the one I have suggested.” The urgency of the North Korean crisis masks the historical significance of another longer-term development underway of worldwide significance ― China taking the lead as the champion of the next stage of globalization. In his speech at the recently concluded Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation in Beijing, senior Chinese strategist Zheng Bijian notes that, according to International Monetary Fund projections, by 2018, the developing world could comprise 59 percent of the global economy, compared to the 41 percent of the advanced nations. “The global economy as a whole, driven by the developing world, will continue to gather new momentum for growth in the second, third and fourth decades of this century,” he asserts. “The more rapid growth in the developing economies will in turn stimulate renewed growth in the developed world by becoming an even larger market for its goods and services. The new phase of globalization will thus be a reverse from the past in which the developed world was the growth engine.” The whole idea of China’s “One Belt, One Road” initiative for infrastructure investment, says Zheng, is to tie together maritime and inland trading routes, thus boosting the prospect of greater prosperity across Eurasia to Africa. European participants at the forum, however, had their doubts. “The [European Union] has dealt a blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s bid to lead a global infrastructure revolution,” The Guardian reports this week, “after its members refused to endorse part of the multi-billion-dollar plan because it did not include commitments to social and environmental sustainability and transparency.”  In an interview, Singapore’s Kishore Mahbubani underscores the non-Western perspective on the fate of globalization expressed by Zheng. “Globalization has not failed,” he says. “All discussions on globalization are distorted because Western analysts focus on the roughly 15 percent of the world’s population who live in the West. They ignore the 85 percent who are the rest. The last 30 years of human history have been the best 30 years that the rest have enjoyed. Why? The answer is globalization.” The perception in the advanced economies that globalization has failed is due to a simple fact, according to Mahbubani: “Western elites who enjoyed the fruits of globalization did not share them with their Western masses.” Other highlights in The WorldPost this week include: Somalia Is On The Brink of Famine, And Time is Running Out Xi Jinping Primes China To Be Leader Of The Free-Trade Pack Parag Khanna: Swiss Direct Democracy + Singapore’s Smart Rulers = Direct Technocracy What Iran’s Election Could Mean For The Nuclear Deal And U.S. Relations This Year’s U.S. Worldwide Threat Report Warns Of Cyberattacks, Nukes And Climate Change For more on Somalia’s drought, check out our WorldPost video, adapted from this week’s op-ed, “Somalia Is On The Brink Of Famine, And Time Is Running Out,” below: WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

19 мая, 23:23

Weekend Roundup: Why New Talks With North Korea Are In The Cards

North Korea’s recent launch of a missile it claims is capable of carrying a nuclear warhead — and its possible role in intercontinental cyberattacks — have upped the stakes in what is already arguably the most dangerous global crisis. Paradoxically, Pyongyang’s heightened provocations, combined with the limited arsenal of tenable responses by the international community, are pushing the relevant powers in conflict closer to talking than ever before. Indeed, U.S. President Donald Trump has said he is willing to talk to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. South Korea’s newly elected president, Moon Jae-in, also said in his first days in office that he is open to visiting the North under the right circumstances. Yoon Young-Kwan, a former South Korean foreign minister, writes that Moon’s policy is akin to the “Ostpolitik” approach of former German Chancellor Willy Brandt, which prepared the way for German unification after the end of the Cold War.  Top Chinese diplomat Fu Ying spells out the urgent realism that is forcing a fresh approach that departs from the sanctions plus “strategic patience” thinking that has guided the policy of America and its allies in recent years. As I write in my piece summarizing our discussion, “Madame Fu’s fundamental point is that increased sanctions or threats of military action without talks is precisely what is driving North Korea to intensify its weapons program.” Trying to outsource the problem to China won’t work, in her view, because, as I relay, “China is not a party to the antagonism and hostility that has caused the security dilemma of North Korea. The country’s deep insecurity comes from its constant fear of the kind of regime change preceded by sanctions that the United States and its allies have executed elsewhere, including in Iraq.” The best that can be achieved, Madame Fu argues, now appears to be a “Pareto-optimal” solution. Such a path, I write, recapping her words, “may not meet the optimal benefits every party seeks but would ensure the minimum interest of all parties with minimal cost. In other words, compromise all around.” To make that work, she explains in a Brookings Institution historical review, action aimed at reducing the present high level of tension must be both “synchronized and reciprocal.”  Former U.S. Defense Secretary William Perry also soberly warns that military action is unrealistic. “If the U.S. conducted a preemptive military strike,” he writes, noting that he planned such an option back in 1994 before the North crossed the nuclear threshold, “it would trigger bloody reprisal attacks on Seoul, quite possibly leading to a second Korean war, this one entailing the use of nuclear weapons.” The only alternative now, he concurs with Fu Ying, is for the U.S. and China to adopt a common approach. “I believe that there is now an opportunity for creative diplomacy that has not previously existed. This opportunity has opened because China is now more deeply concerned than in the past about the damaging consequences of the North’s nuclear program. ... The U.S. could seize this opportunity not by insisting that China should solve the problem, but by working together with China to solve it.” Conflict scholar David Cortright agrees with Fu Ying that “the leaders of North Korea will not give up the bomb until they feel more secure.” To reach that end, he argues that, as with Iran, the U.S. should promise “to lift sanctions and renew trade in exchange for nuclear restrictions.” Writing from Seoul, Seok-Hyun Hong, the publisher of one of South Korea’s largest newspapers who spoke with President Trump this week as President Moon’s envoy, says “time is running out for my country” and that “South Korea must prevent a war at any cost.” He then lays out a two-stage roadmap for Trump to draw back from the brink. In the first stage, North Korea would agree to stop development of nuclear arms and missiles at the current level. On that basis, a new dialogue or negotiations would start with Pyongyang in stage two. “Donald Trump,” he writes, “may be the U.S. president who can turn the tables in the region to transform troubles and threats into opportunity and bring us closer to resolving the North Korean issue. But this will only be possible if he stops to think and channel his aggression into a concrete plan such as the one I have suggested.” The urgency of the North Korean crisis masks the historical significance of another longer-term development underway of worldwide significance ― China taking the lead as the champion of the next stage of globalization. In his speech at the recently concluded Belt and Road Forum for International Cooperation in Beijing, senior Chinese strategist Zheng Bijian notes that, according to International Monetary Fund projections, by 2018, the developing world could comprise 59 percent of the global economy, compared to the 41 percent of the advanced nations. “The global economy as a whole, driven by the developing world, will continue to gather new momentum for growth in the second, third and fourth decades of this century,” he asserts. “The more rapid growth in the developing economies will in turn stimulate renewed growth in the developed world by becoming an even larger market for its goods and services. The new phase of globalization will thus be a reverse from the past in which the developed world was the growth engine.” The whole idea of China’s “One Belt, One Road” initiative for infrastructure investment, says Zheng, is to tie together maritime and inland trading routes, thus boosting the prospect of greater prosperity across Eurasia to Africa. European participants at the forum, however, had their doubts. “The [European Union] has dealt a blow to Chinese President Xi Jinping’s bid to lead a global infrastructure revolution,” The Guardian reports this week, “after its members refused to endorse part of the multi-billion-dollar plan because it did not include commitments to social and environmental sustainability and transparency.”  In an interview, Singapore’s Kishore Mahbubani underscores the non-Western perspective on the fate of globalization expressed by Zheng. “Globalization has not failed,” he says. “All discussions on globalization are distorted because Western analysts focus on the roughly 15 percent of the world’s population who live in the West. They ignore the 85 percent who are the rest. The last 30 years of human history have been the best 30 years that the rest have enjoyed. Why? The answer is globalization.” The perception in the advanced economies that globalization has failed is due to a simple fact, according to Mahbubani: “Western elites who enjoyed the fruits of globalization did not share them with their Western masses.” Other highlights in The WorldPost this week include: Somalia Is On The Brink of Famine, And Time is Running Out Xi Jinping Primes China To Be Leader Of The Free-Trade Pack Parag Khanna: Swiss Direct Democracy + Singapore’s Smart Rulers = Direct Technocracy What Iran’s Election Could Mean For The Nuclear Deal And U.S. Relations This Year’s U.S. Worldwide Threat Report Warns Of Cyberattacks, Nukes And Climate Change For more on Somalia’s drought, check out our WorldPost video, adapted from this week’s op-ed, “Somalia Is On The Brink Of Famine, And Time Is Running Out,” below: WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 мая, 21:27

Weekend Roundup: Macron’s Challenge Has Global Resonance

The election of Emmanuel Macron as the new president of France has, for now, stalled the onward march of nationalist and extremist populism across Western democracies. Jacques Attali, a longtime mentor to Macron, put it this way in an interview with me as election results came in: “As in the United States and Great Britain, the main political debate is precisely this: is going back to the past better than going forward? We have answered differently than others in the Brexit and Donald Trump votes. France has sided decisively with the future.” Above all, he emphasizes, voters saw that “a better French future depends on a stronger Europe.”  Alain Minc, one of the more prominent early supporters of the incoming president and an outside political adviser, also underscores the anti-nationalist European dimension that played out in France. “The most important consequence of the election,” he says, ”is that it will now be possible to relaunch the European construction.” In Minc’s view, the election also signaled “that populism is no longer condemned to the extremist edge.” Instead, a new kind of “mainstream populism,” as he labels it, has emerged. From the populist playbook, Minc explains, “Macron took the idea that political parties are not necessary, and he could directly connect to people at the grass roots. ... By mainstream, I mean pro-European and pro-market — essentially the ‘social market’ model of Germany that combines free-market dynamism with strong social protections.” Minc sees Macron as very much in the mold of former U.S. President Bill Clinton and his centrist policies in the United States during the 1990s. Writing from Paris, Zaki Laïdi concurs that “Macron’s political genius was to see that France’s main divide was not right versus left. He thus realized it was possible to launch a movement against both the Republicans on the right and the Socialists on the left.” Anne Dias expects further shrewd moves from Macron in the days and weeks ahead as he tries to assemble a parliamentary majority. “Appointing a premier from the center-right party [instead of from the left],” she writes from Paris, “would not only forge an overture to the right to implement economic and security reforms, but also — and this has been Macron’s grand scheme all along — it would create a ‘recomposition’ of the French political landscape.”  Bill Emmott, a former editor of The Economist, warns that elections are not the be-all, and certainly not the end-all. “The French vote was important but ultimately not decisive” in defeating those who oppose a more open society and economy, he argues. “And it would be wrong to say the fight is over, even in France, let alone the rest of the West. ... Elections count, but they do not bring the battle to a close.” For Emmott, the key challenge for the long-term survival of liberal democracy is to remain open to the world of trade, technology and immigration, while at the same time closing the growing inequality gap. “Populist nationalists such as Trump and [far-right nationalist leader Marine] Le Pen have sought to frame the debate as being about globalism versus patriotism,” he writes. “But that is to divert attention from the true issue. The real issue is that open, liberal societies have in the past succeeded by combining openness with a strong sense of equality ― a winning formula that has become neglected for so long that today it’s been effectively rendered obsolete.” How Macron meets this challenge in France will test whether his victory in this election is in the end meaningful. France has one of the most rigid labor markets in Europe, where strict hiring and firing rules guarantee security for those who have jobs and shut out those who don’t. General unemployment remains at a stubborn approximately 10 percent, and youth unemployment is near 25 percent. Innovative companies like Uber have famously been met with stiff resistance — only the beginning of the heady opposition already mounting from trade unions and student activists who oppose Macron’s pro-growth proposals, which they see as paving the way for an American-style precarious situation for workers.  In short, French voters may have rejected the past, but they have hardly embraced Macron’s vision of the future. Marine Le Pen, who sought to inflame anxieties over immigration and national identity, garnered a substantial just under 34 percent of the vote. More than one-third of the electorate abstained or cast null ballots. Macron’s approval rating as he enters the Élysée Palace appears fragile: 47 percent of the public, according to a recent survey cited by The Financial Times, “do not like” him.  On the European front, Angela Merkel, the German partner with whom Macron seeks to build a better future for his country and the region, continues to insist on austerity policies and firmly resists the idea of a financial union and a common budget that Macron sees as critical to ending the eurozone’s dysfunction. Macron succeeded brilliantly as a post-party outsider in exploiting the anti-establishment fervor roiling France. Now comes the hard part of translating his vision into practice. Other highlights in The WorldPost this week: France’s New President Just Displayed His Commitment To Gender Equality What’s Next For Marine Le Pen And France’s Far Right? Trump Once Again Invites Questions And Doubts About His Stability From Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti Offers A Vision For America The World’s Rejection Of Trump-Like Leaders Might Be Telling Us Something  As Trump Withdraws From The World, Non-State Networks Step Up As Ice Melts, Dangerous Diseases From The Past Could Arise Again Syrians Say Trump’s Airstrike Against Assad Didn’t Change A Thing How Trump Gave China’s ‘Belt And Road’ Scheme A Boost   WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

12 мая, 21:27

Weekend Roundup: Macron’s Challenge Has Global Resonance

The election of Emmanuel Macron as the new president of France has, for now, stalled the onward march of nationalist and extremist populism across Western democracies. Jacques Attali, a longtime mentor to Macron, put it this way in an interview with me as election results came in: “As in the United States and Great Britain, the main political debate is precisely this: is going back to the past better than going forward? We have answered differently than others in the Brexit and Donald Trump votes. France has sided decisively with the future.” Above all, he emphasizes, voters saw that “a better French future depends on a stronger Europe.”  Alain Minc, one of the more prominent early supporters of the incoming president and an outside political adviser, also underscores the anti-nationalist European dimension that played out in France. “The most important consequence of the election,” he says, ”is that it will now be possible to relaunch the European construction.” In Minc’s view, the election also signaled “that populism is no longer condemned to the extremist edge.” Instead, a new kind of “mainstream populism,” as he labels it, has emerged. From the populist playbook, Minc explains, “Macron took the idea that political parties are not necessary, and he could directly connect to people at the grass roots. ... By mainstream, I mean pro-European and pro-market — essentially the ‘social market’ model of Germany that combines free-market dynamism with strong social protections.” Minc sees Macron as very much in the mold of former U.S. President Bill Clinton and his centrist policies in the United States during the 1990s. Writing from Paris, Zaki Laïdi concurs that “Macron’s political genius was to see that France’s main divide was not right versus left. He thus realized it was possible to launch a movement against both the Republicans on the right and the Socialists on the left.” Anne Dias expects further shrewd moves from Macron in the days and weeks ahead as he tries to assemble a parliamentary majority. “Appointing a premier from the center-right party [instead of from the left],” she writes from Paris, “would not only forge an overture to the right to implement economic and security reforms, but also — and this has been Macron’s grand scheme all along — it would create a ‘recomposition’ of the French political landscape.”  Bill Emmott, a former editor of The Economist, warns that elections are not the be-all, and certainly not the end-all. “The French vote was important but ultimately not decisive” in defeating those who oppose a more open society and economy, he argues. “And it would be wrong to say the fight is over, even in France, let alone the rest of the West. ... Elections count, but they do not bring the battle to a close.” For Emmott, the key challenge for the long-term survival of liberal democracy is to remain open to the world of trade, technology and immigration, while at the same time closing the growing inequality gap. “Populist nationalists such as Trump and [far-right nationalist leader Marine] Le Pen have sought to frame the debate as being about globalism versus patriotism,” he writes. “But that is to divert attention from the true issue. The real issue is that open, liberal societies have in the past succeeded by combining openness with a strong sense of equality ― a winning formula that has become neglected for so long that today it’s been effectively rendered obsolete.” How Macron meets this challenge in France will test whether his victory in this election is in the end meaningful. France has one of the most rigid labor markets in Europe, where strict hiring and firing rules guarantee security for those who have jobs and shut out those who don’t. General unemployment remains at a stubborn approximately 10 percent, and youth unemployment is near 25 percent. Innovative companies like Uber have famously been met with stiff resistance — only the beginning of the heady opposition already mounting from trade unions and student activists who oppose Macron’s pro-growth proposals, which they see as paving the way for an American-style precarious situation for workers.  In short, French voters may have rejected the past, but they have hardly embraced Macron’s vision of the future. Marine Le Pen, who sought to inflame anxieties over immigration and national identity, garnered a substantial just under 34 percent of the vote. More than one-third of the electorate abstained or cast null ballots. Macron’s approval rating as he enters the Élysée Palace appears fragile: 47 percent of the public, according to a recent survey cited by The Financial Times, “do not like” him.  On the European front, Angela Merkel, the German partner with whom Macron seeks to build a better future for his country and the region, continues to insist on austerity policies and firmly resists the idea of a financial union and a common budget that Macron sees as critical to ending the eurozone’s dysfunction. Macron succeeded brilliantly as a post-party outsider in exploiting the anti-establishment fervor roiling France. Now comes the hard part of translating his vision into practice. Other highlights in The WorldPost this week: France’s New President Just Displayed His Commitment To Gender Equality What’s Next For Marine Le Pen And France’s Far Right? Trump Once Again Invites Questions And Doubts About His Stability From Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti Offers A Vision For America The World’s Rejection Of Trump-Like Leaders Might Be Telling Us Something  As Trump Withdraws From The World, Non-State Networks Step Up As Ice Melts, Dangerous Diseases From The Past Could Arise Again Syrians Say Trump’s Airstrike Against Assad Didn’t Change A Thing How Trump Gave China’s ‘Belt And Road’ Scheme A Boost   WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

09 мая, 08:12

Макрон и Ротшильды: за что «золотой мальчик» получил протекцию Rothschild & Cie

Победа Эммануэля Макрона на президентских выборах во Франции стала ещё одним актом назначения во главе республики ставленника Ротшильдов. Банк, в котором довелось два года поработать Макрону, Rothschild & Cie, уже после свержения де Голля стал «родовым гнездом» для многих французских президентов. Вот и звезда Эммануэля Макрона взошла, когда тот получил рекомендацию серых кардиналов экономики Франции.

08 мая, 20:50

France Broke Brexit And Trump's Populist Wave By Voting For The Future

function onPlayerReadyVidible(e){'undefined'!=typeof HPTrack&&HPTrack.Vid.Vidible_track(e)}!function(e,i){if(e.vdb_Player){if('object'==typeof commercial_video){var a='',o='m.fwsitesection='+commercial_video.site_and_category;if(a+=o,commercial_video['package']){var c='&m.fwkeyvalues=sponsorship%3D'+commercial_video['package'];a+=c}e.setAttribute('vdb_params',a)}i(e.vdb_Player)}else{var t=arguments.callee;setTimeout(function(){t(e,i)},0)}}(document.getElementById('vidible_1'),onPlayerReadyVidible); Jacques Attali has been a major presence in the French political and intellectual scene for decades. He has published more than a dozen books on wide-ranging subjects and was the top adviser to the late François Mitterrand, who was president of France from 1981 to 1995.    Attali was subsequently appointed by then-President Nicolas Sarkozy to chair a commission on how to reform the French economy. In that capacity, Attali hired Emmanuel Macron as his assistant and later recommended him to President François Hollande as economy minister. The WorldPost spoke to Attali by phone on Sunday. How do you read the vote in Sunday’s election: the victory of a new political center in France, or only a consensus against the extreme right? Perhaps it is the beginning of post-ideological politics in France? It is, first of all, a vote by a clear majority who believe the future can be better than the past. As in the United States and Great Britain, the main political debate is precisely this: is going back to the past better than going forward? We have answered differently than others in the Brexit and Donald Trump votes. France has sided decisively with the future. Emmanuel Macron has defined that forward path as liberal progressivism. Of course, even those who didn’t embrace this vision but voted mainly to stop the far-right from advancing, are also a sign of optimism for the future. 'France has sided decisively with the future.' What does this defeat mean for Le Pen and other populists in Europe? Does it show the limitation of their appeal and thus their distance from ever gaining power? Yes and no. As we speak, the far-right garnered around 35 percent of the vote (later down to closer to 34 percent) ― higher than ever before. And then there were those who abstained from voting entirely. So we can’t dismiss the anger and frustration. That won’t go away by itself. There are real issues. But it demonstrates that the notion that all of the Western democracies would follow the road of Brexit and Trump is bullshit. You headed a commission appointed by then-President Nicolas Sarkozy for which you hired Emmanuel Macron as your assistant to make recommendations on how to remove the wall of regulations and restrictions impeding economic growth in France. Those recommendations included relaxed working hours for retail and services, more flexibility in hiring and firing and deregulating some protected cartels, like taxi drivers. Will such policies, as Macron endorsed in his campaign, answer the anger and frustration? Yes, those were some of the recommendations. But we also prioritized early childhood education and training for unemployed youth. So we aimed both at promoting growth, but also building a trampoline to boost the equality of opportunity ― policies aimed directly at the kind of frustration that has been building in France.  'The vote demonstrates that the notion that all of the Western democracies would follow the road of Brexit and Trump is bullshit.' Does it worry you that in the first round more than 50 percent of youth voted for Marine Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, the far-left candidate in the first round? Yes. It is obviously related that 25 percent of French youth are unemployed. That is the key challenge, and it is why a priority must be placed on training programs linked to employment as we recommended in the commission. Will Macron be able to gather a parliamentary majority to see through such reforms now, as he has embraced?  I’m not a member of his incipient party, so I speak only as an independent observer. In the past, an elected president has always been able to obtain a majority in parliamentary elections. I expect the same this time. Do you expect a closer relationship now, especially with Germany — and thus a strong core for a multi-speed Europe? The most important point of Macron’s program is his pro-European stance. He wants a closer relationship with Germany precisely in order to make a quantum leap in European integration. A better French future depends on a stronger Europe. This interview has been edited for clarity and updated with results from France’s presidential election. type=type=RelatedArticlesblockTitle=Related on WorldPost: + articlesList=590ced7fe4b0e7021e97dd77,590f7162e4b0104c734fb804,590b71aee4b0d5d9049a53cc -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

08 мая, 16:39

08.05.2017 16:39 : Жак Аттали: Макрон будет прислушиваться к мнению французов, отдавших свои голоса другим кандидатам на выборах

Новый президент Франции Эммануэль Макрон будет прислушиваться к мнению французов, отдавших свои голоса другим кандидатам в ходе выборов. Такое мнение в интервью радиостанции «Эхо Москвы» выразил экономист, писатель и политический деятель Жак Аттали. «(Макрон) В полной мере должен учитывать мнение тех, кто голосовал и за Марин Ле Пен и других кандидатов в первом и во втором туре. Он ясно сказал в своей вчерашней речи, что он президент всех французов, и те, кто голосовал за других кандидатов, должны быть выслушаны. И я уверен, что он их будет слушать», — сказал Ж.Аттали. В настоящее время у Франции «есть, конечно, огромный потенциал развития», однако в стране «есть люди, которые недовольны бюрократизацией Европы, и они недовольны европейскими институциями», отметил политический деятель. Однако Э.Макрон в своей речи 7 мая «ясно сказал», что французам «не нужно будет голосовать за экстремистов для того, чтобы быть выслушанным», добавил он. По итогам второго тура президентских выборов во Франции, который прошел 7 мая, представитель движения «Вперед!» Эммануэль Макрон набрал 66,06% голосов, его соперница, лидер «Национального фронта» Марин Ле Пен — 33,94%.

08 мая, 16:00

Интервью : Жак Аттали

Гости: Жак Аттали Ведущие: Виталий Дымарский Это победа французской демократии, победа демократа, проевропейца, который считает, что нужно, чтобы Франция оставалась великой европейской державой в рамках Евросоюза. И никакого нет глобализма карикатурного…

08 мая, 12:57

Bill Blain: "Macron Will Prove A Disappointment As Nothing Is Actually Fixed In Europe"

From Bill Blain’s latest Morning Porridge edition “To summarise the summary: anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job..” The best thing about the French Election is I've just won a case of very fine French wine on the result!  The papers and financial blogosphere are full of positivity – France is fixed, therefore the Euro is safe and its all great news. Put yer buying boots on.. And on the back of Friday’s very strong US numbers.. don’t worry that bonds continue to rally in the face of a likely Fed Hike.. Please.. the only thing good about the French vote is the least bad candidate won. I question the grand expressions of upside the market is calling for. France has dodged a bullet, perhaps, but they aint solved the crisis – which boils to down to being the wrong economy using the wrong currency and absolutely no control of monetary or fiscal policy to fix it. Macron has a head full of supply side policy cliches about sorting the labour market, and some catchy soundbites on Franco-German European hegemony – including the sacrifice of a fraction of the bloated state payroll. For all the hype, he’s a compromise of compromise candidates. Lets not forget that fully 12% of the votes were spoilt – meaning a significant minority of Frenchmen made a conscious choice that neither candidate was any good! I’ll make a grand prediction: Macron will prove a disappointment. His lack of power base from which to actually effect long term change across France means we'll get one or other of the Le Pens in 5 years time. Although he will no doubt trade on his youth and popularity – don’t be surprised if the lustre quickly fades. A number of blogs say he’ll quickly build a coalition of the willing.. I doubt it. He's going to struggle to form any kind of working government in the face of the established parties, and hostility from right and left. There is also the likelihood the electorate will come to realise the gifted young game-changer is actually as establishment as they come. Don’t forget he is the protégé of Jacques Attali -  those of us of a certain vintage will remember Attali as the archetypal enarch - squandering billions on titivating the Glistening Bank (The EBRD) with marble lifts and ego-building offices rather than actually lending. Macron’s paid up membership of the discredited French upper class is something a better organised Front Nationale will play to in coming years. On the upside, the numbers are moving in Macron’s direction. The state isn’t in the same perilous debt position pre ECB intervention. A wee bit inflation will massage the numbers nicely. There are no immediate risks on the horizon. Unemployment is trending down (slowly), and is likely to boost his popularity. Merkel looks a shoe in for the German Election (very strong showing at the weekend in Danish Germany).  But, but and but again.. When Europe looks calm and sorted, its not. Nothing is actually fixed.. For all the happy posts this morning about Euro strength, which stocks to buy on the basis of French recovery, and the rest… I doubt it. Although there is apparently nothing to worry about in Euroland anymore – we’ve still got the festering pustule that is Italy, episode 47 of the Greek Crisis on our doorsteps, and the who knows what coming from the Brexit negotiations. Europe will continue to amuse, fascinate and frustrate.. I don't normally spend my Sundays watching the TV wallpaper paste that passes as "political comment" but as I supped my coffee, one soundbite caught my ear: "the aim of Europe is to ensure the economic collapse of the UK to make clear leaving the EU is never an option." Oh dear.... Is there a danger the now pointless UKIP decides to establish some convoluted relevance as the force of anti-Europeanism? Sure enough, someone later suggested we should mount a European boycott. If we stop buying French plonk, German cars, Spanish holidays, etc, then that'll teach 'em. It so happens an American chum of mine was in Yoorp over the weekend and he popped down for dinner last night. As he is an economist of some renown, and a former Scotsman before he went all Yankee on us, I asked his opinion on Brexit and what America thinks. He was succinct: “We don’t give a fig. As long as you all play nice and don’t break the global economy meaning we’ll have to bail it out, we really don’t care about Europe and the UK.” Nice.. but to the point.. A trade war with Europe and the nihilistic post UKIP politics of aggression would be a very bad idea... If I can’t get good European wine, it will inevitably mean drinking more Argentine Malbec.. Not a bad wine, but it’s impossible to function properly afterward!

08 мая, 07:49

Александр Дугин: Имя Европы — Марин Ле Пен

Оказалось, что есть два Трампа, солнечный и лунный, солнечный остался в предвыборной кампании, теперь мы имеем дело с лунным. Но солнечный существует. Вот тот солярный Трамп, который есть с точки зрения онтологии Вечности и аналитики Вечности, уже и деться никуда не может.. И вот этот архетип солярного Трампа есть, и он необратимо присутствует в картине новой геополитики.

07 мая, 15:27

Имя Европы — Марин Ле Пен

7 мая во Франции проходит второй тур выборов президента. Основные кандидаты: Ле  Пен и Макрон представляют собой не просто две политические силы, но две Франции, два менталитета, два мировоззрения. Электоральная геополитика В этих выборах очень важно обратить внимание на электоральную геополитику: восток Франции голосовал за Ле Пен, а запад за Макрона. Взгляните на это разделение, на этот расклад голосов. Эта карта геополитически напоминает карту Украины периода электоральных выборов «Ющенко — Януковича». Есть Донбасс, есть восток и Крым, которые голосуют за одного кандидата, кандидата условно правого, консервативного, пророссийского,  евразийского. И «западенский» кандидат, который получает поддержку с запада Украины. То же самое видим мы в электоральной геополитике Франции (интересно что, что специалист по электоральной геополитике Ив Лакост, который с горящими глазами пытался все анализировать, сегодня в куда-то исчез, потому что все, о чем его мелкая геополитика говорила все эти годы, смыло за последние годы огромной хаотичной волной; сейчас самое время поговорить об электоральной геополитике, над которой все раньше смеялись). Франция расколота по геополитическому принципу. Есть евразийская Франция, голосующая за Марин Ле Пен. Обратим внимание на эту карту, демонстрирующую электоральную ситуацию на севере, востоке и  юге Франции. В этих районах сплошное компактное проживание евразийских французов.. Это можно назвать «французской Новороссией» (это территория Нормандии, Эльзаса и Бургундии итд). Исторически -  это Третий удел Карла Великого, это те земли, которые достались Лотарю в наследство от Карла Великого - от великой Лотарингии. Мы сталкиваемся с альтернативной геополитикой не только прошлого, но с альтернативной геополитикой настоящего и будущего. Мы видим восточногерманское, а именно центральногерманское, Лотарингское пространство, Третью Европу. Напомню, была французская Европа, у Карла Лысого была Германская Европа, а была Лотарингия Лотаря. И вот эта Третья Европа, «Швейцарская Европа», как ее называют, голосует за Марин. Это и есть континентальная Европа. Во Франции при голосовании мир столкнулся с чистой геополитикой. То есть, помимо столкновения идеологий, о котором мы сегодня говорим ( «популизм против системы», «Макрон как запчасть глобализма, который ничем не отличается просто от пыли в парижском метро, оставленной какими-нибудь арабами, из которых сыпется труха», поскольку в этом персонаже никакой онтологии нет), есть еще геополитика, Марин Ле Пен - это очень серьезно, и у нее есть геополитическая модель. Территории, голосующие за Макрона в Средние Века находились под англосаксонским влиянием (Аквитания, Бретань в свое время были территорией английского государства). И здесь опять присутствует геополитика. Если бы у европейцев сегодня была хоть капля сознания, они на это бы обратили очень серьезное внимание. Эта карта голосования первого тура свидетельствует о правоте Дюмезиля и структурализма в том, что «ничто никогда никуда не уходит, что все остается в вечности, и, конечно, не на поверхности эта вечность лежит».  Стоит только чуть-чуть потрясти систему, и мы видим, что силовые линии цивилизаций, культур, народов, логосов и их идентичностей, сегодня проступают с новой силой. Соответственно, силовые линии Европы никуда не делись. Конечно,   может быть пройдет еще  лет 15,  и в Европе будут говорить — эти кварталы проголосовали за там какого-нибудь Абу Муслима, эти проголосовали за Жана - тогда будет другая геополитика, уже чисто интеграционная. Но пока мы видим старую Европу. Старая Европа все еще делится на  атлантистскую, береговую, и  другую  - континентальную, германскую.. Марин - это полюс всеевропейского сопротивления Марин Ле Пен является одним из фундаментальных символов нашей борьбы (борьбы народа против элит), подобно Трампу накануне выборов, точнее подобно «трампизму». Обращаю ваше внимание на Энн Колтер, которая на вопрос продолжает ли она настаивать, что  тезис “in Trump we trust” (а Энн Колтер написала книжку с таким названием), ответила , что она продолжает настаивать на тезисе “in Trumpism we trust”. Именно «трампистский Трамп», Трамп эпохи предвыборной кампании - это грандиозный символ, он никуда не делся и  на самом деле представляет собой сейчас фундаментальный фактор глобальной геополитики. Сейчас в Западной Атлантике, в США есть очень важный фактор, никуда не исчезнувший, давший о себе знать - это американский народ, проголосовавший за антиглобалистскую повестку дня. Этот символ американцы сейчас захлопывают, Трампа перекодировали и будут пытаться сделать так, чтобы о нем все забыли, но на самом деле, обратите внимание — это необратимое явление. То, что проявилось во время американских выборов,  для нас является фундаментальным фактором, который никуда не денется:  это то, что сейчас называют «Беннон, Алекс Джонс, альт-райт». Может  быть, они не смогут сейчас воплотить это в интеллектуальный штаб ( хотя говорят, что Беннон, поскольку он является носителем идеи «трампистского Трампа», может создать именно сейчас альтернативный штаб). Может быть, не сегодня, но этот штаб будет создаваться.  Я не знаю, когда он будет создан, но он точно будет, поскольку столь мощная поддержка, которая была оказана платформе Трампа в США, не может просто исчезнуть. Иными словами, это важнейший, фундаментальный момент, как бы он ни назывался, и как бы он ни реорганизовался на следующем этапе Оказалось, что есть два Трампа, солнечный и лунный, солнечный остался в предвыборной кампании, теперь мы имеем дело с лунным. Но солнечный существует. Вот тот солярный Трамп, который есть с точки зрения онтологии Вечности и аналитики Вечности, уже и деться никуда не может.. И вот этот архетип солярного Трампа есть, и он необратимо присутствует в картине новой геополитики. Сегодняшние выборы во Франции – новая веха в истории борьбы народа с «системой»,  отличная  от 2002 года, когда ее отец, Жан-Мари Ле Пен вышел во второй тур. Он был «мальчиком для битья», он представлял собой сторонников «крайне правых», которых очень много во Франции, но  недостаточно, чтобы изменить политическую систему. За него собрались и голосовали крайне правые, а со стороны системы barrage был тогда тотальный, никакого выхода за пределы этого крайне правого электората, который постепенно нарастал к 2002 году, Жан-Мари не сделал, он провел совершенно нормальную кампанию, прибавив себе всего несколько процентов во втором туре, и сделав действительно все что он мог. Сейчас совершенно другая ситуация. И Ле Пен не случайно вышла из партии. Она - это полюс всеевропейского сопротивления, представитель другой Европы, настоящей. Сама Марин может сдаться, может выиграть, может проиграть, ее могут «угнать» так же, как Трампа, ее могут перекодировать… Но есть в ее победе в первом туре нечто необратимое.  И сейчас  мы должны это зафиксировать, потому что потом будут говорить: "Мы же вам говорили, что Марин Ле Пен не признает Крым...", если она станет президентом… Может и не признает, может ее перекодируют — с ней может произойти индивидуально все что угодно. А вот архетипически, персонально с Марин Ле Пен уже ничего больше не произойдёт, потому что она показала, что при минимальной технологии, при минимальном внимании к современным моделям, при очень ограниченных ресурсах, практически без ресурсов (то что происходит с FN - это без ресурсов) можно выигрывать. И это настоящая политика. Так же как, с Трампом — ресурсы Трампа были весьма ограниченными; против Трампа было все — все деньги мира, все власти мира, все институции мира. Он обратился к народной поддержке, проделал себе маленький такой тоннельчик, и все прорвало... Точно так же с Францией —ничтожные ( в особенности в отличие от Макрона) средства затрачены, то есть то, что затрачивает Марин, и то, что затрачивает Макрон, — это в тысячи раз различающиеся пропорции. И достаточно микроскопического потенциала, ориентированного на мощь народа, на мощь той геополитической платформы, на которой держится Европа и мир, на платформу народов — и результат колоссальный. То есть мы констатируем, что Ле Пен вышла за грани, отведенные для «крайне правого» гетто, куда всех до этого отправляли и сейчас  она - лидер сопротивления не только «крайне правых», а всего народа. Она на самом деле взяла на себя миссию быть носителем  популистского момента, - все остальные Меланшон, Фийон– показали себя пресмыкающимися червями системы, частью Макрона. Если сам Макрон - запчасть системы. Вы спросите, а как же Меланшон, разве он не носитель популистского момента? Он  евроскептик и использует термин «народ». Но это не популизм в новом смысле слова. Меланшон обслуживает одно из направлений движения системы, которая, как Сорос, играет на двух направлениях. Дело в том что глобальная система устроена следующим образом: есть сегодня — это власть мирового капитала, и есть завтра - это власть разнузданных антифашистских террористических толп. Вот эти две модели между собой конкурируют: как раньше конкурировали коммунизм и капитализм, сегодня это делают либерализм и крайне левые  — такие меланшоновцы, или сандерсовцы. Последние представляют завтрашний хаос. Первые  - сегодняшнее положение дел. Но все они сдвигаются от сегодня к завтра, Сорос действует и там, и там — это и есть либерализм. Правый и левый одновременно. Меланшон - это левая часть глобализации. Он никакой не популист, популист только одна Марин  Ле Пен, и все люди,  рабочие люди— это популисты,  народ Франции - это популисты, Марина - это популист, крайне правые, альт-райт, постмодернист, правые все -  это  настоящие популисты. Марин Ле Пен отныне больше не принадлежит себе, она теперь Жанна Д’Арк. Теперь вспомните, от какой именно части Франции Жанна Д'Арк выступала? Именно от той, от которой сейчас выступает Марина. И где Жанну Д’Арк сожгли? Ее сожгли англичане. Вот это очень интересный момент — тот же самый раскол, та же Жанна Д'Арк.  Жанна Д'Арк -- это консервативный символ континентальной глубинной почвенной Франции, почвенной Европы. Поэтому сейчас эти архетипы оживают. Марин больше не принадлежит ни Франции, ни Национальному Фронту, ни самой себе( она уже вышла за все пределы). Больше никакой Марин нет. Как есть «Трамп выборов», «трампизм», как есть Путин, который тоже не себе принадлежит, и сейчас что бы он ни делал — Путин,  -- во всем мире люди которые говорят «нет» системе, которых достала глобализация, говорят — «я за Путина!» Просто из антитезы. Вот это очень важно. Представим,  если бы Марина не прошла во второй тур?  Представляете себе ситуацию? Что если бы глобалисты уже в первом туре дожали barrage, вытащили бы Фийона  или Меланшона, и, конечно, Макрона с «мамой-обезьяной»,  и все бы вместе  вытеснили Марину. Тогда все это болото с удовольствием облегченно вздохнуло  и сказало бы: «фух, миновало, минимальные риски, демократия победила, это локальный феномен», — сказали бы они, — «это нам не угрожает, мы на это обращать внимание не будет». То что произошло сейчас, уже после первого тура,  делает практически неважным как Марин себя ведет и как она себя будет вести. Дальше ее будут вести — что бы она ни делала, она уже находится в фундаментальном луче архетипа. И этот луч архетипа ее доведет до результата. Она обозначила Европу. Имя Европы — Марин. Она вскрыла истинное имя того, что такое Европа. Соответственно, это очень важный момент: я думаю, что это действительное пробуждение очень глубоких архетипов, и это архетипы совершенно специфической, очень особой, парадоксальной, но  именно европейской Европы. Это обнаружение второго полюса,  это второй полюс духа Трамп, который вечен, это трампизм, «трампистский Трамп», за которого голосовал американский народ, независимо от того, что Трампа  угнали, перекодировали. Нас интересует принципиальный момент: американский народ проголосовал за Трампа- Беннона, за Трампа- Стива Миллера, за Трампа -Энн Колтер, за Трампа, в которого in Trump we trust. Они проголосовали за него, и это необратимо, чтобы ни  говорили эксперты. Это вещь необратимая. Такое же необратимое явление Марин сейчас. Мы фиксируем исторический момент — эти выборы, между этими выборами произошло самое главное. И вот сейчас не так важно, мне кажется, что будет дальше — победит она, или не победит во втором туре. Победит ли Ле Пен? Может победить. Потому, что Brexit состоялся, и победа Трампа состоялась. Ситуация во Франции формулируется так - народ против истеблишмента. При этом  одна часть народа полностью зомбирована истеблишментом. Об этом не надо забывать. И у нас, в России, кстати, так же. И в Америке точно так же:  не то чтобы половина населения была за истеблишмент, но она просто им зомбирована, выведена из игры, то есть является в большей степени  населением, чем народом. Народ VS Население Рассмотрим отношение между «народом» и «населением»,  между «народом» и «людьми». Можно сказать так: все население вместе представляет собой одновременно и народ и население. Но в одной части, в одной половине, народа больше чем населения, а в другой --  населения больше чем народа. Население — это статистическая концепция, конструкт, с которым работают разные формы принуждения. Население -- это контингент, который впитывает глобалистский дискурс, построенный по принципу доминации времени.  Он может быть либеральный или коммунистический или либерал-коммунистический, или даже националистический, точнее, вяло националистический. Иными словами, население --это модернистская часть общества, на которую модернистская схема действует сильнее, чем традиционалистская. Если взять археомодерн, то эта часть погружена  более в модерн, чем  в архаику. Одновременно есть народ, в котором гораздо больше архаики, чем модерна. Так вот, в каждой области мира -- в Америке, в России и во Франции -- мы видим один и тот же элемент археомодерна, который наглядно проявляется в выборах. В России археомодерна - 90%,  в Америке – чуть больше 50%: американский археомодерн среди избирателей выдал нам Трампа,  то есть в Америке архаика слегка доминирует. И  естественно, она доминирует во Франции: в  иберальной, якобинской, республиканской Франции момент архаики на самом деле доминирует  в тех регионах,  где «народа» больше, чем «населения». Соотношение архаики и модерна примерно 50 на 50 сегодня,  и соответственно, игра идет за эти проценты, то есть,  кого больше в промежуточных группах – «населения» или «народа». И что здесь выиграет—совершенно непредсказуемая вещь. То есть я считаю, что у Марин есть шанс выиграть. Я не уверен, и никто не уверен, конечно, что она выиграет, но я не уверен, что она проиграет — точно так же, как никто не был уверен в Brexit’е или в победе Трампа, и ясно, что все глобалистские социологические опросы -- чистая чепуха. Как мы, социологи, знаем, социологически общественного мнения не существует, потому что общественное мнение - это то мнение, которое внушает населению правящая элита, которое может лишь частично согласовываться с народом. Но согласовывать или  не согласовывать  с народом зависит от того, как элита будет строить собственную стратегию. Здесь возникает следующий момент --  эти выборы покажут зазор между «населением» и «народом», то есть, условно говоря: есть 10-15% народа, в которых пропорции между «народом и « населением» не являются константой. Они-то и будут выбирать. И либо они конченые сволочи – и тогда они проголосуют за Макрона,  и тогда они «население». Либо они все-таки еще французский народ,  и тогда они найдут в себе силы и проголосуют за единственный правильный выбор — за Марин Ле Пен. Во Франции это на самом деле уже почти религиозный выбор— впервые в Европе в наше время происходят религиозные выборы. Момент исторический. Именно та в том же режиме, как во Франции сегодня происходят выборы, в истории меняются религии, решается исход гражданских войн, побеждают роялисты или якобинцы, разные народы принимают ислам, христианство или иудаизм. Сегодня есть две религии — религия народа,  обычного, простого, не Бог весть какого, но народа. И  религия ублюдков мирового масштаба, представителей чистого зла, которые предлагают больше грязи, больше взрывов, больше террористов, больше педерастов — вот это их главная тема. Они это не скрывают, они выбрали себе такого незатейливого чудика Макрона, бессмысленные речи которого невозможно слушать.  Его  сторонники даже не могут объяснить, почему надо за него голосовать. «Молодой, мол, новое несет с собой, стабильность обеспечит»…  Так они  лепечут, потому что это еще вопрос, на каком языке говорит сегодняшнее население. Можно ли это вообще назвать языком, мыслью? Это население Сороса. Население, слушающее по телевизору актеров типа Урганта, так называемое «обычное население». Население – это те существа, которые согласились с перерождением в «постлюдей». Они как бы дают некую подпись, которая свидетельствует — «да, хорошо, я буду постчеловеком, и поэтому я голосую за Макрона, за Хиллари, поэтому я голосую за целый ряд совершенно одинаковых молекул из матрицы». И есть «народ», который голосует за Европу. Поэтому сегодняшний выбор - это религия. Пусть светская религия, политическая религия, социальная религия --  но это религия.  Сейчас идут религиозные выборы, идет определение судьбы. И вопрос стоит о том, каков процент этого промежуточного типа, который  совмещает в себе и  Макрона и Марин одновременно, у которых в одно и то же время функционирует системный микрочип, и осталось еще что-то человеческое.. И как они будут решать, от этого зависит судьба Европы Очень показательно — оргкомитет «Manif Pour Tous» выступил в поддержку Марин. Это многомиллионные толпы, на самом-то деле. Это и есть настоящая Франция.  «Manif Pour Tous»  - это очень серьезно. И поэтому я думаю, что с социологической точки зрения выбор этих 50% колеблющихся, в которых и «население» и «народ» присутствуют в равной степени, определится в последний момент все. Даже уже не важно, что там произойдет во втором туре — просто  это будет действительно столкновение,  условно говоря, как гугеноты против католиков — своего рода  Варфоломеевская ночь, то есть либо одни, либо другие. Это религиозный выбор и этот выбор глобальный, потому что каждый сейчас и  все мы вместе – французы. Весь мир сейчас реально французы, потому что весь мир либо за Марин Ле Пен, либо за Макрона.  Весь народ мира  (как мы) были за Трампа, а сейчас мы -- за Марин. Сейчас мы -- за Путина, за Ле Пен и за Трампа. И так голосует одна и та же голосующая армия -- народ и народы. На самом деле, есть и те, кто голосует за Макрона, за Хиллари и непонятно за кого еще и за что.. За самоубийство, за Навального, за Сороса …Такие тоже есть, они представлены в разных пропорциях, в разных обществах. Самое поразительное, что мы, вообще-то говоря, почти везде выигрываем, то есть, нас, народа – большинство. Безусловное большинство здесь, в России. Большинство народа оказалось и в Америке, и, как минимум, народа -- половина во Франции. Вот каковы действительные результаты этих выборов. Выборы как гражданская война Первое, что я хочу сказать, что не зависит от того, что произойдет: эти выборы исторические, решающие, которые в значительной степени предопределяют судьбу Европы и мира.  Второе - если выбор будет сделан в пользу Макрона, этот выбор не абсолютный. Это означает, что французы выберут гражданскую войну. Они не доберутся до выборов Марин  Ле Пен через 4 года. За 4 года Макрон. этот Олланд номер два, этот не просто «мистер Желе», а «мистер Микрочип» – продемонстрирует полный маразм того, что уже было, только в десятикратном размере. В стране ничего не будет происходить: старый, вышедший из праха Финкелькраута или Глюксманн, Жак  Аттали просто расскажет нам кряхтящим вороньим голосом что-то про то, что деньги спасают мир, улыбнется, и, как бы сказать, растворится. И останутся одни только пожирающие мусор беженцы с инвалидами, заполнят улицу вместе с гей-прайдом. На самом деле, во Францию и сейчас страшно ездить, а после нескольких месяцев правления Макрона она просто будет закрыта на карантин, там по улицам будут летать обрывки бумаги, потому что там перестанут убирать улицы. Сквозь хлам будут ходить зомбированные лунатики с масками Макрона вместо маски Анонимуса. Франция закончится гораздо быстрее, чем думает ее население — и дальше начнется гражданская война. Люди, которые проголосуют за Макрона, проголосуют за гражданскую войну, люди, которые проголосуют за Марин Ле Пен (хочется сказать, что они проголосуют за мир, но это не получается), они тоже проголосуют, но только за правильную версию того же самого. Мировая консервативная революция Если консервативная революция победит во Франции, необходимо будет заняться экспортом консервативной революции, тем более, что она уже у нас, в России,  полу-состоялась, а в Америке надо будет заниматься консервативной революцией дополнительно. Мы должны отбросить националистическую версию трактовки консервативной революции -- консервативная революция может быть только мировой. То есть необходимо заниматься не спасением Франции в организацией там порядка, это все равно невозможно, а надо энергично заниматься экспортом консервативной революции в Германию, в Австрию, в Италию, в Венгрию — туда, где назревает хаос. Нам нужна именно мировая консервативная революция. В России ситуация очень похожа — наши силы растут, наши консервативные тенденции во всех точках мира приобретают видимый, ощутимый характер, кризис глобальной либеральной капиталистической право-левой системы налицо, мы находимся в революционном моменте, и уже не важно, победит ли Марин Ле Пен, или нет — ситуация необратимо сдвигается в нашу сторону.  Есть люди, силы, общественные силы, которые представляют собой архаическое начало, заявляют о себе все более и более громко. Представим, что Макрон победил, Марин вежливо признала результаты выборов. После этого она может ничего не делать -- она становится полюсом притяжения. Она просто может говорить —«да», «нет», «хорошо», «извините», поскольку на становится штабом, и ее архетип начинает действовать на всех. Люди начинают ходить со значками Марин, возникает интеллектуальное движение, все говорят — «я знаю, как Марин думает», «я знаю о ее философии». Сразу же роль Ален Сораля,  Алена де Бенуа (в любом случае после этих выборов)  неизмеримо повышается  — и  либо они будут героями типа Стива Беннона, либо просто главными теоретиками сопротивления. Их роль возрастает уже сейчас. Это  может быть  признано или не признано, но это абсолютно точно и это необратимо при любом раскладе. Более того, представим себе, Макрон заявляет: «Давайте пригласим  еще мигрантов, имеющихся слишком мало для наших либерально-капиталистических нужд, не нравится  мне нынешний Париж, недостаточно он темный по вечерам, вот, давайте, мы его сейчас еще притушим. И давайте больше капиталов, сократим налоги капиталистам, меньше отправим среднему классу,  и вообще, французам следует эмигрировать в виртуальность, что нами им и предложено ( хотя все происходит не так быстро, как хотелось бы, технологии слегка отстают, виртуальных очков на всех не хватает, особенно для новоприбывших)». И на самом деле французы будут мигрировать в виртуальную реальность, и если они не успеют сделать это достаточно быстро, то поймут, что такое настоящий кошмар. Утро Макрона, после выборов Макрона, будет, как утро после тяжелейшего похмелья. Французы сами удивятся, что же они наделали и с какими безобразными акциями и выходками прошел вчерашний день. Но их к этому готовят, их напичкивают, их наркотизируют сейчас микрочипами. Но когда они проснутся, они проснутся «к войне». Утро после Макрона -- это «доброе утро, здравствуй, война» в Европе. Вот это очень важный момент. Три полюса мировой консервативной революции С Трампом (трампизмом), с Ле Пен и с тем, что есть у нас, мы фактически имеем три полюса реальной мировой консервативной революции. И все эти три полюса по большому счету представлены интеллектуальными субъектными центрами. В России понятно, какими. В Америке - это Беннон и «альт-райт», и альт-райт все больше и больше подает признаков субъектности. Альт-райт превращаются из спящего кота в мыслящий субъект, пусть немного роботоподобного, немножко слабоумного, но тем не менее, это начинающий мыслящий субъект. Америка пробудила субъектность, консервативно-революционную субъектность, они мыслят. «Альт-райт» заговорили языком газеты «Лимонка» начала 1992 или 1993 годов. Это огромный прогресс для американцев. И если мы сравним тот дискурс, который у них был до выборов Трампа, это был просто жалкий лепет, абсолютно неуклюжие, непоколебимые,  хотя и правильные, консервативные, но совершенно не актуальные, абсолютно неприемлемые метания о какой-то старой одноэтажной Америке. Или это была маргинальная чушь. Американцы сформируют субъект, потому что в Америке сейчас уже есть консервативно-революционный субъект в первичной стадии. Во Франции есть великолепный,  доведенный  до высокой степени и готовый к использованию консервативно-революционный субъект: это Сораль и Де Бенуа. Все. что вокруг движения «Egalité et Réconciliation», все, что вокруг « Éléments» — это и есть та среда, из которой  взошел «Национальный фронт»( NF). На этих идеях весь FN жил в течение тридцати-сорока лет, в течение которых я их наблюдаю. Таким образом, у нас есть три примера консервативной революции с относительно разноплановыми успехами, и есть три абсолютно конкретных, четких, ясных, оформленных с разной степенью кристаллизации, субъекта консервативной революции. И французские выборы показывают, что у нас есть этот субъект. Раз Марин попала во второй тур, это эсхатологический знак, это значит, «время близко». Из этого надо сделать следующий вывод. Там, где есть история, там есть субъект. История никогда не делается путем свино-масс. Свино-массы либо приходят потом, когда история сделана, либо приходят «люди истории», которые гонят свино-массы на те или иные события— ведь свиньи ничего не понимают, понимает только народ. Народ, сущностью которого, по мысли Гегеля и Хайдеггера, является его мыслящая элита. Мыслящая элита и есть народ. Мыслящая элита есть функция от народа. Не от населения. И эта мыслящая элита, которая говорит народу «Да», она и представляет этот народ. Она не является чем-то отдельным от народа,  она приходит к народу, учит его чему-то, затем уходит, но сама она, эта мыслящая элита, никуда не может уйти, потому что она растет из народа, она есть сознание народа. Вот что такое мыслящая элита. И мы видим появление такой мыслящей элиты в Америке, мы видим появление мыслящей элиты во Франции, и мы имеем мыслящую элиту здесь, в России. Эти три мыслящие элиты начинают опираться на три народа, которые начинают шевелиться и проступать из-под конвенционального концепта того, чем являются эти общества -- это очень тонкая вещь. Я думаю, что нынешняя ситуация является приглашением к очень активной деятельности. И в первую очередь интеллектуальной. Просто политикой пусть занимаются политики, социальными вопросами, тем более экономическими, пусть занимаются экономисты и участники социальных процессов, а вот политической философией, выявлением стратегий, гносеологических, метафизических стратегий, настоящих стратегий политической философии должны заниматься мы. Все, что происходит во Франции сейчас, имеет необратимый характер, соответственно, на повестке дня стоит создание консервативно-революционного интернационала в полном смысле этого слова. При этом совершенно явно различимы три полюса этого консервативного интернационала -- это мы, русские, это французы и американцы. Все остальные группируются, гравитируют, вокруг нас, как вокруг Солнца. И еще, конечно, есть Иран — консервативно-революционный, в Турции процессы тоже идут — на самом деле во всем мире сейчас будут формироваться консервативно-революционные ячейки, по аналогии с тем, как они формировались вокруг коммунистов в конце 19 века. Коммунисты находятся сейчас полностью в руках представителей Сороса и либералов, которые просто предлагают им диссолютивную повестку дня --  разложиться, раствориться от наркотиков. Сегодняшние коммунисты не представляют альтернативы современному обществу, потому что у них никакого дискурса нет, это просто разложившийся дискурс либералов, только в более продвинутой стадии разложения. То есть либерал защищает то, что происходит сегодня, а либерал-коммунист, нынешний левый либерал, защищает то, что будет завтра. Это Макрон, только постаревший, но не с бородой, потому что борода не растет у этого пола. Я думаю, что сейчас как раз ситуация настоящей консервативной революции в полном смысле слова, все предпосылки для нее есть. Можно считать, что сейчас закладывается тройственная структура, если говорить о европейском человечестве -- это Америка, Франция и Россия, закладывается консервативно-революционная ось с тремя полюсами. Но я думаю, что одновременно надо очень внимательно следить за аналогичными тенденциями, которые выражаются в следующем: 1) констелляция вокруг А.Сораля и  А. Де Бенуа в Европе, 2) особый локус Латинской Америки, поскольку она думает давно в этом направлении, просто без особых успехов, поддержки и зримых результатов; но интеллектуально и социально-политически, и даже институционально, некие вещи созрели в Латинской Америке и поэтому мы должны на нее обращать внимание, 3) Иран -- это готовый пример несколько даже перезревшей консервативной революции, которая была настолько успешной и раньше времени возникшей, что сами иранцы, наверное, с трудом себя осознают в качестве великого примера. Соответственно, есть все остальные страны, которые так или иначе будут на этот пример реагировать. Сегодня как никогда актуален консервативно-революционный дискурс, в первую очередь,  именно консервативно-революционный анализ и мониторинг на основании консервативно-революционного дискурса многополярности, четвертой политической теории и евразийства, которые сегодня актуальны для всех. И здесь обмен позициями и понимание, внимательное прочтение, споры, дебаты, выяснение «кто прав - кто не прав» относительно нового концептуального аппарата, выработка новых формул, вплоть до мемов, становится очень важным заданием, потому что мы вступили в абсолютно новый исторический момент. 

05 мая, 21:57

Weekend Roundup: If You Don’t Have Solid Borders, You Get Walls

Even if U.S. President Donald Trump never ends up building an actual wall along the Mexican border, it was the compelling metaphor of shutting out a menacing world and protecting his own tribe that won the day in the election last year. That such a message would so resonate in a nation founded and sustained by immigrants is a sign of just how disruptive the fluid flows of globalization have been to any solid sense of cultural and social cohesion. Without boundaries that define who we are, any community is at a loss over how to secure its fate by navigating the constant churn and endless flux of today’s world. In the end, it is this sense of loss of control over one’s destiny ― whether as a result of technological change, globalization or the related issue of mass immigration ― that is at the root of the populist backlash. Identity politics is an effort to create a safe and familiar space for you and your kind in a world of tumult fomented by strangers. The French philosopher Régis Debray saw the backlash coming. In his 2010 Éloge des frontières (In Praise of Borders), he understood that unlike the universalizing reason behind globalization, culture is rooted in the vernacular wellspring of emotional attachment and belonging. Debray argued that if borders don’t secure cultural affinity, walls will be erected in their place by insecure identities fearing contamination. “The border,” he wrote, is “a vaccine against the epidemic of walls.” The Brexit vote, Trump’s victory and the strong showing of Marine Le Pen’s National Front in the first round of France’s election ought to impress this lesson upon progressive political leaders searching for a way to reconnect with an electorate that marginalized them. Those with a liberal outlook surely must read the writing on Trump’s wall that every country has the right to control its borders and insist upon clear criteria for obtaining citizenship ― including language, knowledge of laws and acceptance of host country values and norms.  Helen Clark writes from Perth that changes being proposed to Australia’s immigration policy would do just that — require an “Australian values” section in the test for citizenship. In 2015, Australia’s immigration authority defined those values in this way: Australian society values respect for the freedom and dignity of the individual, freedom of religion, commitment to the rule of law, Parliamentary democracy, equality of men and women and a spirit of egalitarianism that embraces mutual respect, tolerance, fair play and compassion for those in need and pursuit of the public good; Australian society values equality of opportunity for individuals, regardless of their race, religion or ethnic background; The English language, as the national language, is an important unifying element of Australian society. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is right to argue that the diversity that comes with immigration is a core strength of society — it is linked to creativity, innovation and even security. Yet, as Paul May points out, immigration policies in Canada are based primarily on the skills and economic needs of Canadian society and not mostly family based as they are in the U.S. and much of Europe. “In the U.S., about two-thirds of permanent residents are admitted to reunite with family members,” May writes. “Less than 20 percent are admitted because of their professional skills. In Canada, by contrast, it’s almost the opposite: more than 60 percent of permanent residents are admitted via the economy class, and only a quarter are admitted because of family reunification.” Bob Dane, the executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, argues that the U.S. needs a more merit-based immigration policy ― perhaps like Canada’s ― as Trump has vaguely called for. “Our current immigration system fails to serve any identifiable national or public interests,” he writes. Following Canada’s example, however, is not so easy for a country like the U.S. As May points out, unlike Canada, the U.S. has plenty of demand for low-wage workers and shares a long border with a largely impoverished nation whose laborers are hungry for work. Nonetheless, moving in the direction of such a system would go some distance toward recovering a sense of lost control over the American border and weaken the impetus behind the appeal of a wall. Jerry Nickelsburg reinforces May’s point about the structural need in the American economy for lower-wage workers, particularly in agriculture. In an article titled “If You Want Strawberry Fields Forever, You Need Migrant Labor,” Nickelsburg offers an alternative to the present immigration quandary. “One option would be to normalize the status of undocumented farm workers, perhaps via a new version of the bracero program of 1942 to 1964 that permitted U.S. farmers to recruit temporary agricultural help from Mexico. ... It also would have the side benefits of reducing illegal border crossings — U.S. farms would not be providing jobs to newly arrived undocumented immigrants — and this would allow undocumented immigrants already here to come out of the shadows.” Among others, former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo has argued for a similar course. Edward Leamer argues that, indeed, “aliens” are taking American jobs. But those aliens are legal robots, not undocumented immigrants. Harvard Historian Calder Walton warns of the dangers of paranoid and conspiracy-minded leaders, whether Joseph Stalin or Donald Trump, making decisions based on raw intelligence. Other highlights this week include: Trump’s Tough Talk About North Korea Might Actually End The Crisis Forget North Korea. The Next Nuclear Crisis Festers On The India-Pakistan Border Triangular Diplomacy At Work Again With China, India And Russia Playing One Off Against The Other Angela Merkel Chooses Not To Wear A Headscarf In Saudi Arabia WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

05 мая, 21:57

Weekend Roundup: If You Don’t Have Solid Borders, You Get Walls

Even if U.S. President Donald Trump never ends up building an actual wall along the Mexican border, it was the compelling metaphor of shutting out a menacing world and protecting his own tribe that won the day in the election last year. That such a message would so resonate in a nation founded and sustained by immigrants is a sign of just how disruptive the fluid flows of globalization have been to any solid sense of cultural and social cohesion. Without boundaries that define who we are, any community is at a loss over how to secure its fate by navigating the constant churn and endless flux of today’s world. In the end, it is this sense of loss of control over one’s destiny ― whether as a result of technological change, globalization or the related issue of mass immigration ― that is at the root of the populist backlash. Identity politics is an effort to create a safe and familiar space for you and your kind in a world of tumult fomented by strangers. The French philosopher Régis Debray saw the backlash coming. In his 2010 Éloge des frontières (In Praise of Borders), he understood that unlike the universalizing reason behind globalization, culture is rooted in the vernacular wellspring of emotional attachment and belonging. Debray argued that if borders don’t secure cultural affinity, walls will be erected in their place by insecure identities fearing contamination. “The border,” he wrote, is “a vaccine against the epidemic of walls.” The Brexit vote, Trump’s victory and the strong showing of Marine Le Pen’s National Front in the first round of France’s election ought to impress this lesson upon progressive political leaders searching for a way to reconnect with an electorate that marginalized them. Those with a liberal outlook surely must read the writing on Trump’s wall that every country has the right to control its borders and insist upon clear criteria for obtaining citizenship ― including language, knowledge of laws and acceptance of host country values and norms.  Helen Clark writes from Perth that changes being proposed to Australia’s immigration policy would do just that — require an “Australian values” section in the test for citizenship. In 2015, Australia’s immigration authority defined those values in this way: Australian society values respect for the freedom and dignity of the individual, freedom of religion, commitment to the rule of law, Parliamentary democracy, equality of men and women and a spirit of egalitarianism that embraces mutual respect, tolerance, fair play and compassion for those in need and pursuit of the public good; Australian society values equality of opportunity for individuals, regardless of their race, religion or ethnic background; The English language, as the national language, is an important unifying element of Australian society. Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is right to argue that the diversity that comes with immigration is a core strength of society — it is linked to creativity, innovation and even security. Yet, as Paul May points out, immigration policies in Canada are based primarily on the skills and economic needs of Canadian society and not mostly family based as they are in the U.S. and much of Europe. “In the U.S., about two-thirds of permanent residents are admitted to reunite with family members,” May writes. “Less than 20 percent are admitted because of their professional skills. In Canada, by contrast, it’s almost the opposite: more than 60 percent of permanent residents are admitted via the economy class, and only a quarter are admitted because of family reunification.” Bob Dane, the executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform, argues that the U.S. needs a more merit-based immigration policy ― perhaps like Canada’s ― as Trump has vaguely called for. “Our current immigration system fails to serve any identifiable national or public interests,” he writes. Following Canada’s example, however, is not so easy for a country like the U.S. As May points out, unlike Canada, the U.S. has plenty of demand for low-wage workers and shares a long border with a largely impoverished nation whose laborers are hungry for work. Nonetheless, moving in the direction of such a system would go some distance toward recovering a sense of lost control over the American border and weaken the impetus behind the appeal of a wall. Jerry Nickelsburg reinforces May’s point about the structural need in the American economy for lower-wage workers, particularly in agriculture. In an article titled “If You Want Strawberry Fields Forever, You Need Migrant Labor,” Nickelsburg offers an alternative to the present immigration quandary. “One option would be to normalize the status of undocumented farm workers, perhaps via a new version of the bracero program of 1942 to 1964 that permitted U.S. farmers to recruit temporary agricultural help from Mexico. ... It also would have the side benefits of reducing illegal border crossings — U.S. farms would not be providing jobs to newly arrived undocumented immigrants — and this would allow undocumented immigrants already here to come out of the shadows.” Among others, former Mexican President Ernesto Zedillo has argued for a similar course. Edward Leamer argues that, indeed, “aliens” are taking American jobs. But those aliens are legal robots, not undocumented immigrants. Harvard Historian Calder Walton warns of the dangers of paranoid and conspiracy-minded leaders, whether Joseph Stalin or Donald Trump, making decisions based on raw intelligence. Other highlights this week include: Trump’s Tough Talk About North Korea Might Actually End The Crisis Forget North Korea. The Next Nuclear Crisis Festers On The India-Pakistan Border Triangular Diplomacy At Work Again With China, India And Russia Playing One Off Against The Other Angela Merkel Chooses Not To Wear A Headscarf In Saudi Arabia WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Rosa O’Hara is the Social Editor of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar (First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 22:44

Weekend Roundup: In France, Reality Has Escaped Its Institutions

The first round of France’s presidential elections last weekend demonstrated that the clear-cut division of loyalties to the old mainstream parties ― the left and right political divide born during the French Revolution ― has collapsed in France. In the industrial era, the left always stood for social protection from the insecurities spawned by the market, while the right championed the blood, soil and tradition of “a certain idea of France,” as Charles de Gaulle once put it. All that has now been fatally disrupted by globalization and rapid technological change. Alain Touraine, the country’s “dean” of sociology, captured the moment well at a Berggruen Institute meeting in Lisbon last week. “Reality has escaped its institutions,” he quipped. And not just in France. As in the election of U.S. President Donald Trump in America and the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, this partisan dissipation has been accompanied by the consolidation of a territorial rift between rural and deindustrialized zones of France on the one hand and the globally integrated, cosmopolitan coastal zones and cities on the other.   The French elections, as Pascal Perrineau writes from Paris, pitted “patriots” against “globalists” worried about a Brexit-like split from Europe that far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised. He also notes that Le Pen’s anti-immigrant, anti-elite and anti-globalization narrative, which also embraces a strong welfare state, attracted significant numbers of working-class voters once faithful to the left.   Surprisingly, Le Pen appealed widely to young voters as well in her campaign against the centrist “En Marche!” vision of Emmanuel Macron, who came out on top in the first round. Together, Le Pen and Jean-Luc Mélenchon, on the opposite extreme of the spectrum, garnered more than 50 percent of the youth vote. Mélenchon attracted that support in part through cutting-edge social media and hologram appearances at rallies, as well as through his calls for a 100 percent marginal tax rate on the rich and the limiting of CEO pay to 20 times that of the lowest-paid employee. His campaign exploited longstanding fears over the “Uberization” of the economy by Macron’s pro-Europe, pro-market proposals for American-style deregulation and a “flexible” labor market that would only create a new “precariat class” of insecure, part-time, low-paid workers with few benefits. Unlike the other competing candidates and parties, Mélenchon has so far refused to support Macron against Le Pen in the final vote on May 7, throwing open a desperate contest to win over his constituency. Anne Sinclair reacts to these results and lays out the new political landscape as it now stands as the country prepares for the runoff election. “One quarter of French people dream of a gentler and less precarious life,” she writes. “Another quarter prioritize taxes and debt reduction. A third quarter is seeking national security and a populist leader who doesn’t represent the elite. And finally, a fourth quarter, slightly more confident about the country’s future, is interested in profound modifications to governance and French politics.”  Nicolas Tenzer writes from Paris that “whoever becomes the next president will have to cope with this divided France, large sections of which distrust open-society values, Europe and the free market.” If Macron, who is so far favored in polling, has a chance of obtaining a governing mandate, Tenzer continues, “he will have to demonstrate that Europe and globalization can bring justice and fairness and that France can mend its divided society.” But, “if Macron’s center can’t mend this divide,” he warns, “populists will be waiting in the wings.” Other highlights this week include: France’s Election Is About So Much More Than Just Populism How The Coming Elections In France And Germany Can Save The West The Oceans Are Drowning In Plastic — And No One’s Paying Attention Women Are The Lifeline To Those Without Access To Water In Kenya Puffing Across The ‘One Belt, One Road’ Rail Route To Nowhere WHO WE ARE     EDITORS: Nathan Gardels, Co-Founder and Executive Advisor to the Berggruen Institute, is the Editor-in-Chief of The WorldPost. Kathleen Miles is the Executive Editor of The WorldPost. Farah Mohamed is the Managing Editor of The WorldPost. Alex Gardels and Peter Mellgard are the Associate Editors of The WorldPost. Suzanne Gaber is the Editorial Assistant of The WorldPost. Katie Nelson is News Director at HuffPost, overseeing The WorldPost and HuffPost’s news coverage. Nick Robins-Early and Jesselyn Cook are World Reporters. Rowaida Abdelaziz is World Social Media Editor. EDITORIAL BOARD: Nicolas Berggruen, Nathan Gardels, Arianna Huffington, Eric Schmidt (Google Inc.), Pierre Omidyar(First Look Media), Juan Luis Cebrian (El Pais/PRISA), Walter Isaacson (Aspen Institute/TIME-CNN), John Elkann (Corriere della Sera, La Stampa), Wadah Khanfar (Al Jazeera) and Yoichi Funabashi (Asahi Shimbun). VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS: Dawn Nakagawa. CONTRIBUTING EDITORS: Moises Naim (former editor of Foreign Policy), Nayan Chanda (Yale/Global; Far Eastern Economic Review) and Katherine Keating (One-On-One). Sergio Munoz Bata and Parag Khanna are Contributing Editors-At-Large. The Asia Society and its ChinaFile, edited by Orville Schell, is our primary partner on Asia coverage. Eric X. Li and the Chunqiu Institute/Fudan University in Shanghai and Guancha.cn also provide first person voices from China. We also draw on the content of China Digital Times. Seung-yoon Lee is The WorldPost link in South Korea. Jared Cohen of Google Ideas provides regular commentary from young thinkers, leaders and activists around the globe. Bruce Mau provides regular columns from MassiveChangeNetwork.com on the “whole mind” way of thinking. Patrick Soon-Shiong is Contributing Editor for Health and Medicine. ADVISORY COUNCIL: Members of the Berggruen Institute’s 21st Century Council and Council for the Future of Europe serve as theAdvisory Council — as well as regular contributors — to the site. These include, Jacques Attali, Shaukat Aziz, Gordon Brown, Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Juan Luis Cebrian, Jack Dorsey, Mohamed El-Erian, Francis Fukuyama, Felipe Gonzalez, John Gray, Reid Hoffman, Fred Hu, Mo Ibrahim, Alexei Kudrin, Pascal Lamy, Kishore Mahbubani, Alain Minc, Dambisa Moyo, Laura Tyson, Elon Musk, Pierre Omidyar, Raghuram Rajan, Nouriel Roubini, Nicolas Sarkozy, Eric Schmidt, Gerhard Schroeder, Peter Schwartz, Amartya Sen, Jeff Skoll, Michael Spence, Joe Stiglitz, Larry Summers, Wu Jianmin, George Yeo, Fareed Zakaria, Ernesto Zedillo, Ahmed Zewail and Zheng Bijian. From the Europe group, these include: Marek Belka, Tony Blair, Jacques Delors, Niall Ferguson, Anthony Giddens, Otmar Issing, Mario Monti, Robert Mundell, Peter Sutherland and Guy Verhofstadt. MISSION STATEMENT The WorldPost is a global media bridge that seeks to connect the world and connect the dots. Gathering together top editors and first person contributors from all corners of the planet, we aspire to be the one publication where the whole world meets. We not only deliver breaking news from the best sources with original reportage on the ground and user-generated content; we bring the best minds and most authoritative as well as fresh and new voices together to make sense of events from a global perspective looking around, not a national perspective looking out. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

28 апреля, 17:16

Михаил Веллер: Эхо профессии

Известный писатель и философ о скандале в радиоэфире

26 августа 2016, 09:20

Андрей Фурсов. Битва за Будущее. Часть II. 15.07.2016 [РАССВЕТ]

Подпишитесь на наш новый канал: https://www.youtube.com/c/RASSVETTV Что скрывают за термином «глобализация»; возможен ли новый социализм; правые, левые и православные монархисты; мировая тенденция расслоения общества и историческая уникальность советской модели; проект глобального перемещения, геоклиматическая катастрофа и возможное переселение американцев на Украину; что скрывают за термином «постиндустриальное общество»; конец Библейского проекта; о преемственности, сакральности и этнической чистоте Русской власти; логика внешней политики России с 2012-го и др. 00:06 – Демонтаж капитализма ускорился после распада СССР 05:08 – Лукавство Аттали и что такое международное сообщество? 09:24 – Что скрывают за термином «глобализация»? 13:45 – Возможен ли новый социализм? 15:57 – Правые, левые и православные монархисты 18:26 – Мировая тенденция расслоения общества и историческая уникальность советской модели 21:49 – Проект глобального перемещения, геоклиматическая катастрофа и возможное переселение американцев на Украину 27:04 – Что скрывают за термином «постиндустриальное общество»? 29:53 – Конец Библейского проекта 33:19 – Преемственность Русской власти 39:00 – Сакральность Русской власти 40:20 – Этническая чистота Русской власти 41:27 – Логика внешней политики России с 2012-го 45:02 – Со сдержанным оптимизмом о будущем Подписаться на канал: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc-OSFoYXFuDjZkcK0osUVg Смотреть больше видео: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5Dp3frI99iqwpKB9Nj6uuIGjKvxslM39 ПОДДЕРЖАТЬ КАНАЛ Яндекс Деньги: 410014420769282 (https://goo.gl/97xTfy) PayPal: [email protected]